Albinism: General term for a number of inherited defects of amino acid metabolism in which there is a deficiency or absence of pigment in the eyes, skin, or hair.Albinism, Oculocutaneous: Heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders comprising at least four recognized types, all having in common varying degrees of hypopigmentation of the skin, hair, and eyes. The two most common are the tyrosinase-positive and tyrosinase-negative types.Monophenol Monooxygenase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction between L-tyrosine, L-dopa, and oxygen to yield L-dopa, dopaquinone, and water. It is a copper protein that acts also on catechols, catalyzing some of the same reactions as CATECHOL OXIDASE. EC 1.14.18.1.Hermanski-Pudlak Syndrome: Syndrome characterized by the triad of oculocutaneous albinism (ALBINISM, OCULOCUTANEOUS); PLATELET STORAGE POOL DEFICIENCY; and lysosomal accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin.Nystagmus, Pathologic: Involuntary movements of the eye that are divided into two types, jerk and pendular. Jerk nystagmus has a slow phase in one direction followed by a corrective fast phase in the opposite direction, and is usually caused by central or peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Pendular nystagmus features oscillations that are of equal velocity in both directions and this condition is often associated with visual loss early in life. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p272)Hypopigmentation: A condition caused by a deficiency or a loss of melanin pigmentation in the epidermis, also known as hypomelanosis. Hypopigmentation can be localized or generalized, and may result from genetic defects, trauma, inflammation, or infections.Folklore: The common orally transmitted traditions, myths, festivals, songs, superstitions, and stories of all peoples.Melanosomes: Melanin-containing organelles found in melanocytes and melanophores.Nystagmus, Congenital: Nystagmus present at birth or caused by lesions sustained in utero or at the time of birth. It is usually pendular, and is associated with ALBINISM and conditions characterized by early loss of central vision. Inheritance patterns may be X-linked, autosomal dominant, or recessive. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p275)Eye: The organ of sight constituting a pair of globular organs made up of a three-layered roughly spherical structure specialized for receiving and responding to light.Ocular Hypertension: A condition in which the intraocular pressure is elevated above normal and which may lead to glaucoma.Eye Color: Color of the iris.Melanocytes: Mammalian pigment cells that produce MELANINS, pigments found mainly in the EPIDERMIS, but also in the eyes and the hair, by a process called melanogenesis. Coloration can be altered by the number of melanocytes or the amount of pigment produced and stored in the organelles called MELANOSOMES. The large non-mammalian melanin-containing cells are called MELANOPHORES.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.Albinism, Ocular: Albinism affecting the eye in which pigment of the hair and skin is normal or only slightly diluted. The classic type is X-linked (Nettleship-Falls), but an autosomal recessive form also exists. Ocular abnormalities may include reduced pigmentation of the iris, nystagmus, photophobia, strabismus, and decreased visual acuity.Melanins: Insoluble polymers of TYROSINE derivatives found in and causing darkness in skin (SKIN PIGMENTATION), hair, and feathers providing protection against SUNBURN induced by SUNLIGHT. CAROTENES contribute yellow and red coloration.Piebaldism: Autosomal dominant, congenital disorder characterized by localized hypomelanosis of the skin and hair. The most familiar feature is a white forelock presenting in 80 to 90 percent of the patients. The underlying defect is possibly related to the differentiation and migration of melanoblasts, as well as to defective development of the neural crest (neurocristopathy). Piebaldism may be closely related to WAARDENBURG SYNDROME.Toxoplasmosis, Ocular: Infection caused by the protozoan parasite TOXOPLASMA in which there is extensive connective tissue proliferation, the retina surrounding the lesions remains normal, and the ocular media remain clear. Chorioretinitis may be associated with all forms of toxoplasmosis, but is usually a late sequel of congenital toxoplasmosis. The severe ocular lesions in infants may lead to blindness.Pigmentation DisordersEvoked Potentials, Visual: The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.Eye ProteinsPhotophobia: Abnormal sensitivity to light. This may occur as a manifestation of EYE DISEASES; MIGRAINE; SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; MENINGITIS; and other disorders. Photophobia may also occur in association with DEPRESSION and other MENTAL DISORDERS.Skin Pigmentation: Coloration of the skin.Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: A form of phagocyte bactericidal dysfunction characterized by unusual oculocutaneous albinism, high incidence of lymphoreticular neoplasms, and recurrent pyogenic infections. In many cell types, abnormal lysosomes are present leading to defective pigment distribution and abnormal neutrophil functions. The disease is transmitted by autosomal recessive inheritance and a similar disorder occurs in the beige mouse, the Aleutian mink, and albino Hereford cattle.Membrane Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins whose primary function is to facilitate the transport of molecules across a biological membrane. Included in this broad category are proteins involved in active transport (BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT, ACTIVE), facilitated transport and ION CHANNELS.Electronystagmography: Recording of nystagmus based on changes in the electrical field surrounding the eye produced by the difference in potential between the cornea and the retina.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Dominance, Ocular: The functional superiority and preferential use of one eye over the other. The term is usually applied to superiority in sighting (VISUAL PERCEPTION) or motor task but not difference in VISUAL ACUITY or dysfunction of one of the eyes. Ocular dominance can be modified by visual input and NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS.Genetic Diseases, X-Linked: Genetic diseases that are linked to gene mutations on the X CHROMOSOME in humans (X CHROMOSOME, HUMAN) or the X CHROMOSOME in other species. Included here are animal models of human X-linked diseases.Tonometry, Ocular: Measurement of ocular tension (INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE) with a tonometer. (Cline, et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Pontederiaceae: A plant family of the order Liliales, subclass Liliidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Most species are perennials, native primarily to tropical America. They have creeping rootstocks, fibrous roots, and leaves in clusters at the base of the plant or borne on branched stems. The fruit is a capsule containing many seeds, or a one-seeded winged structure.Refraction, Ocular: Refraction of LIGHT effected by the media of the EYE.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Fundus Oculi: The concave interior of the eye, consisting of the retina, the choroid, the sclera, the optic disk, and blood vessels, seen by means of the ophthalmoscope. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Iris: The most anterior portion of the uveal layer, separating the anterior chamber from the posterior. It consists of two layers - the stroma and the pigmented epithelium. Color of the iris depends on the amount of melanin in the stroma on reflection from the pigmented epithelium.Eye Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the EYE.Characidae: A family of fresh water fish in the order CHARACIFORMES, which includes the Tetras.Social Alienation: The state of estrangement individuals feel in cultural settings that they view as foreign, unpredictable, or unacceptable.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Catechol Oxidase: An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction between catechol and oxygen to yield benzoquinone and water. It is a complex of copper-containing proteins that acts also on a variety of substituted catechols. EC 1.10.3.1.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Pigment Epithelium of Eye: The layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA; the CILIARY BODY; and the IRIS in the eye.Caves: Geological formations consisting of underground enclosures with access from the surface.Chondrodysplasia Punctata: A heterogeneous group of bone dysplasias, the common character of which is stippling of the epiphyses in infancy. The group includes a severe autosomal recessive form (CHONDRODYSPLASIA PUNCTATA, RHIZOMELIC), an autosomal dominant form (Conradi-Hunermann syndrome), and a milder X-linked form. Metabolic defects associated with impaired peroxisomes are present only in the rhizomelic form.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Ocular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Fovea Centralis: An area approximately 1.5 millimeters in diameter within the macula lutea where the retina thins out greatly because of the oblique shifting of all layers except the pigment epithelium layer. It includes the sloping walls of the fovea (clivus) and contains a few rods in its periphery. In its center (foveola) are the cones most adapted to yield high visual acuity, each cone being connected to only one ganglion cell. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Hair Color: Color of hair or fur.Refractive Errors: Deviations from the average or standard indices of refraction of the eye through its dioptric or refractive apparatus.Optic Chiasm: The X-shaped structure formed by the meeting of the two optic nerves. At the optic chiasm the fibers from the medial part of each retina cross to project to the other side of the brain while the lateral retinal fibers continue on the same side. As a result each half of the brain receives information about the contralateral visual field from both eyes.Intraocular Pressure: The pressure of the fluids in the eye.Tuberculosis, Ocular: Tuberculous infection of the eye, primarily the iris, ciliary body, and choroid.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Strabismus: Misalignment of the visual axes of the eyes. In comitant strabismus the degree of ocular misalignment does not vary with the direction of gaze. In noncomitant strabismus the degree of misalignment varies depending on direction of gaze or which eye is fixating on the target. (Miller, Walsh & Hoyt's Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, p641)Iris Diseases: Diseases, dysfunctions, or disorders of or located in the iris.Ophthalmic Solutions: Sterile solutions that are intended for instillation into the eye. It does not include solutions for cleaning eyeglasses or CONTACT LENS SOLUTIONS.Platelet Storage Pool Deficiency: Disorder characterized by a decrease or lack of platelet dense bodies in which the releasable pool of adenine nucleotides and 5HT are normally stored.Ichthyosis: Any of several generalized skin disorders characterized by dryness, roughness, and scaliness, due to hypertrophy of the stratum corneum epidermis. Most are genetic, but some are acquired, developing in association with other systemic disease or genetic syndrome.Kallmann Syndrome: A genetically heterogeneous disorder caused by hypothalamic GNRH deficiency and OLFACTORY NERVE defects. It is characterized by congenital HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM and ANOSMIA, possibly with additional midline defects. It can be transmitted as an X-linked (GENETIC DISEASES, X-LINKED), an autosomal dominant, or an autosomal recessive trait.Guinea: A republic in western Africa, south of SENEGAL and MALI, east of GUINEA-BISSAU. Its capital is Conakry.Visual Pathways: Set of cell bodies and nerve fibers conducting impulses from the eyes to the cerebral cortex. It includes the RETINA; OPTIC NERVE; optic tract; and geniculocalcarine tract.Optic Nerve: The 2nd cranial nerve which conveys visual information from the RETINA to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the RETINAL GANGLION CELLS which sort at the OPTIC CHIASM and continue via the OPTIC TRACTS to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other targets include the SUPERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEI. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Prader-Willi Syndrome: An autosomal dominant disorder caused by deletion of the proximal long arm of the paternal chromosome 15 (15q11-q13) or by inheritance of both of the pair of chromosomes 15 from the mother (UNIPARENTAL DISOMY) which are imprinted (GENETIC IMPRINTING) and hence silenced. Clinical manifestations include MENTAL RETARDATION; MUSCULAR HYPOTONIA; HYPERPHAGIA; OBESITY; short stature; HYPOGONADISM; STRABISMUS; and HYPERSOMNOLENCE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p229)Eye Infections, Parasitic: Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 1: A melanocortin receptor subtype found primarily in MELANOCYTES. It shows specificity for ALPHA-MSH and ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. Loss of function mutations of the type 1 melanocortin receptor account for the majority of red hair and fair skin recessive traits in human.Genes, Recessive: Genes that influence the PHENOTYPE only in the homozygous state.Conjunctival DiseasesEye Infections: Infection, moderate to severe, caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses, which occurs either on the external surface of the eye or intraocularly with probable inflammation, visual impairment, or blindness.Uveitis: Inflammation of part or all of the uvea, the middle (vascular) tunic of the eye, and commonly involving the other tunics (sclera and cornea, and the retina). (Dorland, 27th ed)Melanophores: Chromatophores (large pigment cells of fish, amphibia, reptiles and many invertebrates) which contain melanin. Short term color changes are brought about by an active redistribution of the melanophores pigment containing organelles (MELANOSOMES). Mammals do not have melanophores; however they have retained smaller pigment cells known as MELANOCYTES.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Sunscreening Agents: Chemical or physical agents that protect the skin from sunburn and erythema by absorbing or blocking ultraviolet radiation.ConjunctivitisOcular Hypotension: Abnormally low intraocular pressure often related to chronic inflammation (uveitis).Oxidoreductases: The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)Zimbabwe: A republic in southern Africa, east of ZAMBIA and BOTSWANA and west of MOZAMBIQUE. Its capital is Harare. It was formerly called Rhodesia and Southern Rhodesia.Adaptor Protein Complex beta Subunits: A family of large adaptin protein complex subunits of approximately 90-130 kDa in size.Vitreous Body: The transparent, semigelatinous substance that fills the cavity behind the CRYSTALLINE LENS of the EYE and in front of the RETINA. It is contained in a thin hyaloid membrane and forms about four fifths of the optic globe.Electroretinography: Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.DNA Mutational Analysis: Biochemical identification of mutational changes in a nucleotide sequence.Sunburn: An injury to the skin causing erythema, tenderness, and sometimes blistering and resulting from excessive exposure to the sun. The reaction is produced by the ultraviolet radiation in sunlight.Hemorrhagic Disorders: Spontaneous or near spontaneous bleeding caused by a defect in clotting mechanisms (BLOOD COAGULATION DISORDERS) or another abnormality causing a structural flaw in the blood vessels (HEMOSTATIC DISORDERS).Macula Lutea: An oval area in the retina, 3 to 5 mm in diameter, usually located temporal to the posterior pole of the eye and slightly below the level of the optic disk. It is characterized by the presence of a yellow pigment diffusely permeating the inner layers, contains the fovea centralis in its center, and provides the best phototropic visual acuity. It is devoid of retinal blood vessels, except in its periphery, and receives nourishment from the choriocapillaris of the choroid. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Corneal Diseases: Diseases of the cornea.Aqueous Humor: The clear, watery fluid which fills the anterior and posterior chambers of the eye. It has a refractive index lower than the crystalline lens, which it surrounds, and is involved in the metabolism of the cornea and the crystalline lens. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed, p319)Ceroid: A naturally occurring lipid pigment with histochemical characteristics similar to lipofuscin. It accumulates in various tissues in certain experimental and pathological conditions.Codon, Nonsense: An amino acid-specifying codon that has been converted to a stop codon (CODON, TERMINATOR) by mutation. Its occurance is abnormal causing premature termination of protein translation and results in production of truncated and non-functional proteins. A nonsense mutation is one that converts an amino acid-specific codon to a stop codon.Eye Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the eye; may also be hereditary.

Albinism: its implications for refractive development. (1/72)

PURPOSE: Albinism involves the mutation of one or more of the genes associated with melanin synthesis and has many ramifications for vision. This study focuses on the refractive implications of albinism in the context of emmetropization. METHODS: Refractive, biometric, and visual acuity data were collected for a group of 25 albino individuals that included the following: 18 oculocutaneous (13 tyrosine positive, 5 tyrosine negative); 7 ocular (2 autosomal recessive, 5 sex-linked recessive). Their age range was 3 to 51 years. All exhibited horizontal pendular nystagmus. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences relating to albino subtype for any of the measured parameters. All the subjects had reduced visual acuity (mean: 0.90, logMAR) and overall, there was a bias toward hyperopia in their refractive errors (mean: + 1.07 D). However the refractive errors of the group covered a broad range (SD: 4.67 D) and included both high myopia and high hyperopia. An axial origin to the refractive errors is implied by the high correlation between refractive errors and axial lengths. Refractive astigmatism averaged 2.37 D and was consistently with-the-rule and highly correlated with corneal astigmatism, which was also with-the-rule. Meridional analysis of the refractive data indicated that the vertical meridian for hyperopic subjects was consistently nearer emmetropia compared to their horizontal meridian. Myopic subjects showed the opposite trend. CONCLUSIONS: The overall refractive profile of the subjects is consistent with emmetropization being impaired in albinism. However, the refractive errors of hyperopic subjects also can be explained in terms of "meridional emmetropization." The contrasting refractive profiles of myopic subjects may reflect operational constraints of the emmetropization process.  (+info)

Oa1 knock-out: new insights on the pathogenesis of ocular albinism type 1. (2/72)

Ocular albinism type I (OA1) is an X-linked disorder characterized by severe reduction of visual acuity, strabismus, photophobia and nystagmus. Ophthalmologic examination reveals hypopigmentation of the retina, foveal hypoplasia and iris translucency. Microscopic examination of both retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and skin melanocytes shows the presence of large pigment granules called giant melanosomes or macromelanosomes. In this study, we have generated and characterized Oa1-deficient mice by gene targeting (KO). The KO males are viable, fertile and phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild-type littermates. Ophthalmologic examination shows hypopigmentation of the ocular fundus in mutant animals compared with wild-type. Analysis of the retinofugal pathway reveals a reduction in the size of the uncrossed pathway, demonstrating a misrouting of the optic fibres at the chiasm, as observed in OA1 patients. Microscopic examination of the RPE shows the presence of giant melanosomes comparable with those described in OA1 patients. Ultrastructural analysis of the RPE cells, suggests that the giant melanosomes may form by abnormal growth of single melanosomes, rather than the fusion of several, shedding light on the pathogenesis of ocular albinism.  (+info)

Expression pattern of the ocular albinism type 1 (Oa1) gene in the murine retinal pigment epithelium. (3/72)

PURPOSE: Mutations in the OA1 gene cause ocular albinism type 1 (OA1), an X-linked form of albinism affecting only the eye, with skin pigmentation appearing normal. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease the time of onset and the pattern of expression of the mouse homolog of the OA1 gene were monitored during eye development. The localization of Oa1 mRNA was studied and compared with the expression of other genes involved in melanosomal biogenesis. METHODS: The Oa1 expression pattern during eye development and after birth was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization. Localization of Oa1 mRNA was compared with TYROSINASE: (TYR:), pink-eyed dilution (p), and Pax2 expression patterns. RESULTS: RT-PCR revealed that Oa1 expression began at embryonic day (E)10.5 and was maintained until adulthood. By in situ hybridization analysis Oa1 transcripts were detected in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) beginning at E10.5 in the dorsal part of the eyecup and in the same area where transcripts of other genes involved in pigmentation are found. Of note, the expression pattern of these genes was complementary to Pax2 expression, which was restricted to the ventral side of the optic cup. At later stages, expression of Oa1, TYR:, and p expanded to the entire RPE and ciliary body. CONCLUSIONS: Oa1 expression can be detected at early stages of RPE development, together with other genes involved in pigmentation defects. Oa1 is likely to play an important function in melanosomal biogenesis in the RPE beginning during the earliest steps of melanosome formation.  (+info)

Defective intracellular transport and processing of OA1 is a major cause of ocular albinism type 1. (4/72)

Ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) is an X-linked disorder mainly characterized by a severe reduction of visual acuity, hypopigmentation of the retina and the presence of macromelanosomes in the skin and eyes. Various types of mutation have been identified within the OA1 gene in patients with the disorder, including several missense mutations of unknown functional significance. In order to shed light into the molecular pathogenesis of ocular albinism and possibly define critical functional domains within the OA1 protein, we characterized 19 independent missense mutations with respect to processing and subcellular distribution on expression in COS-7 cells. Our analysis indicates the presence of at least two distinct biochemical defects associated with the different missense mutations. Eleven of the nineteen OA1 mutants (approximately 60%) were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, showing defecNStive intracellular transport and glycosylation, consistent with protein misfolding. The remaining eight of the nineteen OA1 mutants (approximately 40%) displayed sorting and processing behaviours indistinguishable from those of the wild-type protein. Consistent with our recent findings that OA1 represents a novel type of intracellular G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), we found that most of these latter mutations cluster within the second and third cytosolic loops, two regions that in canonical GPCRs are known to be critical for their downstream signaling, including G protein-coupling and effector activation. The biochemical analysis of OA1 mutations performed in this study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of the OA1 protein and implies protein misfolding as a major pathogenic mechanism in OA1.  (+info)

Behavioral visual responses of wild-type and hypopigmented zebrafish. (5/72)

Zebrafish possess three classes of chromatophores that include iridophores, melanophores, and xanthophores. Mutations that lack one or two classes of chromatophores have been isolated or genetically constructed. Using a behavioral assay based on visually mediated escape responses, we measured the visual response of fully and partially pigmented zebrafish. In zebrafish that lack iridophores (roy mutants), the behavioral visual responses were similar to those of wild-type animals except at low contrast stimulation. In the absence of melanophores (albino mutants) or both melanophores and iridophores (ruby mutants), the behavioral visual responses were normal under moderate illumination but reduced when tested under dim or bright conditions or under low contrast stimulation. Together, the data suggest that screening pigments in the retina play a role in the regulation of behavioral visual responses and are necessary for avoiding "scatter" under bright light conditions.  (+info)

Correlation between rod photoreceptor numbers and levels of ocular pigmentation. (6/72)

PURPOSE: Ocular melanin synthesis modulates rod photoreceptor production, because in albino eyes, rod numbers are reduced by approximately 30%. In this study, rod numbers and ocular rhodopsin concentrations were measured in intermediate pigmentation phenotypes to determine whether proportional reductions in melanin are correlated with proportional changes in rod numbers. Further, patterns of cell production and death were examined around the time of birth, when rod production peaks, to determine whether there are abnormalities in these features associated with hypopigmentation. METHODS: Four mouse pigmentation phenotypes were used: fully pigmented, albino, Beige, and Himalayan. The latter two are intermediate-pigmentation phenotypes, with Beige having markedly more pigment than Himalayan. Ocular melanin concentrations were measured during development and at maturity. Rods were counted at maturity and measurements of ocular rhodopsin undertaken. Mitotic and pyknotic cells were also counted in neonates. RESULTS: Rods and ocular rhodopsin were reduced in both Beige and Himalayan mice below levels found in fully pigmented mice, but not to levels found in albino animals. This was more marked in Himalayan than Beige mice, reflecting the lower concentration of melanin found in the former compared with the latter, both in development and at maturity. Although patterns of cell production were elevated in the hypopigmented animals, such patterns varied. CONCLUSIONS: Rod numbers are modulated within a range between that in fully pigmented and albino phenotypes by the concentration of ocular melanin. However, in these animals, there is no obvious correlation between these events and patterns of cell production and death in neonates.  (+info)

Motor and sensory characteristics of infantile nystagmus. (7/72)

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Past studies have explored some of the associations between particular motor and sensory characteristics and specific categories of non-neurological infantile nystagmus. The purpose of this case study is to extend this body of work significantly by describing the trends and associations found in a database of 224 subjects who have undergone extensive clinical and psychophysical evaluations. METHODS: The records of 224 subjects with infantile nystagmus were examined, where 62% were idiopaths, 28% albinos, and 10% exhibited ocular anomalies. Recorded variables included age, mode of inheritance, birth history, nystagmus presentation, direction of the nystagmus, waveform types, spatial and temporal null zones, head postures and nodding, convergence, foveation, ocular alignment, refractive error, visual acuity, stereoacuity, and oscillopsia. RESULTS: The age distribution of the 224 patients was between 1 month and 71 years, with the mean age and mode being 23 (SD 16) years and 16-20 years respectively. By far the most common pattern of inheritance was found to be autosomal dominant (n = 40), with the nystagmus being observed by the age of 6 months in 87% of the sample (n = 128). 139 (62%) of the 224 subjects were classified as idiopaths, 63 (28%) as albinos, and 22 (10%) exhibited ocular anomalies. Conjugate uniplanar horizontal oscillations were found in 174 (77.7%) of the sample. 32 (14.3%) had a torsional component to their nystagmus. 182 (81.2%) were classed as congenital nystagmus (CN), 32 (14.3%) as manifest latent nystagmus (MLN), and 10 (4.5%) as a CN/MLN hybrid. Neither CN nor MLN waveforms were related to any of the three subject groups (idiopaths, albinos, and ocular anomalies) MLN was found in idiopaths and albinos, but most frequently in the ocular anomaly group. The most common oscillation was a horizontal jerk with extended foveation (n = 49; 27%). The amplitudes and frequencies of the nystagmus ranged between 0.3-15.7 degrees and 0.5-8 Hz, respectively. Periodic alternating nystagmus is commonly found in albinos. Albino subjects did not show a statistically significantly higher nystagmus intensity when compared with the idiopaths (p>0.01). 105 of 143 subjects (73%) had spatial nulls within plus or minus 10 degrees of the primary position although 98 subjects (69%) employed a compensatory head posture. Subjects with spatial null zones at or beyond plus or minus 20 degrees always adopted constant head postures. Head nodding was found in 38 subjects (27% of the sample). Horizontal tropias were very common (133 out of 213; 62.4%) and all but one of the 32 subjects with MLN exhibited a squint. Adult visual acuity is strongly related to the duration and accuracy of the foveation period. Visual acuity and stereoacuity were significantly better (p<0.01) in the idiopaths compared to the albino and ocular anomaly groups. 66 subjects out of a sample of 168 (39%) indicated that they had experienced oscillopsia at some time. CONCLUSIONS: There are strong ocular motor and sensory patterns and associations that can help define an infantile nystagmus. These include the nystagmus being bilateral, conjugate, horizontal uniplanar, and having an accelerating slow phase (that is, CN). Decelerating slow phases (that is, MLN) are frequently associated with strabismus and early form deprivation. Waveform shape (CN or MLN) is not pathognomonic of any of the three subject groups (idiopaths, albinos, or ocular anomalies). There is no one single stand alone ocular motor characteristic that can differentiate a benign form of infantile nystagmus (CN, MLN) from a neurological one. Rather, the clinician must consider a host of clinical features.  (+info)

Identification of three novel OA1 gene mutations identified in three families misdiagnosed with congenital nystagmus and carrier status determination by real-time quantitative PCR assay. (8/72)

BACKGROUND: X-linked ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) is caused by mutations in OA1 gene, which encodes a membrane glycoprotein localised to melanosomes. OA1 mainly affects pigment production in the eye, resulting in optic changes associated with albinism including hypopigmentation of the retina, nystagmus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, abnormal crossing of the optic fibers and reduced visual acuity. Affected Caucasian males usually appear to have normal skin and hair pigment. RESULTS: We identified three previously undescribed mutations consisting of two intragenic deletions (one encompassing exon 6, the other encompassing exons 7-8), and a point mutation (310delG) in exon 2. We report the development of a new method for diagnosis of heterozygous deletions in OA1 gene based on measurement of gene copy number using real-time quantitative PCR from genomic DNA. CONCLUSION: The identification of OA1 mutations in families earlier reported as families with hereditary nystagmus indicate that ocular albinism type 1 is probably underdiagnosed. Our method of real-time quantitative PCR of OA1 exons with DMD exon as external standard performed on the LightCycler trade mark allows quick and accurate carrier-status assessment for at-risk females.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Clinical and molecular characterization of a family affected with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1). AU - Lam, Byron L. AU - Fingert, J. H.. AU - Shutt, B. C.. AU - Singleton, E. M.. AU - Merin, L. M.. AU - Brown, H. H.. AU - Sheffield, V. C.. AU - Stone, E. M.. PY - 1997/12/1. Y1 - 1997/12/1. N2 - Thirty-one members of a family affected with X-linked ocular albinism (OAI) were studied to characterize the clinical phenotype and identify the disease-causing mutation. The family members were examined with ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography, and Goldmann perimetry. Linkage analysis was performed with markers from the OAI locus. Exons 2 and 8 of the OAI gene were assayed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The six affected males had visual acuities ranging from 20/40 to 20/200. All had nystagmus, iris transillumination, and foveal hypoplasia. The eldest affected male had 20/40 vision and was asymptomatic. The level of the visual acuity of the affected males was not related to the ...
Ocular albinism is a form of albinism which, in contrast to oculocutaneous albinism, presents primarily in the eyes.[1] There are multiple forms of ocular albinism, which are clinically similar.[2]:865. Both known genes are on the X chromosome. When the term "autosomal recessive ocular albinism" ("AROA") is used, it usually refers to mild variants of oculocutaneous albinism rather than ocular albinism, which is X-linked.[3]. ...
Mutations in human and/or mouse homologs are associated with this disease. Synonyms: Forsius-Eriksson syndrome; FORSIUS-ERIKSSON TYPE OCULAR ALBINISM
Its estimated that about one in every 18,000-20,000 people in the United States have some form of albinism.. There are several different forms. Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) happens when theres a mutation in one gene. OCA results in white skin, white hair, and blue eyes.. X-linked ocular albinism occurs only in men, and manifests as light-colored skin and hair thats still considered within the "normal" range.. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome has symptoms similar to OCA, but its more common in Puerto Rico and its usually accompanied by blood, lung, and bowel disorders.. And Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare version that gives hair a silver cast and causes skin to be grayish. White blood cell counts are often affected as well, making people with this type more prone to infections.. As for eye color in humans with albinism, the red, pink, or purple appearance can show up when the light is just right. While the eyes themselves can be blue or brown, the lack of pigmentation can make them seem ...
Ocular albinism, type 1: lt;table class=infobox cellspacing=3 style=border-spacing:3px;width:22em;|>||Ocular Albinis... World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection ever assembled.
Purpose: Ocular albinism type 1 (OA1) is characterized by the presence of macromelanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and abnormal crossing of the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) axons. It is caused by mutations in the OA1 gene. How the reduced melanosomal pigmentation of OA1 RPE exerts its effects upon the RGCs to influence the misrouting of their axons at the optic chiasm remains unsolved. In mouse, by embryonic day 15, the RPE is already melanized, the ipsilateral and contralateral RGCs have been generated and the majority of their axons pass through the optic chiasm. Our aim is to identify candidate genes critical for normal pigmentation of the RPE and crossing of the optic nerves using microarrays hybridized with mRNAs from 15 days post coito (dpc) ocular albino (Oa1-/-) and control (B6/NCrl) embryonic mice eyes.. Methods: 15.5 dpc mouse embryos (6-10/litter) were collected from pregnant Oa1-/- and the corresponding control B6/NCrl females. Total RNA was isolated from the eyes of ...
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Ocular albinism is a genetic condition that reduces the pigmentation of the iris, which is the colored part of the eye, and the retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. Many folks with ocular albinism have difficulty seeing outside without sunglasses and transitioning from outside to inside.. Nystagmus is a condition in which the eyes move in an involuntary and repetitive way. Sometimes the movement is slow and horizontal. Other times the movement is fast twitched, vertical, and rotary. There are supposedly 49 different subtypes of nystagmus with varying degrees of severity. These movements often result in reduced vision and depth perception. The condition tends to improve until about age 10, and stabilizes for the remainder of the persons life.. Due to her visual issues, Sonyas best corrected visual acuity is 20/200, the cut off point for legal blindness. In other words, even with glasses or contacts, she can only see something clearly from 20 feet away that other ...
Get the inside info on Karl, Ted Allan, Md - Mid Island Eye Physicians. Business details, special offers, read 1 reviews and more.Surgeons
boys Ocular Albinism, I stopped in at Guest Relations right inside the entrance and asked if there would be any accommodations they could offer us as the boys are extremely photophobic (their eyes are very sensitive to bright light/sunlight) and I explained that it would be hard for them to stand in long lines in the sun for extended periods of time. The person behind the desk was very understanding and gave us a Ride Accessibility Pass (RAP) which allowed us to set up a time to get on each ride without having to stand in line. Instead, we could wait elsewhere out of the sun and then enter the ride through the exit and get on almost immediately. We actually only ended up needing to use this pass a handful of times though since we were at the park on a Monday and the lines were not terribly long to begin with ...
... Vision for Children nears a cure for genetic eye disorder Posted on June 30, 2017 When Vivian and Sam Hardages newborn son was diagnosed with ocular albinism more than two decades...
I am the mom of 2 awesome boys. My youngest son has life-threatening food allergies to milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, and shellfish. Both kiddos also have seasonal and environmental allergies, eczema, asthma, and a vision impairment called Ocular Albinism. "Life is a journey, not a destination ...
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Kannuka k las aland suvitajate juurevool 1883-84. aastail, m ni aasta enne talude m mist (1888). See ajandki talude hinnad k rgeks. Suvitajaist saadud sissetulek aidand tasuda ostuv lga ja v imaldand veel uusi suvimarju juure ehitada. N udmine suvikorterite j rele olnud nii suur, et kus aga uus maja rajatud, siis tellitud juba ette tarvitamiseks, makstud osa riraha avansiks. Teenitud lisaks veel suvitajate kraami vedamisest jne., n nda et v ike Kannuka k la (9 talu) omand varsti umbes 50 suvemaja. Suvitajad tarvitand rohkesti ka k iksuguseid p llumajandussaadusi, eriti piima ja v id. Juba enne kui Kannukal suvemaju oligi viidud rohkesti v id Sillam ele suvitajaile, aga kui Kannukal aland suvitamine, siis pidand iga ks piimakarja suurendama, v i ja piim tarvitatud suvel k ik kohal. Suvitajaid k ind peamiselt Peterburist ja Moskvast, v hem osa Tartust. N d (1931) seisab suur osa majadest t hjad, kuigi neist on s ilind veel ainult ks neljandik osa. Mitmest majast on varastatud klaasid ja praeahjud ...
A five generation family with an X linked ocular disorder has been investigated. The major clinical features were reduced visual acuity, nystagmus, and myopia. Although impaired night vision was not a symptom, using psychophysical and electrophysiological testing both rod and cone function were found to be abnormal in all affected males. No abnormality was detected in carrier females. Gene location studies showed X linked transmission of a gene that maps to proximal Xp11. The findings observed in this cohort are similar to those previously reported in both congenital stationary night blindness type 2 (CSNB2) and Aland Island eye disease (AIED). This study addresses whether CSNB2 and AIED are a single entity or whether the latter is a subset of the former.
MalaCards based summary : Ocular Albinism with Congenital Sensorineural Deafness, also known as waardenburg syndrome type 2 with ocular albinism, is related to albinism, ocular, with late-onset sensorineural deafness and ocular albinism. An important gene associated with Ocular Albinism with Congenital Sensorineural Deafness is TYR (Tyrosinase), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Transcriptional misregulation in cancer and Neural Crest Differentiation. Affiliated tissues include eye and skin, and related phenotypes are craniofacial and hearing/vestibular/ear ...
PURPOSE The purpose of the current research was to detect the underlying genetic defect in a Chinese family with X-linked congenital nystagmus and perform prenatal genetic diagnosis for their current pregnancy. METHODS A common clinical examination and an ophthalmic evaluation were performed on the proband, one carrier, and one unaffected member. Mutation analysis of the G protein-coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) and four-point-one (4.1), ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domain-containing 7 (FRMD7) genes was performed by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified exons in the proband. The detected GPR143 mutation was tested in all available family members and 200 normal controls by direct sequencing. RESULTS Congenital nystagmus, obvious fundus hypopigmentation, and foveal hypoplasia were observed in the proband but not in the carriers or the unaffected members. A novel splicing mutation c.658+1 g|t not found in 200 unrelated controls was identified and co-segregated with X-linked ocular albinism (XLOA) in this
In this study, we report a family with typical clinical signs of X-linked congenital nystagmus. The sequence analysis of GPR143 identified a novel duplication mutation in exon 1. All affected males were hemizygous for the mutation whereas female carriers were heterozygous for the duplication. Nystagmus is common in all types of albinism. Diagnosis of the underlying disease often requires extensive clinical, electrophysiological, psychophysical, and eventually molecular genetic examinations, especially when clinical findings are unrevealing. A few individuals initially misdiagnosed with congenital nystagmus have been shown to be affected by ocular albinism type 1 by screening GPR143 [10,11]. However, in our study, none of the patients with the GPR143 mutation had the classical phenotype of ocular albinism. GPR143 was cloned from the OA1 critical region in Xp22.3-22.2 in 1995 [7]. To date, more than 90 different GPR143 mutations have since been described. However, there were only nine different ...
Fisher SE, Ciccodicola A, Tanaka K, Curci A, Desicato S, Durso M, Craig IW. Sequence-based exon prediction around the synaptophysin locus reveals agene-rich area containing novel genes in human proximal Xp.Genomics. 1997 Oct 15;45(2):340-7. PMID: 9344658 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]. The human Xp11.23-p11.22 interval has been implicated in several inherited diseases including Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome; three forms of X-linked hypercalciuric nephrolithiaisis; and the eye disorders retinitis pigmentosa 2, congenital stationary night blindness, and Aland Island eye disease. In constructing YAC contigs spanning Xp11. 23-p11.22, we have previously shown that the region around the synaptophysin (SYP) gene is refractory to cloning in YACs, but highly stable in cosmids. Preliminary analysis of the latter suggested that this might reflect a high density of coding sequences and we therefore undertook the complete sequencing of a SYP-containing cosmid. Sequence data were extensively analyzed using ...
The human Xp11.23-p11.22 interval has been implicated in several inherited diseases including Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome; three forms of X-linked hypercalciuric nephrolithiaisis; and the eye disorders retinitis pigmentosa 2, congenital stationary night blindness, and Aland Island eye disease. In constructing YAC contigs spanning Xp11. 23-p11.22, we have previously shown that the region around the synaptophysin (SYP) gene is refractory to cloning in YACs, but highly stable in cosmids. Preliminary analysis of the latter suggested that this might reflect a high density of coding sequences and we therefore undertook the complete sequencing of a SYP-containing cosmid. Sequence data were extensively analyzed using computer programs such as CENSOR (to mask repeats), BLAST (for homology searches), and GRAIL and GENE-ID (to predict exons). This revealed the presence of 29 putative exons, organized into three genes, in addition to the 7 exons of the complete SYP coding region, all mapping within a 44-kb ...
Visual function and ocular pigmentation are being studied in patients with albinism and other disorders associated with hypopigmentation. The degree of ocular pigmentation is assessed clinically by estimating the melanin content of the iris, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid. Visual function is measured in the conventional manner to study central vision, and electrophysiological methods to detect a misrouting of the visual pathways. The purpose of this study is to document the visual deficit and the pigmentary changes of patients with albinism, to observe their natural course, and to determine whether misrouting of the visual pathways is present and is correlated with pigmentation ...
There are about 16 different genes responsible for eye color, it is mostly attributed to two adjacent genes on chromosome 15, hect domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 2 (HERC2) and ocular albinism (that is, oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2)). An intron in HERC2 contains the promoter region for OCA2, affecting its expression. Therefore, singlenucleotide polymorphisms SNP in either of these two genes have a large role in the eye color of an individual. Furthermore, with all genetic expression, aberration also occurs. Some individuals may express two phenotypes-one in each eye-or a complete lack of pigmentation, ocular albinism. We could say that a conserved regulatory element within intron 86 of the HERC2 gene that is perfectly associated with the brown/blue eye color, in studied individuals from Denmark, Turkey and Jordan. This element had an inhibitory eVect on the OCA2 promoter activity in cell cultures, and the blue and the brown alleles were shown to bind non-identical subsets of ...
There are about 16 different genes responsible for eye color, it is mostly attributed to two adjacent genes on chromosome 15, hect domain and RCC1-like domain-containing protein 2 (HERC2) and ocular albinism (that is, oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2)). An intron in HERC2 contains the promoter region for OCA2, affecting its expression. Therefore, singlenucleotide polymorphisms SNP in either of these two genes have a large role in the eye color of an individual. Furthermore, with all genetic expression, aberration also occurs. Some individuals may express two phenotypes-one in each eye-or a complete lack of pigmentation, ocular albinism. We could say that a conserved regulatory element within intron 86 of the HERC2 gene that is perfectly associated with the brown/blue eye color, in studied individuals from Denmark, Turkey and Jordan. This element had an inhibitory eVect on the OCA2 promoter activity in cell cultures, and the blue and the brown alleles were shown to bind non-identical subsets of ...
Define ocular transillumination. ocular transillumination synonyms, ocular transillumination pronunciation, ocular transillumination translation, English dictionary definition of ocular transillumination. n. The passing of a light through the walls of a body part or organ to facilitate medical inspection. trans′il·lu′mi·nate′ v. trans′il·lu′mi·na′tor n.
Define transillumination. transillumination synonyms, transillumination pronunciation, transillumination translation, English dictionary definition of transillumination. n. The passing of a light through the walls of a body part or organ to facilitate medical inspection. trans′il·lu′mi·nate′ v. trans′il·lu′mi·na′tor n.
Predicted to have calcium channel activity and calcium, potassium:sodium antiporter activity. Involved in negative regulation of melanin biosynthetic process. Predicted to localize to trans-Golgi network. Is expressed in brain; ear; embryo mesenchyme; and liver. Used to study ocular albinism. Human ortholog(s) of this gene implicated in oculocutaneous albinism type VI. Orthologous to human SLC24A5 (solute carrier family 24 member 5 ...
Doctors give trusted, helpful answers on causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment, and more: Dr. Hamilton on do people with blue eyes generally have worse sight than people with brown eyes: Iris color is determined by the amount of brown pigment it contains. A large amount creates brown eyes; less pigment creates a blue appearance. Eye sight is related to the shape of the eye and health of the retina (film layer) and optic nerve. Some eye conditions can lead to poor vision and blue eyes (ocular albinism), but eye color itself is usually not related to eye sight.
Our first full collection is focuses on textural whites. In several of the images youll see Sam, who is legally blind because of his ocular albinism. He reached out to us, seeking an apprenticeship in weaving. We have worked on developing products that are highly tactile, and technically simple to weave. The tailoring of that process has informed the choice to focus on the materialization of the nuances and subtleties of the single color white in wool. These works favor tactility. Through this experience Sam has become an accomplished weaver and has produced much of the collection. The learnings from this relationship have gone both ways, and weve become acutely aware of the current conditions for blind and visually impaired people. The global unemployment rate for the blind in the US alone tops out at 75%. In Germany the unemployment rate is at 72%. We see an opportunity to provide a creative pathway towards meaningful work.". ...
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The ocular manifestations in type IV oculocutaneous albinism are similar to those of other types. Nystagmus, strabismus, misrouting of neuronal axons, and foveal hypoplasia are prominent features although there is some clinical heterogeneity among patients. Nystagmus may not be present at birth but is almost always evident by 3-4 months of age. The iris may be pale blue or tan and does not generally darken with age. Poor stereopsis is common. Vision is stable after childhood and usually in the range of 20/100-20/400. ...
Webvision summarizes recent advances in knowledge and understanding of the visual system through dedicated chapters and evolving discussion to serve as a clearing house for all things related to retina and vision science.. Contact: [email protected] ...
Devices and methods for visually confirming the positioning of a distal end portion of an illuminating device placed within a patient include inserting a distal end portion of an illuminating device internally into a patient, emitting light from the distal end portion of the illuminating device, observing transillumination resulting from the light emitted from the distal end portion of the illuminating device that occurs on an external surface of the patient, and correlating the location of the observed transillumination on the external surface of the patient with an internal location of the patient that underlies the location of observed transillumination, to confirm positioning of the distal end portion of the illuminating device.
Representative low- and high-magnification transillumination of adult dog myocytes after isolation (day 0) and 1-3 days of culture (day 1, day 3). (a) shows t
These defects may be passed down (inherited) through families.. The most severe form of albinism is called oculocutaneous albinism. People with this type of albinism have white or pink hair, skin, and iris color. They also have vision problems.. Another type of albinism, called ocular albinism type 1 (OA1), affects only the eyes. The persons skin and eye color are usually in the normal range. However, an eye exam will show that there is no coloring in the back of the eye (retina).. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a form of albinism caused by a change to a single gene. It can occur with a bleeding disorder, as well as with lung, kidney, and bowel diseases. ...
Purpose : Albinism is a group of disorders characterised by a lack of pigment and abnormal retinal development. Despite being a common cause for visual impairment world-wide, there are few treatments and patients typically suffer life-long visual disability. To develop a targeted and effective treatment for albinism-linked visual impairment, the role of the pigment synthesis pathway in normal ocular development needs to be interrogated. The aim of this study was to characterise the phenotypic differences in the retina of C57BL/6-c2J (CALB) mouse model of human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) compared to normally pigmented C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Methods : Components of the dopaminergic signalling pathway in the developing retina of untreated CALB and B6 mice were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) at E11, 12, 16, 17 and W4, 5, 6, 8, 12, 16, with n=3 per group per time point. We looked at the distribution of ocular albinism 1 (OA1) and dopaminergic D2 receptors, DOPA decarboxylase (DD) and tyrosine ...
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Transillumination is a useful and inexpensive clinical tool that can be used for a range of conditions including testicular hydrocele. This paper gives a brief overview of the clinical use of transillumination in general, for testicular hydroceles and guidance for photography.
Lone Ferret (previously known under the name Lone Fox) is a francophone furry from France and one of the organisers of Franfurence. His fursona tends to be a white albino ferret. ...
The board certified ophthalmologists at Island Eye Surgicenter in Long Island share their top tips on how to protect your eyes from the summer sun.
Oculocerebral syndrome with hypopigmentation information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, videos, forums, prevention, and prognosis.
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Selected genes are highlighted in orange, bookmarked genes are green. - Chemical increases gene, - Chemical decreases gene, - Chemical increases and decreases gene simultaneosly, No arrows - gene doesnt interact with the chemical. - Gene should be increased/decreased most of the time and the chemical does it. - Gene should be increased/decreased most of the time but the chemical does the opposite. ...
Ocular and oculocutaneous albinism represent a spectrum of disorders with absent or significantly diminished amount of melanin either across different body tissues - skin, hair, eye (Oculocutaneous Albinism 1 and 2), or exclusively in eye tissues only (Ocular Albinism 1) .. The functionality and the clinical findings are diverse (the phenotype), and no direct correlation has been established to the underlying mutations (genotype).. The common ocular phenotype includes iris transillumination, foveal hypoplasia, nystagmus, reduced visual acuity, refractive error, photosensitivity and abnormal development of the visual pathways with characteristic abnormal routing of ganglion cell axons in the chiasma, resulting in abnormal visually evoked potentials. Current treatment options are limited to optical methods and low vision aids.. The mechanism of melanin pigment formation in the RPE cells and its role in the visual pathways and structures development is not completely understood, but a correlation ...
Sometimes the color of a persons eyes are not normal. Here are some interesting causes of this phenomenon.. Heterochromia, for example, is a condition in which the two eyes are different colors, or part of one eye is a different color. This can be caused by genetic inconsistencies, issues that occur during the development of the eye, or acquired later in life due to an injury or disease. Ocular albinism is a condition in which the eye is a very light color due to low levels of pigmentation in the iris, which is the result of a genetic mutation. It is usually accompanied by serious vision problems. Oculocutaneous albinism is a similar mutation in the bodys ability to produce and store melanin that affects skin and hair color in addition to the eyes.. Eye color can also be affected by certain medications. For example, a certain glaucoma eye drop is known to darken light irises to brown, as well as lengthen and darken eyelashes.. ...
Sometimes the color of a persons eyes are not normal. Here are some interesting causes of this phenomenon.. Heterochromia, for example, is a condition in which the two eyes are different colors, or part of one eye is a different color. This can be caused by genetic inconsistencies, issues that occur during the development of the eye, or acquired later in life due to an injury or disease. Ocular albinism is a condition in which the eye is a very light color due to low levels of pigmentation in the iris, which is the result of a genetic mutation. It is usually accompanied by serious vision problems. Oculocutaneous albinism is a similar mutation in the bodys ability to produce and store melanin that affects skin and hair color in addition to the eyes.. Eye color can also be affected by certain medications. For example, a certain glaucoma eye drop is known to darken light irises to brown, as well as lengthen and darken eyelashes.. ...
Sometimes the color of a persons eyes are not normal. Here are some interesting causes of this phenomenon.. Heterochromia, for example, is a condition in which the two eyes are different colors, or part of one eye is a different color. This can be caused by genetic inconsistencies, issues that occur during the development of the eye, or acquired later in life due to an injury or disease. Ocular albinism is a condition in which the eye is a very light color due to low levels of pigmentation in the iris, which is the result of a genetic mutation. It is usually accompanied by serious vision problems. Oculocutaneous albinism is a similar mutation in the bodys ability to produce and store melanin that affects skin and hair color in addition to the eyes.. Eye color can also be affected by certain medications. For example, a certain glaucoma eye drop is known to darken light irises to brown, as well as lengthen and darken eyelashes.. ...
Sometimes the color of a persons eyes are not normal. Here are some interesting causes of this phenomenon.. Heterochromia, for example, is a condition in which the two eyes are different colors, or part of one eye is a different color. This can be caused by genetic inconsistencies, issues that occur during the development of the eye, or acquired later in life due to an injury or disease. Ocular albinism is a condition in which the eye is a very light color due to low levels of pigmentation in the iris, which is the result of a genetic mutation. It is usually accompanied by serious vision problems. Oculocutaneous albinism is a similar mutation in the bodys ability to produce and store melanin that affects skin and hair color in addition to the eyes.. Eye color can also be affected by certain medications. For example, a certain glaucoma eye drop is known to darken light irises to brown, as well as lengthen and darken eyelashes.. ...
Sometimes the color of a persons eyes are not normal. Here are some interesting causes of this phenomenon.. Heterochromia, for example, is a condition in which the two eyes are different colors, or part of one eye is a different color. This can be caused by genetic inconsistencies, issues that occur during the development of the eye, or acquired later in life due to an injury or disease. Ocular albinism is a condition in which the eye is a very light color due to low levels of pigmentation in the iris, which is the result of a genetic mutation. It is usually accompanied by serious vision problems. Oculocutaneous albinism is a similar mutation in the bodys ability to produce and store melanin that affects skin and hair color in addition to the eyes.. Eye color can also be affected by certain medications. For example, a certain glaucoma eye drop is known to darken light irises to brown, as well as lengthen and darken eyelashes.. ...
Ocular Manifestations of Albinism at eMedicine *^ Wallow; Albert (1997). "The color of the human eye: a review of morphologic ... Ocular albinism and eye color. Normally, there is a thick layer of melanin on the back of the iris. Even people with the ... NOAH - What is Albinism? Archived 14 May 2012 at the Wayback Machine. Albinism.org. Retrieved on 23 December 2011. ... The gene OCA2 (OMIM: 203200), when in a variant form, causes the pink eye color and hypopigmentation common in human albinism ...
MITF Waardenburg syndrome/albinism, digenic; 103470; TYR Waardenburg syndrome/ocular albinism, digenic; 103470; MITF Wagner ... OCA2 Albinism, brown; 203290; TYRP1 Albinism, oculocutaneous, type IA; 203100; TYR Albinism, oculocutaneous, type IB; 606952; ... ATP7A Ocular albinism, type I, Nettleship-Falls type; 300500; GPR143 Oculoauricular syndrome; 612109; HMX1 Oculocutaneous ... TYR Albinism, oculocutaneous, type II; 203200; OCA2 Albinism, rufous; 278400; TYRP1 Alcohol sensitivity, acute; 610251; ALDH2 ...
He was diagnosed with ocular albinism. Skelley took up judo as a sport at the age of five. A successful judoka, he was already ...
... deformations in the skeleton Ocular albinism; lack of pigmentation in the eye Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency; ... Fabry disease; A lysosomal storage disease causing anhidrosis, fatigue, angiokeratomas, burning extremity pain and ocular ...
She is legally blind due to ocular albinism. In 2000, aged 28, she left her job in Accenture to launch the Aisling Foundation, ... Casey was diagnosed with ocular albinism as a child but was not personally informed until her 17th birthday. She graduated from ...
TYRP2, for example, is important in the development of correct pigmentation; general and ocular albinism is associated with ... and the vestibulo-ocular reflex accordingly. The vestibulo-ocular reflex, one of the primary areas affected by ... Small KW, Pollock SC, Vance JM, Stajich JM, Pericak-Vance M (June 1996). "Ocular motility in North Carolina autosomal dominant ... These conditions do not consistently cause the symptoms of dizziness and ocular impairment that have been localized to the ...
Ocular albinism type 1 protein is a conserved integral membrane protein with seven transmembrane domains. It is expressed in ... 2006). "Scanning the ocular albinism 1 (OA1) gene for polymorphisms in congenital nystagmus by DHPLC". Ophthalmic Genet. 27 (2 ... 1996). "Analysis of the OA1 gene reveals mutations in only one-third of patients with X-linked ocular albinism". Hum. Mol. ... Oetting WS (2002). "New insights into ocular albinism type 1 (OA1): Mutations and polymorphisms of the OA1 gene". Hum. Mutat. ...
"Ocular albinism: evidence for a defect in an intracellular signal transduction system". Nature Genetics. 23 (1): 108-12. doi: ...
Adie's pupil which fails to constrict in response to light; Aniridia, which is absence of the iris; Albinism where the iris is ... Hemeralopia is known to occur in several ocular conditions. Cone dystrophy and achromatopsia, affecting the cones in the retina ... Rarely it may have ocular complications such as hemeralopia, pigmentary chorioretinitis, optic atrophy or retinal/iris coloboma ...
... ocular albinism, and Prader-Willi syndrome plus albinism". N. Engl. J. Med. 330 (8): 529-34. doi:10.1056/NEJM199402243300803. ... Oculocutaneous albinism caused by mutations in the OCA2 gene is called oculocutaneous albinism type 2. The prevalence of OCA ... "OCA2 - oculocutaneous albinism II". Genetics Home Reference - Your guide to understanding genetic conditions. U.S. National ... Certain mutations in OCA2 result in type 2 oculocutaneous albinism. OCA2 encodes the human homologue of the mouse p (pink-eyed ...
He made important contributions in the research of ocular albinism, retinitis pigmentosa and hereditary night blindness. Prior ...
She has ocular albinism and nystagmus, conditions she was born with, and is 156 centimetres (61 in) tall. Taylor has ...
Ocular albinism affects not only eye pigmentation but visual acuity, as well. People with albinism typically test poorly, ... Oculocutaneous Albinism Archived 2008-12-23 at the Wayback Machine. "Ocular Manifestations of Albinism" "Causes of Variability ... Another form of Albinism, the "yellow oculocutaneous albinism", appears to be more prevalent among the Amish, who are of ... The incidence of albinism in Hopi Indians has been estimated as approximately 1 in 200 individuals. It is interesting to note ...
"Aberrant splicing in the ocular albinism type 1 gene (OA1/GPR143) is corrected in vitro by Morpholino antisense ...
This gene is highly expressed in the retina, and is a strong candidate for ocular albinism type 1 syndrome. Alternatively ...
The Nettleship-Falls syndrome, the most common type of ocular albinism, is named after him and English ophthalmologist Edward ...
... controls expression of the ocular albinism type 1 gene: link between melanin synthesis and melanosome biogenesis". Mol. Cell. ...
... and optic neuronal defects shared in all types of oculocutaneous and ocular albinism". The Alabama Journal of Medical Sciences ... GeneReviews/NCBI/NIH/UW entry on Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 1 Tyrosinase at the US National Library of Medicine Medical ... A mutation in the tyrosinase gene resulting in impaired tyrosinase production leads to type I oculocutaneous albinism, a ... Witkop CJ (Oct 1979). "Albinism: hematologic-storage disease, susceptibility to skin cancer, ...
1993). "The genes for X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): cloning and ... a novel gene for severe ocular malformations?". Mol. Vis. 13: 1475-82. PMID 17893649. GeneReview/NIH/UW entry on Microphthalmia ... a novel gene for severe ocular malformations?". Mol. Vis. 13: 1475-82. PMID 17893649. ...
Jan 2014). "The protein Ocular albinism 1 is the orphan GPCR GPR143 and mediates depressor and bradycardic responses to DOPA in ...
This gene is mapped in close proximity to APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), which are ... between the loci for X-linked ocular albinism (OA1) and microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS)". Hum. Genet. 95 ...
"Key Ocular Signs for Screening". Milesresearch.com. Retrieved 2009-11-19. Dame Miriam Rothschild, by Naomi Gryn, Jewish ... A Japanese review of 11 children with albinism found that the condition was present. All had sectoral/partial heterochromia. ... Ocular melanosis - a condition characterized by increased pigmentation of the uveal tract, episclera, and anterior chamber ... Simple heterochromia - a rare condition characterized by the absence of other ocular or systemic problems. The lighter eye is ...
This gene is located adjacent to the ocular albinism gene and it is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of the ocular ... albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness phenotype. This gene is highly similar to the Y chromosome TBL1Y gene. TBL1X ...
Ocular albinism Ocular coloboma-imperforate anus Ocular convergence spasm Ocular histoplasmosis Ocular melanoma Ocular motility ... Oculocutaneous albinism type 1 Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 Oculocutaneous albinism type 3 Oculocutaneous albinism, ... tyrosinase negative Oculocutaneous albinism, tyrosinase positive Oculocutaneous tyrosinemia Oculodental syndrome Rutherfurd ... disorders Ocular toxoplasmosis Oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum Oculo cerebral dysplasia Oculo cerebro acral syndrome Oculo ...
Since the locus encoding human SHROOM2 lies within the critical region for two distinct forms of ocular albinism, it is ...
People with albinism often have vision loss to the extent that many are legally blind, though few of them actually cannot see. ... is a category of vision loss or visual impairment that is caused by factors unrelated to refractive errors or coexisting ocular ... inflammatory ocular hypertension syndrome (IOHS); 2) severe uveitic angle closure; 3) corticosteroid-induced; and 4) a ... uveitis refers to a complex category of ocular diseases that can cause blindness if either left untreated or improperly ...
Ocular albinism is a form of albinism which, in contrast to oculocutaneous albinism, presents primarily in the eyes.[1] There ... "autosomal recessive ocular albinism" ("AROA") is used, it usually refers to mild variants of oculocutaneous albinism rather ... Ocular albinism, type 1 (OA1). 300500. GPR143. Also known as Nettleship-Falls syndrome,[4][5][6] is the most common variety of ... "Ocular albinism - Genetics Home Reference".. *^ James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005). Andrews Diseases of the ...
keywords = "Genetics, Ocular albinism, X-linked",. author = "Lam, {Byron L} and Fingert, {J. H.} and Shutt, {B. C.} and ... Clinical and molecular characterization of a family affected with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1). / Lam, Byron L; Fingert, J. H ... Clinical and molecular characterization of a family affected with X-linked ocular albinism (OA1). Ophthalmic Genetics. 1997 Dec ... N2 - Thirty-one members of a family affected with X-linked ocular albinism (OAI) were studied to characterize the clinical ...
Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 explanation free. What is Oculocutaneous albinism type 2? Meaning of Oculocutaneous albinism ... Looking for online definition of Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 in the Medical Dictionary? ... ocular albinism type 2, Oculocutaneous albinism type 3, oculocutaneous albinism type 1B Albinism. Definition. Albinism is an ... The other type of albinism is ocular albinism type 1 (OA1). It is inherited either as an X-linked or less commonly as an ...
... t not found in 200 unrelated controls was identified and co-segregated with X-linked ocular albinism (XLOA) in this family. The ... A novel GPR143 mutation in a Chinese family with X-linked ocular albinism type 1. Xu-hui Gao, Tiecheng Liu, +4 authors Mao-nian ... Identification of a Novel Mutation in a Chinese Family with X-Linked Ocular Albinism. Yuanyuan Wang, Xiao-hui Guo, +3 authors ... Molecular genetic and clinical evaluation of three Chinese families with X-linked ocular albinism. Xuan Zou, Hui Li, +4 authors ...
... but no ocular disorders when they were born, pigment was accumulated over time and with sun exposure. ... Purpose: Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder. The most common type OCA1 and OCA2 are caused by ... Conclusions: This study expands the mutation spectrum of oculocutaneous albinism. It is the first report that c.549_510delGT ... Yun Wang; Mutational analysis of TYR and OCA2 genes in four Chinese families with oculocutaneous albinism. Invest. Ophthalmol. ...
Ocular albinism is a genetic condition that primarily affects the eyes. Explore symptoms, inheritance, genetics of this ... Genetic Testing Registry: Ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness *Genetic Testing Registry: Ocular albinism, ... The most common form of ocular albinism is known as the Nettleship-Falls type or type 1. Other forms of ocular albinism are ... medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/ocular-albinism/ Ocular albinism. ...
Ocular albinism type 1 (OA1), also called Nettleship-Falls syndrome, is the most common type of ocular albinism, with a ... Albinism may manifest itself as oculocutaneous (OCA) or just ocular (OA). There occur at least ten different types of OCA and ... Ocular albinism results from defects in the melanin system, which may arise from either defects in the OA1 receptor, or ... Samaraweera, P., Shen, B., Newton, J.M., Barsh, G.S. and Orlow, S.J. (2001). The mouse ocular albinism 1 gene product is an ...
Click on a [studies] link to search within your current results for studies in that region. Use the back button to return to this list and try another region ...
Visual Function and Ocular Pigmentation in Albinism. Brief Summary To study the relationship between visual function and ocular ... Visual function and ocular pigmentation are being studied in patients with albinism and other disorders associated with ... Visual Function and Ocular Pigmentation in Albinism. This study has been completed. ... Visual Function and Ocular Pigmentation in Albinism. Official Title ...
Synonyms: autosomal recessive Waardenburg syndrome type 2 with ocular albinism; digenic Waardenburg syndrome/albinism; digenic ... Synonyms: autosomal recessive Waardenburg syndrome type 2 with ocular albinism; digenic Waardenburg syndrome/albinism; digenic ... Waardenburg syndrome/ocular albinism; WS2-OA Alt IDs: OMIM:103470, ICD10CM:E70.3, ORDO:352740 Definition: An ocular albinism ... Human Disease Modeled: ocular albinism with sensorineural deafness. Associated Mouse Gene: Mitf Allelic Composition. Genetic ...
What is Ocular Albinism? Meaning of Ocular Albinism as a legal term. What does Ocular Albinism mean in law? ... Definition of Ocular Albinism in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... Related to Ocular Albinism: nystagmus, Oculocutaneous albinism, ocular albinism type 2, ocular albinism type 1 ... Ocular Albinism legal definition of Ocular Albinism https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Ocular+Albinism ...
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E70.318 - Other ocular albinism. SNOMEDCT:. 26399002 - Ocular albinism. Look For. Subscription Required ... There are 3 types of ocular albinism: type 1 (OA1), type 2, and ocular albinism with sensorineural deafness. OA1, also known as ... Ocular albinism. Subscriber Sign In VisualDx Mobile Feedback Select Language Share Enter a Symptom, Medication, or Diagnosis. ... Ocular albinism (OA) is a genetic disease characterized by impaired synthesis of the pigment melanin. ...
... list providing answers to our most frequently asked questions on ocular albinism and oculocutaneous albinism. ... Looking for answers on ocular albinism? Take a look at our comprehensive ... FAQ about Ocular Albinism (OA) and Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA):. 1.) What is ocular albinism (OA)? Human albinism can be ... Historically, X-linked ocular albinism is also called Nettleship-Falls ocular albinism, after the two physicians who defined ...
To elucidate the molecular genetics defect of ocular cutaneous albinism. Methods:: One member of a family affected with ocular ... A Novel Mutation in TRP1 Gene in an Ocular Cutaneous Albinism Patient ... A Novel Mutation in TRP1 Gene in an Ocular Cutaneous Albinism Patient ... A Novel Mutation in TRP1 Gene in an Ocular Cutaneous Albinism Patient. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2007;48(13):1318. ...
... Clinical Characteristics. Ocular Features: Signs in ocular albinism include hypopigmentation of the ... New Insights Into Ocular Albinism Type 1 (OA1): Mutations and Polymorphisms of the OA1 Gene [13]. Oetting WS. New Insights Into ... Ocular albinism with infertility and late-onset sensorineural hearing loss [7]. Fabian-Jessing BK, Vestergaard EM, Plomp AS, ... Ocular albinism (OA1) is a recessive X-linked disorder, caused by mutations in the GPR143 [2] gene, located at Xp22.3. The ...
Albinism, Oculocutaneous, Type III. Clinical Characteristics. Ocular Features: The irides may be multicolored with the central ... Oculocutaneous albinism. Gronskov K, Ek J, Brondum-Nielsen K. Oculocutaneous albinism. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2007 Nov 2;2:43. ... This tyrosinase-positive type of albinism is sometimes called rufous (ROCA) or brown (BOCA) oculocutaneous albinism and is ... Rufous oculocutaneous albinism in southern African Blacks is caused by mutations in the TYRP1 gene. Manga P, Kromberg JG, Box ...
MalaCards based summary : Ocular Albinism, also known as albinism, ocular, is related to albinism, ocular, with late-onset ... Diseases in the Ocular Albinism family:. Albinism, Ocular, Type I Diseases related to Ocular Albinism via text searches within ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Ocular Albinism:. Name: Ocular Albinism 12 76 25 37 29 6 15 ... albinism, ocular, with late-onset sensorineural deafness 33.7. MITF TYR 2. albinism, ocular, with sensorineural deafness 33.6. ...
... ocular, with late-onset sensorineural deafness and ocular albinism. An important gene associated with Ocular Albinism with ... Albinism, Ocular, with Late-Onset Sensorineural Deafness Diseases related to Ocular Albinism with Congenital Sensorineural ... MalaCards integrated aliases for Ocular Albinism with Congenital Sensorineural Deafness:. Name: Ocular Albinism with Congenital ... Ocular Albinism with Congenital Sensorineural Deafness, also known as waardenburg syndrome type 2 with ocular albinism, is ...
Ocular albinism with congenital sensorineural deafness disease page. Quantitative data and detailed annnotation of the targets ... Ocular albinism with congenital sensorineural deafness. GtoPdb Disease Summaries. This section gives an overview of the disease ... No ligand related data available for Ocular albinism with congenital sensorineural deafness ...
Albinism results from defective production of melanin from tyrosine through a complex pathway of metabolic reactions. ... Albinism consists of a group of inherited abnormalities of melanin synthesis and are typically characterized by a congenital ... Mutations of the P gene in oculocutaneous albinism, ocular albinism, and Prader-Willi syndrome plus albinism. N Engl J Med. ... encoded search term (Albinism) and Albinism What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * White Blood Cell ...
... ocular? Find out information about Albinism, ocular. The state of having colorless chromatophores, which results in the absence ... Related to Albinism, ocular: Oculocutaneous albinism, ocular migraine, ocular albinism type 1, ocular albinism type 2 albinism ... Albinism, ocular , Article about Albinism, ocular by The Free Dictionary https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Albinism% ... albinism. (redirected from Albinism, ocular). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical. ...
Ocular Albinism, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome, Chediak-Higashi Syndrome testing with next generation sequencing of a multigene ... Oculocutaneous Albinism, Ocular Albinism, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome, Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. NGS panel. Genes. (full. coding ... Oculocutaneous Albinism, Ocular Albinism, Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome, Chediak-Higashi Syndrome *List of diseases covered by ... ocular albinism).. Additionally, there are also syndromic forms of albinism such as Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and Chediak- ...
... ocular albinism-both parents most carry a defective OCA gene by Mario TooDank , This newsletter was created with Smore, an ... Ocular albinism. For some people, albinism affects only their eyes. This is known as ocular albinism. ... Ocular albinism. For some people, albinism affects only their eyes. This is known as ocular albinism. ... One person in 17,000 has some type of albinism. Albinism affects people from all races. Most children with albinism are born to ...
Ocular albinism--an X-linked albinism where there are vision problems without changes in skin or hair ... People with the most common forms of Type 1 and Type 2 albinism and ocular albinism have a normal lifespan. ... Amelioration of both functional and morphological abnormalities in the retina of a mouse model of ocular albinism following AAV ... Albinism affects the amount of pigment found in the skin, hair, and eyes. People with albinism usually have little to no ...
  • Although people with albinism may experience a variety of eye problems, one of the myths about albinism is that it causes people to have pink or red eyes. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In fact, people with albinism can have irises varying from light gray or blue to brown. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • If people with albinism seem to have reddish eyes, it's because light is being reflected from the back of the eye (retina) in much the same way as happens when people are photographed with an electronic flash. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Affected males with X-linked ocular albinism can have a visual disability that ranges from almost none to legal blindness, and the female carriers can have variable retinal pigmentary appearance. (elsevier.com)
  • Albinism is an inherited condition present at birth, characterized by a lack of pigment that normally gives color to the skin, hair, and eyes. (thefreedictionary.com)
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