Organic compounds containing a carbonyl group in the form -CHO.
An enzyme that oxidizes an aldehyde in the presence of NAD+ and water to an acid and NADH. This enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.1.1.70.
Oxidoreductases that are specific for ALDEHYDES.
An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the oxidation of an aldose to an alditol. It possesses broad specificity for many aldoses. EC 1.1.1.21.
A colorless, flammable liquid used in the manufacture of acetic acid, perfumes, and flavors. It is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol. It has a general narcotic action and also causes irritation of mucous membranes. Large doses may cause death from respiratory paralysis.
Acrolein is an unsaturated aldehyde (C3H4O), highly reactive, toxic and naturally occurring compound that can be found in certain foods, tobacco smoke and is produced as a result of environmental pollution or industrial processes.
Benzaldehydes are aromatic organic compounds consisting of a benzene ring connected to a formyl group (-CHO), which is the simplest and most representative compound being benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO).
A carbamate derivative used as an alcohol deterrent. It is a relatively nontoxic substance when administered alone, but markedly alters the intermediary metabolism of alcohol. When alcohol is ingested after administration of disulfiram, blood acetaldehyde concentrations are increased, followed by flushing, systemic vasodilation, respiratory difficulties, nausea, hypotension, and other symptoms (acetaldehyde syndrome). It acts by inhibiting aldehyde dehydrogenase.
'Ketones' are organic compounds with a specific structure, characterized by a carbonyl group (a carbon double-bonded to an oxygen atom) and two carbon atoms, formed as byproducts when the body breaks down fats for energy due to lack of glucose, often seen in diabetes and starvation states.
A metalloflavoprotein enzyme involved the metabolism of VITAMIN A, this enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of RETINAL to RETINOIC ACID, using both NAD+ and FAD coenzymes. It also acts on both the 11-trans- and 13-cis-forms of RETINAL.
Alkyl compounds containing a hydroxyl group. They are classified according to relation of the carbon atom: primary alcohols, R-CH2OH; secondary alcohols, R2-CHOH; tertiary alcohols, R3-COH. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Acyclic branched or unbranched hydrocarbons having two carbon-carbon double bonds.
A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
A cyanide compound which has been used as a fertilizer, defoliant and in many manufacturing processes. It often occurs as the calcium salt, sometimes also referred to as cyanamide. The citrated calcium salt is used in the treatment of alcoholism.
A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.
The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-diphosphate coupled to adenosine 5'-phosphate by pyrophosphate linkage. It is found widely in nature and is involved in numerous enzymatic reactions in which it serves as an electron carrier by being alternately oxidized (NAD+) and reduced (NADH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
Unsaturated hydrocarbons of the type Cn-H2n, indicated by the suffix -ene. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed, p408)
An autosomal recessive neurocutaneous disorder characterized by severe ichthyosis MENTAL RETARDATION; SPASTIC PARAPLEGIA; and congenital ICHTHYOSIS. It is caused by mutation of gene encoding microsomal fatty ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE leading to defect in fatty alcohol metabolism.
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-phosphate (NMN) coupled by pyrophosphate linkage to the 5'-phosphate adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. It serves as an electron carrier in a number of reactions, being alternately oxidized (NADP+) and reduced (NADPH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Glyceraldehyde is a triose sugar, a simple monosaccharide (sugar) that contains three carbon atoms, with the molecular formula C3H6O3, and it exists in two structural forms, namely D-glyceraldehyde and L-glyceraldehyde, which are diastereomers of each other, and it is a key intermediate in several biochemical pathways, including glycolysis and gluconeogenesis.
Enzymes that catalyze a reverse aldol condensation. A molecule containing a hydroxyl group and a carbonyl group is cleaved at a C-C bond to produce two smaller molecules (ALDEHYDES or KETONES). EC 4.1.2.
The study of the structure, preparation, properties, and reactions of carbon compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A metallic element with the atomic symbol Ir, atomic number 77, and atomic weight 192.22.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Addition of hydrogen to a compound, especially to an unsaturated fat or fatty acid. (From Stedman, 26th ed)
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
A group of nitrogen mustard compounds which are substituted with a phosphoramide group or its derivatives. They are usually cytotoxic and used as antineoplastic agents.
Acetals are chemical compounds formed when a carbonyl group (aldehyde or ketone) reacts with two equivalents of alcohol in the presence of a strong acid, resulting in the formation of a stable carbon-carbon bond and producing water as a byproduct.
The conformation, properties, reaction processes, and the properties of the reactions of carbon compounds.
Usually high-molecular-weight, straight-chain primary alcohols, but can also range from as few as 4 carbons, derived from natural fats and oils, including lauryl, stearyl, oleyl, and linoleyl alcohols. They are used in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, detergents, plastics, and lube oils and in textile manufacture. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Small molecules that are required for the catalytic function of ENZYMES. Many VITAMINS are coenzymes.
"Esters are organic compounds that result from the reaction between an alcohol and a carboxylic acid, playing significant roles in various biological processes and often used in pharmaceutical synthesis."
Peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of lipids using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A metallic element with the atomic symbol Mo, atomic number 42, and atomic weight 95.94. It is an essential trace element, being a component of the enzymes xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and nitrate reductase. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Changing an open-chain hydrocarbon to a closed ring. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Isomeric forms and derivatives of PROPANOL (C3H7OH).
Tungsten. A metallic element with the atomic symbol W, atomic number 74, and atomic weight 183.85. It is used in many manufacturing applications, including increasing the hardness, toughness, and tensile strength of steel; manufacture of filaments for incandescent light bulbs; and in contact points for automotive and electrical apparatus.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A hypnotic and sedative used in the treatment of INSOMNIA.
Formaldehyde is a colorless, flammable, strong-smelling chemical compound, primarily used as a preservative in medical laboratories and fungicide, which is also produced naturally in the human body and released during decomposition.
The generic name for the group of aliphatic hydrocarbons Cn-H2n+2. They are denoted by the suffix -ane. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
'Allyl compounds' are organic substances that contain the allyl group (CH2=CH-CH2-) as a functional component, which can be found in various forms such as allyl alcohol, allyl chloride, and allyl esters.
A transient reddening of the face that may be due to fever, certain drugs, exertion, stress, or a disease process.
Compounds similar to hydrocarbons in which a tetravalent silicon atom replaces the carbon atom. They are very reactive, ignite in air, and form useful derivatives.
A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.
GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS in which one of the two acyl chains is attached to glycerol with an ether alkenyl linkage instead of an ester as with the other glycerophospholipids.
A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.
An iron-molybdenum flavoprotein containing FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE that oxidizes hypoxanthine, some other purines and pterins, and aldehydes. Deficiency of the enzyme, an autosomal recessive trait, causes xanthinuria.
Compounds of the general formula R:N.NR2, as resulting from the action of hydrazines with aldehydes or ketones. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of XANTHINE in the presence of NAD+ to form URIC ACID and NADH. It acts also on a variety of other purines and aldehydes.
Hydrocarbons with at least one triple bond in the linear portion, of the general formula Cn-H2n-2.
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
A genus of VIBRIONACEAE, made up of short, slightly curved, motile, gram-negative rods. Various species produce cholera and other gastrointestinal disorders as well as abortion in sheep and cattle.
Organic compounds containing the carboxy group (-COOH). This group of compounds includes amino acids and fatty acids. Carboxylic acids can be saturated, unsaturated, or aromatic.
Glyoxal is a chemical compound, an organic dicarbonyl compound, with the formula O=C-CH-CH=O, which is a colorless liquid that can be used as a reagent in various chemical reactions, including the formation of Schiff bases and other adducts with amines.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
A group of compounds derived from ammonia by substituting organic radicals for the hydrogens. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Semicarbazides are organic compounds containing a functional group with the structure NH2-NH-CO-NH2, which are commonly used as reagents in chemical reactions to form semicarbazones, and can also be found in some pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals.
The reactions, changes in structure and composition, the properties of the reactions of carbon compounds, and the associated energy changes.
The collective name for the boron hydrides, which are analogous to the alkanes and silanes. Numerous boranes are known. Some have high calorific values and are used in high-energy fuels. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.
Imines are organic compounds containing a functional group with a carbon-nitrogen double bond (=NH or =NR), classified as azomethines, which can be produced from aldehydes or ketones through condensation with ammonia or amines.
A technology, in which sets of reactions for solution or solid-phase synthesis, is used to create molecular libraries for analysis of compounds on a large scale.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Any chemical species which accepts an electron-pair from a LEWIS BASE in a chemical bonding reaction.
The creation of an amine. It can be produced by the addition of an amino group to an organic compound or reduction of a nitro group.
The most abundant natural aromatic organic polymer found in all vascular plants. Lignin together with cellulose and hemicellulose are the major cell wall components of the fibers of all wood and grass species. Lignin is composed of coniferyl, p-coumaryl, and sinapyl alcohols in varying ratios in different plant species. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Compounds possessing both a hydroxyl (-OH) and an amino group (-NH2).
An organic compound used often as a reagent in organic synthesis, as a flavoring agent, and in tanning. It has been demonstrated as an intermediate in the metabolism of acetone and its derivatives in isolated cell preparations, in various culture media, and in vivo in certain animals.
Alcohols derived from the aryl radical (C6H5CH2-) and defined by C6H5CHOH. The concept includes derivatives with any substituents on the benzene ring.
Mitochondria in hepatocytes. As in all mitochondria, there are an outer membrane and an inner membrane, together creating two separate mitochondrial compartments: the internal matrix space and a much narrower intermembrane space. In the liver mitochondrion, an estimated 67% of the total mitochondrial proteins is located in the matrix. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p343-4)
An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.
A plastic substance deposited by insects or obtained from plants. Waxes are esters of various fatty acids with higher, usually monohydric alcohols. The wax of pharmacy is principally yellow wax (beeswax), the material of which honeycomb is made. It consists chiefly of cerotic acid and myricin and is used in making ointments, cerates, etc. (Dorland, 27th ed)
One of the protein CROSS-LINKING REAGENTS that is used as a disinfectant for sterilization of heat-sensitive equipment and as a laboratory reagent, especially as a fixative.
A highly reactive aldehyde gas formed by oxidation or incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. In solution, it has a wide range of uses: in the manufacture of resins and textiles, as a disinfectant, and as a laboratory fixative or preservative. Formaldehyde solution (formalin) is considered a hazardous compound, and its vapor toxic. (From Reynolds, Martindale The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p717)
Condensation products of aromatic amines and aldehydes forming azomethines substituted on the N atom, containing the general formula R-N:CHR. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A carotenoid constituent of visual pigments. It is the oxidized form of retinol which functions as the active component of the visual cycle. It is bound to the protein opsin forming the complex rhodopsin. When stimulated by visible light, the retinal component of the rhodopsin complex undergoes isomerization at the 11-position of the double bond to the cis-form; this is reversed in "dark" reactions to return to the native trans-configuration.
The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.

Single atom modification (O-->S) of tRNA confers ribosome binding. (1/2673)

Escherichia coli tRNALysSUU, as well as human tRNALys3SUU, has 2-thiouridine derivatives at wobble position 34 (s2U*34). Unlike the native tRNALysSUU, the full-length, unmodified transcript of human tRNALys3UUU and the unmodified tRNALys3UUU anticodon stem/loop (ASLLys3UUU) did not bind AAA- or AAG-programmed ribosomes. In contrast, the completely unmodified yeast tRNAPhe anticodon stem/loop (ASLPheGAA) had an affinity (Kd = 136+/-49 nM) similar to that of native yeast tRNAPheGmAA (Kd = 103+/-19 nM). We have found that the single, site-specific substitution of s2U34 for U34 to produce the modified ASLLysSUU was sufficient to restore ribosomal binding. The modified ASLLysSUU bound the ribosome with an affinity (Kd = 176+/-62 nM) comparable to that of native tRNALysSUU (Kd = 70+/-7 nM). Furthermore, in binding to the ribosome, the modified ASLLys3SUU produced the same 16S P-site tRNA footprint as did native E. coli tRNALysSUU, yeast tRNAPheGmAA, and the unmodified ASLPheGAA. The unmodified ASLLys3UUU had no footprint at all. Investigations of thermal stability and structure monitored by UV spectroscopy and NMR showed that the dynamic conformation of the loop of modified ASLLys3SUU was different from that of the unmodified ASLLysUUU, whereas the stems were isomorphous. Based on these and other data, we conclude that s2U34 in tRNALysSUU and in other s2U34-containing tRNAs is critical for generating an anticodon conformation that leads to effective codon interaction in all organisms. This is the first example of a single atom substitution (U34-->s2U34) that confers the property of ribosomal binding on an otherwise inactive tRNA.  (+info)

Decolorization and detoxification of extraction-stage effluent from chlorine bleaching of kraft pulp by Rhizopus oryzae. (2/2673)

Rhizopus oryzae, a zygomycete, was found to decolorize, dechlorinate, and detoxify bleach plant effluent at lower cosubstrate concentrations than the basidiomycetes previously investigated. With glucose at 1 g/liter, this fungus removed 92 to 95% of the color, 50% of the chemical oxygen demand, 72% of the adsorbable organic halide, and 37% of the extractable organic halide in 24 h at temperatures of 25 to 45 degrees C and a pH of 3 to 5. Even without added cosubstrate the fungus removed up to 78% of the color. Monomeric chlorinated aromatic compounds were removed almost completely, and toxicity to zebra fish was eliminated. The fungal mycelium could be immobilized in polyurethane foam and used repeatedly to treat batches of effluent. The residue after treatment was not further improved by exposure to fresh R. oryzae mycelium.  (+info)

Identification and characterization of alkenyl hydrolase (lysoplasmalogenase) in microsomes and identification of a plasmalogen-active phospholipase A2 in cytosol of small intestinal epithelium. (3/2673)

A lysoplasmalogenase (EC 3.3.2.2; EC 3.3.2.5) that liberates free aldehyde from 1-alk-1'-enyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine or -choline (lysoplasmalogen) was identified and characterized in rat gastrointestinal tract epithelial cells. Glycerophosphoethanolamine was produced in the reaction in equimolar amounts with the free aldehyde. The microsomal membrane associated enzyme was present throughout the length of the small intestines, with the highest activity in the jejunum and proximal ileum. The rate of alkenyl ether bond hydrolysis was dependent on the concentrations of microsomal protein and substrate, and was linear with respect to time. The enzyme hydrolyzed both ethanolamine- and choline-lysoplasmalogens with similar affinities; the Km values were 40 and 66 microM, respectively. The enzyme had no activity with 1-alk-1'-enyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine or -choline (intact plasmalogen), thus indicating enzyme specificity for a free hydroxyl group at the sn-2 position. The specific activities were 70 nmol/min/mg protein and 57 nmol/min/mg protein, respectively, for ethanolamine- and choline-lysoplasmalogen. The pH optimum was between 6.8 and 7.4. The enzyme required no known cofactors and was not affected by low mM levels of Ca2+, Mg2+, EDTA, or EGTA. The detergents, Triton X-100, deoxycholate, and octyl glucoside inhibited the enzyme. The chemical and physical properties of the lysoplasmalogenase were very similar to those of the enzyme in liver and brain microsomes. In developmental studies the specific activities of the small intestinal and liver enzymes increased markedly, 11.1- and 3.4-fold, respectively, in the first approximately 40 days of postnatal life. A plasmalogen-active phospholipase A2 activity was identified in the cytosol of the small intestines (3.3 nmol/min/mg protein) and liver (0.3 nmol/min/mg protein) using a novel coupled enzyme assay with microsomal lysoplasmalogenase as the coupling enzyme.  (+info)

Formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins in ischemic rat heart. (4/2673)

4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a major lipid peroxidation product formed during oxidative stress. Because of its reactivity with nucleophilic compounds, particularly metabolites and proteins containing thiol groups, HNE is cytotoxic. The aim of this study was to assess the extent and time course for the formation of HNE-modified proteins during ischemia and ischemia plus reperfusion in isolated rat hearts. With an antibody to HNE-Cys/His/Lys and densitometry of Western blots, we quantified the amount of HNE-protein adduct in the heart. By taking biopsies from single hearts (n = 5) at various times (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 35, and 40 min) after onset of zero-flow global ischemia, we showed a progressive, time-dependent increase (which peaked after 30 min) in HNE-mediated modification of a discrete number of proteins. In studies with individual hearts (n = 4/group), control aerobic perfusion (70 min) resulted in a very low level (296 arbitrary units) of HNE-protein adduct formation; by contrast, after 30-min ischemia HNE-adduct content increased by >50-fold (15,356 units, P < 0.05). In other studies (n = 4/group), administration of N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine (MPG, 1 mM) to the heart for 5 min immediately before 30-min ischemia reduced HNE-protein adduct formation during ischemia by approximately 75%. In studies (n = 4/group) that included reperfusion of hearts after 5, 10, 15, or 30 min of ischemia, there was no further increase in the extent of HNE-protein adduct formation over that seen with ischemia alone. Similarly, in experiments with MPG, reperfusion did not significantly influence the tissue content of HNE-protein adduct. Western immunoblot results were confirmed in studies using in situ immunofluorescent localization of HNE-protein in cryosections. In conclusion, ischemia causes a major increase in HNE-protein adduct that would be expected to reflect a toxic sequence of events that might act to compromise tissue survival during ischemia and recovery on reperfusion.  (+info)

Conversion of (+/-)-synephrine into p-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde by Arthrobacter synephrinum. A novel enzymic reaction. (5/2673)

A partically purified enzyme from Arthrobacter synephrinum was found to catalyse the conversion of (+/-)-synphrine into p-hydroxyphrenylacetaldehyde and methylamine. The enzyme is highly specific for synephrine and is distinctly different from monoamine oxidase.  (+info)

Hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in pancreatic beta-cells of GK rats, a model of type 2 diabetes. (6/2673)

Reactive oxygen species are involved in a diversity of biological phenomena such as inflammation, carcinogenesis, aging, and atherosclerosis. We and other investigators have shown that the level of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker for oxidative stress, is increased in either the urine or the mononuclear cells of the blood of type 2 diabetic patients. However, the association between type 2 diabetes and oxidative stress in the pancreatic beta-cells has not been previously described. We measured the levels of 8-OHdG and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE)-modified proteins in the pancreatic beta-cells of GK rats, a model of nonobese type 2 diabetes. Quantitative immunohistochemical analyses with specific antibodies revealed higher levels of 8-OHdG and HNE-modified proteins in the pancreatic beta-cells of GK rats than in the control Wistar rats, with the levels increasing proportionally with age and fibrosis of the pancreatic islets. We further investigated whether the levels of 8-OHdG and HNE-modified proteins would be modified in the pancreatic beta-cells of GK rats fed with 30% sucrose solution or 50 ppm of voglibose (alpha-glucosidase inhibitor). In the GK rats, the levels of 8-OHdG and HNE-modified proteins, as well as islet fibrosis, were increased by sucrose treatment but reduced by voglibose treatment. These results indicate that the pancreatic beta-cells of GK rats are oxidatively stressed, and that chronic hyperglycemia might be responsible for the oxidative stress observed in the pancreatic beta-cells.  (+info)

Formation of lipoxygenase-pathway-derived aldehydes in barley leaves upon methyl jasmonate treatment. (7/2673)

In barley leaves, the application of jasmonates leads to dramatic alterations of gene expression. Among the up-regulated gene products lipoxygenases occur abundantly. Here, at least four of them were identified as 13-lipoxygenases exhibiting acidic pH optima between pH 5.0 and 6.5. (13S,9Z,11E,15Z)-13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid was found to be the main endogenous lipoxygenase-derived polyenoic fatty acid derivative indicating 13-lipoxygenase activity in vivo. Moreover, upon methyl jasmonate treatment > 78% of the fatty acid hydroperoxides are metabolized by hydroperoxide lyase activity resulting in the endogenous occurrence of volatile aldehydes. (2E)-4-Hydroxy-2-hexenal, hexanal and (3Z)- plus (2E)-hexenal were identified as 2,4-dinitro-phenylhydrazones using HPLC and identification was confirmed by GC/MS analysis. This is the first proof that (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal is formed in plants under physiological conditions. Quantification of (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, hexanal and hexenals upon methyl jasmonate treatment of barley leaf segments revealed that hexenals were the major aldehydes peaking at 24 h after methyl jasmonate treatment. Their endogenous content increased from 1.6 nmol.g-1 fresh weight to 45 nmol.g-1 fresh weight in methyl-jasmonate-treated leaf segments, whereas (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, peaking at 48 h of methyl jasmonate treatment increased from 9 to 15 nmol.g-1 fresh weight. Similar to the hexenals, hexanal reached its maximal amount 24 h after methyl jasmonate treatment, but increased from 0.6 to 3.0 nmol.g-1 fresh weight. In addition to the classical leaf aldehydes, (2E)-4-hydroxy-2-hexenal was detected, thereby raising the question of whether it functions in the degradation of chloroplast membrane constituents, which takes place after methyl jasmonate treatment.  (+info)

Disinfection of upper gastrointestinal fibreoptic endoscopy equipment: an evaluation of a cetrimide chlorhexidine solution and glutaraldehyde. (8/2673)

There is little information available on the bacteriological contamination of upper gastrointestinal fibreoptic endoscopes during routine use and the effects of 'disinfecting solutions'. A bacteriological evaluation was therefore made of cleaning an endoscope and its ancillary equipment with (1) water, (2) an aqueous solution of 1% cetrimide with 0.1% chlorhexidine, and (3) activated aqueous 2% glutaraldehyde. All equipment, but particularly the endoscope itself, was found to be heavily contaminated after use with a wide variety of organisms of which 53% were Gram positive. Cleaning the endoscope and ancillary equipment with water and the cetrimide/chlorhexidine solution alone or in combination was inadequate to produce disinfection but immersion in glutaraldehyde for two minutes consistently produced sterile cultures with our sampling technique. A rapid and simple method for disinfection of endoscopic equipment is therefore recommended and we think this is especially suitable for busy endoscopy units.  (+info)

Aldehydes are a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of a functional group consisting of a carbon atom bonded to a hydrogen atom and a double bonded oxygen atom, also known as a formyl or aldehyde group. The general chemical structure of an aldehyde is R-CHO, where R represents a hydrocarbon chain.

Aldehydes are important in biochemistry and medicine as they are involved in various metabolic processes and are found in many biological molecules. For example, glucose is converted to pyruvate through a series of reactions that involve aldehyde intermediates. Additionally, some aldehydes have been identified as toxicants or environmental pollutants, such as formaldehyde, which is a known carcinogen and respiratory irritant.

Formaldehyde is also commonly used in medical and laboratory settings for its disinfectant properties and as a fixative for tissue samples. However, exposure to high levels of formaldehyde can be harmful to human health, causing symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat. Therefore, appropriate safety measures must be taken when handling aldehydes in medical and laboratory settings.

Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a class of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of alcohol and other aldehydes in the body. These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids, using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a cofactor.

There are several isoforms of ALDH found in different tissues throughout the body, with varying substrate specificities and kinetic properties. The most well-known function of ALDH is its role in alcohol metabolism, where it converts the toxic aldehyde intermediate acetaldehyde to acetate, which can then be further metabolized or excreted.

Deficiencies in ALDH activity have been linked to a number of clinical conditions, including alcohol flush reaction, alcohol-induced liver disease, and certain types of cancer. Additionally, increased ALDH activity has been associated with chemotherapy resistance in some cancer cells.

Aldehyde oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids using NAD+ or FAD as cofactors. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of aldehydes generated from various metabolic processes, such as lipid peroxidation and alcohol metabolism. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have been identified in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals.

The oxidation reaction catalyzed by aldehyde oxidoreductases involves the transfer of electrons from the aldehyde substrate to the cofactor, resulting in the formation of a carboxylic acid and reduced NAD+ or FAD. The enzymes are classified into several families based on their sequence similarity and cofactor specificity.

One of the most well-known members of this family is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which catalyzes the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones as part of the alcohol metabolism pathway. Another important member is aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which further oxidizes the aldehydes generated by ADH to carboxylic acids, thereby preventing the accumulation of toxic aldehydes in the body.

Deficiencies in ALDH enzymes have been linked to several human diseases, including alcoholism and certain types of cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of aldehyde oxidoreductases is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Aldehyde reductase is an enzyme that belongs to the family of alcohol dehydrogenases. Its primary function is to catalyze the reduction of a wide variety of aldehydes into their corresponding alcohols, using NADPH as a cofactor. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the detoxification of aldehydes generated from various metabolic processes, such as lipid peroxidation and alcohol metabolism. It is widely distributed in different tissues, including the liver, kidney, and brain. In addition to its detoxifying function, aldehyde reductase has been implicated in several physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as neuroprotection, cancer, and diabetes.

Acetaldehyde is a colorless, volatile, and flammable liquid with a pungent odor. It is the simplest aldehyde, with the formula CH3CHO. Acetaldehyde is an important intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol and is produced by the oxidation of ethanol by alcohol dehydrogenase. It is also a naturally occurring compound that is found in small amounts in various foods and beverages, such as fruits, vegetables, and coffee.

Acetaldehyde is a toxic substance that can cause a range of adverse health effects, including irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, nausea, vomiting, and headaches. It has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Long-term exposure to acetaldehyde has been linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, including cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus, and liver.

Acrolein is an unsaturated aldehyde with the chemical formula CH2CHCHO. It is a colorless liquid that has a distinct unpleasant odor and is highly reactive. Acrolein is produced by the partial oxidation of certain organic compounds, such as glycerol and fatty acids, and it is also found in small amounts in some foods, such as coffee and bread.

Acrolein is a potent irritant to the eyes, nose, and throat, and exposure to high levels can cause coughing, wheezing, and shortness of breath. It has been shown to have toxic effects on the lungs, heart, and nervous system, and prolonged exposure has been linked to an increased risk of cancer.

In the medical field, acrolein is sometimes used as a laboratory reagent or as a preservative for biological specimens. However, due to its potential health hazards, it must be handled with care and appropriate safety precautions should be taken when working with this compound.

Benzaldehyde is an organic compound with the formula C6H5CHO. It is the simplest aromatic aldehyde, and it consists of a benzene ring attached to a formyl group. Benzaldehyde is a colorless liquid with a characteristic almond-like odor.

Benzaldehyde occurs naturally in various plants, including bitter almonds, cherries, peaches, and apricots. It is used in many industrial applications, such as in the production of perfumes, flavorings, and dyes. In addition, benzaldehyde has been used in medical research for its potential therapeutic effects, such as its anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties.

However, it is important to note that benzaldehyde can be toxic in high concentrations and may cause irritation to the skin, eyes, and respiratory system. Therefore, it should be handled with care and used in accordance with appropriate safety guidelines.

Disulfiram is a medication used to treat chronic alcoholism. It works by inhibiting the enzyme acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, which is responsible for breaking down acetaldehyde, a toxic metabolite produced when alcohol is consumed. When a person taking disulfiram consumes alcohol, the buildup of acetaldehyde causes unpleasant symptoms such as flushing, nausea, palpitations, and shortness of breath, which can help discourage further alcohol use.

The medical definition of Disulfiram is:

A medication used in the treatment of chronic alcoholism, which works by inhibiting the enzyme acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, leading to an accumulation of acetaldehyde when alcohol is consumed, causing unpleasant symptoms that discourage further alcohol use. Disulfiram is available as a tablet for oral administration and is typically prescribed under medical supervision due to its potential for serious interactions with alcohol and other substances.

Ketones are organic compounds that contain a carbon atom bound to two oxygen atoms and a central carbon atom bonded to two additional carbon groups through single bonds. In the context of human physiology, ketones are primarily produced as byproducts when the body breaks down fat for energy in a process called ketosis.

Specifically, under conditions of low carbohydrate availability or prolonged fasting, the liver converts fatty acids into ketone bodies, which can then be used as an alternative fuel source for the brain and other organs. The three main types of ketones produced in the human body are acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone.

Elevated levels of ketones in the blood, known as ketonemia, can occur in various medical conditions such as diabetes, starvation, alcoholism, and high-fat/low-carbohydrate diets. While moderate levels of ketosis are generally considered safe, severe ketosis can lead to a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in people with diabetes.

Retinal dehydrogenase, also known as Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of alcohol and other aldehydes in the body. In the eye, retinal dehydrogenase plays a specific role in the conversion of retinaldehyde to retinoic acid, which is an important molecule for the maintenance and regulation of the visual cycle and overall eye health.

Retinoic acid is involved in various physiological processes such as cell differentiation, growth, and survival, and has been shown to have a protective effect against oxidative stress in the retina. Therefore, retinal dehydrogenase deficiency or dysfunction may lead to impaired visual function and increased susceptibility to eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.

In chemistry, an alcohol is a broad term that refers to any organic compound characterized by the presence of a hydroxyl (-OH) functional group attached to a carbon atom. This means that alcohols are essentially hydrocarbons with a hydroxyl group. The simplest alcohol is methanol (CH3OH), and ethanol (C2H5OH), also known as ethyl alcohol, is the type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages.

In the context of medical definitions, alcohol primarily refers to ethanol, which has significant effects on the human body when consumed. Ethanol can act as a central nervous system depressant, leading to various physiological and psychological changes depending on the dose and frequency of consumption. Excessive or prolonged use of ethanol can result in various health issues, including addiction, liver disease, neurological damage, and increased risk of injuries due to impaired judgment and motor skills.

It is important to note that there are other types of alcohols (e.g., methanol, isopropyl alcohol) with different chemical structures and properties, but they are not typically consumed by humans and can be toxic or even lethal in high concentrations.

Alkadienes are organic compounds that contain two carbon-carbon double bonds in their molecular structure. The term "alka" refers to the presence of hydrocarbons, while "diene" indicates the presence of two double bonds. These compounds can be classified as either conjugated or non-conjugated dienes based on the arrangement of the double bonds.

Conjugated dienes have their double bonds adjacent to each other, separated by a single bond, while non-conjugated dienes have at least one methylene group (-CH2-) separating the double bonds. The presence and positioning of these double bonds can significantly affect the chemical and physical properties of alkadienes, including their reactivity, stability, and spectral characteristics.

Alkadienes are important intermediates in various chemical reactions and have applications in the production of polymers, pharmaceuticals, and other industrial products. However, they can also be produced naturally by some plants and microorganisms as part of their metabolic processes.

Alcohol oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to NADH. These enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of alcohols and other organic compounds in living organisms.

The most well-known example of an alcohol oxidoreductase is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is responsible for the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the liver during the metabolism of alcoholic beverages. Other examples include aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH).

These enzymes are important targets for the development of drugs used to treat alcohol use disorder, as inhibiting their activity can help to reduce the rate of ethanol metabolism and the severity of its effects on the body.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

Cyanamide is a chemical compound with the formula NH2CN. It is a colorless, crystalline solid that is highly soluble in water and has an ammonia-like odor. Cyanamide is used as a reagent in organic synthesis and as a fertilizer.

In a medical context, cyanamide may be used as a drug to treat certain conditions. For example, it has been used as a muscle relaxant and to reduce muscle spasms in people with multiple sclerosis. It is also being studied as a potential treatment for alcohol dependence, as it may help to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms.

It is important to note that cyanamide can be toxic in high doses, and it should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is a group of enzymes responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, and reducing equivalents such as NAD+ to NADH. In humans, ADH plays a crucial role in the metabolism of ethanol, converting it into acetaldehyde, which is then further metabolized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) into acetate. This process helps to detoxify and eliminate ethanol from the body. Additionally, ADH enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of other alcohols, such as methanol and ethylene glycol, which can be toxic if allowed to accumulate in the body.

Catalysis is the process of increasing the rate of a chemical reaction by adding a substance known as a catalyst, which remains unchanged at the end of the reaction. A catalyst lowers the activation energy required for the reaction to occur, thereby allowing the reaction to proceed more quickly and efficiently. This can be particularly important in biological systems, where enzymes act as catalysts to speed up metabolic reactions that are essential for life.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

NAD (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It plays an essential role in cellular metabolism, particularly in redox reactions, where it acts as an electron carrier. NAD exists in two forms: NAD+, which accepts electrons and becomes reduced to NADH. This pairing of NAD+/NADH is involved in many fundamental biological processes such as generating energy in the form of ATP during cellular respiration, and serving as a critical cofactor for various enzymes that regulate cellular functions like DNA repair, gene expression, and cell death.

Maintaining optimal levels of NAD+/NADH is crucial for overall health and longevity, as it declines with age and in certain disease states. Therefore, strategies to boost NAD+ levels are being actively researched for their potential therapeutic benefits in various conditions such as aging, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic diseases.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Alkenes are unsaturated hydrocarbons that contain at least one carbon-carbon double bond in their molecular structure. The general chemical formula for alkenes is CnH2n, where n represents the number of carbon atoms in the molecule.

The double bond in alkenes can undergo various reactions, such as addition reactions, where different types of molecules can add across the double bond to form new compounds. The relative position of the double bond in the carbon chain and the presence of substituents on the carbon atoms can affect the physical and chemical properties of alkenes.

Alkenes are important industrial chemicals and are used as starting materials for the synthesis of a wide range of products, including plastics, resins, fibers, and other chemicals. They are also found in nature, occurring in some plants and animals, and can be produced by certain types of bacteria through fermentation processes.

Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome is a rare inherited metabolic neurocutaneous disorder characterized by the triad of ichthyosis (scaly, dry skin), mental retardation, and spasticity (stiff and awkward movements due to rigidity of muscles). It is caused by a deficiency of fatty alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme, which leads to an accumulation of fatty alcohols in the body. This disorder is typically noticed in early infancy with the development of yellowish, scaly skin lesions. Neurological symptoms such as spasticity, speech and motor delay become apparent around 18-24 months of age. Other features may include ocular (eye) involvement like decreased vision, photophobia (sensitivity to light), and strabismus (crossed eyes). Seizures can also occur in some cases. The condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, meaning that an individual must inherit two copies of the mutated gene, one from each parent, to develop the disease.

NADP (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate) is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role as an electron carrier in various redox reactions in the human body. It exists in two forms: NADP+, which functions as an oxidizing agent and accepts electrons, and NADPH, which serves as a reducing agent and donates electrons.

NADPH is particularly important in anabolic processes, such as lipid and nucleotide synthesis, where it provides the necessary reducing equivalents to drive these reactions forward. It also plays a critical role in maintaining the cellular redox balance by participating in antioxidant defense mechanisms that neutralize harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS).

In addition, NADP is involved in various metabolic pathways, including the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle in photosynthesis. Overall, NADP and its reduced form, NADPH, are essential molecules for maintaining proper cellular function and energy homeostasis.

Glyceraldehyde is a triose, a simple sugar consisting of three carbon atoms. It is a clear, colorless, sweet-tasting liquid that is used as a sweetener and preservative in the food industry. In the medical field, glyceraldehyde is used in research and diagnostics, particularly in the study of carbohydrate metabolism and enzyme function.

Glyceraldehyde is also an important intermediate in the glycolytic pathway, which is a series of reactions that convert glucose into pyruvate, producing ATP and NADH as energy-rich compounds. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate in this pathway.

In addition, glyceraldehyde has been studied for its potential role in the development of diabetic complications and other diseases associated with carbohydrate metabolism disorders.

Aldehyde-lyases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the breakdown or synthesis of molecules involving an aldehyde group through a reaction known as lyase cleavage. This type of reaction results in the removal of a molecule, typically water or carbon dioxide, from the substrate.

In the case of aldehyde-lyases, these enzymes specifically catalyze reactions that involve the conversion of an aldehyde into a carboxylic acid or vice versa. These enzymes are important in various metabolic pathways and play a crucial role in the biosynthesis and degradation of several biomolecules, including carbohydrates, amino acids, and lipids.

The systematic name for this class of enzymes is "ald(e)hyde-lyases." They are classified under EC number 4.3.1 in the Enzyme Commission (EC) system.

Organic chemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the study of carbon-containing compounds, their synthesis, reactions, properties, and structures. These compounds can include both naturally occurring substances (such as sugars, proteins, and nucleic acids) and synthetic materials (such as plastics, dyes, and pharmaceuticals). A key characteristic of organic molecules is the presence of covalent bonds between carbon atoms or between carbon and other elements like hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and halogens. The field of organic chemistry has played a crucial role in advancing our understanding of chemical processes and has led to numerous technological and medical innovations.

Iridium is not a medical term, but rather a chemical element with the symbol Ir and atomic number 77. It's a transition metal that is part of the platinum group. Iridium has no known biological role in humans or other organisms, and it is not used in medical treatments or diagnoses.

However, iridium is sometimes mentioned in the context of geological time scales because iridium-rich layers in rock formations are associated with major extinction events, such as the one that marked the end of the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. The leading hypothesis for this association is that large asteroid impacts can create iridium-rich vapor plumes that settle onto the Earth's surface and leave a distinct layer in the rock record.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Hydrogenation, in the context of food science and biochemistry, refers to the process of adding hydrogen atoms to certain unsaturated fats or oils, converting them into saturated fats. This is typically done through a chemical reaction using hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalyst, often a metal such as nickel or palladium.

The process of hydrogenation increases the stability and shelf life of fats and oils, but it can also lead to the formation of trans fats, which have been linked to various health issues, including heart disease. Therefore, the use of partially hydrogenated oils has been largely phased out in many countries.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Phosphoramide mustards are a class of alkylating agents used in chemotherapy. They work by forming covalent bonds with DNA, causing cross-linking of the DNA strands and preventing DNA replication and transcription. This results in cytotoxicity and ultimately cell death. The most common phosphoramide mustard is mechlorethamine, which is used in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and various types of leukemia. Other examples include cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide, which are used to treat a wide range of cancers including breast, ovarian, and lung cancer. These agents are known for their potent antineoplastic activity, but they also have a narrow therapeutic index and can cause significant side effects, such as myelosuppression, nausea, vomiting, and hair loss.

An acetal is a chemical compound that contains two ether functional groups (-O-) bonded to two carbon atoms, which in turn are bonded to two other carbon atoms forming a six-membered ring. Acetals are formed by the reaction of an aldehyde with two equivalents of an alcohol under acid catalysis, followed by removal of water. They are stable compounds that do not easily hydrolyze back to their starting materials, making them useful in various chemical and industrial applications. In the context of organic chemistry, acetals are a subclass of hemiacetals, which contain only one ether functional group bonded to a carbon atom that is also bonded to another oxygen-containing group.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question as "Organic chemistry phenomena" is a broad term and not a medical definition. However, I can provide you with an explanation of organic chemistry phenomena in a general context.

Organic chemistry is the study of carbon-containing compounds, their synthesis, reactions, properties, and structures. The term "organic" was originally used to describe biological materials, but now it refers to any compound that contains carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms, except for some simple oxides, sulfides, and halides.

Organic chemistry phenomena encompass a wide range of processes and events related to organic compounds. These can include:

1. Structural properties: Understanding the arrangement of atoms in organic molecules and how they influence chemical behavior and reactivity.
2. Stereochemistry: The study of three-dimensional spatial arrangements of atoms in organic molecules, which can significantly impact their properties and biological activity.
3. Functional groups: Recognizing and understanding the behavior of specific groupings of atoms within organic molecules that determine their chemical reactivity.
4. Reaction mechanisms: Investigating and describing the step-by-step processes by which organic reactions occur, including the movement of electrons, formation and breaking of bonds, and energy changes.
5. Synthetic methodologies: Developing strategies and techniques for creating complex organic molecules from simpler precursors, often involving multiple steps and protecting group strategies.
6. Physical properties: Examining how factors such as molecular weight, polarity, solubility, and melting/boiling points affect the behavior of organic compounds in various conditions.
7. Spectroscopic analysis: Utilizing techniques like NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), IR (Infrared) spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry to analyze the structure and composition of organic molecules.
8. Biochemistry and medicinal chemistry: Exploring how organic compounds interact with biological systems, including drug design, development, and delivery.

While not a medical definition per se, understanding organic chemistry phenomena is crucial for many areas within medicine, such as pharmaceutical research, toxicology, and biochemistry.

Fatty alcohols, also known as long-chain alcohols or long-chain fatty alcohols, are a type of fatty compound that contains a hydroxyl group (-OH) and a long alkyl chain. They are typically derived from natural sources such as plant and animal fats and oils, and can also be synthetically produced.

Fatty alcohols can vary in chain length, typically containing between 8 and 30 carbon atoms. They are commonly used in a variety of industrial and consumer products, including detergents, emulsifiers, lubricants, and personal care products. In the medical field, fatty alcohols may be used as ingredients in certain medications or topical treatments.

Coenzymes are small organic molecules that assist enzymes in catalyzing chemical reactions within cells. They typically act as carriers of specific atoms or groups of atoms during enzymatic reactions, facilitating the conversion of substrates into products. Coenzymes often bind temporarily to enzymes at the active site, forming an enzyme-coenzyme complex.

Coenzymes are usually derived from vitamins or minerals and are essential for maintaining proper metabolic functions in the body. Examples of coenzymes include nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and coenzyme A (CoA). When a coenzyme is used up in a reaction, it must be regenerated or replaced for the enzyme to continue functioning.

In summary, coenzymes are vital organic compounds that work closely with enzymes to facilitate biochemical reactions, ensuring the smooth operation of various metabolic processes within living organisms.

Esters are organic compounds that are formed by the reaction between an alcohol and a carboxylic acid. They are widely found in nature and are used in various industries, including the production of perfumes, flavors, and pharmaceuticals. In the context of medical definitions, esters may be mentioned in relation to their use as excipients in medications or in discussions of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Esters can also be found in various natural substances such as fats and oils, which are triesters of glycerol and fatty acids.

Lipid peroxidation is a process in which free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), steal electrons from lipids containing carbon-carbon double bonds, particularly polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). This results in the formation of lipid hydroperoxides, which can decompose to form a variety of compounds including reactive carbonyl compounds, aldehydes, and ketones.

Malondialdehyde (MDA) is one such compound that is commonly used as a marker for lipid peroxidation. Lipid peroxidation can cause damage to cell membranes, leading to changes in their fluidity and permeability, and can also result in the modification of proteins and DNA, contributing to cellular dysfunction and ultimately cell death. It is associated with various pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Molybdenum" is not a medical term. It is an element with the symbol Mo and atomic number 42 on the periodic table. Molybdenum is used in various industries, including medicine, for example in the production of surgical instruments and some prosthetics due to its strength and resistance to corrosion. However, it is not a term used to describe a medical condition or bodily process. If you have any questions related to elements and their uses in medicine, I'd be happy to help with those!

Cyclization is a chemical process that involves forming a cyclic structure or ring-shaped molecule from a linear or open-chain compound. In the context of medicinal chemistry and drug design, cyclization reactions are often used to synthesize complex molecules, including drugs, by creating rings or fused ring systems within the molecule's structure.

Cyclization can occur through various mechanisms, such as intramolecular nucleophilic substitution, electrophilic addition, or radical reactions. The resulting cyclized compounds may exhibit different chemical and biological properties compared to their linear precursors, making them valuable targets for drug discovery and development.

In some cases, the cyclization process can lead to the formation of stereocenters within the molecule, which can impact its three-dimensional shape and how it interacts with biological targets. Therefore, controlling the stereochemistry during cyclization reactions is crucial in medicinal chemistry to optimize the desired biological activity.

Overall, cyclization plays a significant role in the design and synthesis of many pharmaceutical compounds, enabling the creation of complex structures that can interact specifically with biological targets for therapeutic purposes.

"Propanols" is a general term that refers to a class of alcohols containing a propanol group, which is a functional group made up of a carbon atom bonded to three hydrogen atoms and a hydroxyl group (-OH). There are two primary structures for propanols: 1-propanol (n-propyl alcohol) and 2-propanol (isopropyl alcohol), which differ in the arrangement of their carbon chain.

1-Propanol, also known as n-propyl alcohol, has a linear structure with the hydroxyl group attached to one end of the carbon chain: CH3CH2CH2OH. It is a colorless liquid that is used as a solvent and in the production of other chemicals.

2-Propanol, also known as isopropyl alcohol or isopropanol, has a branched structure with the hydroxyl group attached to a branch on the second carbon atom: (CH3)2CHOH. It is a colorless, flammable liquid that is widely used as a solvent and disinfectant.

Both 1-propanol and 2-propanol have applications in various industries, including pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and cleaning products. However, they should be handled with care due to their flammability and potential health hazards, such as irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'Tungsten' is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol W and atomic number 74. Tungsten is a rare metal found naturally on Earth, and it has many industrial uses due to its hardness, high density, and high melting point.

In the context of medicine or healthcare, tungsten may be encountered in certain medical devices, such as X-ray tubes and electrodes, where its properties are utilized for their durability and heat resistance. However, it is not a term that would typically have a formal medical definition.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Chloral hydrate is a sedative and hypnotic medication, which means it can help to promote sleep and reduce anxiety. It is a type of compound called a chloral derivative and works by increasing the activity of a neurotransmitter in the brain called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which has a calming effect on the nervous system.

Chloral hydrate is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and liquid solutions. It is typically used for short-term treatment of insomnia or anxiety, but it may also be used for other purposes as determined by a healthcare provider.

Like all medications, chloral hydrate can have side effects, which can include dizziness, headache, stomach upset, and changes in behavior or mood. It is important to use this medication only as directed by a healthcare provider and to report any unusual symptoms or concerns promptly.

Formaldehyde is not a medication or a term commonly used in human medicine. It is a chemical compound with the formula CH2O, which is commonly used in industry for various purposes such as a preservative, disinfectant, and embalming agent. Formaldehyde is also found naturally in the environment and is produced in small amounts by certain animals, plants, and humans.

Exposure to formaldehyde can cause irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and skin, and prolonged exposure has been linked to cancer, particularly nasopharyngeal cancer and leukemia. Therefore, it is important to limit exposure to this chemical and use appropriate protective equipment when handling it.

Alkanes are a group of saturated hydrocarbons, which are characterized by the presence of single bonds between carbon atoms in their molecular structure. The general formula for alkanes is CnH2n+2, where n represents the number of carbon atoms in the molecule.

The simplest and shortest alkane is methane (CH4), which contains one carbon atom and four hydrogen atoms. As the number of carbon atoms increases, the length and complexity of the alkane chain also increase. For example, ethane (C2H6) contains two carbon atoms and six hydrogen atoms, while propane (C3H8) contains three carbon atoms and eight hydrogen atoms.

Alkanes are important components of fossil fuels such as natural gas, crude oil, and coal. They are also used as starting materials in the production of various chemicals and materials, including plastics, fertilizers, and pharmaceuticals. In the medical field, alkanes may be used as anesthetics or as solvents for various medical applications.

Allyl compounds are organic compounds that contain the allyl group, which is a functional group with the formula CH2=CH-CH2-. The allyl group consists of a methylene bridge (CH2-) flanked by a carbon-carbon double bond (-CH=). Allyl compounds can be derived from allyl alcohol, allyl chloride, or other allyl halides and can participate in various chemical reactions due to the reactivity of the double bond. They are used in organic synthesis, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals.

"Flushing" is a medical term that refers to a sudden, temporary reddening of the skin, often accompanied by feelings of warmth. This occurs when the blood vessels beneath the skin dilate or expand, allowing more blood to flow through them. Flushing can be caused by various factors such as emotional stress, alcohol consumption, spicy foods, certain medications, or medical conditions like carcinoid syndrome or menopause. It is generally harmless but can sometimes indicate an underlying issue that requires medical attention.

Silanes are a group of chemical compounds that contain silicon and hydrogen. The general formula for silanes is Si_xH_(2x+2), where x is a positive integer. Silanes are named after their parent compound, silane (SiH4), which contains one silicon atom and four hydrogen atoms.

Silanes are colorless and highly flammable gases at room temperature. They are typically prepared by the reaction of metal silicides with acids or by the reduction of halogenated silanes. Silanes have a variety of industrial applications, including as intermediates in the production of silicon-based materials such as semiconductors and polymers.

In medical contexts, silanes are not typically used directly. However, some silane-containing compounds have been investigated for their potential therapeutic uses. For example, some organosilanes have been shown to have antimicrobial properties and may be useful as disinfectants or in the development of medical devices. Other silane-containing materials have been studied for their potential use in drug delivery systems or as imaging agents in diagnostic procedures.

It is important to note that some silanes can be hazardous if not handled properly, and they should only be used by trained professionals in a controlled environment. Exposure to silanes can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects.

Ethanol is the medical term for pure alcohol, which is a colorless, clear, volatile, flammable liquid with a characteristic odor and burning taste. It is the type of alcohol that is found in alcoholic beverages and is produced by the fermentation of sugars by yeasts.

In the medical field, ethanol is used as an antiseptic and disinfectant, and it is also used as a solvent for various medicinal preparations. It has central nervous system depressant properties and is sometimes used as a sedative or to induce sleep. However, excessive consumption of ethanol can lead to alcohol intoxication, which can cause a range of negative health effects, including impaired judgment, coordination, and memory, as well as an increased risk of accidents, injuries, and chronic diseases such as liver disease and addiction.

Plasmalogens are a type of complex lipid called glycerophospholipids, which are essential components of cell membranes. They are characterized by having a unique chemical structure that includes a vinyl ether bond at the sn-1 position of the glycerol backbone and an ester bond at the sn-2 position, with the majority of them containing polyunsaturated fatty acids. The headgroup attached to the sn-3 position is typically choline or ethanolamine.

Plasmalogens are abundant in certain tissues, such as the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. They have been suggested to play important roles in cellular functions, including membrane fluidity, signal transduction, and protection against oxidative stress. Reduced levels of plasmalogens have been associated with various diseases, including neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and aging-related conditions.

Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique that combines the separating power of gas chromatography with the identification capabilities of mass spectrometry. This method is used to separate, identify, and quantify different components in complex mixtures.

In GC-MS, the mixture is first vaporized and carried through a long, narrow column by an inert gas (carrier gas). The various components in the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase inside the column, leading to their separation based on their partition coefficients between the mobile and stationary phases. As each component elutes from the column, it is then introduced into the mass spectrometer for analysis.

The mass spectrometer ionizes the sample, breaks it down into smaller fragments, and measures the mass-to-charge ratio of these fragments. This information is used to generate a mass spectrum, which serves as a unique "fingerprint" for each compound. By comparing the generated mass spectra with reference libraries or known standards, analysts can identify and quantify the components present in the original mixture.

GC-MS has wide applications in various fields such as forensics, environmental analysis, drug testing, and research laboratories due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and ability to analyze volatile and semi-volatile compounds.

Xanthine oxidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of xanthine to uric acid, which is the last step in purine metabolism. It's a type of molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) during its reaction mechanism.

The enzyme exists in two interconvertible forms: an oxidized state and a reduced state. The oxidized form, called xanthine oxidase, reduces molecular oxygen to superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, while the reduced form, called xanthine dehydrogenase, reduces NAD+ to NADH.

Xanthine oxidase is found in various tissues, including the liver, intestines, and milk. An overproduction of uric acid due to increased activity of xanthine oxidase can lead to hyperuricemia, which may result in gout or kidney stones. Some medications and natural compounds are known to inhibit xanthine oxidase, such as allopurinol and febuxostat, which are used to treat gout and prevent the formation of uric acid stones in the kidneys.

A hydrazone is not a medical term per se, but rather a chemical compound. However, it's important for medical professionals to understand the properties and reactions of various chemical compounds, including hydrazones, in the context of pharmacology, toxicology, and medicinal chemistry. Here's a general definition:

Hydrazones are organic compounds that contain a functional group with the structure R1R2C=NNR3, where R1, R2, and R3 are hydrogen atoms or organic groups. They are formed by the condensation reaction of a carbonyl compound (aldehyde or ketone) with hydrazine or its derivatives. Hydrazones can exhibit various biological activities, such as antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer properties. Some hydrazones are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds.

Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of purines, which are nitrogen-containing compounds that form part of DNA and RNA. Specifically, XDH helps to break down xanthine and hypoxanthine into uric acid, a waste product that is excreted in the urine.

XDH can exist in two interconvertible forms: a dehydrogenase form (XDH) and an oxidase form (XO). In its dehydrogenase form, XDH uses NAD+ as an electron acceptor to convert xanthine into uric acid. However, when XDH is converted to its oxidase form (XO), it can use molecular oxygen as an electron acceptor instead, producing superoxide and hydrogen peroxide as byproducts. These reactive oxygen species can contribute to oxidative stress and tissue damage in the body.

Abnormal levels or activity of XDH have been implicated in various diseases, including gout, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Alkynes are a type of hydrocarbons that contain at least one carbon-carbon triple bond in their molecular structure. The general chemical formula for alkynes is CnH2n-2, where n represents the number of carbon atoms in the molecule.

The simplest and shortest alkyne is ethyne, also known as acetylene, which has two carbon atoms and four hydrogen atoms (C2H2). Ethyne is a gas at room temperature and pressure, and it is commonly used as a fuel in welding torches.

Alkynes are unsaturated hydrocarbons, meaning that they have the potential to undergo chemical reactions that add atoms or groups of atoms to the molecule. In particular, alkynes can be converted into alkenes (hydrocarbons with a carbon-carbon double bond) through a process called partial reduction, or they can be fully reduced to alkanes (hydrocarbons with only single bonds between carbon atoms) through a process called complete reduction.

Alkynes are important intermediates in the chemical industry and are used to produce a wide range of products, including plastics, resins, fibers, and pharmaceuticals. They can be synthesized from other hydrocarbons through various chemical reactions, such as dehydrogenation, oxidative coupling, or metathesis.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

"Vibrio" is a genus of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, curved-rod bacteria that are commonly found in marine and freshwater environments. Some species of Vibrio can cause diseases in humans, the most notable being Vibrio cholerae, which is the causative agent of cholera, a severe diarrheal illness. Other pathogenic species include Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which can cause gastrointestinal or wound infections. These bacteria are often transmitted through contaminated food or water and can lead to serious health complications, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

Carboxylic acids are organic compounds that contain a carboxyl group, which is a functional group made up of a carbon atom doubly bonded to an oxygen atom and single bonded to a hydroxyl group. The general formula for a carboxylic acid is R-COOH, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Carboxylic acids can be found in various natural sources such as in fruits, vegetables, and animal products. Some common examples of carboxylic acids include formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), propionic acid (C2H5COOH), and butyric acid (C3H7COOH).

Carboxylic acids have a variety of uses in industry, including as food additives, pharmaceuticals, and industrial chemicals. They are also important intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds. In the body, carboxylic acids play important roles in metabolism and energy production.

Glyoxal is an organic compound with the formula CH(O)CHO. It is a colorless liquid that is used primarily as a building block in the synthesis of other chemicals, including pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals. Glyoxal is also found in small amounts in the environment, including in tobacco smoke and in certain foods.

In the body, glyoxal can be produced as a byproduct of normal metabolic processes, particularly when sugars are broken down. Under some circumstances, high levels of glyoxal may contribute to the development of chronic diseases, including diabetes and its complications. This is because glyoxal can react with proteins and other biological molecules in the body, forming advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) that can disrupt normal cellular function and contribute to tissue damage. However, more research is needed to fully understand the role of glyoxal in human health and disease.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Amines are organic compounds that contain a basic nitrogen atom with a lone pair of electrons. They are derived from ammonia (NH3) by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms with alkyl or aryl groups. The nomenclature of amines follows the substitutive type, where the parent compound is named as an aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbon, and the functional group "amine" is designated as a suffix or prefix.

Amines are classified into three types based on the number of carbon atoms attached to the nitrogen atom:

1. Primary (1°) amines: One alkyl or aryl group is attached to the nitrogen atom.
2. Secondary (2°) amines: Two alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.
3. Tertiary (3°) amines: Three alkyl or aryl groups are attached to the nitrogen atom.

Quaternary ammonium salts have four organic groups attached to the nitrogen atom and a positive charge, with anions balancing the charge.

Amines have a wide range of applications in the chemical industry, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, polymers, and solvents. They also play a significant role in biological systems as neurotransmitters, hormones, and cell membrane components.

Semicarbazides are organic compounds that contain the functional group -NH-CO-NH-NH2. They are derivatives of hydrazine and carbamic acid, with the general structure (CH3)NHCSNH2. Semicarbazides are widely used in the synthesis of various chemical compounds, including heterocyclic compounds, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals.

In a medical context, semicarbazides themselves do not have any therapeutic use. However, they can be used in the preparation of certain drugs or drug intermediates. For example, semicarbazones, which are derivatives of semicarbazides, can be used to synthesize some antituberculosis drugs.

It is worth noting that semicarbazides and their derivatives have been found to have mutagenic and carcinogenic properties in some studies. Therefore, they should be handled with care in laboratory settings, and exposure should be minimized to reduce potential health risks.

Organic chemistry processes refer to the chemical reactions, pathways, and mechanisms that involve organic compounds. These are primarily made up of carbon atoms bonded to hydrogen atoms, often along with other elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, halogens, phosphorus, and silicon. Organic chemistry processes can include various types of reactions, such as substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangement reactions, which may occur under mild conditions and can be influenced by factors like temperature, pressure, catalysts, and solvents.

These processes are essential in understanding the behavior and transformation of natural and synthetic organic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, polymers, dyes, and materials with unique properties. They form the basis for various industrial applications and scientific research in fields such as medicinal chemistry, biochemistry, materials science, and environmental studies.

Boranes are a group of chemical compounds that contain only boron and hydrogen. The most well-known borane is BH3, also known as diborane. These compounds are highly reactive and have unusual structures, with the boron atoms bonded to each other in three-center, two-electron bonds. Boranes are used in research and industrial applications, including as reducing agents and catalysts. They are highly flammable and toxic, so they must be handled with care.

Volatilization, in the context of pharmacology and medicine, refers to the process by which a substance (usually a medication or drug) transforms into a vapor state at room temperature or upon heating. This change in physical state allows the substance to evaporate and be transferred into the air, potentially leading to inhalation exposure.

In some medical applications, volatilization is used intentionally, such as with essential oils for aromatherapy or topical treatments that utilize a vapor action. However, it can also pose concerns when volatile substances are unintentionally released into the air, potentially leading to indoor air quality issues or exposure risks.

It's important to note that in clinical settings, volatilization is not typically used as a route of administration for medications, as other methods such as oral, intravenous, or inhalation via nebulizers are more common and controlled.

In the field of organic chemistry, imines are a class of compounds that contain a functional group with the general structure =CR-NR', where C=R and R' can be either alkyl or aryl groups. Imines are also commonly referred to as Schiff bases. They are formed by the condensation of an aldehyde or ketone with a primary amine, resulting in the loss of a molecule of water.

It is important to note that imines do not have a direct medical application, but they can be used as intermediates in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals and bioactive compounds. Additionally, some imines have been found to exhibit biological activity, such as antimicrobial or anticancer properties. However, these are areas of ongoing research and development.

Combinatorial chemistry techniques are a group of methods used in the field of chemistry to synthesize and optimize large libraries of chemical compounds in a rapid and efficient manner. These techniques involve the systematic combination of different building blocks, or reagents, in various arrangements to generate a diverse array of molecules. This approach allows chemists to quickly explore a wide chemical space and identify potential lead compounds for drug discovery, materials science, and other applications.

There are several common combinatorial chemistry techniques, including:

1. **Split-Pool Synthesis:** In this method, a large collection of starting materials is divided into smaller groups, and each group undergoes a series of chemical reactions with different reagents. The resulting products from each group are then pooled together and redistributed for additional rounds of reactions. This process creates a vast number of unique compounds through the iterative combination of building blocks.
2. **Parallel Synthesis:** In parallel synthesis, multiple reactions are carried out simultaneously in separate reaction vessels. Each vessel contains a distinct set of starting materials and reagents, allowing for the efficient generation of a series of related compounds. This method is particularly useful when exploring structure-activity relationships (SAR) or optimizing lead compounds.
3. **Encoded Libraries:** To facilitate the rapid identification of active compounds within large libraries, encoded library techniques incorporate unique tags or barcodes into each molecule. These tags allow for the simultaneous synthesis and screening of compounds, as the identity of an active compound can be determined by decoding its corresponding tag.
4. **DNA-Encoded Libraries (DELs):** DELs are a specific type of encoded library that uses DNA molecules to encode and track chemical compounds. In this approach, each unique compound is linked to a distinct DNA sequence, enabling the rapid identification of active compounds through DNA sequencing techniques.
5. **Solid-Phase Synthesis:** This technique involves the attachment of starting materials to a solid support, such as beads or resins, allowing for the stepwise addition of reagents and building blocks. The solid support facilitates easy separation, purification, and screening of compounds, making it an ideal method for combinatorial chemistry applications.

Combinatorial chemistry techniques have revolutionized drug discovery and development by enabling the rapid synthesis, screening, and optimization of large libraries of chemical compounds. These methods continue to play a crucial role in modern medicinal chemistry and materials science research.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lewis acids" is actually a term from the field of chemistry rather than medicine. It was named after Gilbert N. Lewis, who proposed the concept in 1923. A Lewis acid is defined as an electron-pair acceptor in a chemical reaction. In simpler terms, it's a molecule or ion that can accept a pair of electrons from another molecule or ion to form a covalent bond. Common examples of Lewis acids include aluminum chloride (AlCl3), boron trifluoride (BF3), and iron(III) chloride (FeCl3).

Amination is a chemical process or reaction that involves the addition of an amino group (-NH2) to a molecule. This process is often used in organic chemistry to create amines, which are compounds containing a basic nitrogen atom with a lone pair of electrons.

In the context of biochemistry, amination reactions play a crucial role in the synthesis of various biological molecules, including amino acids, neurotransmitters, and nucleotides. For example, the enzyme glutamine synthetase catalyzes the amination of glutamate to form glutamine, an essential amino acid for many organisms.

It is important to note that there are different types of amination reactions, depending on the starting molecule and the specific amino group donor. The precise mechanism and reagents used in an amination reaction will depend on the particular chemical or biological context.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lignin" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of biology and chemistry, particularly in botany and wood science. Lignin is a complex organic polymer that binds cellulose fibers together, providing strength and rigidity to the cell walls of plants. It is a major component of wood and bark.

If you have any medical terms you would like defined or any other questions, please let me know!

Amino alcohols are organic compounds containing both amine and hydroxyl (alcohol) functional groups. They have the general structure R-NH-OH, where R represents a carbon-containing group. Amino alcohols can be primary, secondary, or tertiary, depending on the number of alkyl or aryl groups attached to the nitrogen atom.

These compounds are important in many chemical and biological processes. For example, some amino alcohols serve as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, dyes, and polymers. In biochemistry, certain amino alcohols function as neurotransmitters or components of lipids.

Some common examples of amino alcohols include:

* Ethanolamine (monoethanolamine, MEA): a primary amino alcohol used in the production of detergents, emulsifiers, and pharmaceuticals
* Serinol: a primary amino alcohol that occurs naturally in some foods and is used as a flavoring agent
* Choline: a quaternary ammonium compound with a hydroxyl group, essential for human nutrition and found in various foods such as eggs, liver, and peanuts
* Trimethylamine (TMA): a tertiary amino alcohol that occurs naturally in some marine animals and is responsible for the "fishy" odor of their flesh.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pyruvaldehyde" is not a recognized term in medical or clinical sciences. It is, however, a chemical compound with the formula CH3COCHO, which is sometimes used in laboratory research. It might be referred to in the context of biochemistry or pathophysiology of certain diseases, but it's not a term commonly used in medical diagnosis or treatment. Always consult with a healthcare professional or trusted medical source for information related to health and medicine.

Benzyl alcohol is an aromatic alcohol with the chemical formula C6H5CH2OH. It is a colorless liquid with a mild, pleasant odor and is used as a solvent and preservative in cosmetics, medications, and other products. Benzyl alcohol can also be found as a natural component of some essential oils, fruits, and teas.

Benzyl alcohol is not typically considered a "drug" or a medication, but it may have various pharmacological effects when used in certain medical contexts. For example, it has antimicrobial properties and is sometimes used as a preservative in injectable medications to prevent the growth of bacteria and fungi. It can also be used as a local anesthetic or analgesic in some topical creams and ointments.

It's important to note that benzyl alcohol can be harmful or fatal to infants and young children, especially when it is used in high concentrations or when it is introduced into the body through intravenous (IV) routes. Therefore, it should be used with caution in these populations and only under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

I'd be happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. Mitochondria are organelles found in the cells of all complex living organisms, including humans, while the liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen. They don't have a medical definition together. I can certainly provide you with separate definitions for each:

1. Mitochondria: These are double-membrane-bound cellular organelles that generate most of the chemical energy needed to power the cell's biochemical reactions. Commonly known as the "powerhouse of the cell," mitochondria convert organic substrates, such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids, into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria are dynamic structures that can change their shape, size, and number through fission (division) and fusion (merging) processes. They play essential roles in various cellular functions, including calcium signaling, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and the regulation of cellular metabolism.

2. Liver: The liver is a large, lobulated organ that lies mainly in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity, just below the diaphragm. It plays a crucial role in various physiological functions, such as detoxification, protein synthesis, metabolism, and nutrient storage. The liver is responsible for removing toxins from the bloodstream, producing bile to aid in digestion, regulating glucose levels, synthesizing plasma proteins, and storing glycogen, vitamins, and minerals. It also contributes to the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids, helping maintain energy homeostasis in the body.

I hope this clarifies any confusion! If you have any further questions or need more information, please don't hesitate to ask.

Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique used to identify and quantify the chemical components of a mixture or compound. It works by ionizing the sample, generating charged molecules or fragments, and then measuring their mass-to-charge ratio in a vacuum. The resulting mass spectrum provides information about the molecular weight and structure of the analytes, allowing for identification and characterization.

In simpler terms, mass spectrometry is a method used to determine what chemicals are present in a sample and in what quantities, by converting the chemicals into ions, measuring their masses, and generating a spectrum that shows the relative abundances of each ion type.

I believe you may be asking for a medical explanation or examples of substances that are referred to as "waxes." Waxes are not a specific medical term, but they can refer to various natural or synthetic esters that are insoluble in water and have a soft, waxy consistency. In a medical context, the term "waxes" might refer to:

1. Cerumen (Earwax): A yellowish waxy substance produced by glands in the ear canal. Cerumen helps protect the ear by trapping dirt, dust, and other particles and preventing them from entering the inner ear.
2. Sebaceous Waxes: These are esters found in sebum, an oily substance produced by sebaceous glands in the skin. Sebum helps keep the skin and hair moisturized and protected.
3. Cutaneous Waxes: These are lipid-rich substances secreted by specialized sweat glands called eccrine glands. They help to waterproof and protect the skin.
4. Histological Waxes: Paraffin or other waxes used in histology for tissue processing, embedding, and microtomy to prepare thin sections of tissues for examination under a microscope.

These are some examples of substances that can be referred to as "waxes" in a medical context.

I believe there might be a misunderstanding in your question. "Glutaral" does not seem to be a recognized medical term or abbreviation in healthcare and biomedical sciences. It is possible that you may be looking for information on "glutaraldehyde," which is a disinfectant and sterilizing agent used in medical settings.

Glutaraldehyde is a chemical compound with the formula C5H8O2, and it's often used as a 2% solution. It's an effective agent against bacteria, viruses, and fungi, making it useful for sterilizing medical equipment. However, glutaraldehyde can cause respiratory issues and skin irritation in some individuals, so proper handling and use are essential to minimize exposure.

If you meant to ask about a different term or if this answer does not address your question, please provide more context or clarify your request, and I will be happy to help further.

Formaldehyde is a colorless, pungent, and volatile chemical compound with the formula CH2O. It is a naturally occurring substance that is found in certain fruits like apples and vegetables, as well as in animals. However, the majority of formaldehyde used in industry is synthetically produced.

In the medical field, formaldehyde is commonly used as a preservative for biological specimens such as organs, tissues, and cells. It works by killing bacteria and inhibiting the decaying process. Formaldehyde is also used in the production of various industrial products, including adhesives, resins, textiles, and paper products.

However, formaldehyde can be harmful to human health if inhaled or ingested in large quantities. It can cause irritation to the eyes, nose, throat, and skin, and prolonged exposure has been linked to respiratory problems and cancer. Therefore, it is essential to handle formaldehyde with care and use appropriate safety measures when working with this chemical compound.

A Schiff base is not a medical term per se, but rather a chemical concept that can be relevant in various scientific and medical fields. A Schiff base is a chemical compound that contains a carbon-nitrogen double bond with the nitrogen atom connected to an aryl or alkyl group, excluding hydrogen. This structure is also known as an azomethine.

The general formula for a Schiff base is R1R2C=NR3, where R1 and R2 are organic groups (aryl or alkyl), and R3 is a hydrogen atom or an organic group. These compounds can be synthesized by the condensation of a primary amine with a carbonyl compound, such as an aldehyde or ketone.

Schiff bases have been studied in various medical and biological contexts due to their potential bioactivities. Some Schiff bases exhibit antimicrobial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. They can also serve as ligands for metal ions, forming complexes with potential applications in medicinal chemistry, such as in the development of new drugs or diagnostic agents.

Retinaldehyde, also known as retinal, is a form of vitamin A that is essential for vision. It is the aldehyde form of retinol (vitamin A alcohol) and is involved in the visual cycle, where it plays a crucial role in the process of converting light into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

When light hits the retina, it activates a protein called rhodopsin, which contains retinaldehyde as one of its components. This activation causes a chemical change in retinaldehyde, leading to the generation of an electrical signal that is transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve.

Retinaldehyde is also involved in other physiological processes, including the regulation of gene expression and cell growth and differentiation. It can be synthesized in the body from beta-carotene, a pigment found in fruits and vegetables, or obtained directly from animal sources such as liver, fish liver oil, and dairy products.

Biotransformation is the metabolic modification of a chemical compound, typically a xenobiotic (a foreign chemical substance found within an living organism), by a biological system. This process often involves enzymatic conversion of the parent compound to one or more metabolites, which may be more or less active, toxic, or mutagenic than the original substance.

In the context of pharmacology and toxicology, biotransformation is an important aspect of drug metabolism and elimination from the body. The liver is the primary site of biotransformation, but other organs such as the kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract can also play a role.

Biotransformation can occur in two phases: phase I reactions involve functionalization of the parent compound through oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis, while phase II reactions involve conjugation of the metabolite with endogenous molecules such as glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetate to increase its water solubility and facilitate excretion.

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Phenolic aldehydes are derivatives of phenol. Phenolic aldehydes can be found in wines and cognacs. Examples : ... doi:10.1002/14356007.a03_463 Determination of Phenolic Aldehydes in Cognacs and Wines by Capillary Electrophoresis: New Cognac ... Hydroxybenzaldehydes Protocatechuic aldehyde Vanillin and isovanillin 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzaldehyde can be isolated from ... 1014914701477 Health-Beneficial Phenolic Aldehyde in Antigonon leptopus Tea. Vanisree Mulabagal, Ruby L. Alexander-Lindo, David ...
... is a phenolic aldehyde, a compound released from cork stoppers into wine. This molecule can be used as ... Protocatechuic aldehyde regulates G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER-1) and exhibits protective effects in endothelial ... Rao SR, Ravishankar GA (January 2000). "Biotransformation of protocatechuic aldehyde and caffeic acid to vanillin and capsaicin ... "G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 is involved in the protective effect of protocatechuic aldehyde against endothelial ...
... coniferyl aldehyde is a precursor to sinapaldehyde via hydroxylation mediated by coniferyl aldehyde 5-hydroxylase. Coniferyl ... Coniferyl aldehyde is an organic compound with the formula HO(CH3O)C6H3CH=CHCHO. It is a derivative of cinnamaldehyde, ... "Coniferyl aldehyde 5-hydroxylation and methylation direct syringyl lignin biosynthesis in angiosperms". Proceedings of the ... Conjugated aldehydes, Vinylogous carboxylic acids, All stub articles, Aromatic compound stubs). ...
Zincke aldehydes, or 5-aminopenta-2,4-dienals, are the product of the reaction of a pyridinium salt with two equivalents of any ... Tryptamine-derived Zincke aldehydes are heated with strong base to give the rearranged enal as shown below. This reaction was ... One drawback of the Zincke Aldehyde synthesis is the need for 2 equivalents of the amine in the initial pyridine ring opening ... Also in 2009, the first reports of Zincke aldehydes undergoing a Pictet-Spengler reaction appeared from the group of Christian ...
Fatty aldehydes are aliphatic, long-chain aldehydes which may be mono- or polyunsaturated. The fatty aldehydes include ... Fat aldehydes were also detected in the heart muscle of mammals. Fatty aldehydes can be prepared by dehydrogenation of fatty ... Many fatty aldehydes find use as a fragrance in perfume production. An example is 2-methylundecanal which is the typical odor ... Fatty aldehydes are a natural component of many natural ingredients such as the essential oils of various citrus fruits. ...
... , also known as tetradecanal, is a reduced form of myristic acid. It is naturally produced by bioluminescent ...
... is a fragrance molecule which has been used in soaps, detergents, lotions, and perfumes since the 1920s. It ... Cyclamen aldehyde is not naturally occurring and is prepared by the crossed-aldol condensation of cuminaldehyde and ... The Council of Europe (1970) included cyclamen aldehyde in the list of admissible artificial flavoring substances, at a level ...
Limitations of aldehydes and ketones as chemical reporters include: Competition with endogenous aldehydes or ketones in ... This compound is very reactive and easily hydrolyzed, releasing the aldehyde and a molecule of H2S, The aldehyde tag is a ... demonstrate the application of the aldehyde tag as a chemical conjugation site for glycans. The aldehyde tag sequence was ... including methods like stop codon suppression and aldehyde tagging. Limiting the use of aldehydes and ketones is their ...
... is a phenolic aldehyde contained in the seeds of Phytolacca americana (American pokeweed). Caffeic acid ... Conjugated aldehydes, Catechols, Vinylogous carboxylic acids, All stub articles, Aromatic compound stubs). ... Caffeyl alcohol Woo, Won-Sick; Kang, Sam-Sik (1979). "A New Phenolic Aldehyde from the Seeds of Phytolacca americana". Korean ...
... is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of the plant hormone abscisic acid. It is produced by the ... Ram K. Sindhu, David H. Griffin and Daniel C. Walton (1990). "Abscisic Aldehyde Is an Intermediate in the Enzymatic Conversion ... "Abscisic aldehyde oxidase in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana". The Plant Journal. 23 (4): 481-488. doi:10.1046/j.1365-313x. ... "The Short-Chain Alcohol Dehydrogenase ABA2 Catalyzes the Conversion of Xanthoxin to Abscisic Aldehyde". The Plant Cell Online. ...
... s (EC 1.2.1.3) are a group of enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of aldehydes. They convert aldehydes (R ... Aldehyde dehydrogenase is a polymorphic enzyme responsible for the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids. There are three ... The active site of a human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2. Cys302 and Glu268 interact with the aldehyde substrate. The ... Marchitti SA, Brocker C, Stagos D, Vasiliou V (June 2008). "Non-P450 aldehyde oxidizing enzymes: the aldehyde dehydrogenase ...
AO catalyzes the conversion of an aldehyde in the presence of oxygen and water to an acid and hydrogen peroxide. an aldehyde + ... Aldehyde oxidase is very concentrated in the liver, where it oxidizes multiple aldehydes and nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds ... Aldehyde oxidase is a member of the molybdenum flavoprotein family and has a very complex evolutionary profile-as the genes of ... Aldehyde oxidase is thought to have a significant impact on pharmacokinetics. AO is capable of oxidizing many drugs in the ...
T. rotula has been known to produce many types of polyunsaturated aldehydes, including (2E,4E/Z)-hepta-2,4-dienal, (2E,4E/Z,7Z ... Polyunsaturated aldehydes are oxylipins that are formed from lipids (specifically the fatty acid portion of lipids) when ... Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are a group of allelopathic chemicals typically associated with diatom-copepod predator-prey ... These particular aldehydes are also produced by Stephanopyxis turris and Skeletonema costatum in response to wounding. ...
... has been widely used in total synthesis of natural product. For example, the ... Asymmetric addition of alkenylmetals to aldehydes is a chemical reaction in enantioselective synthesis that reacts an ... After transmetalation with diethylzinc, the generated alkenylzinc reagent (C) further reacted with the aldehyde (D) through ... alkenylmetal with an aldehyde to give an allyl alcohol (Figure "Asymmetric addition of alkenylmetals to aldehydes"). The ...
In enzymology, a betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.8) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction betaine aldehyde ... Other names in common use include betaine aldehyde oxidase, BADH, betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, and BetB. This enzyme ... ROTHSCHILD HA, BARRON ES (1954). "The oxidation of betaine aldehyde by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase". J. Biol. Chem. 209 (2 ... This enzyme belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, specifically those acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donor with NAD+ ...
... , a named reaction in chemistry, was invented by Henry Stephen (OBE/MBE). This reaction involves the ... 1925). "A new synthesis of aldehydes". J. Chem. Soc., Trans. 127: 1874-1877. doi:10.1039/CT9252701874. Wang, Zerong (2009). ... from which an aldehyde (7) is formed. Substitutes that increase the electron density promote the formation of the aldimine-tin ... "Über eine neue Methode zur Umwandlung von Carbonsäuren in Aldehyde" [About a new method for converting carboxylic acids into ...
NAD-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase, NAD-linked aldehyde dehydrogenase, propionaldehyde dehydrogenase, and aldehyde ... In enzymology, an aldehyde dehydrogenase (NAD+) (EC 1.2.1.3) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction an aldehyde + ... Other names in common use include CoA-independent aldehyde dehydrogenase, m-methylbenzaldehyde dehydrogenase, NAD-aldehyde ... This enzyme belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, specifically those acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donor with NAD+ ...
Aldehyde dehydrogenase may also refer to: Aldehyde dehydrogenase (FAD-independent) Aldehyde dehydrogenase (NAD(P)+) Aldehyde ... Aldehyde dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that catalyse the oxidation of aldehydes. ... Aldehyde dehydrogenase (pyrroloquinoline-quinone) All pages with titles containing Aldehyde dehydrogenase This disambiguation ... page lists articles associated with the title Aldehyde dehydrogenase. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change ...
Betaine aldehyde is a substrate for choline dehydrogenase (mitochondrial). Glycine betaine aldehyde is a short chain aldehyde ... Glycine betaine aldehyde, often simply called betaine aldehyde, is an intermediate in the metabolism of glycine, serine and ... The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) stimulates the transformation of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine. ... Glycine betaine aldehyde is a component of glycine, serine and threonine metabolism. It also serves as an osmolyte. It can be ...
n-aldehyde + O2 + 2 NADPH + H+ → (n-1)-alkane + formate + H2O + 2 NADP+ Aldehyde deformylating oxygenases are found in ... Compared to other aldehyde decarbonylases, such as insect or plant aldehyde decarbonylase, cyanobacterial ADO is unusual in ... Short-chain aldehydes are also observed to be substrate inhibitors. Buer BC, Paul B, Das D, Stuckey JA, Marsh EN (November 2014 ... Aldehyde deformylating oxygenases (ADO) (EC 4.1.99.5) are a family of enzymes which catalyze the oxygenation of medium and long ...
This enzyme belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, specifically those acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donor with NAD+ ... The systematic name of this enzyme class is coniferyl aldehyde:NAD(P)+ oxidoreductase. Achterholt S, Priefert H, Steinbuchel A ... In enzymology, a coniferyl-aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.68) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction coniferyl ... 2 H+ The 4 substrates of this enzyme are coniferyl aldehyde, H2O, NAD+, and NADP+, whereas its 4 products are ferulate, NADH, ...
... which is in equilibrium with the Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde (6). The Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde reverts to strychnine in a single ... that should correctly be called Wieland-Kaziro aldehyde, but became known and accepted as Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde...") F. A. L ... The Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde has been used in the industrial synthesis of alcuronium chloride (Alloferin) via dimerization. ... The so-called Wieland-Gumlich aldehyde (6) is an indoline derived by chemical degradation from strychnine. This compound is of ...
The Grundmann aldehyde synthesis is a chemical reaction that produces an aldehyde from an acyl halide. Because of the Rosenmund ...
In enzymology, an aldehyde dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.2.1.4) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction an aldehyde + ... Other names in common use include NADP+-acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, NADP+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase, and aldehyde ... This enzyme belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, specifically those acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donor with NAD+ ... Adachi O, Matsushita K, Shinagawa E, Ameyama M (1980). "Crystallization and properties of NADP-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase ...
In enzymology, an aryl-aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.9) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction an aromatic aldehyde + ... This enzyme belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, specifically those acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donor with ... The systematic name of this enzyme class is aryl-aldehyde:oxygen oxidoreductase. Crawford DL, Sutherland JB, Pometto AL, Miller ... H2O2 The 3 substrates of this enzyme are aromatic aldehyde, O2, and H2O, whereas its two products are aromatic carboxylic acid ...
In enzymology, an abscisic-aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.14) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction abscisic aldehyde ... Seo M, Koiwai H, Akaba S, Komano T, Oritani T, Kamiya Y, Koshiba T (2000). "Abscisic aldehyde oxidase in leaves of Arabidopsis ... This enzyme belongs to the family of oxidoreductases, specifically those acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donor with ... Sagi M, Fluhr R, Lips SH (1999). "Aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase in a flacca tomato mutant with deficient abscisic ...
... (RASP), also known as reactive aldehydes, refer to a class of electrophilic organic aldehyde ... RASP are metabolized by aldehyde dehydrogenases or aldehyde reductases. Due to the toxicity of RASP, only a small number of ... Wood, Paul L.; Khan, M. Amin; Moskal, Joseph R. (2007-05-11). "The concept of "aldehyde load" in neurodegenerative mechanisms: ... Fritz, Kristofer S.; Petersen, Dennis R. (2013-06-01). "An overview of the chemistry and biology of reactive aldehydes". Free ...
... is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the AOX1 gene. Aldehyde oxidase produces hydrogen peroxide and, ... "Entrez Gene: aldehyde oxidase 1". Berger R, Mezey E, Clancy KP, Harta G, Wright RM, Repine JE, Brown RH, Brownstein M, ... 2007). "Human aldehyde oxidase 1 interacts with ATP-binding cassette transporter-1 and modulates its activity in hepatocytes". ... Aldehyde oxidase is a candidate gene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. MOCOS GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ENSG00000138356 - ...
The Bouveault aldehyde synthesis (also known as the Bouveault reaction) is a one-pot substitution reaction that replaces an ... The Bouveault aldehyde synthesis is an example of a formylation reaction, and is named for French scientist Louis Bouveault. ... The first step of the Bouveault aldehyde synthesis is the formation of the Grignard reagent. Upon addition of a N,N- ... Bodroux-Chichibabin aldehyde synthesis Bouveault-Blanc reduction Duff reaction Louis Bouveault (1904). "Modes de formation et ...
... the aldehyde may be named by replacing the suffix -ic acid or -oic acid in this trivial name by -aldehyde. The word aldehyde ... Some aldehydes are substrates for aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes which metabolize aldehydes in the body. There are toxicities ... The aldehyde group is somewhat polar. The C=O bond length is about 120-122 picometers. Aldehydes have properties that are ... Aldehydes are a common motif in many chemicals important in technology and biology. Aldehyde molecules have a central carbon ...
Complete a MNG Neurochemistry and Metabolic Test requisition and submit with specimen frozen Monday-Friday, OK for Saturday delivery.. ...
Enantioselective addition of anthrones to ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes. The first examples of enantioselective addition of ... The first examples of enantioselective addition of anthrones to ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes are disclosed. The reaction was ... unsaturated aldehydes. Tetrahedron Letters, 50 (25), 3067-3069. (doi:10.1016/j.tetlet.2009.04.037). ... anthrones to ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes are disclosed. The reaction was performed at ?40 °C achieving high yields and ...
Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitors. Class Summary. Disulfiram inhibits aldehyde dehydrogenase, and, as a result, acetaldehyde ...
View & Buy from our full range of Fluorinated Aldehydes , Apollo Scientific ... Fluorinated Aldehydes. Apollo offers a wide selection of Fluorinated Aldehydes for your R&D needs, with many products unique to ... Fluorinated Aldehydes Manufacture, Bulk Supply & Global Distributors. ...
We demonstrate the applicability of this method as a one-pot conversion of aldehydes to esters for a broad range of aldehyde ... We demonstrate the applicability of this method as a one-pot conversion of aldehydes to esters for a broad range of aldehyde ... Organocatalyzed Anodic Oxidation of Aldehydes. A method for the catalytic formation of electroauxiliaries and subsequent anodic ...
Aldehydes (Low-Molecular-Weight). Exposure to acetaldehyde has produced nasal tumors in rats and laryngeal tumors in hamsters, ... Therefore, NIOSH recommends that careful consideration should be given to reducing exposures to these nine related aldehydes. ... and Mutagenicity of Related Low-Molecular-Weight Aldehydes" [DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 91-112.] ...
Chemical description Urea Aldehyde resin Forms pastilles Solubility in water ... Home / Restoration / 67205 Laropal A101 Aldehyde varnish resin. Kremer 100g plastic container. ...
WTALD2YR - Two Year Aldehyde Subsample Weights Variable Name: WTALD2YR. SAS Label: Two Year Aldehyde Subsample Weights English ... Aldehydes are potentially carcinogenic and mutagenic; therefore, exposure to aldehydes has raised concerns about adverse health ... Free aldehydes are captured by the SPME fiber; desorbed into the heated GC injector; and extracted aldehydes are focused at the ... Two Year Aldehyde Subsample Weights Target: Both males and females 12 YEARS - 150 YEARS. Code or Value. Value Description. ...
JoVE Core Organic Chemistry Chapter 20.28: Vicinal Diols via Reductive Coupling of Aldehydes or Ketones: Pinacol Coupling ... JoVE Core Organic Chemistry Chapter 12.7: Preparation of Aldehydes and Ketones from Alcohols, Alkenes, and Alkynes ... JoVE Core Organic Chemistry Chapter 12.8: Preparation of Aldehydes and Ketones from Nitriles and Carboxylic Acids ... JoVE Core Organic Chemistry Chapter 12.14: Acetals and Thioacetals as Protecting Groups for Aldehydes and Ketones ...
3. aldehyde-alcohol noun. an oily colorless liquid obtained by the condensation of two molecules of acetaldehyde; contains an ...
... aldehyde-ethers, aldehydephenols and aldehydes with other oxygen function :Vanillin (4-hydroxy-3methoxy benzaldehyde), under ... Aldehyde-alcohols, aldehyde-ethers, aldehydephenols and aldehydes with other oxygen function :Other : Anisic aldehyde ( ... Aldehyde-alcohols, aldehyde-ethers, aldehydephenols and aldehydes with other oxygen function : Other : Other : Aldehyde- ... Aldehyde-alcohols, aldehyde-ethers, aldehydephenols and aldehydes with other oxygen function :Vanillin (4-hydroxy-3methoxy ...
And finally, theres retinaldehyde or retinal aldehyde. Its very stable, Chang says, but its also the least potent retinoid ...
This database contains fatty acid methyl, ethyl and butyl esters; fatty acids up to C18; alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, alkanes ... This database contains fatty acid methyl, ethyl and butyl esters; fatty acids up to C18; alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, alkanes ... Chemical classes represented include acids, esters, ethers, alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aldehydes, amides, anhydrides, ...
HuanggangShi Chuxiong Chemical Co., Ltd. is a high-tech enterprise integrating basic chemical industry and fine chemical industry and relying on advanced technology. The company was founded in 2011 and is headquartered in Huanggang City, Hubei Province, covering an area of 40135 square meters.
HuanggangShi Chuxiong Chemical Co., Ltd. is a high-tech enterprise integrating basic chemical industry and fine chemical industry and relying on advanced technology. The company was founded in 2011 and is headquartered in Huanggang City, Hubei Province, covering an area of 40135 square meters.
Aldehyde acrylique; Aldeide acrilica; Aqualine; Crolean; Ethylene aldehyde; Magnacide H; Propylene aldehyde; Slimicide; ... Other names: Acrolein; Acrylaldehyde; Acrylic Aldehyde; Allyl aldehyde; Aqualin; NSC 8819; Prop-2-En-1-al; Propenal; 2-Propen-1 ...
The latest research report published by Fact.MR on the Survey of Disinfectant Spray Market is intended to offer reliable data on various key factors shaping the growth curve & outlook of Disinfectant Spray market. This report works as a rich source of information for key entities such as policy makers, end-use industries, investors, and opinion leaders.. The Demand analysis of Disinfectant Spray Market offers a comprehensive analysis of diverse features, demand, product developments, revenue generation, and sales of Disinfectant Spray Market across the globe.. Click Here To get a Sample Report (Including Full TOC, Table & Figures):-https://www.factmr.com/connectus/sample?flag=S&rep_id=4704. A comprehensive estimate of the Disinfectant Spray market has been provided through an optimistic scenario as well as a conservative scenario, taking into account the Sales of Disinfectant Spray during the forecast period. Price point comparison by region with the global average price is also considered in ...
Aldehydes,. *Metals,. *Uncombusted hydrocarbons,. *Isocyanates, and. *Others [Leikauf et al. 1995].. In some communities, ...
Information on Registered Substances comes from registration dossiers which have been assigned a registration number. The assignment of a registration number does however not guarantee that the information in the dossier is correct or that the dossier is compliant with Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 (the REACH Regulation). This information has not been reviewed or verified by the Agency or any other authority. The content is subject to change without prior notice ...
aldehyde dehydrogenase 5 family, member A1. *aldehyde dehydrogenase 5 family, member A1 (succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase) ...
It is a potent and selective scavenger of unsaturated aldehydes [11]. Likewise, vitamin E is a chain-breaking antioxidant, ...
Aldehydes. See other substances:. *1-ethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline *ethyl 2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1-benzofuran-3-carboxylate ...
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase as a Marker for Chemically Initiated Mouse Liver Tumors.. 1986. ...
Aldehyde detection in electronic cigarette aerosols. ACS Omega 2:1207-14 [Google Scholar] ... Aldehyde detection in electronic cigarette aerosols. ACS Omega 2:1207-14 [Google Scholar] ...
decanal (aldehyde C-10). FL/FR. dodecanal (aldehyde C-12 lauric). FL/FR. ...
aromatic -aldehyde. the word "aromatic" but NOT "aldehyde". "aromatic aldehyde". the exact phrase "aromatic aldehyde". ... aromatic +aldehyde. both words "aromatic" AND "aldehyde". + ... aromatic aldehyde. the word "aromatic" OR "aldehyde". + ...
aromatic -aldehyde. the word "aromatic" but NOT "aldehyde". "aromatic aldehyde". the exact phrase "aromatic aldehyde". ... aromatic +aldehyde. both words "aromatic" AND "aldehyde". + ... aromatic aldehyde. the word "aromatic" OR "aldehyde". + ...
Choose the conformation in each pair that is most stable. If both are equally stable, then write no difference.(a) <IMAGE>
The majority of volatile compounds detected were acids, alcohols, and aldehydes. The concentrations of hexanal, hexanol, E-2- ... The majority of volatile compounds detected were acids, alcohols, and aldehydes. The concentrations of hexanal, hexanol, E-2- ... The majority of volatile compounds detected were acids, alcohols, and aldehydes. The concentrations of hexanal, hexanol, E-2- ...
  • For detailed information about coniferyl-aldehyde dehydrogenase, go to the full flat file . (brenda-enzymes.org)
  • In most of us, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) quickly metabolizes acetaldehyde to the inert acetate, which can be safely excreted. (medscape.com)
  • The researchers focused in on the aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and conducted a screening study. (medscape.com)
  • [ 3 ] Subsequent studies identified a defect in fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH), a component of the fatty alcohol:NAD oxidoreductase enzyme complex. (medscape.com)
  • An aldehyde dehydrogenase expressed in the mitochondrial matrix that is essential for the metabolism of ETHANOL. (bvsalud.org)
  • The 13C NMR spectra of aldehydes and ketones gives a suppressed (weak) but distinctive signal at δC 190 to 205. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aldehydes are different from ketones because the formyl group is at the end of the molecule in an aldehyde. (wikipedia.org)
  • Catalytic efficiency declined after switching from ketones to aldehydes. (unimore.it)
  • A Re(I) complex of 3,3′-diamino-2,2′-bipyridine reacts irreversibly with aldehydes and unhindered ketones in water to form bis-aminal cyclised derivatives with the solid-state structure of the reaction with benzaldehyde reported. (hud.ac.uk)
  • We show that PLA breakdown products are oxidized and may contain aldehydes and/or ketones. (lu.se)
  • Smaller aldehydes are more soluble in water, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde completely so. (wikipedia.org)
  • [5] In the past, aldehydes were sometimes named after the corresponding alcohols , for example, vinous aldehyde for acetaldehyde . (wikipedia.org)
  • Two of the most important aldehydes, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, tend to form long chains. (wikipedia.org)
  • Further information can be found in the "NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 55: Carcinogenicity of Acetaldehyde and Malonaldehyde, and Mutagenicity of Related Low-Molecular-Weight Aldehydes" [DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 91-112. (cdc.gov)
  • Aldehydes are highly reactive and participate in many reactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reactive aldehydes are common carcinogens. (ox.ac.uk)
  • 10 December 2020 - Acrolein and crotonaldehyde are reactive aldehydes that are produced in high volumes and used in the manufacture of numerous chemical products such as herbicides in recirculating water systems, pharmaceuticals, rubber, chemicals, leather, and food and agriculture. (who.int)
  • Of all aldehydes, formaldehyde is produced the most. (wikipedia.org)
  • In organic chemistry, an aldehyde (/ˈældɪhaɪd/) is an organic compound containing a functional group with the structure R−CH=O. The functional group itself (without the "R" side chain) can be referred to as an aldehyde but can also be classified as a formyl group. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aldehyde group (or formyl group) is colored red. (wikipedia.org)
  • Possibly because of the high reactivity of the formyl group, aldehydes are not common in several of the natural building blocks: amino acids, nucleic acids, lipids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The group without the side chain is called the aldehyde group or formyl group . (wikipedia.org)
  • Personal breathing zone air samples were collected during cutting procedures conducted with either a cutting torch or a cut off saw, and analyzed for total particulates, metals, oxides of nitrogen, aldehydes, 4,4-methylene-dianiline (101779), volatile organic compounds and carbon-monoxide (630080). (cdc.gov)
  • CH3CH2CH2CHO}}} Aldehydes are commonly generated by alcohol oxidation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dietary haem iron catalyses lipid oxidation, leading to the production of alpha-beta unsaturated aldehydes (alkenals), such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) from n-6 fatty acids [ 9 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To establish a practical model for evaluating the oxidation of frying oil using aldehydes , the aldehydes of 10 commercial oils during frying at 180 °C were identified using headspace- gas chromatography / mass spectrometry , and the changes of common aldehydes and their correlation with carbonyl values (CV) were analyzed. (bvsalud.org)
  • The genetic defect in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome results in deficient activity of FALDH, which catalyzes the oxidation of fatty aldehyde to fatty acid. (medscape.com)
  • The aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are key enzymes which play a vital role in many growth and developmental processes. (scientificasia.org)
  • Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) is a protective proteins which plays a significant role in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes in order to cope up with the cellular damage of aldehydes and mitigate oxidative stress in plants. (scientificasia.org)
  • The use of the commercially available trichloromethanesulfonyl chloride enables an efficient α-chlorination of aldehydes, including a catalytic asymmetric version, under very mild reaction conditions. (organic-chemistry.org)
  • The method reproducibly hydrolyzes aldehyde adducts covalently bound to proteins, using automation to individually incubate samples prior to analysis with hydrochloric acid (Yeo 2004). (cdc.gov)
  • Aldehydes have properties that are diverse and that depend on the remainder of the molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • A dialdehyde is a molecule with two aldehydes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Important aldehydes and related compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many fragrances (smell producing compounds) are aldehydes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In summary, this work provides theoretical support for using aldehyde as the quality evaluation index of frying oil and provides a new idea for evaluating oil deterioration from the perspective of volatile compounds. (bvsalud.org)
  • Most of the investigated compounds are semisynthetic derivatives prepared by the condensation of the natural product damsin (1) with aldehydes. (lu.se)
  • The volatile aldehydes have pungent odors. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this case, excess dichromate will further oxidize the aldehyde to a carboxylic acid, so either the aldehyde is distilled out as it forms (if volatile) or milder reagents such as PCC are used. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, in aqueous solution only a tiny fraction of glucose exists as the aldehyde. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the laboratory scale, α-hydroxy acids are used as precursors to prepare aldehydes via oxidative cleavage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aldehydes can be identified by spectroscopic methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • We demonstrate the applicability of this method as a one-pot conversion of aldehydes to esters for a broad range of aldehyde and alcohol substrates. (wisc.edu)
  • Never use photosensitizing Cinnamic Aldehyde before UV exposure. (silverlinechemicals.com)
  • therefore, exposure to aldehydes has raised concerns about adverse health effects in humans. (cdc.gov)
  • Fancd2 counteracts the toxic effects of naturally produced aldehydes in mice. (ox.ac.uk)
  • It has been reported that too much accumulation of aldehydes interfere with metabolites and become toxic. (scientificasia.org)
  • This method employs isotope dilution to quantify precisely trace amounts of aldehydes with limits of detection in the low parts per trillion range. (cdc.gov)
  • Most sugars, however, are derivatives of aldehydes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In biology, aldehydes are used to replace amine groups and form sugars. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aldehydes are a common motif in many chemicals important in technology and biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most potent derivatives formed from the condensation of 1 with aromatic aldehydes towards JIMT-1 cells are 3a and 3i, both with ratios between the IC50 values for MCF-10A and JIMT-1 cells close to 5. (lu.se)
  • Traces of many aldehydes are found in essential oils and often contribute to their favorable odours, e.g. cinnamaldehyde, cilantro, and vanillin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many aldehydes are found in essential oils and are the reason for their smells. (wikipedia.org)
  • This analytical method quantifies trace levels of 12 aldehydes from protein adducts in human serum. (cdc.gov)
  • Because aldehydes have the tendency to react with biological molecules to form various products, including Schiff base protein adducts, free aldehydes released into the headspace of biological samples from the Schiff base protein adducts at low pH (~3) are analyzed. (cdc.gov)
  • Another commonly made aldehyde is butyraldehyde . (wikipedia.org)
  • The results showed that the total peak area of aldehydes increased significantly with heating time , which was related to the fatty acid and tocopherol contents of the oils . (bvsalud.org)
  • Investigation of hazards to a train crew from diesel exhaust gases conducted through sampling of levels of carbon-monoxide (630080), nitrogen-dioxide (10102440), sulfur-dioxide (7446095) and aldehydes reveals low to nondetectable concentrations of these substances. (cdc.gov)
  • Catalysis of the reaction: an aldehyde + NAD+ + H2O = an acid + NADH + H+. (systemsbiology.net)
  • Haem iron from meat plays a role in the promotion of colorectal cancer in rodent models, in association with enhanced luminal lipoperoxidation and subsequent formation of aldehydes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Apollo offers a wide selection of Fluorinated Aldehydes for your R&D needs, with many products unique to Apollo. (apolloscientific.co.uk)
  • Trapping of luminal haem-induced aldehydes normalised cellular genotoxicity, permeability, and ROS formation on a colon epithelial cell line. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Silverline Chemicals have become a respectable entity to get Cinnamic Aldehyde In Cameroon . (silverlinechemicals.com)
  • Silverline Chemicals is one of the prominent Cinnamic Aldehyde Manufacturers in India that extract Cinnamic Aldehyde from different parts of the plant, including leaves, bark, flowers, twigs, and fruits, by the process of steam/hydro distillation. (silverlinechemicals.com)
  • The common names for aldehydes are not always the official names. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aldehyde molecules have a central carbon atom that is connected by a double bond to oxygen, a single bond to hydrogen and another single bond to a third substituent, which is carbon or, in the case of formaldehyde, hydrogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aldehydes have a carbon double bonded to an oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are several methods for preparing aldehydes, but the dominant technology is hydroformylation. (wikipedia.org)
  • This acidification of the α-hydrogen in aldehyde is attributed to: the electron-withdrawing quality of the formyl center and the fact that the conjugate base, an enolate anion, delocalizes its negative charge. (wikipedia.org)
  • An Evaluation Model for the Quality of Frying Oil Using Key Aldehyde Detected by HS-GC/MS. (bvsalud.org)
  • We present the X-ray crystal structure of PLpro in complex with ubiquitin-aldehyde and model the interaction of PLpro with other ubiquitin-chain and ISG15 substrates. (rcsb.org)
  • [6] " In industry, aldehydes are used to prepare plasticizers , polyols , and alcohols . (wikipedia.org)
  • Many aldehydes have strong smells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not quite as strong as most of the saturated aliphatic aldehydes, it is still best used in dilution. (mysticmomentsuk.com)