A slow progressive disease of mink caused by the ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE VIRUS. It is characterized by poor reproduction, weight loss, autoimmunity, hypergammaglobulinemia, increased susceptibility to bacterial infections, and death from renal failure. The disease occurs in all color types, but mink which are homozygous recessive for the Aleutian gene for light coat color are particularly susceptible.
A species of PARVOVIRUS that causes a disease in mink, mainly those homozygous for the recessive Aleutian gene which determines a desirable coat color.
Carnivores of genus Mustela of the family MUSTELIDAE. The European mink, which has white upper and lower lips, was widely trapped for commercial purposes and is classified as endangered. The American mink, lacking a white upper lip, is farmed commercially.
A family of very small DNA viruses containing a single molecule of single-stranded DNA and consisting of two subfamilies: PARVOVIRINAE and DENSOVIRINAE. They infect both vertebrates and invertebrates.
A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, infecting a variety of vertebrates including humans. Parvoviruses are responsible for a number of important diseases but also can be non-pathogenic in certain hosts. The type species is MINUTE VIRUS OF MICE.
The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)
Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.
The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.
The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NEW BRUNSWICK; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Halifax. The territory was granted in 1621 by James I to the Scotsman Sir William Alexander and was called Nova Scotia, the Latin for New Scotland. The territory had earlier belonged to the French, under the name of Acadia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p871 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p384)
Immunoelectrophoresis in which immunoprecipitation occurs when antigen at the cathode is caused to migrate in an electric field through a suitable medium of diffusion against a stream of antibody migrating from the anode as a result of endosmotic flow.
Fish-eating carnivores of the family MUSTELIDAE, found on both hemispheres.
The family of omnivorous New World skunks, showing typical warning coloration of patterned black and white and able to eject a malodorous secretion when the animal is startled or in danger.

Three-dimensional structure of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus: implications for disease pathogenicity. (1/70)

The three-dimensional structure of expressed VP2 capsids of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus strain G (ADVG-VP2) has been determined to 22 A resolution by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction techniques. A structure-based sequence alignment of the VP2 capsid protein of canine parvovirus (CPV) provided a means to construct an atomic model of the ADVG-VP2 capsid. The ADVG-VP2 reconstruction reveals a capsid structure with a mean external radius of 128 A and several surface features similar to those found in human parvovirus B19 (B19), CPV, feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), and minute virus of mice (MVM). Dimple-like depressions occur at the icosahedral twofold axes, canyon-like regions encircle the fivefold axes, and spike-like protrusions decorate the threefold axes. These spikes are not present in B19, and they are more prominent in ADV compared to the other parvoviruses owing to the presence of loop insertions which create mounds near the threefold axes. Cylindrical channels along the fivefold axes of CPV, FPV, and MVM, which are surrounded by five symmetry-related beta-ribbons, are closed in ADVG-VP2 and B19. Immunoreactive peptides made from segments of the ADVG-VP2 capsid protein map to residues in the mound structures. In vitro tissue tropism and in vivo pathogenic properties of ADV map to residues at the threefold axes and to the wall of the dimples.  (+info)

Replication of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in vivo is influenced by residues in the VP2 protein. (2/70)

Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is the etiological agent of Aleutian disease of mink. Several ADV isolates have been identified which vary in the severity of the disease they elicit. The isolate ADV-Utah replicates to high levels in mink, causing severe Aleutian disease that results in death within 6 to 8 weeks, but does not replicate in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells. In contrast, ADV-G replicates in CrFK cells but does not replicate in mink. The ability of the virus to replicate in vivo is determined by virally encoded determinants contained within a defined region of the VP2 gene (M. E. Bloom, J. M. Fox, B. D. Berry, K. L. Oie, and J. B. Wolfinbarger. Virology 251:288-296, 1998). Within this region, ADV-G and ADV-Utah differ at only five amino acid residues. To determine which of these five amino acid residues comprise the in vivo replication determinant, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to individually convert the amino acid residues of ADV-G to those of ADV-Utah. A virus in which the ADV-G VP2 residue at 534, histidine (H), was converted to an aspartic acid (D) of ADV-Utah replicated in CrFK cells as efficiently as ADV-G. H534D also replicated in mink, causing transient viremia at 30 days postinfection and a strong antibody response. Animals infected with this virus developed diffuse hepatocellular microvesicular steatosis, an abnormal accumulation of intracellular fat, but did not develop classical Aleutian disease. Thus, the substitution of an aspartic acid at residue 534 for a histidine allowed replication of ADV-G in mink, but the ability to replicate was not sufficient to cause classical Aleutian disease.  (+info)

Unusual, high genetic diversity of Aleutian mink disease virus. (3/70)

The genetic diversity of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) was examined. Sequences obtained from 35 clinical samples were compared with five published sequences. An unusual, high genetic variability was revealed. Three phylogenetic subgroups of AMDV were identified, and the presence of more than one genotype at some farms was detected.  (+info)

Replication of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in mink lymph node histocultures. (4/70)

Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV), causes an immune disorder with a persistent infection of lymphoid organs in adult mink. We studied replication of ADV in gel-supported histocultures prepared from adult mink mesenteric lymph node (MLN). Evidence of virus replication in the histocultures was first observed by indirect immunofluorescence 72 h after incubation with virus. Cells resembling lymphocytes and macrophages contained both ADV capsid (VP2) and nonstructural (NS1 and NS2) proteins, and were present in a distribution suggestive of infected cells within germinal centres. ADV replicative form and encapsidated virion DNA were also detected in infected histocultures at time-points after 72 h. In addition, we were able to passage ADV-Utah to a new round of histocultures. These results suggested that the infected cells were actual target cells for ADV replication and that productive ADV-Utah replication, complete with the generation of virus, was occurring in the histocultures. The mink MLN histocultures provide a system to study the replication and molecular pathogenesis of ADV in target tissues.  (+info)

Nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis associated with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus infection in ranch mink. (5/70)

Severe nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis associated with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) infection was observed in adult ranch mink. Brain lesions included severe, locally extensive to coalescing lymphoplasmacytic meningoencephalitis with accompanying gliosis, satellitosis, and mild extension of inflammation into the leptomeninges. ADV was identified in mesenteric lymph node, spleen, brain, and liver of affected mink by polymerase chain reaction techniques. Sequences of the ADV isolate (TH5) revealed 2 unique residues in the region of the viral genome that determines pathogenicity. These findings suggest that certain strains of ADV may preferentially cause disease in the nervous system. ADV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurologic disorders in mink.  (+info)

Spontaneous Aleutian disease in a ferret. (6/70)

A 3-year-old female ferret died five days after admission to a veterinary clinic for treatment of acute dyspnea and posterior paresis. Blood chemistry showed no hypergammaglobulinemia. Histopathological examination revealed mild to severe inflammatory infiltrates, composed mostly of plasma cells, in multiple organs. Lesions were especially severe in the kidneys, where focal segmental membranous glomerulopathy was also present. In the liver, in addition to lymphocytic and plasmacytic infiltration in periportal areas, dilatation and proliferation of the bile ducts were seen. On analysis of PCR products, using primers directed against the gene encoding Aleutian disease (AD) viral capsid and formalin-fixed kidney samples, we detected a single band of about 400 bp, specific to the AD virus.  (+info)

Poly IC therapy in aleutian disease of mink. (7/70)

Twenty-four virgin female aleutian mink were infected with aleutian disease agent and after 24 hours, 12 of these were treated with a course of polyinosinic acid-polycytidilic acid (Poly IC) injections. After six weeks the gammaglobulin level was significantly lower in the treated group but at 12 weeks this difference was no longer present. Four of the treated mink had normal target organ histology when killed at 20 weeks. The untreated group all showed moderate to marked changes but this difference was not statistically significant. There was a marked increase in the reactive lymphocyte blastogenesis index during the first weeks of infection and the phytohaemagglutinin response was seen to fall progressively. The antiglobulin reaction usually became positive after infection but neither antinuclear nor antierythrocyte antibodies were found. Precipitating antibodies to several polynucleotides were frequently present and were unrelated to infection or to Poly IC treatment.  (+info)

Deposition of IgA in renal glomeruli of mink affected with Aleutian disease. (8/70)

The glomerular deposition of immunoglobulin (Ig) was studied in sapphire mink affected with terminal Aleutian disease (AD). Fluorescein conjugated Ig-class specific antiserums were used to evaluate and identify the glomerular Ig. Kidneys of all 28 mink with documented AD had deposits of IgA and beta 1 C in a capillary and mesangial distribution. Only 7 of 28 mink had demonstrable glomerular IgG and/or IgM. In addition, interstitial plasma cell infiltrates in 17 of 19 kidneys stained exclusively with anti-IgA. All antiserums used in this study were evaluated for Ig-class specificity by both gel diffusion and agarose-bead techniques. The striking Ig class restriction demonstrated for glomerular Ig deposition in AD is discussed in light of current knowledge of the pathogenesis of AD glomerulopathy.  (+info)

Aleutian Mink Disease (AMD) is a viral disease that primarily affects minks, particularly those of the Aleutian subspecies. The disease is caused by the parvovirus known as the Aleutian mink disease virus (ADMV).

The virus targets and infects the immune system's white blood cells, leading to a hyperactive immune response. This results in the production of excessive amounts of antibodies, a condition known as "autoimmune disease." The continued stimulation of the immune system can lead to damage and failure of various organs, including the liver and kidneys.

Clinical signs of AMD can vary widely but often include weight loss, anemia, jaundice, and neurological symptoms such as uncoordinated movements and tremors. The disease can be spread through direct contact with infected animals or their bodily fluids, as well as through contaminated equipment or surfaces.

It's worth noting that while the Aleutian Mink Disease primarily affects minks, there have been reports of related parvoviruses infecting other animal species, including humans. However, these viruses are not considered to be a significant public health concern at this time.

Aleutian Mink Disease Virus (AMDV) is a small, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus belonging to the family Parvoviridae and genus Amdoparvovirus. This virus primarily infects minks, causing a chronic wasting disease known as Aleutian Disease. The name of the virus comes from the Aleutian Islands of Alaska where the disease was first identified in mink farms during the 1940s.

The virus is highly host-specific and does not typically infect humans or other animals, except for some cases in wild and farmed foxes, raccoons, and dogs. The infection in these animals may lead to similar symptoms as observed in minks, such as weight loss, anemia, and immune suppression.

AMDV has a strong affinity for infecting cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, leading to chronic inflammation and immune complex deposition in various organs, including the kidneys, spleen, and liver. The infection can result in a spectrum of clinical signs, from subclinical to severe and fatal disease, depending on factors such as the age, genetics, and immune status of the host.

Diagnosis of AMDV infection is usually accomplished through serological tests, such as ELISA or hemagglutination inhibition assays, which detect antibodies against the virus in infected animals. Additionally, molecular techniques like PCR can be used to directly amplify and detect viral DNA in clinical samples.

There are no specific treatments for AMDV infection, and control measures primarily focus on preventing the spread of the virus through biosecurity practices, such as maintaining strict sanitation, quarantine procedures, and vaccination programs for susceptible animals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mink" is not a medical term. It refers to a species of small, semiaquatic carnivorous mammals that are known for their sleek fur. They belong to the family Mustelidae, which also includes otters, weasels, and ferrets. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help!

Parvoviridae is a family of small, non-enveloped viruses that infect a wide range of hosts, including humans, animals, and birds. These viruses have a single-stranded DNA genome and replicate in the nucleus of infected cells. They are resistant to heat, acid, and organic solvents, making them difficult to inactivate.

The family Parvoviridae is divided into two subfamilies: Parvovirinae and Densovirinae. Parvovirinae infect vertebrates, while Densovirinae infect invertebrates. The subfamily Parvovirinae includes several genera that infect various hosts, such as humans, dogs, cats, and primates.

Parvovirus B19 is a well-known member of this family that causes a variety of clinical manifestations in humans, including fifth disease (slapped cheek syndrome), arthralgia, and occasionally more severe diseases in immunocompromised individuals or those with certain hematological disorders.

In animals, parvoviruses can cause serious diseases such as canine parvovirus infection in dogs and feline panleukopenia in cats, which can be fatal if left untreated.

Parvovirus is a type of virus that is known to cause diseases in various animals, including dogs and humans. The most common strain that infects humans is called Parvovirus B19. This particular strain is responsible for the illness known as Fifth disease, which primarily affects young children and causes symptoms such as fever, rash, and joint pain.

Parvovirus B19 spreads through respiratory droplets, such as when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It can also be transmitted through blood or contaminated objects. Once the virus enters the body, it typically targets and infects rapidly dividing cells, particularly those found in the bone marrow and the fetal heart.

In dogs, a different strain of parvovirus called Canine Parvovirus (CPV) is responsible for a highly contagious and often fatal gastrointestinal illness. CPV primarily affects puppies between 6 weeks and 6 months old, but older dogs can also be infected if they haven't been vaccinated.

It is essential to maintain good hygiene practices and ensure proper vaccination to prevent parvovirus infections in both humans and animals.

"Cat" is a common name that refers to various species of small carnivorous mammals that belong to the family Felidae. The domestic cat, also known as Felis catus or Felis silvestris catus, is a popular pet and companion animal. It is a subspecies of the wildcat, which is found in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

Domestic cats are often kept as pets because of their companionship, playful behavior, and ability to hunt vermin. They are also valued for their ability to provide emotional support and therapy to people. Cats are obligate carnivores, which means that they require a diet that consists mainly of meat to meet their nutritional needs.

Cats are known for their agility, sharp senses, and predatory instincts. They have retractable claws, which they use for hunting and self-defense. Cats also have a keen sense of smell, hearing, and vision, which allow them to detect prey and navigate their environment.

In medical terms, cats can be hosts to various parasites and diseases that can affect humans and other animals. Some common feline diseases include rabies, feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), and toxoplasmosis. It is important for cat owners to keep their pets healthy and up-to-date on vaccinations and preventative treatments to protect both the cats and their human companions.

Capsid proteins are the structural proteins that make up the capsid, which is the protective shell of a virus. The capsid encloses the viral genome and helps to protect it from degradation and detection by the host's immune system. Capsid proteins are typically arranged in a symmetrical pattern and can self-assemble into the capsid structure when exposed to the viral genome.

The specific arrangement and composition of capsid proteins vary between different types of viruses, and they play important roles in the virus's life cycle, including recognition and binding to host cells, entry into the cell, and release of the viral genome into the host cytoplasm. Capsid proteins can also serve as targets for antiviral therapies and vaccines.

A capsid is the protein shell that encloses and protects the genetic material of a virus. It is composed of multiple copies of one or more proteins that are arranged in a specific structure, which can vary in shape and symmetry depending on the type of virus. The capsid plays a crucial role in the viral life cycle, including protecting the viral genome from host cell defenses, mediating attachment to and entry into host cells, and assisting with the assembly of new virus particles during replication.

Viral DNA refers to the genetic material present in viruses that consist of DNA as their core component. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is one of the two types of nucleic acids that are responsible for storing and transmitting genetic information in living organisms. Viruses are infectious agents much smaller than bacteria that can only replicate inside the cells of other organisms, called hosts.

Viral DNA can be double-stranded (dsDNA) or single-stranded (ssDNA), depending on the type of virus. Double-stranded DNA viruses have a genome made up of two complementary strands of DNA, while single-stranded DNA viruses contain only one strand of DNA.

Examples of dsDNA viruses include Adenoviruses, Herpesviruses, and Poxviruses, while ssDNA viruses include Parvoviruses and Circoviruses. Viral DNA plays a crucial role in the replication cycle of the virus, encoding for various proteins necessary for its multiplication and survival within the host cell.

Virus replication is the process by which a virus produces copies or reproduces itself inside a host cell. This involves several steps:

1. Attachment: The virus attaches to a specific receptor on the surface of the host cell.
2. Penetration: The viral genetic material enters the host cell, either by invagination of the cell membrane or endocytosis.
3. Uncoating: The viral genetic material is released from its protective coat (capsid) inside the host cell.
4. Replication: The viral genetic material uses the host cell's machinery to produce new viral components, such as proteins and nucleic acids.
5. Assembly: The newly synthesized viral components are assembled into new virus particles.
6. Release: The newly formed viruses are released from the host cell, often through lysis (breaking) of the cell membrane or by budding off the cell membrane.

The specific mechanisms and details of virus replication can vary depending on the type of virus. Some viruses, such as DNA viruses, use the host cell's DNA polymerase to replicate their genetic material, while others, such as RNA viruses, use their own RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase enzymes. Understanding the process of virus replication is important for developing antiviral therapies and vaccines.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nova Scotia" is not a medical term. It is a geographical location, specifically a province on the east coast of Canada. If you have any questions about medical terms or health-related topics, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) is a laboratory technique used in the field of immunology and serology for the identification and detection of antigens or antibodies in a sample. It is a type of electrophoretic technique that involves the migration of antigens and antibodies in an electric field towards each other, resulting in the formation of a precipitin line at the point where they meet and react.

In CIEP, the antigen is placed in the gel matrix in a trough or well, while the antibody is placed in a separate trough located perpendicularly to the antigen trough. An electric current is then applied, causing both the antigens and antibodies to migrate towards each other through the gel matrix. When they meet, they form a precipitin line, which can be visualized as a white band or line in the gel.

CIEP is a rapid and sensitive technique that can be used to detect and identify specific antigens or antibodies in a sample. It is often used in the diagnosis of infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and other medical conditions where the presence of specific antigens or antibodies needs to be detected.

It's important to note that CIEP has been largely replaced by more modern techniques such as ELISA and Western blotting, which offer greater sensitivity and specificity. However, it is still used in some research and diagnostic settings due to its simplicity and cost-effectiveness.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. The term "otters" refers to a group of aquatic mammals, and it does not have a medical definition. If you are referring to a medical term that may sound similar, please provide more context or check the spelling.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Mephitidae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically referring to a family of mammals that includes skunks and stink badgers. These animals are known for their ability to produce and spray foul-smelling liquids as a defense mechanism.

... was first recognized in ranch-raised mink in 1956. The disease was so named because it was first found in mink ... Aleutian disease, also known as mink plasmacytosis, is a disease which causes spontaneous abortion and death in minks and ... The disease spread from minks to ferrets, as the two were raised on the same farms. Aleutian disease has also more currently ... Once symptoms have been indicated, the mink is certain to die. A lethal infection in mink, the Aleutian disease virus lies ...
Aleutian+Mink+Disease at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Aleutian+Mink+Disease+Virus at ... Cheng F, Chen AY, Best SM, Bloom ME, Pintel D, Qiu J (March 2010). "The capsid proteins of Aleutian mink disease virus activate ... "Driving forces behind the evolution of the Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in the context of intensive farming". Virus ... Mustelids (minks, ferrets, and foxes), skunk, and raccoons serve as natural hosts. There are five species in this genus. ...
... aleutian mink disease virus MeSH B04.280.580.650.600.325 - feline panleukopenia virus MeSH B04.280.580.650.600.550 - mice ... aleutian mink disease virus MeSH B04.909.204.671.650.600.325 - feline panleukopenia virus MeSH B04.909.204.671.650.600.550 - ... mink cell focus-inducing viruses MeSH B04.909.574.807.375.525.596 - moloney murine leukemia virus MeSH B04.909.574.807.375.525. ... mink cell focus-inducing viruses MeSH B04.909.777.731.375.525.596 - moloney murine leukemia virus MeSH B04.909.777.731.375.525. ...
Aleutian mink disease MeSH C20.673.774.535 - granulomatous disease, chronic MeSH C20.673.774.600 - Job's syndrome MeSH C20.683. ... Still's disease, adult-onset MeSH C20.111.258.250 - demyelinating autoimmune diseases, cns MeSH C20.111.258.250.175 - diffuse ... heavy chain disease MeSH C20.683.780.490.512 - immunoproliferative small intestinal disease MeSH C20.683.780.640 - monoclonal ... Hodgkin disease MeSH C20.683.515.761.480 - lymphoma, non-Hodgkin MeSH C20.683.515.761.480.150 - lymphoma, b-cell MeSH C20.683. ...
... aleutian mink disease MeSH C02.256.700.300 - erythema infectiosum MeSH C02.256.700.363 - feline panleukopenia MeSH C02.256. ... kyasanur forest disease MeSH C02.782.417.505 - lassa fever MeSH C02.782.417.560 - marburg virus disease MeSH C02.782.417.762 - ... swine vesicular disease MeSH C02.782.687.484 - foot-and-mouth disease MeSH C02.782.791.142 - african horse sickness MeSH ... kyasanur forest disease MeSH C02.081.885.550 - nairobi sheep disease MeSH C02.182.500.300 - encephalitis, viral MeSH C02.182. ...
... in flow measurement Acoustic droplet vaporization Aleutian disease Virus, a disease of ferrets and minks, or the virus that ...
... tëc'ohts'iy Aleutian disease European mink Sea mink Fur farming Reid, F.; Schiaffini, M. & Schipper, J. (2016). "Neovison vison ... Transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME) is a prion disease of mink, similar to BSE in cattle and scrapie in sheep. A 1985 ... The American mink and European mink have both been found to transmit SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. American minks ... Domestic mink are larger than wild mink, which may cause problems with the ecosystem when they escape. Minks are solitary, ...
Russia Aleutian disease, a disease in minks and ferrets Aleutian Islands, a chain of islands in Alaska Aleut language, the ... Look up Aleutian in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Aleutian may refer to: Aleut people, the indigenous people of the Aleutian ... or Aleutian Trough), a deep in the North Pacific Ocean at the western end of the Aleutian Islands SS Aleutian, an American ... leading from the Alaska state mainland to the Aleutian Islands Aleutian Range, a mountain range in Alaska Aleutian Trench ( ...
The beginning of the river lies in the Aleutian Range. The first six miles of the river run slowly through the tundra. ... Along the river, beaver, foxes, wolverines, mink, and otter are all found as well occasional wolf. In the water, there are ... After the decimation of natives by the disease, white human settlement around the Alagnak increased rapidly. In June 1927 ... Aleutian Range, National Park Service areas in Alaska, National Park Service Wild and Scenic Rivers, Wild and Scenic Rivers of ...
In 2000 there were 351 Mink farms in the U.S. As of 2015 there were 176,573 trappers in the U.S. with most being in the midwest ... The maritime fur trade was pioneered by the Russians, working east from Kamchatka along the Aleutian Islands to the southern ... as well as epidemic diseases. The trade's effect on China and Europe was minimal. For New England, the maritime fur trade and ... The largest producer of mink and foxes is Nova Scotia which in 2012 generated revenues of nearly $150 million and accounted for ...
Regions in the world with similar climates include the Aleutian Islands, the Alaska Peninsula, and Tierra del Fuego, although ... It views the database, called Íslendingabók, as a valuable tool for conducting research on genetic diseases, given the relative ... Wild mammals include the Arctic fox, mink, mice, rats, rabbits, and reindeer. Polar bears occasionally visit the island, ... Natural disasters, including volcanic eruptions and disease, contributed to a decreasing population. In the summer of 1627, ...
In turn, Finnish white-tailed eagles have become the main natural control and may inhibit the mink from breeding via heavy ... Murie, O. J. (1959). Fauna of the Aleutian Islands and Alaska peninsula. North American Fauna, pp. 1-364. Tobish Jr, T. G., & ... Alexander, T. L., & Buxton, D. (Eds.). (1986). Management and diseases of deer: a handbook for the veterinary surgeon. ... Bald eagle juveniles may be found together with white-tailed eagles in the Aleutian islands (where the white-tailed eagle ...
... in central Ontario carried both toxoplasmosis and Aleutian disease, but neither affliction was suspected to ... The American marten is a long, slender-bodied weasel about the size of a mink with relatively large, rounded ears, short limbs ... 1990). The effects of a disease, prey fluctuation, and clear-cutting on American marten in Newfoundland. Logan, UT: Utah State ...
2007). Emerging pests and vector-borne diseases in Europe. Wageningen: Wageningen Academic Publishers. ISBN 978-90-8686-053-1. ... like the Aleutian tern, may wander far from land. The sooty tern is entirely oceanic when not breeding, and healthy young birds ... such as the American mink in Scotland, presents an unfamiliar threat. Adult terns may be hunted by owls and raptors, and their ...
Little effort has gone into assessing the threat of disease to wild North American river otter populations, so it is poorly ... The species is also present throughout Alaska, including the Aleutian Islands, and the north slope of the Brooks Range. However ... Gilbert, F.F.; E.G. Nancekivell (1982). "Food habits of mink (Mustela vison) and otter (Lutra canadensis) in northeastern ...
Anthony, R. G.; Estes, J. A.; Ricca, M. A.; Miles, A. K.; Forsman, E. D. (2008). "Bald eagles and sea otters in the Aleutian ... Mustelid from size of American martens (Martes pennanti), and American minks (Neogale vison), to adult North American river ... from disease; cause of death was undetermined in 293 (20%) of cases. In this study, 68% of mortality was human-caused. Today, ... At minimum population, in the 1950s, it was largely restricted to Alaska, the Aleutian Islands, northern and eastern Canada, ...
Although disease has clearly contributed to the deaths of many of California's sea otters, it is not known why the California ... In the Aleutian Islands, a massive and unexpected disappearance of sea otters has occurred in recent decades. In the 1980s, the ... and minks. It is unique among the mustelids in not making dens or burrows, in having no functional anal scent glands, and in ... In the eastern Pacific Ocean, E. l. kenyoni, the northern sea otter, is found from Alaska's Aleutian Islands to Oregon and E. l ...
In North America, the breeding range has been known in modern times to include the Aleutians (i.e. Buldir and Attu) and much of ... Other relatively large carnivoran prey include house cat (felis catus), American mink (Mustela vision), and striped skunk ( ... disease and parasite activities, risk of hyperthermia) are a matter of concern. Additionally, reduction of sea ice, which snowy ... In North America, they occasionally regularly winter in the Aleutian island chain and do so broadly and with a fair amount of ...
American mink) from North America Procyon lotor (common raccoon) from North America Myocastor coypus (nutria) from South ... Emerging Infectious Diseases. 10 (3): 494-496. doi:10.3201/eid1003.030257. PMC 3322806. PMID 15109420. "Puerto Rico killing ... and Umnak Island in the Aleutian Archipelago from mainland Alaska Lepus europaeus (European hare) From Europe Oryctolagus ... Guyana and Suriname American mink Dog Cat Chital from Asia to Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay and Chile Elk from North America Red ...
However, 2 mink farmers with vascular disease and microangiopathy similar to that in mink with Aleutian disease were found to ... such as Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV), cause a broad spectrum of diseases in animals and man. Acute disease manifests ... Aleutian Mink Disease Virus and Humans. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009;15(12):2040-2042. doi:10.3201/eid1512.090514.. ... Evidence of restricted viral replication in adult mink infected with Aleutian disease of mink parvovirus. J Virol. 1988;62:1495 ...
ADV Rapid Test Kit is for ADV or AMDV detection in mink, it is sensitive, fast and accurate. It can be used in farms and labs. ... Mink Aleutian Disease, ADV Rapid Test Kit is a lateral flow rapid test kit for ADV or AMDV detection in mink, which is ... Aleutian Disease is a severe infection viral disease that causes big damages to fur animals, especially mink. Due to the form ... Performance of the Mink Aleutian Disease, ADV Rapid Test Kit. The kit was validated against counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP ...
The disease occurs in all color types, but mink which are homozygous recessive for the Aleutian gene for light coat color are ... A slow progressive disease of mink caused by the aleutian mink disease virus. It is characterized by poor reproduction, weight ... Aleutian Mink Disease; Disease, Aleutian Mink; Mink Disease, Aleutian. SNOMED CT: Aleutian disease (62251004); Aleutian mink ... A slow progressive disease of mink caused by the aleutian mink disease virus. It is characterized by poor reproduction, weight ...
Antibodies to AMDV were detected by CIEP in 16 of 56 (28.6%) mink and one of the 8 skunks (12.5%). Thirteen of the mink were ... Positive PCR or CIEP samples were detected in 56 of 60 (93.3%) American mink, 43 of 61 (70.5%) short-tailed weasels, 2 of 8 ( ... Positive CIEP or PCR animals were present in all nine counties from which mink or weasel samples were collected. The presence ... The mechanism of virus transmission between wildlife and captive mink and the effects of AMDV exposure on the viability of the ...
Aleutian disease was first recognized in ranch-raised mink in 1956. The disease was so named because it was first found in mink ... Aleutian disease, also known as mink plasmacytosis, is a disease which causes spontaneous abortion and death in minks and ... The disease spread from minks to ferrets, as the two were raised on the same farms. Aleutian disease has also more currently ... Once symptoms have been indicated, the mink is certain to die. A lethal infection in mink, the Aleutian disease virus lies ...
In Blooms case, the Aleutian mink virus grown in the cat kidney cultures caused fairly mild disease in minks, and he was never ... When Bloom was studying Aleutian mink disease virus, he tried mink cells, plus every other mammal line he could purchase. The ... "Cell cultures have played a critical role in modern infectious disease research, particularly in the area of viruses and the ... a division of NIHs National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases located in Hamilton, Mon-tana. Clinical virologists ...
This report indicated that infection with E furonis may have contributed to severe enteric disease with high morbidity and ... to infection with E furonis has typically been reported to be subclinical rather than to cause severe gastrointestinal disease ... None of the examined tissues had histopathologic evidence of other causes for diarrhea, including Aleutian mink disease virus, ... No other infectious agents commonly observed in ferrets with diarrhea (eg, Aleutian mink disease virus, rotavirus, coronavirus ...
Application note Aleutian mink disease virus. Application note Campylobacter. AeroCollect A/S. Park Alle 345. 2605 Brøndby. ...
Aleutian Mink Disease Preferred Concept UI. M0000690. Scope Note. A slow progressive disease of mink caused by the ALEUTIAN ... ALEUTIAN MINK DIS. Entry Term(s). Aleutian Disease of Mink Previous Indexing. Carnivora (1966-1967). Mink (1968-1970). Virus ... A slow progressive disease of mink caused by the ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE VIRUS. It is characterized by poor reproduction, weight ... Aleutian Mink Disease Preferred Term Term UI T001363. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag EPO. ThesaurusID NLM (1971). ...
aleutian mink disease DOID:2934 * Elizabethkingia meningoseptica infectious disease DOID:0050362 * no_name ... A knowledge graph of biological entities such as genes, gene functions, diseases, phenotypes and chemicals. Embeddings are ...
46. ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE [ԱԼԵՈՒՏԱՅԻՆ ՋՐԱՔՍԻ ՀԻՎԱՆԴՈՒԹՅՈՒՆ] 96. ALOE [ԱԼՈԷ] 47. ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE VIRUS [ԱԼԵՈՒՏԱՅԻՆ ՋՐԱՔՍԻ ...
CSP )] (UMLS (CSP) C0007965) =Disease or Syndrome ; =Phagocyte Bactericidal Dysfunction; syndrome =Aleutian mink disease; ... UMLS (CSP) C0917713) =Disease or Syndrome 159. behavior control [Manipulation of the behavior of persons or animals by ... CSP )] (UMLS (CSP) C0011127) =Disease or Syndrome ; =skin ulcer; 185. Behavioral Health & Social Service; Psychologist [An ... MSH )] (UMLS (NCI) C0004903) =Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome ; 161. behavior disorder diagnosis [ ] (UMLS (CSP) ...
mink, liver, blood, histopathology, the Aleutian disease Abstract. The dystrophy of the mink liver is widely distributed in ... Blood samples were obtained from ten minks, seropositive against the Aleutian disease. Liver injury was assessed histologically ... liver disorders and can be suggested only as a common indicator for the liver dysfunctioning of mink with the Aleutian disease ... Relation between serum enzymes and liver histopathology in mink with hepatitis Authors. * Anda Valdovska Faculty of Veterinary ...
Alexandersen, S. (1990). Pathogenesis of disease caused by Aleutian mink disease parvovirus. APMIS, Supplement, 98(14), 1-32. ... terminal palindrome of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus and construction of an infectious molecular clone. Journal of Virology ... Sørensen, J. T., Enevoldsen, C. & Thysen, I. (1990). Computer simulation as a mean to estimate the effect of disease. In Proc. ...
Aleutian mink disease virus in striped skunks: evidence for cross-species spillover. Journal of Wildlife Disease. 51: 389-400. ... Mink farms predict Aleutian disease exposure in wild American mink. PLoS One. 6(7): e21693 PDF ... Molecular epidemiology of Aleutian mink disease virus in free-ranging domestic, hybrid, and wild mink. Evolutionary ... Testing for Aleutian disease virus in river otter (Lontra canadensis) in sympatry with infected American mink (Neovison vison ...
Learn about the veterinary topic of Miscellaneous Diseases of Mink. Find specific details on this topic and related topics from ... or mink plasmacytosis, is an important disease in mink resulting from infection with Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV). An ... It may be seen in conjunction with mink viral enteritis Mink Viral Enteritis Aleutian disease (AD), ... Differential diagnoses include fighting between cagemates, dermatophytosis Miscellaneous Diseases of Mink , and ectoparasite ...
Passive transfer of antiviral antibodies restricts replication of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in vivo. Journal of Virology ... Hansen, S. W. & Møller, S. H. (1989). Correlation between behavioural response and the level of eosinophiles in female minks. ... Møller, S. H. (1988). Temperature preference of drinking water in mink. In Proc. "4th Int. Sci. Congr. in Fur Anim. Prod.," ... Hansen, S. W. & Møller, S. H. (1989). Pinde-test afslører minks temperament. Dansk Pelsdyravl, 52(1), 33-35. ...
Evolutionary analysis of whole-genome sequences confirms inter-farm transmission of Aleutian mink disease virus. Hagberg Emma E ... PLoS neglected tropical diseases 2017 Jun (6) e0005630 * Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage in Zika Virus. Hussain Snawar et al ... Inclusion in the clips does not necessarily represent the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nor does it ... Sexually transmitted diseases 2017 Jul (7) 433-435 * Cryptic Micro-heteroresistance Explains M. tuberculosis Phenotypic ...
Disease, Agricultural Workers Disease, Albers-Schoenberg Disease, Aleutian Mink Disease, Alpers Disease, alpha-Chain Disease ... Disease, Silo Fillers Disease, Simmonds Disease, Sixth Disease, Skin Disease, Slow Virus Disease, Sly Disease, Spinal Disease ... Disease, Bang Disease, Bangs Disease, Basedow Disease, Basedows Disease, Bazin Disease, Bazins Disease, Becker Disease, Best ... Disease, Dent Disease, Dents Disease, Dental Disease, Dental Pulp Disease, Dents Disease, Dercum Disease, Dercums Disease, ...
для норок и хорьков: / for minks an ferrets:. - энцефалопатии норок, алеутской болезни / mink encephalopathy, Aleutian disease ... date and test method) for:- норки / minks - на алеутскую болезнь/ for Aleutian disease of minks ... diseases:. - сибирской язвы / anthrax - для всех видов животных в течение последних 20 дней / for all animal species for the ... норки и хорьки / minks and ferrets - против чумы плотоядных, вирусного энтерита, пастереллеза; / against distemper, viral ...
Aleutian mink disease (AMD), caused by Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV), is a very important infectious disease of mink. ... Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (AMDV) causes Aleutian mink disease (AMD), which is a serious infectious disease of mink. The ... Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is the causative agent of Aleutian disease (AD), which affects mink of all genotypes and ... Aleutian disease (AD), caused by Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV), causes significant welfare problems to mink, and financial ...
REPLICATION OF ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE PARVOVIRUS IN LYMPHOID-TISSUES OF ADULT MINK - INVOLVEMENT OF FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS ... Sequenstration of the Aleutian mink disease parvovirus in larger numbers of macrophages and follicular dendritic cells was ... INTERSTITIAL NEPHRITIS IN ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE POSSIBLE ROLE OF CELL-MEDIATED-IMMUNITY AGAINST VIRUS-INFECTED TUBULAR ... Aleutian mink disease (AD) has been characterized by immune complex glomerulonephritis associated with persistent infection of ...
Aleutian Mink Disease. A slow progressive disease of mink caused by the ALEUTIAN MINK DISEASE VIRUS. It is characterized by ... Aleutian Mink Disease Virus. A species of PARVOVIRUS that causes a disease in mink, mainly those homozygous for the recessive ... Aleutian Mink Disease (AMD) is a highly contagious viral disease that affects mink (Mustela vison) and other members of the ... Aleutian Mink Disease is a highly contagious viral disease that affects mink and is characterized by respiratory symptoms, ...
we got word of a few mink infected with the deadly and contagious aleutians disease. we cared for these animals in their dying ...
ADV: Aleutians Disease Virus. Debilitating and incurable disease originally spread to ferrets by the Aleutian mink. Awareness ... This disease is serious and any ferret exhibiting signs of the disease should be taken to a knowledgeable ferret vet for ... Adrenal: A ferret with adrenal disease. For more information on this or various other ferret diseases, read "Ferrets for ... Some claim that milled ferret are more prone to cancers and other diseases common to ferrets, but it is more likely that this ...
Aleutian Mink Disease. Equine Infectious Anemia. Feline Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Leukoencephalopathy, Progressive ...
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus B4.909.204.671.650.40.50 Alexia, Pure F3.87.700.500 F3.615.700.500 Alicyclobacillus B3.353.500.50 ... Mink Cell Focus-Inducing Viruses B4.909.574.807.375.525.580 B4.613.807.375.525.580 B4.909.777.731.375.525.580 Mink enteritis ... Border disease virus B4.909.777.310.700.100 Borna disease virus B4.909.777.455.149.135 Bornaviridae B4.909.777.455.149 Boron ... Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Epizootic B4.909.777.714.550.400 Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit B4.909.777.162.500.380 ...
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus B4.909.204.671.650.40.50 Alexia, Pure F3.87.700.500 F3.615.700.500 Alicyclobacillus B3.353.500.50 ... Mink Cell Focus-Inducing Viruses B4.909.574.807.375.525.580 B4.613.807.375.525.580 B4.909.777.731.375.525.580 Mink enteritis ... Border disease virus B4.909.777.310.700.100 Borna disease virus B4.909.777.455.149.135 Bornaviridae B4.909.777.455.149 Boron ... Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Epizootic B4.909.777.714.550.400 Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit B4.909.777.162.500.380 ...
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus B4.909.204.671.650.40.50 Alexia, Pure F3.87.700.500 F3.615.700.500 Alicyclobacillus B3.353.500.50 ... Mink Cell Focus-Inducing Viruses B4.909.574.807.375.525.580 B4.613.807.375.525.580 B4.909.777.731.375.525.580 Mink enteritis ... Border disease virus B4.909.777.310.700.100 Borna disease virus B4.909.777.455.149.135 Bornaviridae B4.909.777.455.149 Boron ... Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Epizootic B4.909.777.714.550.400 Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit B4.909.777.162.500.380 ...
Aleutian Mink Disease Virus B4.909.204.671.650.40.50 Alexia, Pure F3.87.700.500 F3.615.700.500 Alicyclobacillus B3.353.500.50 ... Mink Cell Focus-Inducing Viruses B4.909.574.807.375.525.580 B4.613.807.375.525.580 B4.909.777.731.375.525.580 Mink enteritis ... Border disease virus B4.909.777.310.700.100 Borna disease virus B4.909.777.455.149.135 Bornaviridae B4.909.777.455.149 Boron ... Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Epizootic B4.909.777.714.550.400 Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Rabbit B4.909.777.162.500.380 ...
  • Aleutian disease (AD) is known to produce clinical signs in mink and ferrets only ( 2 , 3 ), although other mammals have reportedly been antibody positive. (cdc.gov)
  • Aleutian disease, also known as mink plasmacytosis, is a disease which causes spontaneous abortion and death in minks and ferrets. (wikipedia.org)
  • The virus has been found as a natural infection in the Mustelidae family within mink, ferrets, otters, polecats, stone and pine martens and within other carnivores such as skunks, genets, foxes and raccoons. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease spread from minks to ferrets, as the two were raised on the same farms. (wikipedia.org)
  • A lethal infection in mink, the Aleutian disease virus lies dormant in ferrets until stress or injury allows it to surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • For more information on this or various other ferret diseases, read "Ferrets for Dummies" by Kim Schilling. (ferretsnorth.org)
  • Debilitating and incurable disease originally spread to ferrets by the Aleutian mink. (ferretsnorth.org)
  • Some claim that milled ferret are more prone to cancers and other diseases common to ferrets, but it is more likely that this is due to the small ferret gene pool in North America. (ferretsnorth.org)
  • Ferrets can also become anemic due to a number of specific diseases. (2ndchance.info)
  • Aleutian disease is cause by a type of parvovirus that attacks members of the weasel family, including mink and ferrets. (2ndchance.info)
  • One of the many signs of Aleutian Disease when it attacks ferrets can be anemia. (2ndchance.info)
  • Both ferrets and minks have body shapes and proportions that are strikingly similar to one another, as well as similar lengths and weights, especially if they are grown in similar settings. (petsguide.info)
  • Ferrets and minks that have been domesticated and bred on farms tend to be heavier than their wild counterparts. (petsguide.info)
  • Minks' tails, on the other hand, are often longer than ferrets' tails. (petsguide.info)
  • Minks and ferrets are both territorial animals that can fight over territory. (petsguide.info)
  • The most significant distinction between the habitats of these mustelids is that minks prefer to live near water, whereas ferrets prefer to live on land. (petsguide.info)
  • Due to the fact that minks and ferrets are members of the same family, they have a great deal in common. (petsguide.info)
  • Minks and ferrets have similar-looking bodies that are slender and sleek. (petsguide.info)
  • Unlike ferrets, wild mink can weigh up to 7 lbs and are far heavier than ferrets (3 kg). (petsguide.info)
  • Minks and ferrets that have been domesticated are nearly the same size and weigh between 2-4 pounds (0.9-1.8 kg) . (petsguide.info)
  • In the last two months I have had several clients ask me about Aleutian disease [AD] in ferrets. (weaselwords.com)
  • veterinarians who treat ferrets are dusting off their veterinary school notes to review this old, but little known disease. (weaselwords.com)
  • AD, although originally a disease of mink, now has at least one strain which is specific to ferrets. (weaselwords.com)
  • Ferrets can also be experimentally infected with the mink strains. (weaselwords.com)
  • Unlike the acute, severe disease caused by the feline and canine parvoviruses, active AD in ferrets usually manifests itself as a chronic wasting disease. (weaselwords.com)
  • SKAV poses a threat to mustelid species due to reported isolated infections of captive American mink (Neovison vison) in British Columbia, Canada. (bvsalud.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Selecting American mink (Neovison vison) for tolerance to Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) has gained popularity in recent years, but data on the outcomes of this activity are scant. (bvsalud.org)
  • Notes on the health status of free-living, non-native American mink, Neovison vison , in southern England. (cabi.org)
  • Haematological and serum biochemistry values were determined for 13 adult, free-living American mink, Neovison vison , in southern England live trapped as part of a longer term research project. (cabi.org)
  • The American mink ( Neovison vison ) is a semi-aquatic species of Mustelid native to North America , though human intervention has expanded its range to many parts of Europe and South America . (en-academic.com)
  • [ 1 ] Since the extinction of the sea mink , the American mink is the only extant member of the genus Neovison . (en-academic.com)
  • Reports of a possible relationship between Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (AMDV) and human infection are rare. (cdc.gov)
  • Histopathologic appearance of abdominal aortic biopsy sample from 35-year-old mink farmer in Denmark who had been exposed to Aleutian mink disease parvovirus−infected mink for 10 years (patient 1). (cdc.gov)
  • It is caused by Carnivore amdoparvovirus 1 (also known as Aleutian disease virus, ADV), a highly contagious parvovirus in the genus Amdoparvovirus. (wikipedia.org)
  • A species of PARVOVIRUS that causes a disease in mink, mainly those homozygous for the recessive Aleutian gene which determines a desirable coat color. (lookformedical.com)
  • AD is caused by a parvovirus which was first reported in ranch-bred mink in the 1950's. (weaselwords.com)
  • Canine parvovirus, still one of the most feared puppyhood diseases, was a mutated form of feline panleukopenia, caused by the feline parvovirus. (weaselwords.com)
  • Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is widespread among ranched and free-ranging American mink in Canada, but there is no information on its prevalence in other wild animal species. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The presence of AMDV in so many species across the province has important epidemiological ramifications and could pose a serious health problem for the captive mink, as well as for susceptible wildlife. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The mechanism of virus transmission between wildlife and captive mink and the effects of AMDV exposure on the viability of the susceptible species deserve further investigation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The primary objective of this study was to survey the prevalence of AMDV in wild furbearing species in Nova Scotia (NS), the largest ranched mink pelt producing province in Canada. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Solid signs and open signs represent Aleutian mink disease virus infected and non-infected species, respectively. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This article discusses various animal diseases that have been identified in different species and regions in England and Wales. (cabi.org)
  • By contrast, animals bred for their fur, particularly the three main species - mink, fox, and the raccoon dog - are highly sensitive to it. (covid-19-review.org)
  • TB is endemic among humans in Asia, and where there is intermingling of elephants and humans, both species may act as reservoirs for disease transmission. (vin.com)
  • As a species, the American mink represents a more specialised form than the European mink in the direction of carnivory , as indicated by the more developed structure of the skull. (en-academic.com)
  • [ 5 ] Fossil records of the American mink go back as far as the Irvingtonian, though the species is uncommon among Pleistocene animals. (en-academic.com)
  • The fossil range of the American mink corresponds with the species' current natural range. (en-academic.com)
  • Another significant distinction between the two is that the Mink is a distinct species, whereas the Ferret is a subspecies of the Mink. (petsguide.info)
  • However, 2 mink farmers with vascular disease and microangiopathy similar to that in mink with Aleutian disease were found to have AMDV-specific antibodies and AMDV DNA. (cdc.gov)
  • These findings raise the suspicion that AMDV may play a role in human disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Autonomous parvoviruses, such as Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV), cause a broad spectrum of diseases in animals and man. (cdc.gov)
  • In adult mink, AD is a persistent, slowly progressive AMDV infection in which a dysregulated immune system and a postinfectious antibody response cause an immune complex-mediated vasculitis ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Histopathologic features like those in AMDV-infected mink have been described for 2 patients in the early 1960s ( 10 ). (cdc.gov)
  • however, injection of their antibody-positive blood into Aleutian mink caused neither lesions nor AMDV-antibody production ( 11 ). (cdc.gov)
  • We report finding anti-AMDV antibodies and AMDV genome in tissue from 2 mink farmers with relevant virus exposure and clinical disease similar to that in mink with AD. (cdc.gov)
  • Patient 1 was a mink farmer who had been exposed to AMDV-infected mink for 10 years. (cdc.gov)
  • Mink Aleutian Disease, ADV Rapid Test Kit is a lateral flow rapid test kit for ADV or AMDV detection in mink, which is sensitive, fast and accurate. (ringbio.com)
  • Information on the prevalence of AMDV in wildlife in Eastern Canada is limited to one report on the feral American mink[ 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Aleutian Mink Disease Virus (AMDV) circulates in many American mink (Neogale vison) populations in its native and introduced ranges. (bvsalud.org)
  • In this study, we analysed how AMDV infection in female American mink affects the reproduction of a feral population. (bvsalud.org)
  • Skunk amdoparvovirus (Carnivore amdoparvovirus 4, SKAV) is closely related to Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) and circulates primarily in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) in North America. (bvsalud.org)
  • Mink were inoculated intranasally with a local isolate of Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) over 4 years (n = 1742). (bvsalud.org)
  • Blood samples were collected from each mink up to 14 times until 1211 days post-inoculation (dpi) and were tested for viremia by PCR and for anti-AMDV antibodies by counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). (bvsalud.org)
  • Development of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Fusion VP2332-452 Antigen for Detecting Antibodies against Aleutian Mink Disease Virus. (nih.gov)
  • 1,3-7 These serologic tests detect antibodies to antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms and in some cases have detected infection years in advance of active disease and mycobacterial shedding. (vin.com)
  • Molecular assessment of visitor personal protective equipment contamination with the Aleutian mink disease virus and porcine circovirus-2 in mink and porcine farms. (nih.gov)
  • This is most commonly due to escapees within farms, who when free are hybridizing with wild mink. (wikipedia.org)
  • The dystrophy of the mink liver is widely distributed in mink farms of Latvia. (utlib.ee)
  • It seems increasingly plausible that Covid-19 originated in fur farms, especially mink, as our investigation shows. (covid-19-review.org)
  • This is similar to mink as we saw in Mink farms in Denmark and the Netherlands . (covid-19-review.org)
  • Aleutian Disease is a severe infection viral disease that causes big damages to fur animals, especially mink. (ringbio.com)
  • The disease occurs in all color types, but mink which are homozygous recessive for the Aleutian gene for light coat color are particularly susceptible. (nih.gov)
  • chronic disease reflects a restricted or abortive infection of specific cell types ( 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • In mink kits, AD causes an acute cytopathic infection of alveolar cells, which leads to respiratory distress and death ( 8 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Due to the form of antibody-antigen complex after infection, there is currently no vaccine to this disease. (ringbio.com)
  • This negative link between infection and reproductive output means that Aleutian disease could seriously affect the wild mink population. (bvsalud.org)
  • High-resolution genotyping in combination with patients' statements about geographic places of disease transmission provided valuable indications of likely sources of infection and the causal genotypes during these tularemia outbreaks. (blogspot.com)
  • Positive PCR or CIEP samples were detected in 56 of 60 (93.3%) American mink, 43 of 61 (70.5%) short-tailed weasels, 2 of 8 (25.0%) striped skunks, 2 of 11 (18.2%) North American river otters, 9 of 85 (10.6%) raccoons, and 2 of 20 (10.0%) bobcats. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Look for great blue herons feeding at the water's edge throughout the year, and arctic terns, mink and river otters in the cove at Turnaround Park. (alaska.gov)
  • The pathological findings are dominated by lymphoplasmacellular inflammation and reveal similarities to its relative Carnivore amdoparvovirus 1, the causative agent of Aleutian mink disease. (bvsalud.org)
  • The American mink is a carnivore which feeds on rodents, fish, crustaceans, frogs and birds. (en-academic.com)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (cdc.gov)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists this pathogen as one of the most potentially dangerous bioterrorism bacteria (1). (blogspot.com)
  • Positive CIEP or PCR animals were present in all nine counties from which mink or weasel samples were collected. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The disease was so named because it was first found in mink with the Aleutian coat color gene, a gun-metal grey pelt. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell cultures have played a critical role in modern infectious disease research, particularly in the area of viruses and the expression of viral gene products," Bloom says. (the-scientist.com)
  • A knowledge graph of biological entities such as genes, gene functions, diseases, phenotypes and chemicals. (edu.sa)
  • we got word of a few mink infected with the deadly and contagious aleutians disease. (earthfirstjournal.news)
  • African swine fever (ASF) is a highly contagious, generalized disease of pigs caused by a DNA virus formerly classified as an iridovirus (Iridoviridae) but recently re-classified into a newly created family of viruses called Asfarviridae - a name derived from 'African Swine Fever And Related Viruses. (zoologix.com)
  • Conventional viruses produce slow virus diseases such as SUBACUTE SCLEROSING PANENCEPHALITIS , progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy ( LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY, PROGRESSIVE MULTIFOCAL ), and AIDS . (nih.gov)
  • CONCLUSION: Previous history of selection for tolerance resulted in mink with reduced viral replication and antibody titer. (bvsalud.org)
  • Diseases of viral origin, characterized by incubation periods of months to years, insidious onset of clinical manifestations, and protracted clinical course. (nih.gov)
  • Though the disease process is protracted, viral multiplication may not be unusually slow. (nih.gov)
  • Fur chewing (clipping ) and tail biting are common abnormal behaviors of mink and may be caused by boredom resulting from relatively barren captive environments. (msdvetmanual.com)
  • This is a growing concern within mink producers as it is the most significant infectious disease affecting farmed mink worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several reasons virologists culture cells, says Marshall Bloom , associate director for science management at Rocky Mountain Laboratories, a division of NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases located in Hamilton, Mon-tana. (the-scientist.com)
  • Traditional objectives of investigations of infectious disease outbreaks are to identify ways to control ongoing outbreaks and to prevent future outbreaks. (blogspot.com)
  • Of the 2 billion humans worldwide infected with TB, fewer than 10% will develop active disease. (vin.com)
  • Many endemic viruses circulate in populations without hosts showing visible signs of disease, while still having the potential to alter host survival or reproduction. (bvsalud.org)
  • The American minks of the Pleistocene did not differ much in size or morphology from modern populations, though a slight trend toward increased size is apparent from the Irvingtonian through to the Illinoian and Wisconsinan periods. (en-academic.com)
  • It was assumed that the disease was a result of poor genetics, but it was later found that minks of all coat colors were susceptible to the disease-but tend to have a lower mortality compared with Aleutian mink. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wild minks are typically black in color and have a silky coat. (petsguide.info)
  • There are different strains of this disease which have been documented. (wikipedia.org)
  • Enhancing the pen environments of mink with shelves and various manipulable resources may help to reduce stress and boredom associated with captivity. (msdvetmanual.com)
  • The American mink has been recorded to hybridize with European minks and polecats in captivity, though the hybrid embryos of the American and European minks are usually reabsorbed. (en-academic.com)
  • the CEP tests used to screen mink and an Immunofluorescent Antibody test that [is] more sensitive. (weaselwords.com)
  • This is a severe febrile disease but does not generally result in death. (blogspot.com)
  • In the 1960s, it was common practice for mink ranchers to make their own distemper vaccines by homogenizing tissue from distemper-infected mink, making suspensions, and injecting all the mink on their ranch. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through application of the biotin-streptavidine immunohistochemical method, the presence of the hepatocyte growth factor, as well as the basal membrane components was established in the mink liver tissue, but liver apoptosis was determined by TUNEL. (utlib.ee)
  • transmitted by autosomal recessive inheritance and a similar disorder occurs in the beige mouse, the Aleutian mink, and albino Hereford cattle. (medindex.am)
  • Dermatophytosis ( ringworm ) occurs sporadically in mink as patchy alopecia with crusting. (msdvetmanual.com)
  • The disease, which is characterized by hypocalcemia, occurs at or shortly after parturition in cows and within weeks before or after parturition in ewes. (uchicago.edu)
  • DEATH usually occurs 1-3 years after disease onset. (rush.edu)
  • Lesions can also be found within the pelt depending on the severity of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Likewise, in the mink kits that survive, it infects the alveolar cells and ultimately causes respiratory distress, possibly leading to death. (wikipedia.org)
  • its diverse members cause disease in dogs, cats, swine and wild mammals such as raccoons and coyotes. (weaselwords.com)
  • This stable population of marine mammals resides relatively close to shore near a large human population and offers a novel opportunity to evaluate whether disease acts in a density-dependent manner to limit population growth. (eopugetsound.org)
  • In his 2003 monograph on the introduced mammals of the world, John Long recounts at least 46 translocations in the Aleutian Islands, mostly in the 1900s, and to the Canadian islands of Baffin, Cornwallis and Ellesmere at some point around 1918. (me.uk)
  • In fact, a positive reactor on these tests may never develop clinical disease. (weaselwords.com)
  • An article published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases in 2021 describes trends in birth defects among harbor seals in the Salish Sea from 2003 to 2019. (eopugetsound.org)
  • A 2019 article in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases looked at trace element concentrations of heavy metals in the livers of harbor seals that died and stranded in the San Juan Islands. (eopugetsound.org)
  • Hair loss beginning at the END of the tail, however, is probably NOT adrenal disease. (ferretsnorth.org)
  • In this article, we'll discuss the differences between European and American minks, compare their tail lengths, and look at some of their health concerns. (petsguide.info)
  • When Bloom was studying Aleutian mink disease virus, he tried mink cells, plus every other mammal line he could purchase. (the-scientist.com)
  • This virus can unfortunately reduce fitness of wild mink especially, by disturbing both the productivity within adult females and the overall survivor rates of both juveniles and adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease surveillance in England and Wales, October 2020. (cabi.org)
  • A 2020 paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science describes details of the fungal disease Mucormycosis which has caused the death of harbor porpoises, harbor seals and one orca in Puget Sound in recent years. (eopugetsound.org)
  • 2023. A microbial tale of farming, invasion and conservation: on the gut bacteria of Europ ean and American mink in Western Europe. (appliedevoeco.org)
  • In its introduced range in Europe, the American mink has been linked to declines in European mink and water vole . (en-academic.com)
  • Although superficially similar to the European mink, studies indicate that the American mink's closest relative is the kolonok of Asia. (en-academic.com)
  • Domestic animals, such as cats, are common carriers of ringworm and should not be permitted to enter mink sheds. (msdvetmanual.com)
  • When searching for food, the mink can take down larger prey animals than the ferret, just as it can when hunting for food. (petsguide.info)
  • Of these, only two animals developed disease signs compatible with AD. (weaselwords.com)
  • Mink owners cull their animals, but these are livestock to them. (weaselwords.com)
  • It is speculated that the disease has been transferred from farmed mink to those in the wild. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease surveillance of enclosed and wild deer in Great Britain. (cabi.org)
  • A major distinction between the two is that the Ferret makes an excellent pet, whereas the Mink is too wild to be kept as a pet in a residential setting and must be kept in a wildlife sanctuary or other particular environment. (petsguide.info)