A syndrome characterized by a silent and inert state without voluntary motor activity despite preserved sensorimotor pathways and vigilance. Bilateral FRONTAL LOBE dysfunction involving the anterior cingulate gyrus and related brain injuries are associated with this condition. This may result in impaired abilities to communicate and initiate motor activities. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p348; Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr 1995 Feb;63(2):59-67)
The inability to generate oral-verbal expression, despite normal comprehension of speech. This may be associated with BRAIN DISEASES or MENTAL DISORDERS. Organic mutism may be associated with damage to the FRONTAL LOBE; BRAIN STEM; THALAMUS; and CEREBELLUM. Selective mutism is a psychological condition that usually affects children characterized by continuous refusal to speak in social situations by a child who is able and willing to speak to selected persons. Kussmal aphasia refers to mutism in psychosis. (From Fortschr Neurol Psychiatr 1994; 62(9):337-44)

Aggravation of brainstem symptoms caused by a large superior cerebellar artery aneurysm after embolization by Guglielmi detachable coils--case report. (1/22)

An 81-year-old male presented with right oculomotor nerve paresis and left hemiparesis caused by a mass effect of a large superior cerebellar artery aneurysm. Endovascular treatment was performed using Guglielmi detachable coils. The patient subsequently suffered aggravation of the mass effect 3 weeks after the embolization. Bilateral vertebral artery occlusion was performed, which decreased the cerebral edema surrounding the aneurysm, but his neurological symptoms did not improve. Parent artery occlusion is recommended as the first choice of treatment for an unclippable large or giant aneurysm causing a mass effect on the brainstem.  (+info)

Residual cerebral activity and behavioural fragments can remain in the persistently vegetative brain. (2/22)

This report identifies evidence of partially functional cerebral regions in catastrophically injured brains. To study five patients in a persistent vegetative state (PVS) with different behavioural features, we employed [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), MRI and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) responses to sensory stimulation. Each patient's brain expressed a unique metabolic pattern. In three of the five patients, co-registered PET/MRI correlate islands of relatively preserved brain metabolism with isolated fragments of behaviour. Two patients had suffered anoxic injuries and demonstrated marked decreases in overall cerebral metabolism to 30-40% of normal. Two other patients with non-anoxic, multifocal brain injuries demonstrated several isolated brain regions with relatively higher metabolic rates, that ranged up to 50-80% of normal. Nevertheless, their global metabolic rates remained <50% of normal. MEG recordings from three PVS patients provide clear evidence for the absence, abnormality or reduction of evoked responses. Despite major abnormalities, however, these data also provide evidence for localized residual activity at the cortical level. Each patient partially preserved restricted sensory representations, as evidenced by slow evoked magnetic fields and gamma band activity. In two patients, these activations correlate with isolated behavioural patterns and metabolic activity. Remaining active regions identified in the three PVS patients with behavioural fragments appear to consist of segregated corticothalamic networks that retain connectivity and partial functional integrity. A single patient who suffered severe injury to the tegmental mesencephalon and paramedian thalamus showed widely preserved cortical metabolism, and a global average metabolic rate of 65% of normal. The relatively high preservation of cortical metabolism in this patient defines the first functional correlate of clinical- pathological reports associating permanent unconsciousness with structural damage to these regions. The specific patterns of preserved metabolic activity identified in these patients do not appear to represent random survivals of a few neuronal islands; rather they reflect novel evidence of the modular nature of individual functional networks that underlie conscious brain function. The variations in cerebral metabolism in chronic PVS patients indicate that some cerebral regions can retain partial function in catastrophically injured brains.  (+info)

Posterior encephalopathy subsequent to cyclosporin A presenting as irreversible abulia. (3/22)

A case of cyclosporin A (Cys A)-induced posterior encephalopathy developed into persistent abulia despite rapid and marked improvement of abnormal T2- and FLAIR MRI hyperintense regions. Diffusion-weighted MRI signal intensity was also high at the onset. This change is atypical in Cys A-induced encephalopathy and was thought to predict poor recovery from the encephalopathy. Persistent abulia was probably due to marked hypoperfusion in the whole cortex including bilateral frontal lobes and basal ganglia as detected by SPECT. Apart from the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, direct toxicity of Cys A to the brain may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic, irreversible encephalopathy.  (+info)

Leukoencephalopathy induced by tegafur: serial studies of somatosensory evoked potentials and cerebrospinal fluid. (4/22)

A case of leukoencephalopathy induced by tegafur, an antineoplastic derivative of 5-FU, is reported. The patient received 600 mg of tegafur p.o. for 16 days before excision of rectal cancer. After the operation, gait disturbance and mental abnormalities appeared. He became akinetic and mute within a few days following readministration of tegafur. Serial studies of brain CT, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) were made, and myelin basic proteins (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid were measured. The level of MBP was about twice the normal value and the central conduction time (CCT) of SEP was prolonged at admission. The value of MBP and CCT improved with recovery from akinetic mutism.  (+info)

Abulia following penetrating brain injury during endoscopic sinus surgery with disruption of the anterior cingulate circuit: case report. (5/22)

BACKGROUND: It is common knowledge that the frontal lobes mediate complex human behavior and that damage to these regions can cause executive dysfunction, apathy, disinhibition and personality changes. However, it is less well known that subcortical structures such as the caudate and thalamus are part of functionally segregated fronto-subcortical circuits, that can also alter behavior after injury. CASE PRESENTATION We present a 57 year old woman who suffered penetrating brain injury during endoscopic sinus surgery causing right basal ganglia injury which resulted in an abulic syndrome. CONCLUSION: Abulia does not result solely from cortical injury but can occur after disruption anywhere in the anterior cingulate circuit--in the case of our patient, most prominently at the right caudate.  (+info)

MRI findings from a case of fulminating adult-onset measles encephalitis. (6/22)

We report a rare case of fulminating adult-onset measles encephalitis. A 34-year-old man developed a comatose state after measles eruptions and ultimately akinetic mutism. Titers of anti-measles IgM antibodies were elevated in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3 months after onset revealed widespread hyperintense lesions in the periventricular white matter and marginal hyperintense lesions in the brainstem on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted images. The marginal lesions in the brainstem are similar to subpial demyelinating lesions seen in postinfectious encephalomyelitis. This case of encephalitis may be related to an autoimmune-mediated process triggered by measles infection.  (+info)

Akinetic mutism after right internal watershed infarction. (7/22)

We describe a 72-year-old man who developed akinetic mutism following a cerebrovascular accident involving his right internal watershed area and responded well to dopaminergic agonists. We discuss this rare condition and the unusual unilateral location of the lesion.  (+info)

Akinetic mutism responsive to bromocriptine following subdural hematoma evacuation in a patient with hydrocephalus. (8/22)

An 11-year-old girl with obstructive hydrocephalus developed akinetic mutism after treatment for hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis by ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting. Bilateral chronic subdural hematomas developed about 2 months after insertion of the VP shunt and were evacuated. Postoperatively, the patient developed akinetic mutism, but her condition improved after administration of bromocriptine. Absence of abnormalities on dopamine transporter single photon emission computed tomography, lack of clinical response to levodopa treatment, and normal homovanillic acid concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid all indicated normal dopamine production. Pressure on the periventricular monoamine projections in the thalamus and hypothalamus without major dopamine deprivation in the striatum may have been the most important factors in the development of akinetic mutism in this patient.  (+info)

Akinetic mutism is a neurological condition characterized by a severe decrease in initiating and sustaining voluntary movements and speech, along with a decreased level of responsiveness to the environment. It is often caused by damage to the frontal lobe of the brain, particularly to the anterior cingulate cortex and its connections to other parts of the brain.

People with akinetic mutism may appear awake and have their eyes open, but they are generally unresponsive to external stimuli and do not initiate voluntary movements or speech on their own. They may occasionally respond to direct questions or commands, but their responses are often limited and delayed. The condition can be caused by various factors, including brain injury, stroke, tumors, infections, or degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

Akinetic mutism is distinct from a vegetative state, which is characterized by the absence of both awareness and sleep-wake cycles. In contrast, people with akinetic mutism may retain some degree of awareness and have sleep-wake cycles, although their level of responsiveness is significantly reduced.

1. Mutism (also known as Selective Mutism) is a psychological disorder where a person becomes unable to speak in specific situations or around certain people, despite having normal language skills. It's most commonly diagnosed in children and can lead to significant distress and impairment in social communication and academic performance. The exact cause of mutism isn't well understood, but it's believed to be related to anxiety and social phobias.
2. In a medical context, Mutism may also refer to a symptom characterized by the loss of speech due to neurological or psychological conditions, such as after a stroke or head injury, or in response to severe emotional trauma. This is different from Selective Mutism, which is a specific anxiety disorder that occurs in certain situations and not others.

... is a medical condition where patients tend neither to move (akinesia) nor speak (mutism). Akinetic mutism was ... Akinetic mutism can also occur as a result of damage to the mesencephalic region of the brain. Mesencephalic akinetic mutism is ... However, akinetic mutism most often appears in two different forms: frontal and mesencephalic. Akinetic mutism can occur in the ... When the anterior cingulate cortex is damaged, it can result in akinetic mutism.[citation needed] Akinetic mutism is a symptom ...
Akinetic mutism Hyperkinesia "Bradykinesia". B. Kolb, I. Whishaw (2011). An Introduction to Brain and Behavior. p. 373. Ling, ...
Johnson J (1984). "Stupor and akinetic mutism". Contemporary Neurology. pp. 96-102. doi:10.1016/B978-0-407-00308-8.50018-5. ... featuring the curious symptom of waxy flexibility and the state produced by the drug has been compared to Akinetic mutism. The ...
Akinetic mutism has been associated with structural damage in a variety of brain areas. Akinetic mutism and catatonia may both ... Akinetic mutism is a neurological disorder characterized by a decrease in goal-directed behavior and motivation; however, the ... Differentiating both disorders is the fact that akinetic mutism does not present with echolalia, echopraxia, or posturing. ... Akinetic mutism Autistic catatonia Awakenings (1990 biopic about catatonic patients, based on Oliver Sacks's book of the same ...
Aboulia Akinetic mutism Athymhormia Huntington's disease Progressive supranuclear palsy Laplane, D.; Dubois, B. (2001). "Auto‐ ...
The conditions of akinetic mutism and negative symptoms are closely related. In akinetic mutism, a stroke or other lesion to ... the anterior cingulate cortex causes reduction in movement (akinetic) and speech (mutism). Anhedonia occurs in roughly 70% of ...
Anterior corpus callosum lesions may result in akinetic mutism or anomic aphasia. See also: Alien hand syndrome Dyslexia ...
In severe cases, patients may enter a coma-like state (akinetic mutism).[citation needed] Patients may also experience abnormal ...
In the case of akinetic mutism, many patients describe that as soon as they "will" or attempt a movement, a "counter-will" or " ... Most experts agreed that abulia is clinically distinct from depression, akinetic mutism, and alexithymia. However, only 32% ... and one could easily see an extreme case of abulia as akinetic mutism or a lesser case of abulia as apathy and therefore, not ... akinetic mutism. It's well documented that the caudate nucleus is involved in degenerative diseases of the central nervous ...
Dubois, Borz, and his men invade the apartment of Bernard Hersch, who suffers akinetic mutism. Dubois knew Bernard as Erich ...
The final or terminal stage is characterized by stretching spasms, akinetic mutism, hypotonic paresis, central pyrexia, and ...
Myoclonus persists "even in the late stages of the disease" and even "when patients are unconscious". Akinetic mutism were ...
... pathway Antipsychotic Tardive dyskinesia Tolerance Withdrawal Motivational salience Apathy Abulia Akinetic mutism Dreyer JL ( ...
A rare cause of mutism is akinetic mutism which results due to a lesion around the third ventricle of the brain. Apperception ... Aphemia is the alternate term for mutism. Mutism is absence of speech with apparently normal level of consciousness. Mutism can ... mutism, echolalia (imitating speech), or echopraxia (imitating movements). There is a catatonic subtype of schizophrenia. Cerea ...
... or akinetic mutism. This area is also prominently affected in traumatic brain injuries. One postmortem study of patients with ...
Bilateral ischemia of the area supplied by the paramedian artery can cause serious problems including akinetic mutism, and be ...
If a person can demonstrate ability in voluntary usage of limbs, catatonia and akinetic mutism are most likely ruled out from ... Patients with catatonia or akinetic mutism are not able to perform voluntary commands that involve the use of limbs, while ... In determining a diagnosis between with catatonia, akinetic mutism, and FCMS, a person must demonstrate their ability to ... FCMS shares similar characteristics with the following disorders: catatonia, akinetic mutism, orobuccal apraxia, Broca's ...
Aboulia Akinetic mutism Akrasia Categorical imperative Neuroscience of free will Time management Vīrya Volition (psychology) ...
Audrey's family contended that she was in a state called akinetic mutism - unable to speak and with limited movement, but fully ...
... falls in the less extreme spectrum of diminished motivation, with abulia in the middle and akinetic mutism being more ...
... and akinetic mutism. There is evidence that damage to ACC is present in patients with schizophrenia, where studies have shown ...
Differential brain imaging of patients with such global disturbances of consciousness (including akinetic mutism) reveal that ...
... akinetic mutism, general retardation "frontal release" signs, i.e. reappearance of primitive reflexes such as the snout reflex ...
... akinetic mutism MeSH C10.228.140.055 - amblyopia MeSH C10.228.140.060 - amnesia, transient global MeSH C10.228.140.068 - ... mutism MeSH C10.597.606.150.500.800.750 - stuttering MeSH C10.597.606.150.550 - learning disorders MeSH C10.597.606.150.550.200 ...
... akinetic mutism and disconnection syndromes. The foramina were named after the Scottish physician and University of Edinburgh ...
Frontal abulic syndrome Loss of initiative, creativity and curiosity Pervasive emotional apathy and blandness Akinetic mutism ... "Mutism in the Older Adult". Schott, J. M.; Rossor, M. N. (2003-05-01). "The grasp and other primitive reflexes". Journal of ... With more severe impairment there may be echolalia or mutism. Neurological examination may show primitive reflexes (also known ...
... akinetic mutism, blindsight, visual anosognosia), common neurologic syndromes (seizures, aphasia, amnesia, parkinsonism), ...
Akinetic mutism List of people with locked-in syndrome The Diving Bell and the Butterfly: memoirs of journalist Jean-Dominique ...
... akinetic mutism, slowness and lack of spontaneity Urinary incontinence which usually occurs with bilateral damage in the acute ...
Lesions in this area can lead to low drive states such as apathy, abulia or akinetic mutism and may also result in low drive ...
Akinetic mutism is a medical condition where patients tend neither to move (akinesia) nor speak (mutism). Akinetic mutism was ... Akinetic mutism can also occur as a result of damage to the mesencephalic region of the brain. Mesencephalic akinetic mutism is ... However, akinetic mutism most often appears in two different forms: frontal and mesencephalic. Akinetic mutism can occur in the ... When the anterior cingulate cortex is damaged, it can result in akinetic mutism.[citation needed] Akinetic mutism is a symptom ...
Forgetfulness, visuospatial perceptual problems, difficulties walking, action tremor, akinetic mutism. Spongiform change most ...
Patients with lesions affecting the cingulate cortex typically develop akinetic mutism.. * Patients with inferior mesial (basal ...
When akinetic mutism commenced (average 7.5 weeks), runs of frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity (FIRDA), like that ... 44] At the onset (mean 8.7 weeks) of periodic slow-wave complexes (PSWC), 5 patients already had progressed to akinetic mutism ... describing a 72-year-old patient with von Recklinghausen disease who exhibited akinetic mutism within 6 months of the onset of ... Rigid and akinetic forms of Huntingtons chorea. Arch Neurol (Chicago). 1962. 7:275-288. ...
Akinetic Mutism. The term body therapy includes various treatment techniques that are used to improve posture. Movement ...
Akinetic Mutism 100% * Communication 40% * Imagery 40% * EU - DECODER - Deployment of Brain-Computer Interfaces for the ...
Akinetic Mutism Entry term(s). Akinetic Autism Akinetic Mutisms Autism, Akinetic Coma Vigil Coma Vigilans Mutism, Akinetic ... Akinetic Autism. Akinetic Mutisms. Autism, Akinetic. Coma Vigil. Coma Vigilans. Mutism, Akinetic. Vigil, Coma. Vigils, Coma. ... Akinetic Mutism - Preferred Concept UI. M0000615. Scope note. A syndrome characterized by a silent and inert state without ...
Unconsciousness or unresponsiveness in akinetic mutism? Insights from a multimodal longitudinal exploration. Comanducci, Angela ...
The prefrontal cortex was not always affected in these cases.[14] Paraparesis and akinetic mutism were also documented in the ... One case of akinetic mutism reversal with L-dopa therapy has been reported.[26] ... Deborah G,Ong E,Nighoghossian N, Akinetic mutism reversibility after L-dopa therapy in unilateral left anterior cerebral artery ...
One of the most disabling late effects of posterior fossa tumour surgery is the cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) which has been ... Caner H, Altinors N, Benli S, Calisaneller T, Albayrak A. Akinetic mutism after fourth ventricle choroid plexus papilloma: ... The cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) refers to the constellation of transient mutism, ataxia, hypotonia and irritability ... Cerebellar mutism is thought to be caused by bilateral disturbance of the dentate nuclei and/or their efferents [16, 20,21,22, ...
Chapter 1876 Akinetic Mutism * Altmetric Badge. Chapter 1877 Alien Hand Syndrome * Altmetric Badge ...
Many cases of school refusal or elective mutism might be included here. Overanxious reaction of childhood and adolescence ... akinetic typical atonic Petit mal 345.1 Generalized convulsive epilepsy Epileptic seizures: Grand mal clonic Major epilepsy ... Some cases of elective mutism might be included here. Withdrawing reaction of childhood or adolescence Excludes: infantile ... 309.8 Other Adjustment reaction with elective mutism Hospitalism in children NOS 309.9 Unspecified Adaptation reaction NOS ...
Mutism in the older population in not uncommon and may have one of many causes, including severe depression, locked-in syndrome ... Akinetic Mutism. Following the landmark case report of Cairns et al.,[8] the term akinetic mutism (AM) has been used to ... One is related to the mesencephalic region and is described as apathetic akinetic mutism or somnolent mutism. The other is ... known as hyperpathic akinetic mutism and is associated with bilateral frontal damage (Figure 2).[9] ...
In April 1995, she developed generalized myoclonic jerks and akinetic mutism. An electroencephalograph showed a 6- to 10-Hz ...
In April 1995, she developed generalized myoclonic jerks and akinetic mutism. An electroencephalograph showed a 6- to 10-Hz ...
Akinetic mutism ensued. At autopsy, major abnormalities were limited to the nervous system and skin. Spongiform encephalopathy ...
Patients with lesions affecting the cingulate cortex typically develop akinetic mutism.. * Patients with inferior mesial (basal ...
Japanese & Amish origin; akinetic mutism seen in advanced disease; psychiatric disease. GBA2 ...
Akinetic mutism (disorder). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Akinetic mutism (disorder). Concept Status. Published. ... Akinetic apraxia (finding) {11443001 , SNOMED-CT } Communication, speech and language finding (finding) {284530008 , SNOMED-CT ...
Akinetic Autism Coma Vigil Coma Vigilans Mutism, Akinetic NLM Classification #. WL 348. Previous Indexing. Mutism (1966-1970). ... Akinetic Mutism Preferred Term Term UI T001241. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1971). ... Akinetic Mutism Preferred Concept UI. M0000615. Scope Note. A syndrome characterized by a silent and inert state without ... Mutism, Akinetic Term UI T001240. Date03/29/1974. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID UNK (19XX). ...
Akinetic Autism Coma Vigil Coma Vigilans Mutism, Akinetic NLM Classification #. WL 348. Previous Indexing. Mutism (1966-1970). ... Akinetic Mutism Preferred Term Term UI T001241. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1971). ... Akinetic Mutism Preferred Concept UI. M0000615. Scope Note. A syndrome characterized by a silent and inert state without ... Mutism, Akinetic Term UI T001240. Date03/29/1974. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID UNK (19XX). ...
... akinetic mutism Am,alcoholic male Am,alveolar macrophage Am,alveolar mucosa Am,americium Am,ammeter Am,ampicillin Am, ...
Mutism, Akinetic See Akinetic Mutism Mutism, Conversion See Mutism Mutism, Elective See Mutism ...
She remained in a state of akinetic mutism and died in June 2004, ≈32 months after illness onset. ...
53333005 Akinetic mutism (disorder) 53529004 Chronic gonococcal salpingitis (disorder) 53509000 Myopathy in Cushings disease ( ... 61947007 Deaf mutism (disorder) 25289003 Hyperacusis (disorder) 219334005 Injury of unknown intent by firearms and explosives ( ... 71959007 Elective mutism (disorder) 71938000 Hypercalciuria (disorder) 71908006 Ventricular fibrillation (disorder) 72042002 ...
Clinically, these included dysexecutive syndrome, language disturbances, akinetic mutism and delirium. EEG showed a prevalence ...
... akinetic mutism Am,alcoholic male Am,alveolar macrophage Am,alveolar mucosa Am,americium Am,ammeter Am,ampicillin Am, ...
Akinetic T001241Akinetic Mutism T001242AKR Virus T001242AKR Viruses T001242Virus, AKR T001242Viruses, AKR T001243Alabama ... T010605DEAE Dextran T010605DEAE-Dextran T010606Diethylaminoethyldextran T010607Pulsar T010608Deaf Mutism T010609Deaf-Mutism ... Akinetic T014733Epilepsy, Petit Mal T014733Petit Mal Epilepsies T014734Petit Mal Epilepsy T014735Pyknolepsies T014735Pyknolepsy ... Airway T001236Ajmaline T001237Gilurtymal T001238Tachmalin T001239Lorajmine T001240Akinetic Mutisms T001240Mutism, ...
Akinetic Mutism [C10.228.140.042] * Amblyopia [C10.228.140.055] * Amnesia, Transient Global [C10.228.140.060] ...
Akinetic Mutism AKR murine leukemia virus Alabama Alagille Syndrome Alamethicin Alangiaceae Alanine Alanine Dehydrogenase ...
Mutism (no, or very little, verbal response) - This is not applicable if there is established aphasia ... Akinetic-rigid syndrome. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis [4] Arachnoid cyst in right parietal region ... He did not speak; he demonstrated mutism. He exhibited negativism. There were no apparent responses to questions. His mother ...
Functional tests 274 Hearing aids 276 Treatment 280 Deaf-mutism NOSE AND ACCESSORY SINUSES ^300 General works 301 Anatomy. ... WA 275 Akamushi disease WC 630 Akinetic epilepsy WL 385 Alalia WM 475 Albinism WR 265 Albrights disease WE 250 Albumen QU 55 ... WA 54 Deaf HV Deaf-mutism WV 280 Deafness WV 270 Treatment WV 276 Death W 800 Decalcification WE 250 Decay, Dental WU 270 ...
  • Other causes of akinetic mutism are as follows: Respiratory arrest and cerebral hypoxia Acute cases of encephalitis lethargica Meningitis Hydrocephalus Trauma Tumors Aneurysms Olfactory groove meningioma Cyst in third ventricle Toxical lesions and infections of central nervous system Delayed post-hypoxic leukoencephalopathy (DPHL) Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (mesencephalic form) Akinetic mutism can be misdiagnosed as depression, delirium, or locked-in syndrome, all of which are common following a stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • Similarly to akinetic mutism, patients with locked-in syndrome experience paralysis and can only communicate with their eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Akinetic mutism can occur in the frontal region of the brain and occurs because of bilateral frontal lobe damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with lesions affecting the cingulate cortex typically develop akinetic mutism. (medscape.com)
  • Akinetic mutism is a medical condition where patients tend neither to move (akinesia) nor speak (mutism). (wikipedia.org)
  • Akinetic mutism was first described in 1941 as a mental state where patients lack the ability to move or speak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with akinetic mutism are not paralyzed, but lack the will to move. (wikipedia.org)
  • Akinetic mutism varies across all patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Akinetic mutism is a symptom during the final stages of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (a rare degenerative brain disease) and can help diagnose patients with this disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with depression can experience apathy, slurring of speech, and body movements similar to akinetic mutism. (wikipedia.org)
  • A variety of treatments for akinetic mutism have been documented, but treatments vary between patients and cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the most disabling late effects of posterior fossa tumour surgery is the cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) which has been reported in up to 39% of the patients but the exact incidence is uncertain since milder cases may be unrecognized. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, akinetic mutism most often appears in two different forms: frontal and mesencephalic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Akinetic mutism as a result of frontal lobe damage is clinically characterized as hyperpathic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Akinetic mutism is often the result of severe frontal lobe injury in which the pattern of inhibitory control is one of increasing passivity and gradually decreasing speech and motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Akinetic mutism can also occur as a result of damage to the mesencephalic region of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with lesions affecting the cingulate cortex typically develop akinetic mutism. (medscape.com)
  • [ 8 ] the term akinetic mutism (AM) has been used to describe a syndrome characterized by marked reduction of nearly all motor functions, including facial expression, gestures, and speech output, but with some degree of alertness. (medscape.com)