Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Alcohol Deterrents: Substances interfering with the metabolism of ethyl alcohol, causing unpleasant side effects thought to discourage the drinking of alcoholic beverages. Alcohol deterrents are used in the treatment of alcoholism.Temperance: Habitual moderation in the indulgence of a natural appetite, especially but not exclusively the consumption of alcohol.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts research focused on improving the treatment and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems to reduce the health, social, and economic consequences of this disease. NIAAA, NIMH, and NIDA were created as coequal institutes within the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration in 1974. It was established within the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH in 1992.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Central Nervous System Depressants: A very loosely defined group of drugs that tend to reduce the activity of the central nervous system. The major groups included here are ethyl alcohol, anesthetics, hypnotics and sedatives, narcotics, and tranquilizing agents (antipsychotics and antianxiety agents).Alcoholics: Persons who have a history of physical or psychological dependence on ETHANOL.Alcohol-Induced Disorders, Nervous System: Acute and chronic neurologic disorders associated with the various neurologic effects of ETHANOL. Primary sites of injury include the brain and peripheral nerves.Disulfiram: A carbamate derivative used as an alcohol deterrent. It is a relatively nontoxic substance when administered alone, but markedly alters the intermediary metabolism of alcohol. When alcohol is ingested after administration of disulfiram, blood acetaldehyde concentrations are increased, followed by flushing, systemic vasodilation, respiratory difficulties, nausea, hypotension, and other symptoms (acetaldehyde syndrome). It acts by inhibiting aldehyde dehydrogenase.Naltrexone: Derivative of noroxymorphone that is the N-cyclopropylmethyl congener of NALOXONE. It is a narcotic antagonist that is effective orally, longer lasting and more potent than naloxone, and has been proposed for the treatment of heroin addiction. The FDA has approved naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic: FIBROSIS of the hepatic parenchyma due to chronic excess ALCOHOL DRINKING.Event-Related Potentials, P300: A late-appearing component of the event-related potential. P300 stands for a positive deflection in the event-related voltage potential at 300 millisecond poststimulus. Its amplitude increases with unpredictable, unlikely, or highly significant stimuli and thereby constitutes an index of mental activity. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 6th ed)Alcoholics Anonymous: An organization of self-proclaimed alcoholics who meet frequently to reinforce their practice of abstinence.Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium: An acute organic mental disorder induced by cessation or reduction in chronic alcohol consumption. Clinical characteristics include CONFUSION; DELUSIONS; vivid HALLUCINATIONS; TREMOR; agitation; insomnia; and signs of autonomic hyperactivity (e.g., elevated blood pressure and heart rate, dilated pupils, and diaphoresis). This condition may occasionally be fatal. It was formerly called delirium tremens. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1175)Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Behavior, Addictive: The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency.Aldehyde Dehydrogenase: An enzyme that oxidizes an aldehyde in the presence of NAD+ and water to an acid and NADH. This enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.1.1.70.Alcohol Dehydrogenase: A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Physiological and psychological symptoms associated with withdrawal from the use of a drug after prolonged administration or habituation. The concept includes withdrawal from smoking or drinking, as well as withdrawal from an administered drug.Alcohol Amnestic Disorder: A mental disorder associated with chronic ethanol abuse (ALCOHOLISM) and nutritional deficiencies characterized by short term memory loss, confabulations, and disturbances of attention. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1139)Psychoses, Alcoholic: A group of mental disorders associated with organic brain damage and caused by poisoning from alcohol.Alcohol Withdrawal Seizures: A condition where seizures occur in association with ethanol abuse (ALCOHOLISM) without other identifiable causes. Seizures usually occur within the first 6-48 hours after the cessation of alcohol intake, but may occur during periods of alcohol intoxication. Single generalized tonic-clonic motor seizures are the most common subtype, however, STATUS EPILEPTICUS may occur. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1174)Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders stemming from the misuse and abuse of alcohol.Marital Therapy: A form of psychotherapy involving the husband and wife and directed to improving the marital relationship.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Liver Diseases, Alcoholic: Liver diseases associated with ALCOHOLISM. It usually refers to the coexistence of two or more subentities, i.e., ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER; ALCOHOLIC HEPATITIS; and ALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS.OklahomaSubstance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Acetaldehyde: A colorless, flammable liquid used in the manufacture of acetic acid, perfumes, and flavors. It is also an intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol. It has a general narcotic action and also causes irritation of mucous membranes. Large doses may cause death from respiratory paralysis.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Lipomatosis, Multiple Symmetrical: A condition characterized by the growth of unencapsulated masses of ADIPOSE TISSUE symmetrically deposited around the neck, shoulders, or other sites around the body.Family Health: The health status of the family as a unit including the impact of the health of one member of the family on the family as a unit and on individual family members; also, the impact of family organization or disorganization on the health status of its members.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Pellagra: A disease due to deficiency of NIACIN, a B-complex vitamin, or its precursor TRYPTOPHAN. It is characterized by scaly DERMATITIS which is often associated with DIARRHEA and DEMENTIA (the three D's).Narcotic Antagonists: Agents inhibiting the effect of narcotics on the central nervous system.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Taurine: A conditionally essential nutrient, important during mammalian development. It is present in milk but is isolated mostly from ox bile and strongly conjugates bile acids.MMPI: A personality inventory consisting of statements to be asserted or denied by the individual. The patterns of response are characteristic of certain personality attributes.Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Ethnology: The comparative and theoretical study of culture, often synonymous with cultural anthropology.Thiamine: 3-((4-Amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl)-5-(2- hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazolium chloride.Thiamine Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of THIAMINE in the diet, characterized by anorexia, irritability, and weight loss. Later, patients experience weakness, peripheral neuropathy, headache, and tachycardia. In addition to being caused by a poor diet, thiamine deficiency in the United States most commonly occurs as a result of alcoholism, since ethanol interferes with thiamine absorption. In countries relying on polished rice as a dietary staple, BERIBERI prevalence is very high. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1171)United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to substance abuse and mental health. It is commonly referred to by the acronym SAMHSA. On 1 October 1992, the United States Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) became SAMHSA.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4: A specific pair of GROUP B CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Monoamine Oxidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of naturally occurring monoamines. It is a flavin-containing enzyme that is localized in mitochondrial membranes, whether in nerve terminals, the liver, or other organs. Monoamine oxidase is important in regulating the metabolic degradation of catecholamines and serotonin in neural or target tissues. Hepatic monoamine oxidase has a crucial defensive role in inactivating circulating monoamines or those, such as tyramine, that originate in the gut and are absorbed into the portal circulation. (From Goodman and Gilman's, The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p415) EC 1.4.3.4.Hepatitis, Alcoholic: INFLAMMATION of the LIVER due to ALCOHOL ABUSE. It is characterized by NECROSIS of HEPATOCYTES, infiltration by NEUTROPHILS, and deposit of MALLORY BODIES. Depending on its severity, the inflammatory lesion may be reversible or progress to LIVER CIRRHOSIS.United States Dept. of Health and Human Services: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.Stress Disorders, Traumatic: Anxiety disorders manifested by the development of characteristic symptoms following a psychologically traumatic event that is outside the normal range of usual human experience. Symptoms include re-experiencing the traumatic event, increased arousal, and numbing of responsiveness to or reduced involvement with the external world. Traumatic stress disorders can be further classified by the time of onset and the duration of these symptoms.Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide: A single nucleotide variation in a genetic sequence that occurs at appreciable frequency in the population.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Cardiomyopathy, Alcoholic: Disease of CARDIAC MUSCLE resulting from chronic excessive alcohol consumption. Myocardial damage can be caused by: (1) a toxic effect of alcohol; (2) malnutrition in alcoholics such as THIAMINE DEFICIENCY; or (3) toxic effect of additives in alcoholic beverages such as COBALT. This disease is usually manifested by DYSPNEA and palpitations with CARDIOMEGALY and congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Hydroxytryptophol: 5-Hydroxy-indole-3-ethanol.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Wernicke Encephalopathy: An acute neurological disorder characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and disturbances of mental activity or consciousness. Eye movement abnormalities include nystagmus, external rectus palsies, and reduced conjugate gaze. THIAMINE DEFICIENCY and chronic ALCOHOLISM are associated conditions. Pathologic features include periventricular petechial hemorrhages and neuropil breakdown in the diencephalon and brainstem. Chronic thiamine deficiency may lead to KORSAKOFF SYNDROME. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1139-42; Davis & Robertson, Textbook of Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp452-3)Gypsies: Ethnic group originating in India and entering Europe in the 14th or 15th century.Genome-Wide Association Study: An analysis comparing the allele frequencies of all available (or a whole GENOME representative set of) polymorphic markers in unrelated patients with a specific symptom or disease condition, and those of healthy controls to identify markers associated with a specific disease or condition.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Endophenotypes: Measurable biological (physiological, biochemical, and anatomical features), behavioral (psychometric pattern) or cognitive markers that are found more often in individuals with a disease than in the general population. Because many endophenotypes are present before the disease onset and in individuals with heritable risk for disease such as unaffected family members, they can be used to help diagnose and search for causative genes.Delta Rhythm: Brain waves seen on EEG characterized by a high amplitude and a frequency of 4 Hz and below. They are considered the "deep sleep waves" observed during sleep in dreamless states, infancy, and in some brain disorders.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone: Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Substance Abuse Treatment Centers: Health facilities providing therapy and/or rehabilitation for substance-dependent individuals. Methadone distribution centers are included.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Character: In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.Cooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Myelinolysis, Central Pontine: A demyelinating condition affecting the PONS and characterized clinically by an acute progressive QUADRIPLEGIA; DYSARTHRIA; DYSPHAGIA; and alterations of consciousness. Pathologic features include prominent demyelination in the central PONS with sparing of axons and neurons. This condition is usually associated with systemic disorders such as HYPONATREMIA; chronic ALCOHOLISM; LIVER FAILURE; severe BURNS; malignant NEOPLASMS; hemorrhagic PANCREATITIS; HEMODIALYSIS; and SEPSIS. The rapid medical correction of hyponatremia has been cited as a cause of this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1125-6)Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.
Alcoholism. *Deficient intake. *Increased needs: pregnancy, infant, rapid cellular proliferation, and cirrhosis ... Chronic pancreatitis. *Ileal resection and bypass. *Nitrous oxide anesthesia (usually requires repeated instances). ...
Chronic alcoholism. What did with Titarenko, a little reminiscent of the treatment. Every year, his condition only worsened. ...
Poisoning such as chronic alcoholism, drug addiction or taking drugs by mistake are also common causes. Taking too much ... "chronic alcoholism". Retrieved 2015-07-15. "What is animal cruelty?". The British Columbia SPCA. Retrieved January 19, 2012. " ... An infectious disease that is accompanied by fever, tuberculosis, HIV infection, endocarditis or chronic inflammatory disease ... a chronic disease without fever, cancer, metabolic diseases, respiratory insufficiency, hepatic or digestive diseases ...
Extreme binge drinking can lead to brain damage faster and more severely than chronic drinking (alcoholism). The neurotoxic ... Binge drinking has the propensity to result in brain damage faster as well as more severely than chronic drinking (alcoholism ... Alcohol and Alcoholism. 48 (4): 464-471. doi:10.1093/alcalc/agt046. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-02-01.. ... "Alcohol and Alcoholism. 37 (2): 109-20. doi:10.1093/alcalc/37.2.109. PMID 11912065.. ...
Chronic Alcoholism 1900. The No-Breakfast Plan and the Fasting-Cure Henry S. Tanner Works by Edward Hooker Dewey at Project ...
... has the propensity to result in brain damage faster as well as more severely than chronic drinking (alcoholism ... Extreme binge drinking can lead to brain damage faster and more severely than chronic drinking (alcoholism). The neurotoxic ... The high levels of binge drinking among young people and the adverse consequences that include increased risk of alcoholism as ... Acute intoxication, such as binge drinking and alcoholism, are known potent risk factors for suicide. Binge drinking is also ...
Smith ME, Eng LF (1987). "Glial fibrillary acidic protein in chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in SJL/J ... Alcohol and Alcoholism. 2: 253-7. PMID 8974344. Levi G, Patrizio M, Bernardo A, Petrucci TC, Agresti C (Feb 1993). "Human ... Cullen KM, Halliday GM (1994). "Chronic alcoholics have substantial glial pathology in the forebrain and diencephalon". ... glycoprotein gp120 can directly inhibit the phosphorylation of GFAP and GFAP levels can be decreased in response to chronic ...
See Chalfont & Kurtz: 1971, on alcoholism). In stigmatised illness sufferer is often not accepted as legitimately sick. Chronic ... getting well not an expectation with chronic conditions such as blindness, diabetes. In chronic illness acting the sick role is ... Model fits acute illness (measles, appendicitis, relatively short term conditions). Does not fit chronic/long-term/permanent ...
They include chronic, persistent and repetitive lying; they include stealing; they include acts of deception and ... misrepresentations; they include alcoholism and drug addiction; abnormal sexuality; vagabondage; panhandling; inability to form ...
Furthermore, chronic alcoholism is associated with impairment in sustained attention and visual working memory. Thus, ... While it may not serve as a surprise that chronic alcoholism has been linked to decreased cognitive function including working ... Alcohol & Alcoholism, 37(3), 269-271. Ling, J., Heffernan, T.M., Buchanan, T., Rodgers, J., Scholey, A.B., and Parrot, A.C. ( ... Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 27(6), 970-974 Leitz, J.R., Morgan, C. A. J., Bisby, J.A., Rendell, P.G., ...
"Mechanisms of thiamin deficiency in chronic alcoholism". The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 33 (12): 2750-61. doi: ... Leevy CM (1982). "Thiamin deficiency and alcoholism". Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 378 (Thiamin: Twenty Years of ... Chronic thiamin deficiency can also cause alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome, an irreversible dementia characterized by amnesia and ... "Chronic ethanol feeding and acute ethanol exposure in vitro: effect on intestinal transport of biotin". The American Journal ...
Alcohol and Alcoholism, 37(3), 269-271. Heffernan, T., Clark, R., Bartholomew, J., Ling, J., Stephens, S. (2010). Does binge ... Heffernan, T., Moss, M., Ling, J. (2001). Subjective ratings of prospective memory deficits in chronic heavy alcohol users. ... Their aim was to assess deficits in participants prospective remembering following chronic traumatic brain injuries, under ...
Aversion therapy in alcoholism had its roots in Russia in the early 1930s, with early papers by Pavlov, Galant and Sluchevsky ... apomorphine/placebo in chronic alcoholics". Int J Clin Pharmacol Biopharm. 15: 211-3. Halvorsen, K. A.; Martensen-Larsen, O. ( ... As awareness of alcoholism and its treatment spread, apomorphine was one of the earliest used pharmacotherapies, at first as an ... There is renewed interest in the use of apomorphine to treat addiction, in both smoking cessation and alcoholism. As the drug ...
Peabody's book was based on an earlier study Psychotherapeutic Procedure in the Treatment of Chronic Alcoholism, which had been ... Peabody, Richard R. (January 1930). "Psychotherapeutic Procedure in the Treatment of Chronic Alcoholism". Mental Hygiene. ... Psychotherapeutic Procedure in the Treatment of Chronic Alcoholism". Boston. Retrieved 2010-03-31. Peabody, Richard R. (April ... "Alcoholism". About.com. V., Diane. "History of the Program". A Friend of Bill W. Apopka, Florida. Archived from the original on ...
"Serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and chronic alcoholism. Influence of alcohol ingestion and liver disease". Dig Dis Sci. 30 ... Lok AS, McMahon BJ (February 2007). "Chronic hepatitis B". 45 (2): 507-39. doi:10.1002/hep.21513. PMID 17256718. Kenneth D. ... Chronic hepatitis C virus infection: Wide variability, typically normal to less than twice the ULN, rarely more than 10 times ... the ULN Chronic hepatitis B virus infection: Levels fluctuate; the AST and ALT may be normal, though most patients have mild to ...
Hoyumpa Jr, AM (1980). "Mechanisms of thiamin deficiency in chronic alcoholism". American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 33 (12 ... Said, HM; A Sharifian; A Bagherzadeh; D Mock (1990). "Chronic ethanol feeding and acute ethanol exposure in vitro: effect on ... Leevy, Carroll M. (1982). "Thiamin deficiency and alcoholism". Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 378 (Thiamin: Twenty ...
This phenomenon most commonly occurs with chronic alcoholism. Other celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, HIV, hepatitis ... In addition, alcoholism is known to damage mitochondria and other cellular structures, further impairing cellular energy ... Alcohol Alcoholism is one of the major causes of fatty liver due to production of toxic metabolites like aldehydes during ...
Chronic alcoholism can cause Laennec's cirrhosis. In areas of the world afflicted with chronic starvation (Africa and Asia), ... They develop fatty livers: it is presumed that if they survive, cirrhosis will develop.[citation needed] Chronic alcoholism can ... They argue that alcoholics, in a sense, are no different from those in a state of chronic protein deprivation - both have ... The fatty change subsides and is replaced by fibrosis (scarring) and some chronic inflammation. No doubt the retreat of fatty ...
... is caused primarily by chronic alcoholism; however, vitamin deficiencies are also known to contribute ... Alcoholism may also result in loss of appetite, alcoholic gastritis, and vomiting, which decrease food intake. Alcohol abuse ... It is difficult to assess the prognosis of a patient because it is hard to convince chronic alcoholics to abstain from drinking ... Alcoholism is normally associated with nutritional deficiencies, which may contribute to the development of alcoholic ...
Chronic alcoholism has been linked to male breast cancer. The highest risk for male breast cancer is carried by males with ...
... age at onset of chronic abuse of alcohol, age at initial abuse, how chronic the abuse is, and the age when a person first ... Article]. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 25(3), 362-369. Freeman, T. W., Hart, J., Kimbrell, T., & Ross, E. D ... 2009). Comprehension of Affective Prosody in Veterans With Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. [Article]. Journal of ...
Reduced Fronto-Cerebellar Functional Connectivity in Chronic Alcoholic Patients. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research ... This indicates that when chronic use damages the prefrontal cortex, the importance of the cerebellum to external incentive ...
Louise, plagued by chronic malaria and constant illness, died in 1869 at age 55. Philip followed her two years later. Adeline ... Philip's alcoholism and penchant for brothels placed a constant strain on both the family's finances and his relationship with ... Leila married and lived at a distance; unable to juggle all this, Henry suffered increasing alcoholism. He sold most of his ... Philip descended into even more severe alcoholism and depression. He had violent outbursts and suffered delirium tremens to ...
Chronic pain (c.f. bicifadine) Parkinson's disease Mazindol (Mazanor, Sanorex) - anorectic; 50 nM for SERT, 18 nM for NET, 45 ... Alcoholism (c.f. DOV 102,677) Cocaine addiction (e.g., indatraline) Obesity (e.g., amitifadine, tesofensine) Attention-deficit ... and chronic pain. They are an extension of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-norepinephrine ... where chronic alterations in monoaminergic inputs caused by antidepressant drugs presumably lead to long-lasting adaptations ...
Registration required (help)). "Medical Study Group Finds Alcoholism Fast Becoming "Great Chronic Emergency"". Fitchburg ... In a 1937 article published in the New England Journal of Medicine, he argued that alcoholism had become rampant in the United ... By 1943, in the Boston number of the Medical Clinics of North America, he argued that adult neurosis and alcoholism could be ... He taught neurology at the Harvard Medical School and published research about alcoholism. He was the author of many ...
She admitted to alcoholism as far back as the 1930s, but it had never interfered with her work schedule or performance. She hit ... That same year, suffering from a chronic heart condition, she moved to a small cottage on the grounds of the Motion Picture & ... Though she spoke of her troubled personal life, her parents, her marriages, the scandals, her battle with alcoholism, and other ...
Laboratory of Cardiovascular Physiology and Tissue Injury National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism National ... Matyas C, Varga ZV, Mukhopadhyay P, Paloczi J, Lajtos T, Erdelyi K, Nemeth BT, Nan M, Hasko G, Gao B, Pacher P. Chronic plus ... National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. National Institutes of Health. 5625 Fishers Lane, MSC-9413, room 2N-17. ... Pharmacological inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase may represent a novel therapeutic approach in chronic heart failure. ...
Central pontine myelinolysis is also found in patients with chronic alcoholism, malnutrition, hyponatremia, liver disease and ... Other risk factors for developing CPM in our patient included a history of chronic alcohol abuse, and mild hyponatremia. ...
... is usually diagnosed when chronic heavy drinking is discovered as a cause of the heart failure. ... For more information on support groups where members share common experiences and problems, see alcoholism support groups and ...
Hypoglycaemia in Chronic Alcoholism. Br Med J 1955; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.4919.973-a (Published 16 April 1955) ...
The most characteristic degenerative changes met with in chronic alcoholism are fatty change and atrophy of the parenchyma, ... Degenerations From Chronic Alcoholism. The most characteristic degenerative changes met with in chronic alcoholism are fatty ... While chronic alcoholism predisposes the kidneys, in common with all other organs and tissues, to inflammatory affections, it ... The changes may be acute, as in peripheral neuritis, or, as more frequently happens, chronic. In the latter case the neurons ...
Knochel JP, Bilbrey GL, Fuller TJ - The muscle cell in chronic alcoholism myopathy. Ann NY Acad Sci 252: 274, 1975. [ Links ]. ... Jones JE, Shane SR, Jacobs WH, Flink EB - Magnesium balance studies in chronic alcoholism. Ann NY Acad Sci 162:934, 1969. [ ... Martin FC, Slavin G, Levin AJ, Peters TJ - Investigation of the organelle pathology of skeletal muscle in chronic alcoholism. J ... Perkoff GT, Hardy P, Vélez Garcia E - Reversible acute muscular syndrome in chronic alcoholism. N Engl J Med 274: 1277, 1966 ...
Tremor in chronic alcoholism. William Koller, Robert OHara, Walter Dorus, Judy Bauer ...
While alcoholism is often linked with PTSD, few studies have explored how chronic drinking may subsequently make a person more ... Research suggests that chronic alcohol use may increase the risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by altering the ... While alcoholism is often linked with PTSD, few studies have explored how chronic drinking may subsequently make a person more ... Research suggests that chronic alcohol use may increase the risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by altering the ...
Alcoholism. Chronic alcoholism. Cognitive functioning. Cognitive impairment. Comorbidity. Educational level. Frontal lobe. ... You are here: Home / Test Division / Reference Database / 2000 to 2009 / 2002 / Chronic alcoholism and the frontal lobe: which ... Chronic alcoholism and the frontal lobe: which executive functions are impaired?. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 105(4):276 -- ...
Home » Publications » Chronic Alcoholism Project, Spring 1990. Final Report.. Chronic Alcoholism Project, Spring 1990. Final ...
Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism.. [Shuang Li, S U ... A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The ... XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and ... These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism. ...
Cause of Death: Natural-chronic alcoholism with cardiomegaly. Location: Denton, TX. URL: view their profile ...
Chronic alcoholism may result in brain atrophy and a variety of neuropsychological disorders (1). Reversibility of brain ... Like other investigators (5, 6), we found a decreased Cho/Cr ratio in the cerebellum in patients with chronic alcoholism, which ... A decrease of NAA/Cr, which has been attributed mainly to neuronal loss, has been described in patients with chronic alcoholism ... Our data indicate that in the early stage of abstinence from chronic alcoholism reversibility of brain atrophy occurs. Moreover ...
Sequential MR Imaging and Proton MR Spectroscopy in Patients Who Underwent Recent Detoxification for Chronic Alcoholism: ... Sequential MR Imaging and Proton MR Spectroscopy in Patients Who Underwent Recent Detoxification for Chronic Alcoholism: ... Sequential MR Imaging and Proton MR Spectroscopy in Patients Who Underwent Recent Detoxification for Chronic Alcoholism: ... Sequential MR Imaging and Proton MR Spectroscopy in Patients Who Underwent Recent Detoxification for Chronic Alcoholism: ...
The mechanism linking chronic alcohol intoxication with ARBD remains largely unknown but it is also complicated by common ... METHODS: In a novel transcriptomic study, we targeted the WM only of chronic alcoholics in an attempt to tease apart the ... and one potential sequel of chronic abuse is alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD). This clinically manifests as cognitive ... Comorbidities, confounders, and the white matter transcriptome in chronic alcoholism. Abstract. BACKGROUND: Alcohol abuse is ...
... also known as end-stage alcoholism or alcohol use disorder. ... Discovery Place guest found recovery from chronic alcoholism, ... His Chronic Alcoholism Was Killing Him. Then He Found Help.. Oct 2, 2018 0 Comment Post By:Kate Parrish. Discovery Place » ... Mental and physical effects of chronic alcoholism. Over the next several years, Josh bounced in and out of jobs never finding ... Finding treatment for alcoholism. As Joshs alcoholism continued to close in on him, his family was left wondering what to do. ...
Primary Pulmonary Aspergillosis Evolving into Chronic Cavitary Pulmonary Aspergillosis - in the context of Alcoholism. ... Primary pulmonary aspergillosis evolving into chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis. Primary Aspergillus pneumonia (28.1.99) ... X] Primary pulmonary aspergillosis evolving into chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis.. The patients symptoms had now ... A needle biopsy was done which yielded nonspecific chronic inflammatory tissue. He was being treated with itraconazole. ...
Is Chronic Alcoholism and Drug Addiction the Same When Considering an LPS Conservatorship?. Amy no comments ... Is Chronic alcoholism and drug addiction the same when considering an LPS conservatorship? The answer is "sometimes". ... in acquiring short term care in a hospital or other facility for a person with serious impairment by drug use or alcoholism and ...
Two forms of alcoholism: One which warrants a chronic disease model, and college. Welcome to All About Addiction, THE online ... 5 Replies to "Two forms of alcoholism: One which warrants a chronic disease model, and college" * Jim Twitty says: ... Peele decided to use) have the chronic-relapsing version of alcoholism weve all come to know. I guess the question of what is ... Tagsaddiction, Alcohol, alcohol dependence, alcoholism, stanton peele, treatment, Treatment, what is substance abuse. ...
... hidden medical causes of Chronic Alcoholism - Teratogenic Agent, risk factors, and what causes Chronic Alcoholism - Teratogenic ... Causes of Chronic Alcoholism - Teratogenic Agent including triggers, ... Chronic Alcoholism -- Teratogenic Agent: Causes and Types. Causes of Broader Categories of Chronic Alcoholism -- Teratogenic ... Primary Cause of Chronic Alcoholism -- Teratogenic Agent The primary cause of Chronic Alcoholism -- Teratogenic Agent is the ...
CONCLUSIONS Our results showed that in patients with chronic alcoholism, active EtOH intake is associated with a Th-1 pattern ... T-cell subsets in patients with chronic alcoholism, and we correlated it both with the ethanol (EtOH) intake status and with ... METHODS For that purpose, a total of 30 chronic alcoholic patients, 10 without liver disease (AWLD group) and 20 diagnosed with ... Chronic alcoholism is associated with an imbalanced production of Th-1/Th-2 cytokines by peripheral blood T cells.. @article{ ...
... died from liver disease caused by chronic alcoholism, according to the autopsy. She was found in her home by police officers ...
Possible causes include Chronic Alcoholism. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to ... Chronic Alcoholism: According to the National Library of Medicine, chronic alcoholism can also be a cause of vitamin B12 ... Chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of a low serum magnesium owing to poor nutrition. [surgeryencyclopedia.com] ... Chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of hypomagnesemia, in part because of poor diet. [encyclopedia.com] ...
... convulsive crises in the course of chronic alcoholism (study of the immediately postcritical tracing)]. by Jérôme Vallat et al ... Occasional convulsive crises in the course of chronic alcoholism (study of the immediately postcritical tracing)].. *. Jérôme ... article{Vallat1962OccasionalCC, title={["Occasional" convulsive crises in the course of chronic alcoholism (study of the ...
The Alcoholism forum is an open forum for those who want to stop or who have stopped drinking. ... Chronic Relapser. kae on 07-20-2010 07-21-2010 06:47 AM. by CarolD ... Alcoholism - Do you want to quit drinking? ... SoberRecovery : Alcoholism Drug Addiction Help and Information ...
  • Research suggests that chronic alcohol use may increase the risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by altering the brain's ability to recover from a traumatic experience. (nih.gov)
  • The findings from this study suggest that chronic alcohol use may also increase a person's risk for an anxiety disorder such as PTSD after experiencing such an incident," said lead author Andrew Holmes, Ph.D., of the NIAAA Laboratory of Behavioral and Genomic Neuroscience. (nih.gov)
  • While the American Psychiatric Association does not specifically outline stages of alcohol use disorder (AUD), or alcoholism, it does offer guiding criteria. (discoveryplace.info)
  • However, it did not go unnoticed by me that the groups more likely to have pyroluria (Autism, ADHD, Alcoholism, Bipolar Disorder, D epression, Dyslexia, Schizophrenia) were the same groups at higher risk for gluten sensitivity (and in some cases celiac disease). (google.com)
  • You see many people think Alcoholism is a disease, but it actually is a disorder, a chronic disorder. (addicted.com)
  • The definition of Alcoholism is this: "a chronic disorder characterized by dependence on alcohol, repeated excessive use of alcoholic beverages, can you believe this,the development of withdrawal symptoms on reducing or ceasing intake, morbidity that may include cirrhosis of the liver, and decreased ability to function socially and vocationally. (addicted.com)
  • Alcoholism and viral hepatitis from IV drug use or an endemic region are common causes.The distribution of underlying aetiology will vary regionally, with viral hepatitis being much higher in the developing world, especially Asia. (alcohol-ism.info)
  • The most characteristic degenerative changes met with in chronic alcoholism are fatty change and atrophy of the parenchyma, with a corresponding increment of connective tissue. (chestofbooks.com)
  • While previous studies examined cortical atrophy in individuals with alcoholism, none examined alcohol-associated atrophy using cortical thickness measurements to obtain a regional mapping of tissue loss across the full cortical surface. (eurekalert.org)
  • According to the theory, genes play a strong role in the development of alcoholism. (wikipedia.org)
  • This form, also known as milieu limited alcoholism, appears to be the result of genetic predisposition and environmental provocation, that is, the development of alcoholism in these cases is an interaction between inherited predisposition and the person's life situations. (digitalnaturopath.com)
  • It is further suggested that more prolonged replenishment therapy with vitamin C, preferably by intravenous route, may be needed to normalize its blood levels in some chronic alcoholic patients. (nih.gov)
  • Alcohol dependence is the most common form of drug abuse in the US, with around 7% of the population meeting criteria for alcoholism (Grant 1994). (blogspot.com)
  • Those who drink alcohol at an early age can suffer from the effect of alcohol earlier than for those who drink during later part.Early signs of heavy drinking include regular drunkenness, an established pattern of alcoholism and drinking in risky and dangerous circumstances such as driving while under the influence of alcohol. (alcohol-ism.info)
  • Because women who are suffering from hidden alcoholism are highly unlikely to admit that they have a problem (or seek professional help on their own accord) it is absolutely imperative that friends and family members become familiar with the signs and symptoms of this insidious disease. (newsblaze.com)
  • As SIVmac251 is known to infect the CNS, this data suggests that chronic alcohol may increase the susceptibility of the CNS to HIV infection and further complications, such as HIV encephalitis. (blogspot.com)
  • This article helps shed light on the disease, and may help determine if you or your loved one should seek treatment.Alcoholism is a chronic disease marked by physical dependence, increasing tolerance, cravings, continued use despite physical, psychological, or interpersonal problems, and/or an inability to limit the amount consumed. (alcohol-ism.info)
  • This study documents, for the first time, the dynamic nature of the neuropathology associated with chronic heavy alcohol use," added Terence M. Keane, associate chief of staff for research & development at the VA Boston Healthcare System and assistant dean for research at Boston University School of Medicine, "and is a major concern among the veterans that both of us serve. (eurekalert.org)
  • Alcoholism: a systemic proinflammatory condition. (nih.gov)
  • Considerable research in the last two decades has widened the knowledge about the paramount importance of proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative damage in the pathogenesis of many of the systemic manifestations of alcoholism. (nih.gov)
  • While chronic alcoholism predisposes the kidneys, in common with all other organs and tissues, to inflammatory affections, it cannot be regarded as more than a subsidiary factor in the causation of granular kidney . (chestofbooks.com)
  • Therefore, alcoholism can be viewed as an inflammatory condition, a concept which opens the possibility of using new therapeutic weapons to treat some of the complications of this devastating and frequent disease. (nih.gov)
  • Not all chronic diarrhea is strictly watery, malabsorptive, or inflammatory, because some categories overlap. (aafp.org)
  • Chronic diarrhea should be categorized as watery (secretory vs. osmotic vs. functional), fatty, or inflammatory before full diagnostic evaluation. (aafp.org)
  • Chronic diarrhea may be divided into three basic categories: watery, fatty (malabsorption), and inflammatory (with blood and pus). (aafp.org)