Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
Any impairment, arrest, or reversal of the normal flow of INTESTINAL CONTENTS toward the ANAL CANAL.
Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.
Blockage in any part of the URETER causing obstruction of urine flow from the kidney to the URINARY BLADDER. The obstruction may be congenital, acquired, unilateral, bilateral, complete, partial, acute, or chronic. Depending on the degree and duration of the obstruction, clinical features vary greatly such as HYDRONEPHROSIS and obstructive nephropathy.
Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.
Measure of the maximum amount of air that can be expelled in a given number of seconds during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination . It is usually given as FEV followed by a subscript indicating the number of seconds over which the measurement is made, although it is sometimes given as a percentage of forced vital capacity.
Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.
A form of bronchial disorder with three distinct components: airway hyper-responsiveness (RESPIRATORY HYPERSENSITIVITY), airway INFLAMMATION, and intermittent AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION. It is characterized by spasmodic contraction of airway smooth muscle, WHEEZING, and dyspnea (DYSPNEA, PAROXYSMAL).
Pathological processes involving any part of the LARYNX which coordinates many functions such as voice production, breathing, swallowing, and coughing.
Measurement of volume of air inhaled or exhaled by the lung.
The structural changes in the number, mass, size and/or composition of the airway tissues.
The volume of air that is exhaled by a maximal expiration following a maximal inspiration.
Tracheal stenosis is a medical condition characterized by an abnormal narrowing or constriction of the lumen of the trachea, which can lead to respiratory distress and other related symptoms.
The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the nose. The obstruction may be unilateral or bilateral, and may involve any part of the NASAL CAVITY.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
'Bronchial diseases' is a broad term referring to various medical conditions that affect the bronchial tubes, including inflammation, infection, obstruction or narrowing, leading to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing.
The tubular and cavernous organs and structures, by means of which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange between ambient air and the blood are brought about.
Inflammation of the large airways in the lung including any part of the BRONCHI, from the PRIMARY BRONCHI to the TERTIARY BRONCHI.
Congenital malformation characterized by MICROGNATHIA or RETROGNATHIA; GLOSSOPTOSIS and CLEFT PALATE. The mandibular abnormalities often result in difficulties in sucking and swallowing. The syndrome may be isolated or associated with other syndromes (e.g., ANDERSEN SYNDROME; CAMPOMELIC DYSPLASIA). Developmental mis-expression of SOX9 TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR gene on chromosome 17q and its surrounding region is associated with the syndrome.
Hindrance of the passage of luminal contents in the DUODENUM. Duodenal obstruction can be partial or complete, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Simple obstruction is associated with diminished or stopped flow of luminal contents. Strangulating obstruction is associated with impaired blood flow to the duodenum in addition to obstructed flow of luminal contents.
Tendency of the smooth muscle of the tracheobronchial tree to contract more intensely in response to a given stimulus than it does in the response seen in normal individuals. This condition is present in virtually all symptomatic patients with asthma. The most prominent manifestation of this smooth muscle contraction is a decrease in airway caliber that can be readily measured in the pulmonary function laboratory.
Measurement of the volume of gas in the lungs, including that which is trapped in poorly communicating air spaces. It is of particular use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)
Curves depicting MAXIMAL EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE, in liters/second, versus lung inflation, in liters or percentage of lung capacity, during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviation is MEFV.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.
The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.
Narrowing of the caliber of the BRONCHI, physiologically or as a result of pharmacological intervention.
Blocked urine flow through the bladder neck, the narrow internal urethral opening at the base of the URINARY BLADDER. Narrowing or strictures of the URETHRA can be congenital or acquired. It is often observed in males with enlarged PROSTATE glands.
Partial or complete blockage in any part of the URETHRA that can lead to difficulty or inability to empty the URINARY BLADDER. It is characterized by an enlarged, often damaged, bladder with frequent urges to void.
Tracheal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the structure, function, and integrity of the trachea, including inflammation, infection, trauma, tumors, and congenital abnormalities, which can lead to symptoms such as cough, wheezing, difficulty breathing, and stridor.
Tests involving inhalation of allergens (nebulized or in dust form), nebulized pharmacologically active solutions (e.g., histamine, methacholine), or control solutions, followed by assessment of respiratory function. These tests are used in the diagnosis of asthma.
Agents that cause an increase in the expansion of a bronchus or bronchial tubes.
A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.
The hindering of output from the STOMACH into the SMALL INTESTINE. This obstruction may be of mechanical or functional origin such as EDEMA from PEPTIC ULCER; NEOPLASMS; FOREIGN BODIES; or AGING.
The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.
The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.
Occlusion of the outflow tract in either the LEFT VENTRICLE or the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This may result from CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS, predisposing heart diseases, complications of surgery, or HEART NEOPLASMS.
Surgical incision of the trachea.
Developmental or acquired stricture or narrowing of the LARYNX. Symptoms of respiratory difficulty depend on the degree of laryngeal narrowing.
The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a maximal expiration. Common abbreviation is RV.
The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.
A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
Helium. A noble gas with the atomic symbol He, atomic number 2, and atomic weight 4.003. It is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that is not combustible and does not support combustion. It was first detected in the sun and is now obtained from natural gas. Medically it is used as a diluent for other gases, being especially useful with oxygen in the treatment of certain cases of respiratory obstruction, and as a vehicle for general anesthetics. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.
A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.
Measurement of the maximum rate of airflow attained during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are PEFR and PFR.
The rate of airflow measured during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination.
Difficult or labored breathing.
Abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues of any part of the LARYNX, commonly associated with laryngeal injuries and allergic reactions.
A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist that is primarily used as a bronchodilator agent to treat ASTHMA. Albuterol is prepared as a racemic mixture of R(-) and S(+) stereoisomers. The stereospecific preparation of R(-) isomer of albuterol is referred to as levalbuterol.
The airflow rate measured during the first liter expired after the first 200 ml have been exhausted during a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination. Common abbreviations are MEFR, FEF 200-1200, and FEF 0.2-1.2.
Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.
A form of hypersensitivity affecting the respiratory tract. It includes ASTHMA and RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL.
The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.
Enlargement of air spaces distal to the TERMINAL BRONCHIOLES where gas-exchange normally takes place. This is usually due to destruction of the alveolar wall. Pulmonary emphysema can be classified by the location and distribution of the lesions.
The volume of air remaining in the LUNGS at the end of a normal, quiet expiration. It is the sum of the RESIDUAL VOLUME and the EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME. Common abbreviation is FRC.
Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.
Interference with the secretion of tears by the lacrimal glands. Obstruction of the LACRIMAL SAC or NASOLACRIMAL DUCT causing acute or chronic inflammation of the lacrimal sac (DACRYOCYSTITIS). It is caused also in infants by failure of the nasolacrimal duct to open into the inferior meatus and occurs about the third week of life. In adults occlusion may occur spontaneously or after injury or nasal disease. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p250)
A thin leaf-shaped cartilage that is covered with LARYNGEAL MUCOSA and situated posterior to the root of the tongue and HYOID BONE. During swallowing, the epiglottis folds back over the larynx inlet thus prevents foods from entering the airway.
Tracheal neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop within the trachea, which can be benign or malignant, and have the potential to obstruct the airway and impair respiratory function.
Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
A type of oropharyngeal airway that provides an alternative to endotracheal intubation and standard mask anesthesia in certain patients. It is introduced into the hypopharynx to form a seal around the larynx thus permitting spontaneous or positive pressure ventilation without penetration of the larynx or esophagus. It is used in place of a facemask in routine anesthesia. The advantages over standard mask anesthesia are better airway control, minimal anesthetic gas leakage, a secure airway during patient transport to the recovery area, and minimal postoperative problems.
The act of BREATHING in.
Diseases of domestic and wild horses of the species Equus caballus.
The viscous secretion of mucous membranes. It contains mucin, white blood cells, water, inorganic salts, and exfoliated cells.
Respiratory support system used primarily with rates of about 100 to 200/min with volumes of from about one to three times predicted anatomic dead space. Used to treat respiratory failure and maintain ventilation under severe circumstances.
A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.
Spasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.
Evaluation, planning, and use of a range of procedures and airway devices for the maintenance or restoration of a patient's ventilation.
Noises, normal and abnormal, heard on auscultation over any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT.
A funnel-shaped fibromuscular tube that conducts food to the ESOPHAGUS, and air to the LARYNX and LUNGS. It is located posterior to the NASAL CAVITY; ORAL CAVITY; and LARYNX, and extends from the SKULL BASE to the inferior border of the CRICOID CARTILAGE anteriorly and to the inferior border of the C6 vertebra posteriorly. It is divided into the NASOPHARYNX; OROPHARYNX; and HYPOPHARYNX (laryngopharynx).
A disorder characterized by recurrent apneas during sleep despite persistent respiratory efforts. It is due to upper airway obstruction. The respiratory pauses may induce HYPERCAPNIA or HYPOXIA. Cardiac arrhythmias and elevation of systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures may occur. Frequent partial arousals occur throughout sleep, resulting in relative SLEEP DEPRIVATION and daytime tiredness. Associated conditions include OBESITY; ACROMEGALY; MYXEDEMA; micrognathia; MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY; adenotonsilar dystrophy; and NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p395)
'Tongue diseases' is a broad term referring to various medical conditions that primarily affect the structure, function, or appearance of the tongue, including but not limited to infections, inflammatory conditions, autoimmune disorders, congenital abnormalities, and malignancies.
Disorders characterized by multiple cessations of respirations during sleep that induce partial arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. Sleep apnea syndromes are divided into central (see SLEEP APNEA, CENTRAL), obstructive (see SLEEP APNEA, OBSTRUCTIVE), and mixed central-obstructive types.
Congenital anomalous dilitation of the laryngeal saccule that may extend internally into the airway or externally through the thyrohyoid membrane.
The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.
Radiography of the bronchial tree after injection of a contrast medium.
Analogs and derivatives of atropine.
The technology of transmitting light over long distances through strands of glass or other transparent material.
Recording of change in the size of a part as modified by the circulation in it.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Inflammation involving the GLOTTIS or VOCAL CORDS and the subglottic larynx. Croup is characterized by a barking cough, HOARSENESS, and persistent inspiratory STRIDOR (a high-pitched breathing sound). It occurs chiefly in infants and children.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
Examination, therapy or surgery of the interior of the larynx performed with a specially designed endoscope.
A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)
Act of listening for sounds within the body.
Granular leukocytes with a nucleus that usually has two lobes connected by a slender thread of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing coarse, round granules that are uniform in size and stainable by eosin.
A muscarinic antagonist structurally related to ATROPINE but often considered safer and more effective for inhalation use. It is used for various bronchial disorders, in rhinitis, and as an antiarrhythmic.
The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)
A disorder in which the adductor muscles of the VOCAL CORDS exhibit increased activity leading to laryngeal spasm. Laryngismus causes closure of the VOCAL FOLDS and airflow obstruction during inspiration.
The bottom portion of the pharynx situated below the OROPHARYNX and posterior to the LARYNX. The hypopharynx communicates with the larynx through the laryngeal inlet, and is also called laryngopharynx.
Measurement of rate of airflow over the middle half of a FORCED VITAL CAPACITY determination (from the 25 percent level to the 75 percent level). Common abbreviations are MMFR and FEF 25%-75%.
These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.
Material coughed up from the lungs and expectorated via the mouth. It contains MUCUS, cellular debris, and microorganisms. It may also contain blood or pus.
The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.
A pathological accumulation of air in tissues or organs.
A quaternary ammonium parasympathomimetic agent with the muscarinic actions of ACETYLCHOLINE. It is hydrolyzed by ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE at a considerably slower rate than ACETYLCHOLINE and is more resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific CHOLINESTERASES so that its actions are more prolonged. It is used as a parasympathomimetic bronchoconstrictor agent and as a diagnostic aid for bronchial asthma. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1116)
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.
The measurement of frequency or oscillation changes.
Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
Impairment of bile flow due to obstruction in small bile ducts (INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS) or obstruction in large bile ducts (EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS).
Respiratory tract diseases are a broad range of medical conditions that affect the nose, throat, windpipe, and lungs, impairing breathing and oxygen uptake, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, bronchitis, influenza, tuberculosis, and sleep apnea.
Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
An autosomal recessive genetic disease of the EXOCRINE GLANDS. It is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the CYSTIC FIBROSIS TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR expressed in several organs including the LUNG, the PANCREAS, the BILIARY SYSTEM, and the SWEAT GLANDS. Cystic fibrosis is characterized by epithelial secretory dysfunction associated with ductal obstruction resulting in AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION; chronic RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS; PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENCY; maldigestion; salt depletion; and HEAT PROSTRATION.
Physiological processes and properties of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.
Abnormal enlargement or swelling of a KIDNEY due to dilation of the KIDNEY CALICES and the KIDNEY PELVIS. It is often associated with obstruction of the URETER or chronic kidney diseases that prevents normal drainage of urine into the URINARY BLADDER.
A pair of cone-shaped elastic mucous membrane projecting from the laryngeal wall and forming a narrow slit between them. Each contains a thickened free edge (vocal ligament) extending from the THYROID CARTILAGE to the ARYTENOID CARTILAGE, and a VOCAL MUSCLE that shortens or relaxes the vocal cord to control sound production.
Impairment of bile flow in the large BILE DUCTS by mechanical obstruction or stricture due to benign or malignant processes.
The small airways branching off the TERTIARY BRONCHI. Terminal bronchioles lead into several orders of respiratory bronchioles which in turn lead into alveolar ducts and then into PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
An enlarged THYROID GLAND with at least 50% of the gland situated behind the STERNUM. It is an unusual presentation of an intrathoracic goiter. Substernal goiters frequently cause compression on the TRACHEA leading to deviation, narrowing, and respiratory symptoms.
An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.
The middle portion of the pharynx that lies posterior to the mouth, inferior to the SOFT PALATE, and superior to the base of the tongue and EPIGLOTTIS. It has a digestive function as food passes from the mouth into the oropharynx before entering ESOPHAGUS.
A pulmonary ventilation rate faster than is metabolically necessary for the exchange of gases. It is the result of an increased frequency of breathing, an increased tidal volume, or a combination of both. It causes an excess intake of oxygen and the blowing off of carbon dioxide.
Severe cellulitis of the submaxillary space with secondary involvement of the sublingual and submental space. It usually results from infection in the lower molar area or from a penetrating injury to the mouth floor. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system. It includes the therapeutic use of medical gases and their administrative apparatus, environmental control systems, humidification, aerosols, ventilatory support, bronchopulmonary drainage and exercise, respiratory rehabilitation, assistance with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and maintenance of natural, artificial, and mechanical airways.
The muscles of the PHARYNX are voluntary muscles arranged in two layers. The external circular layer consists of three constrictors (superior, middle, and inferior). The internal longitudinal layer consists of the palatopharyngeus, the salpingopharyngeus, and the stylopharyngeus. During swallowing, the outer layer constricts the pharyngeal wall and the inner layer elevates pharynx and LARYNX.
Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.
Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.
Hypertrophy and dilation of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart that is caused by PULMONARY HYPERTENSION. This condition is often associated with pulmonary parenchymal or vascular diseases, such as CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE and PULMONARY EMBOLISM.
A selective beta-2 adrenergic agonist used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.
Large, hoofed mammals of the family EQUIDAE. Horses are active day and night with most of the day spent seeking and consuming food. Feeding peaks occur in the early morning and late afternoon, and there are several daily periods of rest.
The act of dilating.
Congenital or acquired paralysis of one or both VOCAL CORDS. This condition is caused by defects in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, the VAGUS NERVE and branches of LARYNGEAL NERVES. Common symptoms are VOICE DISORDERS including HOARSENESS or APHONIA.
Agents causing the narrowing of the lumen of a bronchus or bronchiole.
The act of BREATHING out.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
Persistent abnormal dilatation of the bronchi.
Altered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.
Concretions of swallowed hair, fruit or vegetable fibers, or similar substances found in the alimentary canal.
A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.
Earth or other matter in fine, dry particles. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.
The small thick cartilage that forms the lower and posterior parts of the laryngeal wall.
A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
Conditions resulting from abnormalities in the arteries branching from the ASCENDING AORTA, the curved portion of the aorta. These syndromes are results of occlusion or abnormal blood flow to the head-neck or arm region leading to neurological defects and weakness in an arm. These syndromes are associated with vascular malformations; ATHEROSCLEROSIS; TRAUMA; and blood clots.
Abnormal increase of EOSINOPHILS in the blood, tissues or organs.
Procedures of applying ENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Endoscopy involves passing an optical instrument through a small incision in the skin i.e., percutaneous; or through a natural orifice and along natural body pathways such as the digestive tract; and/or through an incision in the wall of a tubular structure or organ, i.e. transluminal, to examine or perform surgery on the interior parts of the body.
Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
A movable fold suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate. The uvula hangs from the middle of the lower border.
A class of drugs designed to prevent leukotriene synthesis or activity by blocking binding at the receptor level.
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.
The act of blowing a powder, vapor, or gas into any body cavity for experimental, diagnostic, or therapeutic purposes.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.
Surgical removal of a tonsil or tonsils. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Abnormally small jaw.
Pathological development in the ILEUM including the ILEOCECAL VALVE.
RESPIRATORY MUSCLE contraction during INHALATION. The work is accomplished in three phases: LUNG COMPLIANCE work, that required to expand the LUNGS against its elastic forces; tissue resistance work, that required to overcome the viscosity of the lung and chest wall structures; and AIRWAY RESISTANCE work, that required to overcome airway resistance during the movement of air into the lungs. Work of breathing does not refer to expiration, which is entirely a passive process caused by elastic recoil of the lung and chest cage. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p406)
A condition of substandard growth or diminished capacity to maintain normal function.
Organic salts of cyanic acid containing the -OCN radical.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.
Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
A condition characterized by infiltration of the lung with EOSINOPHILS due to inflammation or other disease processes. Major eosinophilic lung diseases are the eosinophilic pneumonias caused by infections, allergens, or toxic agents.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA, the mucous membrane lining the NASAL CAVITIES.
A collection of lymphoid nodules on the posterior wall and roof of the NASOPHARYNX.
A collection of blood outside the BLOOD VESSELS. Hematoma can be localized in an organ, space, or tissue.
Inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA in one or more of the PARANASAL SINUSES.
A gel-forming mucin that is primarily found on the surface of gastric epithelium and in the RESPIRATORY TRACT. Mucin 5AC was originally identified as two distinct proteins, however a single gene encodes the protein which gives rise to the mucin 5A and mucin 5C variants.
Compounds that bind to and stimulate ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS.
Excision of the adenoids. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A reduction in the amount of air entering the pulmonary alveoli.
Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.
Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
The largest cartilage of the larynx consisting of two laminae fusing anteriorly at an acute angle in the midline of the neck. The point of fusion forms a subcutaneous projection known as the Adam's apple.
Body ventilators that assist ventilation by applying intermittent subatmospheric pressure around the thorax, abdomen, or airway and periodically expand the chest wall and inflate the lungs. They are relatively simple to operate and do not require tracheostomy. These devices include the tank ventilators ("iron lung"), Portalung, Pneumowrap, and chest cuirass ("tortoise shell").
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
An adrenergic beta-2 agonist that is used as a bronchodilator and tocolytic.
Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.
Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Devices that cause a liquid or solid to be converted into an aerosol (spray) or a vapor. It is used in drug administration by inhalation, humidification of ambient air, and in certain analytical instruments.
Pathological development in the JEJUNUM region of the SMALL INTESTINE.
The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.
The vocal apparatus of the larynx, situated in the middle section of the larynx. Glottis consists of the VOCAL FOLDS and an opening (rima glottidis) between the folds.
The noninvasive measurement or determination of the partial pressure (tension) of oxygen and/or carbon dioxide locally in the capillaries of a tissue by the application to the skin of a special set of electrodes. These electrodes contain photoelectric sensors capable of picking up the specific wavelengths of radiation emitted by oxygenated versus reduced hemoglobin.
A rare and probably congenital condition characterized by great enlargement of the lumen of the trachea and the larger bronchi.
Asthma attacks following a period of exercise. Usually the induced attack is short-lived and regresses spontaneously. The magnitude of postexertional airway obstruction is strongly influenced by the environment in which exercise is performed (i.e. inhalation of cold air during physical exertion markedly augments the severity of the airway obstruction; conversely, warm humid air blunts or abolishes it).
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
One of a pair of small pyramidal cartilages that articulate with the lamina of the CRICOID CARTILAGE. The corresponding VOCAL LIGAMENT and several muscles are attached to it.
Inflammation of the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA, including the VOCAL CORDS. Laryngitis is characterized by irritation, edema, and reduced pliability of the mucosa leading to VOICE DISORDERS such as APHONIA and HOARSENESS.
Any tests done on exhaled air.
Non-therapeutic positive end-expiratory pressure occurring frequently in patients with severe airway obstruction. It can appear with or without the administration of external positive end-expiratory pressure (POSITIVE-PRESSURE RESPIRATION). It presents an important load on the inspiratory muscles which are operating at a mechanical disadvantage due to hyperinflation. Auto-PEEP may cause profound hypotension that should be treated by intravascular volume expansion, increasing the time for expiration, and/or changing from assist mode to intermittent mandatory ventilation mode. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1127)
The 17-valerate derivative of BETAMETHASONE. It has substantial topical anti-inflammatory activity and relatively low systemic anti-inflammatory activity.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
A pathologic process consisting in the formation of pus.

Exposure to nitrogen dioxide and the occurrence of bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years. (1/1199)

BACKGROUND: The objective of the investigation was to test the hypothesis that exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) has a causal influence on the occurrence of bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years of age. METHODS: A nested case-control study with 153 one-to-one matched pairs was conducted within a cohort of 3754 children born in Oslo in 1992/93. Cases were children who developed > or = 2 episodes of bronchial obstruction or one episode lasting >4 weeks. Controls were matched for date of birth. Exposure measurements were performed in the same 14-day period within matched pairs. The NO2 exposure was measured with personal samplers carried close to each child and by stationary samplers outdoors and indoors. RESULTS: Few children (4.6%) were exposed to levels of NO2 > or = 30 microg/m3 (average concentration during a 14-day period). In the 153 matched pairs, the mean level of NO2 was 15.65 microg/m3 (+/-0.60, SE) among cases and 15.37 (+/-0.54) among controls (paired t = 0.38, P = 0.71). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that NO2 exposure at levels observed in this study has no detectable effect on the risk of developing bronchial obstruction in children below 2 years of age.  (+info)

Comparison of two new methods for the measurement of lung volumes with two standard methods. (2/1199)

BACKGROUND: The two most commonly used methods for the measurement of lung volumes are helium dilution and body plethysmography. Two methods have been developed which are both easier and less time consuming to perform. Mathematical modelling uses complex calculations from the flow-volume loop to derive total lung capacity (TLC), and the nitrogen balance technique uses nitrogen from the atmosphere to calculate lung volume in a similar way to helium dilution. This study was designed to compare the two new methods with the two standard methods. METHODS: Sixty one subjects were studied, 23 with normal lung function, 17 with restrictive airway disease, and 21 with obstructive ventilatory defects. Each subject underwent repeated measurements of TLC by each of the four methods in random order. Reproducible values were obtained for each method according to BTS/ARTP guidelines. Bland-Altman plots were constructed for comparisons between the methods and paired t tests were used to assess differences in means. RESULTS: Bland-Altman plots showed that the differences between body plethysmography and helium dilution fell into clinically acceptable ranges (agreement limits +/-0.9 l). The agreement between mathematical modelling or the nitrogen balance technique and helium dilution or body plethysmography was poor (+/-1.8-3.4 l), especially for subjects with airflow obstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Neither of the new methods agrees sufficiently with standard methods to be useful in a clinical setting.  (+info)

Respiratory mechanics in airways obstruction associated with inspiratory dyspnoea. (3/1199)

Inspiratory muscle strength and the flow and elastic pressure opposing inspiration were measured in seven patients with severe airways obstruction who found inspiration difficult at rest. A comparison was made of measurements obtained from seven normal subjects and five patients with airways obstruction not experiencing inspiratory dyspnoea at rest. Measurements were also obtained when inspiratory dyspnoea was induced in the normal subjects by adding an inspiratory resistance or by voluntarily increasing lung volume. Compared with the controls the inspiratory muscle strength of the patients was reduced but was not significantly less than that of the patients without inspiratory dyspnoea. The pressure required to produce inspiratory flow was significantly greater when inspiratory dyspnoea was present (P = 0-01). However, there was considerable overlap in the pressures of those with and without inspiratory dyspnoea. A better relationship was obtained when muscle strength was considered. The ratio of inspiratory muscle strength to the pressure required to produce flow was 0-24 +/- 0-07 (mean +/- SD) in patient with inspiratory dyspnoea, 0-10 +/- 0-03 in patients without inspiratory dyspnoea, and 0-033 +/- 0-019 in normal subjects. There was no overlap between the two patient groups. The ratios of the normal subjects were increased when inspiratory dyspnoea was induced and, with the exception of two cases, were all above those obtained when inspiratory dyspnoea was absent. Inspiratory dyspnoea was experienced with lower ratios in the normals than in the patients with airways obstruction.  (+info)

Aspects of serum and sputum antibody in chronic airways obstruction. (4/1199)

Immunoglobulin levels and precipitating antibody against a range of microbial antigens were measured in simultaneously collected serum and sputum samples from patients with chronic bronchitis (11), cystic fibrosis (9), bronchiectasis (9), and asthma (4). Sputum was prepared by dialysis and high-speed centrifugation methods. Results showed that it was possible to detect precipitating antibody in the sputum, and the rate was increased when both methods were used. A discrepancy was noted between the detection rate in the sputum and serum. This, combined with the lack of correlation between sputum and serum immunoglobulins, lack of relationship between bronchial inflammation and sputum immunoglobulins, and the lack of IgM in the sputum suggested that the antibody and immunoglobulin were locally produced. Sputum IgA (7S) in patients with chronic bronchitis was significantly lower (P less than 0-05) than that found in patients with cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis. Significant differences (P less than 0-05) were also noted in serum IgG levels between patients with chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis while serum IgM levels in patients with chronic bronchitis were significantly lower (P less than 0-05) when compared to serum levels in patients with cystic fibrosis. The presence of precipitating antibody in the sputum raises the possibility that type III reactions may be important in the pathogenesis of these conditions.  (+info)

Localised upper airway obstruction in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. (5/1199)

We describe a case of rapidly progressive upper airway obstruction due to tracheal Pseudomonas abscesses in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The case highlights the aggressive nature of Pseudomonas infections and the difficulty of eradicating this organism in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.  (+info)

Gastric rupture secondary to successful Heimlich manoeuvre. (6/1199)

A fatal case of gastric rupture following the Heimlich manoeuvre is reported. This life-threatening complication has only been reported previously in seven patients with a high mortality rate. All patients should be assessed immediately following this manoeuvre for any potentially life-threatening complications.  (+info)

A resuscitated case from asphyxia by large bronchial cast. (7/1199)

A 62-year-old woman with bronchiectasis suffered from asphyxia due to a large bronchial cast that obstructed the bronchial tree. Immediate bronchoscopic suction of a bronchial cast of 17 cm in length through the intubated tube relieved the patients without any complications. Large bronchial casts appear to be rare in this century but it should be considered in patients with acute exacerbation of excessive sputa not only in patients with asthma or allergy but also in patients with respiratory tract infection.  (+info)

Clinical studies of styrene workers: initial findings. (8/1199)

Styrene monomer is a high volume chemical used chiefly in production of polystyrene. A clinical survey of 493 production workers was undertaken at the oldest and largest monomer production, polymerization, and extrusion facility in the U.S. Relative exposure durations and levels were obtained from occupational histories. Significant differences between the high and low exposure groups were found with regard to history of acute prenarcotic symptoms, acute lower respiratory symptoms, prevalence of FEV 1/FV less than 75 per cent, and elevated GCTP. Other liver function tests, chest x-ray, FVC less than 80 per cent, and hematological parameters showed no distinct pattern. A concomitant mortality study has been mounted and is in progress.  (+info)

Airway obstruction is a medical condition that occurs when the normal flow of air into and out of the lungs is partially or completely blocked. This blockage can be caused by a variety of factors, including swelling of the tissues in the airway, the presence of foreign objects or substances, or abnormal growths such as tumors.

When the airway becomes obstructed, it can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally. They may experience symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and chest tightness. In severe cases, airway obstruction can lead to respiratory failure and other life-threatening complications.

There are several types of airway obstruction, including:

1. Upper airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the upper part of the airway, such as the nose, throat, or voice box.
2. Lower airway obstruction: This occurs when the blockage is located in the lower part of the airway, such as the trachea or bronchi.
3. Partial airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is partially blocked, allowing some air to flow in and out of the lungs.
4. Complete airway obstruction: This occurs when the airway is completely blocked, preventing any air from flowing into or out of the lungs.

Treatment for airway obstruction depends on the underlying cause of the condition. In some cases, removing the obstruction may be as simple as clearing the airway of foreign objects or mucus. In other cases, more invasive treatments such as surgery may be necessary.

Intestinal obstruction, also known as bowel obstruction, is a medical condition characterized by a blockage that prevents the normal flow of contents through the small intestine or large intestine (colon). This blockage can be caused by various factors such as tumors, adhesions (scar tissue), hernias, inflammation, or impacted feces.

The obstruction can be mechanical, where something physically blocks the intestinal lumen, or functional, where the normal muscular contractions of the bowel are impaired. Mechanical obstructions are more common than functional ones.

Symptoms of intestinal obstruction may include abdominal pain and cramping, nausea and vomiting, bloating, inability to pass gas or have a bowel movement, and abdominal distention. If left untreated, intestinal obstruction can lead to serious complications such as tissue death (necrosis), perforation of the intestine, and sepsis. Treatment typically involves hospitalization, intravenous fluids, nasogastric decompression, and possibly surgery to remove the obstruction.

Airway resistance is a measure of the opposition to airflow during breathing, which is caused by the friction between the air and the walls of the respiratory tract. It is an important parameter in respiratory physiology because it can affect the work of breathing and gas exchange.

Airway resistance is usually expressed in units of cm H2O/L/s or Pa·s/m, and it can be measured during spontaneous breathing or during forced expiratory maneuvers, such as those used in pulmonary function testing. Increased airway resistance can result from a variety of conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bronchitis, and bronchiectasis. Decreased airway resistance can be seen in conditions such as emphysema or after a successful bronchodilator treatment.

Ureteral obstruction is a medical condition characterized by the partial or complete blockage of the ureter, which is the tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder. This blockage can be caused by various factors such as kidney stones, tumors, blood clots, or scar tissue, leading to a backup of urine in the kidney (hydronephrosis). Ureteral obstruction can cause pain, infection, and potential kidney damage if not treated promptly.

Obstructive lung disease is a category of respiratory diseases characterized by airflow limitation that causes difficulty in completely emptying the alveoli (tiny air sacs) of the lungs during exhaling. This results in the trapping of stale air and prevents fresh air from entering the alveoli, leading to various symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and decreased exercise tolerance.

The most common obstructive lung diseases include:

1. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): A progressive disease that includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema, often caused by smoking or exposure to harmful pollutants.
2. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by variable airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and an underlying inflammation. Symptoms can be triggered by various factors such as allergens, irritants, or physical activity.
3. Bronchiectasis: A condition in which the airways become abnormally widened, scarred, and thickened due to chronic inflammation or infection, leading to mucus buildup and impaired clearance.
4. Cystic Fibrosis: An inherited genetic disorder that affects the exocrine glands, resulting in thick and sticky mucus production in various organs, including the lungs. This can lead to chronic lung infections, inflammation, and airway obstruction.
5. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency: A genetic condition characterized by low levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin protein, which leads to uncontrolled protease enzyme activity that damages the lung tissue, causing emphysema-like symptoms.

Treatment for obstructive lung diseases typically involves bronchodilators (to relax and widen the airways), corticosteroids (to reduce inflammation), and lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation programs. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or even lung transplantation may be considered.

Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV) is a medical term used to describe the volume of air that can be forcefully exhaled from the lungs in one second. It is often measured during pulmonary function testing to assess lung function and diagnose conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

FEV is typically expressed as a percentage of the Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), which is the total volume of air that can be exhaled from the lungs after taking a deep breath in. The ratio of FEV to FVC is used to determine whether there is obstruction in the airways, with a lower ratio indicating more severe obstruction.

There are different types of FEV measurements, including FEV1 (the volume of air exhaled in one second), FEV25-75 (the average volume of air exhaled during the middle 50% of the FVC maneuver), and FEV0.5 (the volume of air exhaled in half a second). These measurements can provide additional information about lung function and help guide treatment decisions.

Respiratory Function Tests (RFTs) are a group of medical tests that measure how well your lungs take in and exhale air, and how well they transfer oxygen and carbon dioxide into and out of your blood. They can help diagnose certain lung disorders, measure the severity of lung disease, and monitor response to treatment.

RFTs include several types of tests, such as:

1. Spirometry: This test measures how much air you can exhale and how quickly you can do it. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other lung diseases.
2. Lung volume testing: This test measures the total amount of air in your lungs. It can help diagnose restrictive lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis or sarcoidosis.
3. Diffusion capacity testing: This test measures how well oxygen moves from your lungs into your bloodstream. It's often used to diagnose and monitor conditions like pulmonary fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, and other lung diseases that affect the ability of the lungs to transfer oxygen to the blood.
4. Bronchoprovocation testing: This test involves inhaling a substance that can cause your airways to narrow, such as methacholine or histamine. It's often used to diagnose and monitor asthma.
5. Exercise stress testing: This test measures how well your lungs and heart work together during exercise. It's often used to diagnose lung or heart disease.

Overall, Respiratory Function Tests are an important tool for diagnosing and managing a wide range of lung conditions.

Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. The airway obstruction in asthma is usually reversible, either spontaneously or with treatment.

The underlying cause of asthma involves a combination of genetic and environmental factors that result in hypersensitivity of the airways to certain triggers, such as allergens, irritants, viruses, exercise, and emotional stress. When these triggers are encountered, the airways constrict due to smooth muscle spasm, swell due to inflammation, and produce excess mucus, leading to the characteristic symptoms of asthma.

Asthma is typically managed with a combination of medications that include bronchodilators to relax the airway muscles, corticosteroids to reduce inflammation, and leukotriene modifiers or mast cell stabilizers to prevent allergic reactions. Avoiding triggers and monitoring symptoms are also important components of asthma management.

There are several types of asthma, including allergic asthma, non-allergic asthma, exercise-induced asthma, occupational asthma, and nocturnal asthma, each with its own set of triggers and treatment approaches. Proper diagnosis and management of asthma can help prevent exacerbations, improve quality of life, and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Laryngeal diseases refer to conditions that affect the structure and function of the larynx, also known as the voice box. The larynx is a complex structure composed of cartilages, muscles, membranes, and mucous glands that play essential roles in breathing, swallowing, and vocalization.

Laryngeal diseases can be categorized into several types based on their causes and manifestations. Some common laryngeal diseases include:

1. Laryngitis: Inflammation of the larynx that can cause hoarseness, throat pain, coughing, and difficulty swallowing. Acute laryngitis is often caused by viral infections or irritants, while chronic laryngitis may result from prolonged exposure to smoke, chemicals, or acid reflux.
2. Vocal cord lesions: Abnormal growths on the vocal cords, such as polyps, nodules, or cysts, that can affect voice quality and cause hoarseness, breathiness, or pain. These lesions are often caused by overuse, misuse, or trauma to the vocal cords.
3. Laryngeal cancer: Malignant tumors that develop in the larynx and can invade surrounding structures, such as the throat, neck, and chest. Laryngeal cancer is often associated with smoking, alcohol consumption, and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection.
4. Laryngeal stenosis: Narrowing of the airway due to scarring or thickening of the tissues in the larynx. This condition can cause difficulty breathing, wheezing, and coughing, especially during physical activity or sleep.
5. Reinke's edema: Swelling of the vocal cords caused by fluid accumulation in the mucous membrane that covers them. Reinke's edema is often associated with smoking and can cause hoarseness, low voice, and difficulty projecting the voice.
6. Laryngeal papillomatosis: A rare condition characterized by the growth of benign tumors (papillomas) in the larynx, usually caused by HPV infection. These tumors can recur and may require repeated surgeries to remove them.
7. Vocal cord paralysis: Inability of one or both vocal cords to move due to nerve damage or other medical conditions. This condition can cause hoarseness, breathiness, and difficulty speaking or swallowing.

These are some of the common laryngeal disorders that can affect a person's voice, breathing, and swallowing functions. Proper diagnosis and treatment by an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist) are essential to manage these conditions effectively and prevent complications.

Spirometry is a common type of pulmonary function test (PFT) that measures how well your lungs work. This is done by measuring how much air you can exhale from your lungs after taking a deep breath, and how quickly you can exhale it. The results are compared to normal values for your age, height, sex, and ethnicity.

Spirometry is used to diagnose and monitor certain lung conditions, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory diseases that cause narrowing of the airways. It can also be used to assess the effectiveness of treatment for these conditions. The test is non-invasive, safe, and easy to perform.

Airway remodeling is a term used to describe the structural changes that occur in the airways as a result of chronic inflammation in respiratory diseases such as asthma. These changes include thickening of the airway wall, increased smooth muscle mass, and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix components. These alterations can lead to narrowing of the airways, decreased lung function, and increased severity of symptoms. Airway remodeling is thought to be a major contributor to the persistent airflow obstruction that is characteristic of severe asthma.

Vital capacity (VC) is a term used in pulmonary function tests to describe the maximum volume of air that can be exhaled after taking a deep breath. It is the sum of inspiratory reserve volume, tidal volume, and expiratory reserve volume. In other words, it's the total amount of air you can forcibly exhale after inhaling as deeply as possible. Vital capacity is an important measurement in assessing lung function and can be reduced in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory disorders.

Tracheal stenosis is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal narrowing of the trachea (windpipe), which can lead to difficulty breathing. This narrowing can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, scarring, or the growth of abnormal tissue in the airway. Symptoms may include wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest discomfort, particularly during physical activity. Treatment options for tracheal stenosis depend on the severity and underlying cause of the condition and may include medications, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, or surgical interventions such as laser surgery, stent placement, or tracheal reconstruction.

"Bronchi" are a pair of airways in the respiratory system that branch off from the trachea (windpipe) and lead to the lungs. They are responsible for delivering oxygen-rich air to the lungs and removing carbon dioxide during exhalation. The right bronchus is slightly larger and more vertical than the left, and they further divide into smaller branches called bronchioles within the lungs. Any abnormalities or diseases affecting the bronchi can impact lung function and overall respiratory health.

Nasal obstruction is a medical condition that refers to any blockage or restriction in the normal flow of air through the nasal passages. This can be caused by various factors such as inflammation, swelling, or physical abnormalities in the nasal cavity. Common causes of nasal obstruction include allergies, sinusitis, deviated septum, enlarged turbinates, and nasal polyps. Symptoms may include difficulty breathing through the nose, nasal congestion, and nasal discharge. Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

A lung is a pair of spongy, elastic organs in the chest that work together to enable breathing. They are responsible for taking in oxygen and expelling carbon dioxide through the process of respiration. The left lung has two lobes, while the right lung has three lobes. The lungs are protected by the ribcage and are covered by a double-layered membrane called the pleura. The trachea divides into two bronchi, which further divide into smaller bronchioles, leading to millions of tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of gases occurs.

Bronchial diseases refer to medical conditions that affect the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead into the lungs. These diseases can cause inflammation, narrowing, or obstruction of the bronchi, leading to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and difficulty breathing.

Some common bronchial diseases include:

1. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that causes recurring episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing.
2. Chronic Bronchitis: A long-term inflammation of the bronchi that leads to a persistent cough and excessive mucus production.
3. Bronchiectasis: A condition in which the bronchi become damaged and widened, leading to chronic infection and inflammation.
4. Bronchitis: An inflammation of the bronchi that can cause coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness.
5. Emphysema: A lung condition that causes shortness of breath due to damage to the air sacs in the lungs. While not strictly a bronchial disease, it is often associated with chronic bronchitis and COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease).

Treatment for bronchial diseases may include medications such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, or antibiotics, as well as lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking and avoiding irritants. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or surgery may be necessary.

The Respiratory System is a complex network of organs and tissues that work together to facilitate the process of breathing, which involves the intake of oxygen and the elimination of carbon dioxide. This system primarily includes the nose, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, lungs, and diaphragm.

The nostrils or mouth take in air that travels through the pharynx, larynx, and trachea into the lungs. Within the lungs, the trachea divides into two bronchi, one for each lung, which further divide into smaller tubes called bronchioles. At the end of these bronchioles are tiny air sacs known as alveoli where the exchange of gases occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses through the walls of the alveoli into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide, a waste product, moves from the blood to the alveoli and is exhaled out of the body.

The diaphragm, a large muscle that separates the chest from the abdomen, plays a crucial role in breathing by contracting and relaxing to change the volume of the chest cavity, thereby allowing air to flow in and out of the lungs. Overall, the Respiratory System is essential for maintaining life by providing the body's cells with the oxygen needed for metabolism and removing waste products like carbon dioxide.

Bronchitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead to the lungs. This inflammation can cause a variety of symptoms, including coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. Bronchitis can be either acute or chronic.

Acute bronchitis is usually caused by a viral infection, such as a cold or the flu, and typically lasts for a few days to a week. Symptoms may include a productive cough (coughing up mucus or phlegm), chest discomfort, and fatigue. Acute bronchitis often resolves on its own without specific medical treatment, although rest, hydration, and over-the-counter medications to manage symptoms may be helpful.

Chronic bronchitis, on the other hand, is a long-term condition that is characterized by a persistent cough with mucus production that lasts for at least three months out of the year for two consecutive years. Chronic bronchitis is typically caused by exposure to irritants such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, or occupational dusts and chemicals. It is often associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes both chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

Treatment for chronic bronchitis may include medications to help open the airways, such as bronchodilators and corticosteroids, as well as lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation and avoiding irritants. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or lung transplantation may be necessary.

Pierre Robin Syndrome is a congenital condition characterized by a set of distinctive features including:

1. Micrognathia: This is the term for an abnormally small lower jaw (mandible). In Pierre Robin Syndrome, this feature is present at birth and can lead to breathing difficulties due to the tongue falling back and obstructing the airway.

2. Glossoptosis: This refers to the displacement of the tongue towards the back of the mouth. Because of the small jaw, the tongue has limited space and tends to fall back and block the airway, especially during sleep.

3. Cleft Palate: A cleft palate is a birth defect where there is an opening in the roof of the mouth (palate). This occurs because the two sides of the palate do not fuse together properly during fetal development.

The syndrome can vary in severity among individuals, and some may also have other associated conditions such as hearing problems, heart defects, or learning disabilities. The exact cause of Pierre Robin Syndrome is unknown, but it's often associated with genetic syndromes like Stickler syndrome and velocardiofacial syndrome. Treatment typically involves addressing the airway issues first, often through positioning, prone sleeping, or in severe cases, a surgical procedure to bring the jaw forward (distraction osteogenesis). The cleft palate is usually repaired with surgery within the first year of life.

Duodenal obstruction is a medical condition characterized by the blockage or impediment of the normal flow of contents through the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine. This blockage can be partial or complete and can be caused by various factors such as:

1. Congenital abnormalities: Duodenal atresia or stenosis, where there is a congenital absence or narrowing of a portion of the duodenum.
2. Inflammatory conditions: Duodenitis, Crohn's disease, or tumors that cause swelling and inflammation in the duodenum.
3. Mechanical obstructions: Gallstones, tumors, strictures, or adhesions (scar tissue) from previous surgeries can physically block the duodenum.
4. Neuromuscular disorders: Conditions like progressive systemic sclerosis or amyloidosis that affect the neuromuscular function of the intestines can lead to duodenal obstruction.

Symptoms of duodenal obstruction may include nausea, vomiting (often with bilious or fecal matter), abdominal pain, distention, and decreased bowel movements. Diagnosis typically involves imaging studies such as X-rays, CT scans, or upper gastrointestinal series to visualize the blockage. Treatment depends on the underlying cause but may involve surgery, endoscopic procedures, or medications to manage symptoms and address the obstruction.

Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) or bronchial hyperreactivity (BH) is a medical term that refers to the increased sensitivity and exaggerated response of the airways to various stimuli. In people with BHR, the airways narrow (constrict) more than usual in response to certain triggers such as allergens, cold air, exercise, or irritants like smoke or fumes. This narrowing can cause symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.

BHR is often associated with asthma and other respiratory conditions, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchiectasis. It is typically diagnosed through a series of tests that measure the degree of airway narrowing in response to various stimuli. These tests may include spirometry, methacholine challenge test, or histamine challenge test.

BHR can be managed with medications such as bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs, which help to relax the muscles around the airways and reduce inflammation. It is also important to avoid triggers that can exacerbate symptoms and make BHR worse.

Whole-body plethysmography is a non-invasive medical technique used to measure changes in the volume of air in the lungs and chest during breathing. It is often utilized in the diagnosis and assessment of various respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

During whole-body plethysmography, the patient enters a sealed, clear chamber, usually in a standing or sitting position. The patient is instructed to breathe normally while the machine measures changes in pressure within the chamber as the chest and abdomen move during respiration. These measurements are then used to calculate lung volume, airflow, and other respiratory parameters.

This technique provides valuable information about the functional status of the lungs and can help healthcare providers make informed decisions regarding diagnosis, treatment planning, and disease monitoring.

Maximal expiratory flow-volume (MEFV) curves are a graphical representation of the maximum volume of air that can be exhaled during a forced breath, measured at different lung volumes. It is a pulmonary function test used to assess obstructive lung diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

The MEFV curve is created by having the patient take a deep breath in and then exhale as forcefully and quickly as possible into a spirometer, which measures the volume and flow of air. The test is repeated multiple times to ensure accurate results.

The MEFV curve provides information on the degree of obstruction in the airways, the location of the obstruction (central or peripheral), and the severity of the disease. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment and disease progression over time.

Bronchoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the examination of the inside of the airways and lungs with a flexible or rigid tube called a bronchoscope. This procedure allows healthcare professionals to directly visualize the airways, take tissue samples for biopsy, and remove foreign objects or secretions. Bronchoscopy can be used to diagnose and manage various respiratory conditions such as lung infections, inflammation, cancer, and bleeding. It is usually performed under local or general anesthesia to minimize discomfort and risks associated with the procedure.

Pulmonary ventilation, also known as pulmonary respiration or simply ventilation, is the process of moving air into and out of the lungs to facilitate gas exchange. It involves two main phases: inhalation (or inspiration) and exhalation (or expiration). During inhalation, the diaphragm and external intercostal muscles contract, causing the chest volume to increase and the pressure inside the chest to decrease, which then draws air into the lungs. Conversely, during exhalation, these muscles relax, causing the chest volume to decrease and the pressure inside the chest to increase, which pushes air out of the lungs. This process ensures that oxygen-rich air from the atmosphere enters the alveoli (air sacs in the lungs), where it can diffuse into the bloodstream, while carbon dioxide-rich air from the bloodstream in the capillaries surrounding the alveoli is expelled out of the body.

Bronchoconstriction is a medical term that refers to the narrowing of the airways in the lungs (the bronchi and bronchioles) due to the contraction of the smooth muscles surrounding them. This constriction can cause difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath, which are common symptoms of asthma and other respiratory conditions.

Bronchoconstriction can be triggered by a variety of factors, including allergens, irritants, cold air, exercise, and emotional stress. In some cases, it may also be caused by certain medications, such as beta-blockers or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Treatment for bronchoconstriction typically involves the use of bronchodilators, which are medications that help to relax the smooth muscles around the airways and widen them, making it easier to breathe.

Urinary bladder neck obstruction is a medical condition that refers to a partial or complete blockage at the bladder neck, which is the area where the bladder connects to the urethra. This obstruction can be caused by various factors such as prostate enlargement, bladder tumors, scar tissue, or nerve damage.

The bladder neck obstruction can lead to difficulty in urinating, a weak urine stream, and the need to strain while urinating. In severe cases, it can cause urinary retention, kidney failure, and other complications. Treatment for this condition depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, surgery, or minimally invasive procedures.

Urethral obstruction is a medical condition that refers to a blockage in the urethra, which is the tube that carries urine from the bladder out of the body. This blockage can be partial or complete and can be caused by various factors such as scar tissue, stones, tumors, or enlarged prostate gland in men. Symptoms may include difficulty in urinating, painful urination, frequent urination, and urinary retention. If left untreated, urethral obstruction can lead to serious complications such as kidney damage or infection.

Tracheal diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the trachea, also known as the windpipe. The trachea is a tube-like structure made up of rings of cartilage and smooth muscle, which extends from the larynx (voice box) to the bronchi (airways leading to the lungs). Its primary function is to allow the passage of air to and from the lungs.

Tracheal diseases can be categorized into several types, including:

1. Tracheitis: Inflammation of the trachea, often caused by viral or bacterial infections.
2. Tracheal stenosis: Narrowing of the trachea due to scarring, inflammation, or compression from nearby structures such as tumors or goiters.
3. Tracheomalacia: Weakening and collapse of the tracheal walls, often seen in newborns and young children but can also occur in adults due to factors like chronic cough, aging, or connective tissue disorders.
4. Tracheoesophageal fistula: An abnormal connection between the trachea and the esophagus, which can lead to respiratory complications and difficulty swallowing.
5. Tracheal tumors: Benign or malignant growths that develop within the trachea, obstructing airflow and potentially leading to more severe respiratory issues.
6. Tracheobronchial injury: Damage to the trachea and bronchi, often caused by trauma such as blunt force or penetrating injuries.
7. Congenital tracheal abnormalities: Structural defects present at birth, including complete tracheal rings, which can cause narrowing or collapse of the airway.

Symptoms of tracheal diseases may include cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing. Treatment options depend on the specific condition and its severity but may involve medications, surgery, or other interventions to alleviate symptoms and improve respiratory function.

Bronchial provocation tests are a group of medical tests used to assess the airway responsiveness of the lungs by challenging them with increasing doses of a specific stimulus, such as methacholine or histamine, which can cause bronchoconstriction (narrowing of the airways) in susceptible individuals. These tests are often performed to diagnose and monitor asthma and other respiratory conditions that may be associated with heightened airway responsiveness.

The most common type of bronchial provocation test is the methacholine challenge test, which involves inhaling increasing concentrations of methacholine aerosol via a nebulizer. The dose response is measured by monitoring lung function (usually through spirometry) before and after each exposure. A positive test is indicated when there is a significant decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or other measures of airflow, which suggests bronchial hyperresponsiveness.

Other types of bronchial provocation tests include histamine challenges, exercise challenges, and mannitol challenges. These tests have specific indications, contraindications, and protocols that should be followed to ensure accurate results and patient safety. Bronchial provocation tests are typically conducted in a controlled clinical setting under the supervision of trained healthcare professionals.

Bronchodilators are medications that relax and widen the airways (bronchioles) in the lungs, making it easier to breathe. They work by relaxing the smooth muscle around the airways, which allows them to dilate or open up. This results in improved airflow and reduced symptoms of bronchoconstriction, such as wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath.

Bronchodilators can be classified into two main types: short-acting and long-acting. Short-acting bronchodilators are used for quick relief of symptoms and last for 4 to 6 hours, while long-acting bronchodilators are used for maintenance therapy and provide symptom relief for 12 hours or more.

Examples of bronchodilator agents include:

* Short-acting beta-agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, levalbuterol, and pirbuterol
* Long-acting beta-agonists (LABAs) such as salmeterol, formoterol, and indacaterol
* Anticholinergics such as ipratropium, tiotropium, and aclidinium
* Combination bronchodilators that contain both a LABA and an anticholinergic, such as umeclidinium/vilanterol and glycopyrrolate/formoterol.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease characterized by the persistent obstruction of airflow in and out of the lungs. This obstruction is usually caused by two primary conditions: chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Chronic bronchitis involves inflammation and narrowing of the airways, leading to excessive mucus production and coughing. Emphysema is a condition where the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs are damaged, resulting in decreased gas exchange and shortness of breath.

The main symptoms of COPD include progressive shortness of breath, chronic cough, chest tightness, wheezing, and excessive mucus production. The disease is often associated with exposure to harmful particles or gases, such as cigarette smoke, air pollution, or occupational dusts and chemicals. While there is no cure for COPD, treatments can help alleviate symptoms, improve quality of life, and slow the progression of the disease. These treatments may include bronchodilators, corticosteroids, combination inhalers, pulmonary rehabilitation, and, in severe cases, oxygen therapy or lung transplantation.

Gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) is a medical condition that refers to the blockage of the passage from the stomach to the small intestine, also known as the pylorus. This blockage can be caused by various factors, including tumors, scar tissue, or gallstones. As a result, food and digestive enzymes cannot pass through the pylorus into the small intestine, leading to symptoms such as vomiting, abdominal pain, bloating, and weight loss. In severe cases, GOO can lead to malnutrition, dehydration, and other complications if left untreated. Treatment options for GOO depend on the underlying cause of the obstruction and may include medication, endoscopic procedures, or surgery.

Respiratory mechanics refers to the biomechanical properties and processes that involve the movement of air through the respiratory system during breathing. It encompasses the mechanical behavior of the lungs, chest wall, and the muscles of respiration, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles.

Respiratory mechanics includes several key components:

1. **Compliance**: The ability of the lungs and chest wall to expand and recoil during breathing. High compliance means that the structures can easily expand and recoil, while low compliance indicates greater resistance to expansion and recoil.
2. **Resistance**: The opposition to airflow within the respiratory system, primarily due to the friction between the air and the airway walls. Airway resistance is influenced by factors such as airway diameter, length, and the viscosity of the air.
3. **Lung volumes and capacities**: These are the amounts of air present in the lungs during different phases of the breathing cycle. They include tidal volume (the amount of air inspired or expired during normal breathing), inspiratory reserve volume (additional air that can be inspired beyond the tidal volume), expiratory reserve volume (additional air that can be exhaled beyond the tidal volume), and residual volume (the air remaining in the lungs after a forced maximum exhalation).
4. **Work of breathing**: The energy required to overcome the resistance and elastic forces during breathing. This work is primarily performed by the respiratory muscles, which contract to generate negative intrathoracic pressure and expand the chest wall, allowing air to flow into the lungs.
5. **Pressure-volume relationships**: These describe how changes in lung volume are associated with changes in pressure within the respiratory system. Important pressure components include alveolar pressure (the pressure inside the alveoli), pleural pressure (the pressure between the lungs and the chest wall), and transpulmonary pressure (the difference between alveolar and pleural pressures).

Understanding respiratory mechanics is crucial for diagnosing and managing various respiratory disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

Total Lung Capacity (TLC) is the maximum volume of air that can be contained within the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It includes all of the following lung volumes: tidal volume, inspiratory reserve volume, expiratory reserve volume, and residual volume. TLC can be measured directly using gas dilution techniques or indirectly by adding residual volume to vital capacity. Factors that affect TLC include age, sex, height, and lung health status.

Ventricular outflow obstruction is a term used in cardiology to describe a condition where there is an obstruction or narrowing in the flow of blood as it exits the heart's ventricles (the lower chambers of the heart). This obstruction can occur due to various reasons such as congenital heart defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or calcification of the aortic valve.

In a normal heart, the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the aorta through the aortic valve, and the right ventricle pumps deoxygenated blood into the pulmonary artery through the pulmonic valve. Any obstruction in these outflow tracts can lead to increased pressure within the ventricles, which can result in various symptoms such as shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness, or fatigue.

The severity of the obstruction and the resulting symptoms can vary depending on the location and extent of the narrowing. Treatment options may include medications, surgical procedures, or catheter-based interventions to alleviate the obstruction and improve blood flow.

A tracheotomy is a surgical procedure that involves creating an opening in the neck and through the front (anterior) wall of the trachea (windpipe). This is performed to provide a new airway for the patient, bypassing any obstruction or damage in the upper airways. A tube is then inserted into this opening to maintain it and allow breathing.

This procedure is often conducted in emergency situations when there is an upper airway obstruction that cannot be easily removed or in critically ill patients who require long-term ventilation support. Complications can include infection, bleeding, damage to surrounding structures, and difficulties with speaking, swallowing, or coughing.

Laryngostenosis is a medical term that refers to a condition where the larynx (or voice box) becomes narrowed. This can occur due to various reasons such as scarring, swelling, or growths in the laryngeal area. The narrowing can cause difficulty with breathing, swallowing, and speaking. In severe cases, it may require medical intervention, such as surgery, to correct the problem.

Residual Volume (RV) is the amount of air that remains in the lungs after a forced exhale, also known as the "expiratory reserve volume." It is the lowest lung volume that can be reached during a forced exhalation and cannot be completely emptied due to the presence of alveoli that are too small or too far from the airways. This volume is important for maintaining the structural integrity of the lungs and preventing their collapse. Any additional air that enters the lungs after this point will increase the total lung capacity. The normal residual volume for an average adult human is typically around 1 to 1.5 liters.

Respiratory mucosa refers to the mucous membrane that lines the respiratory tract, including the nose, throat, bronchi, and lungs. It is a specialized type of tissue that is composed of epithelial cells, goblet cells, and glands that produce mucus, which helps to trap inhaled particles such as dust, allergens, and pathogens.

The respiratory mucosa also contains cilia, tiny hair-like structures that move rhythmically to help propel the mucus and trapped particles out of the airways and into the upper part of the throat, where they can be swallowed or coughed up. This defense mechanism is known as the mucociliary clearance system.

In addition to its role in protecting the respiratory tract from harmful substances, the respiratory mucosa also plays a crucial role in immune function by containing various types of immune cells that help to detect and respond to pathogens and other threats.

Intubation, intratracheal is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic or rubber tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted through the mouth or nose, passing through the vocal cords and into the trachea (windpipe). This procedure is performed to establish and maintain a patent airway, allowing for the delivery of oxygen and the removal of carbon dioxide during mechanical ventilation in various clinical scenarios, such as:

1. Respiratory failure or arrest
2. Procedural sedation
3. Surgery under general anesthesia
4. Neuromuscular disorders
5. Ingestion of toxic substances
6. Head and neck trauma
7. Critical illness or injury affecting the airway

The process of intubation is typically performed by trained medical professionals, such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists, using direct laryngoscopy or video laryngoscopy to visualize the vocal cords and guide the ETT into the correct position. Once placed, the ETT is secured to prevent dislodgement, and the patient's respiratory status is continuously monitored to ensure proper ventilation and oxygenation.

Helium is not a medical term, but it's a chemical element with symbol He and atomic number 2. It's a colorless, odorless, tasteless, non-toxic, inert, monatomic gas that heads the noble gases section of the periodic table. In medicine, helium is sometimes used in medical settings for its unique properties, such as being less dense than air, which can help improve the delivery of oxygen to patients with respiratory conditions. For example, heliox, a mixture of helium and oxygen, may be used to reduce the work of breathing in patients with conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. Additionally, helium is also used in cryogenic medical equipment and in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines to cool the superconducting magnets.

Lung volume measurements are clinical tests that determine the amount of air inhaled, exhaled, and present in the lungs at different times during the breathing cycle. These measurements include:

1. Tidal Volume (TV): The amount of air inhaled or exhaled during normal breathing, usually around 500 mL in resting adults.
2. Inspiratory Reserve Volume (IRV): The additional air that can be inhaled after a normal inspiration, approximately 3,000 mL in adults.
3. Expiratory Reserve Volume (ERV): The extra air that can be exhaled after a normal expiration, about 1,000-1,200 mL in adults.
4. Residual Volume (RV): The air remaining in the lungs after a maximal exhalation, approximately 1,100-1,500 mL in adults.
5. Total Lung Capacity (TLC): The total amount of air the lungs can hold at full inflation, calculated as TV + IRV + ERV + RV, around 6,000 mL in adults.
6. Functional Residual Capacity (FRC): The volume of air remaining in the lungs after a normal expiration, equal to ERV + RV, about 2,100-2,700 mL in adults.
7. Inspiratory Capacity (IC): The maximum amount of air that can be inhaled after a normal expiration, equal to TV + IRV, around 3,500 mL in adults.
8. Vital Capacity (VC): The total volume of air that can be exhaled after a maximal inspiration, calculated as IC + ERV, approximately 4,200-5,600 mL in adults.

These measurements help assess lung function and identify various respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and restrictive lung diseases.

The larynx, also known as the voice box, is a complex structure in the neck that plays a crucial role in protection of the lower respiratory tract and in phonation. It is composed of cartilaginous, muscular, and soft tissue structures. The primary functions of the larynx include:

1. Airway protection: During swallowing, the larynx moves upward and forward to close the opening of the trachea (the glottis) and prevent food or liquids from entering the lungs. This action is known as the swallowing reflex.
2. Phonation: The vocal cords within the larynx vibrate when air passes through them, producing sound that forms the basis of human speech and voice production.
3. Respiration: The larynx serves as a conduit for airflow between the upper and lower respiratory tracts during breathing.

The larynx is located at the level of the C3-C6 vertebrae in the neck, just above the trachea. It consists of several important structures:

1. Cartilages: The laryngeal cartilages include the thyroid, cricoid, and arytenoid cartilages, as well as the corniculate and cuneiform cartilages. These form a framework for the larynx and provide attachment points for various muscles.
2. Vocal cords: The vocal cords are thin bands of mucous membrane that stretch across the glottis (the opening between the arytenoid cartilages). They vibrate when air passes through them, producing sound.
3. Muscles: There are several intrinsic and extrinsic muscles associated with the larynx. The intrinsic muscles control the tension and position of the vocal cords, while the extrinsic muscles adjust the position and movement of the larynx within the neck.
4. Nerves: The larynx is innervated by both sensory and motor nerves. The recurrent laryngeal nerve provides motor innervation to all intrinsic laryngeal muscles, except for one muscle called the cricothyroid, which is innervated by the external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. Sensory innervation is provided by the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve and the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

The larynx plays a crucial role in several essential functions, including breathing, speaking, and protecting the airway during swallowing. Dysfunction or damage to the larynx can result in various symptoms, such as hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, shortness of breath, or stridor (a high-pitched sound heard during inspiration).

Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) is a measurement of how quickly a person can exhale air from their lungs. It is often used as a quick test to assess breathing difficulties in people with respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PEFR is measured in liters per minute (L/min) and the highest value obtained during a forceful exhalation is recorded as the peak expiratory flow rate. Regular monitoring of PEFR can help to assess the severity of an asthma attack or the effectiveness of treatment.

Forced expiratory flow rates (FEFR) are measures of how quickly and efficiently air can be exhaled from the lungs during a forced breath maneuver. These measurements are often used in pulmonary function testing to help diagnose and monitor obstructive lung diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

FEFR is typically measured during a forced expiratory maneuver, where the person takes a deep breath in and then exhales as forcefully and quickly as possible into a mouthpiece connected to a spirometer. The spirometer measures the volume and flow rate of the exhaled air over time.

There are several different FEFR measurements that can be reported, including:

* Forced Expiratory Flow (FEF) 25-75%: This is the average flow rate during the middle half of the forced expiratory maneuver.
* Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR): This is the maximum flow rate achieved during the first second of the forced expiratory maneuver.
* Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 Second (FEV1): This is the volume of air exhaled in the first second of the forced expiratory maneuver.

Abnormal FEFR values can indicate obstruction in the small airways of the lungs, which can make it difficult to breathe out fully and quickly. The specific pattern of abnormalities in FEFR measurements can help doctors differentiate between different types of obstructive lung diseases.

Dyspnea is defined as difficulty or discomfort in breathing, often described as shortness of breath. It can range from mild to severe, and may occur during rest, exercise, or at any time. Dyspnea can be caused by various medical conditions, including heart and lung diseases, anemia, and neuromuscular disorders. It is important to seek medical attention if experiencing dyspnea, as it can be a sign of a serious underlying condition.

Laryngeal edema is a medical condition characterized by the swelling of the tissues in the larynx or voice box. The larynx, which contains the vocal cords, plays a crucial role in protecting the airways, regulating ventilation, and enabling speech and swallowing. Laryngeal edema can result from various causes, such as allergic reactions, infections, irritants, trauma, or underlying medical conditions like angioedema or autoimmune disorders.

The swelling of the laryngeal tissues can lead to narrowing of the airways, causing symptoms like difficulty breathing, noisy breathing (stridor), coughing, and hoarseness. In severe cases, laryngeal edema may obstruct the airway, leading to respiratory distress or even suffocation. Immediate medical attention is necessary for individuals experiencing these symptoms to ensure proper diagnosis and timely intervention. Treatment options typically include medications like corticosteroids, antihistamines, or epinephrine to reduce swelling and alleviate airway obstruction.

Albuterol is a medication that is used to treat bronchospasm, or narrowing of the airways in the lungs, in conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is a short-acting beta-2 agonist, which means it works by relaxing the muscles around the airways, making it easier to breathe. Albuterol is available in several forms, including an inhaler, nebulizer solution, and syrup, and it is typically used as needed to relieve symptoms of bronchospasm. It may also be used before exercise to prevent bronchospasm caused by physical activity.

The medical definition of Albuterol is: "A short-acting beta-2 adrenergic agonist used to treat bronchospasm in conditions such as asthma and COPD. It works by relaxing the muscles around the airways, making it easier to breathe."

Maximal Expiratory Flow Rate (MEFR) is a measure of how quickly a person can exhale air from their lungs. It is often used in pulmonary function testing to assess the degree of airflow obstruction in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

The MEFR is typically measured by having the person take a deep breath and then exhale as forcefully and quickly as possible into a device that measures the volume and flow of air. The MEFR is calculated as the maximum flow rate achieved during the exhalation maneuver, usually expressed in liters per second (L/s) or seconds (L/sec).

MEFR can be measured at different lung volumes, such as at functional residual capacity (FRC) or at total lung capacity (TLC), to provide additional information about the severity and location of airflow obstruction. However, MEFR is not as commonly used in clinical practice as other measures of pulmonary function, such as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or forced vital capacity (FVC).

Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is a type of clinical specimen obtained through a procedure called bronchoalveolar lavage. This procedure involves inserting a bronchoscope into the lungs and instilling a small amount of saline solution into a specific area of the lung, then gently aspirating the fluid back out. The fluid that is recovered is called bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

BAL fluid contains cells and other substances that are present in the lower respiratory tract, including the alveoli (the tiny air sacs where gas exchange occurs). By analyzing BAL fluid, doctors can diagnose various lung conditions, such as pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and lung cancer. They can also monitor the effectiveness of treatments for these conditions by comparing the composition of BAL fluid before and after treatment.

BAL fluid is typically analyzed for its cellular content, including the number and type of white blood cells present, as well as for the presence of bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms. The fluid may also be tested for various proteins, enzymes, and other biomarkers that can provide additional information about lung health and disease.

Respiratory hypersensitivity, also known as respiratory allergies or hypersensitive pneumonitis, refers to an exaggerated immune response in the lungs to inhaled substances or allergens. This condition occurs when the body's immune system overreacts to harmless particles, leading to inflammation and damage in the airways and alveoli (air sacs) of the lungs.

There are two types of respiratory hypersensitivity: immediate and delayed. Immediate hypersensitivity, also known as type I hypersensitivity, is mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and results in symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, and asthma-like symptoms within minutes to hours of exposure to the allergen. Delayed hypersensitivity, also known as type III or type IV hypersensitivity, is mediated by other immune mechanisms and can take several hours to days to develop after exposure to the allergen.

Common causes of respiratory hypersensitivity include mold spores, animal dander, dust mites, pollen, and chemicals found in certain occupations. Symptoms may include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and fatigue. Treatment typically involves avoiding the allergen, if possible, and using medications such as corticosteroids, bronchodilators, or antihistamines to manage symptoms. In severe cases, immunotherapy (allergy shots) may be recommended to help desensitize the immune system to the allergen.

"Inhalation administration" is a medical term that refers to the method of delivering medications or therapeutic agents directly into the lungs by inhaling them through the airways. This route of administration is commonly used for treating respiratory conditions such as asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and cystic fibrosis.

Inhalation administration can be achieved using various devices, including metered-dose inhalers (MDIs), dry powder inhalers (DPIs), nebulizers, and soft-mist inhalers. Each device has its unique mechanism of delivering the medication into the lungs, but they all aim to provide a high concentration of the drug directly to the site of action while minimizing systemic exposure and side effects.

The advantages of inhalation administration include rapid onset of action, increased local drug concentration, reduced systemic side effects, and improved patient compliance due to the ease of use and non-invasive nature of the delivery method. However, proper technique and device usage are crucial for effective therapy, as incorrect usage may result in suboptimal drug deposition and therapeutic outcomes.

Pulmonary emphysema is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by abnormal, permanent enlargement of the airspaces distal to the terminal bronchioles, accompanied by destruction of their walls and without obvious fibrosis. This results in loss of elastic recoil, which leads to trappling of air within the lungs and difficulty exhaling. It is often caused by cigarette smoking or long-term exposure to harmful pollutants. The disease is part of a group of conditions known as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which also includes chronic bronchitis.

Functional Residual Capacity (FRC) is the volume of air that remains in the lungs after normal expiration during quiet breathing. It represents the sum of the residual volume (RV) and the expiratory reserve volume (ERV). The FRC is approximately 2.5-3.5 liters in a healthy adult. This volume of air serves to keep the alveoli open and maintain oxygenation during periods of quiet breathing, as well as providing a reservoir for additional ventilation during increased activity or exercise.

A tracheostomy is a surgically created opening through the neck into the trachea (windpipe). It is performed to provide an airway in cases where the upper airway is obstructed or access to the lower airway is required, such as in prolonged intubation, severe trauma, or chronic lung diseases. The procedure involves making an incision in the front of the neck and creating a direct opening into the trachea, through which a tracheostomy tube is inserted to maintain the patency of the airway. This allows for direct ventilation of the lungs, suctioning of secretions, and prevention of complications associated with upper airway obstruction.

Lacrimal duct obstruction is a blockage in the lacrimal duct, which is the passageway that drains tears from the eye into the nose. This condition can cause excessive tearing, pain, and swelling in the affected eye. In some cases, it may also lead to recurrent eye infections or inflammation. The obstruction can be caused by various factors such as age-related changes, injury, infection, inflammation, or congenital abnormalities. Treatment options for lacrimal duct obstruction depend on the underlying cause and severity of the condition and may include medications, minor surgical procedures, or more invasive surgeries.

The epiglottis is a flap-like structure located at the base of the tongue, near the back of the throat (pharynx). It is made of elastic cartilage and covered with mucous membrane. The primary function of the epiglottis is to protect the trachea (windpipe) from food or liquids entering it during swallowing.

During normal swallowing, the epiglottis closes over the opening of the larynx (voice box), redirecting the food or liquid bolus into the esophagus. In this way, the epiglottis prevents aspiration, which is the entry of foreign materials into the trachea and lungs.

Inflammation or infection of the epiglottis can lead to a serious medical condition called epiglottitis, characterized by swelling, redness, and pain in the epiglottis and surrounding tissues. Epiglottitis can cause difficulty breathing, speaking, and swallowing, and requires immediate medical attention.

Tracheal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the trachea, which is the windpipe that carries air from the nose and throat to the lungs. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant tracheal neoplasms are relatively rare and can be primary (originating in the trachea) or secondary (spreading from another part of the body, such as lung cancer). Primary tracheal cancers can be squamous cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma, or sarcomas. Symptoms may include cough, difficulty breathing, wheezing, or chest pain. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm and can include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Aerosols are defined in the medical field as suspensions of fine solid or liquid particles in a gas. In the context of public health and medicine, aerosols often refer to particles that can remain suspended in air for long periods of time and can be inhaled. They can contain various substances, such as viruses, bacteria, fungi, or chemicals, and can play a role in the transmission of respiratory infections or other health effects.

For example, when an infected person coughs or sneezes, they may produce respiratory droplets that can contain viruses like influenza or SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). Some of these droplets can evaporate quickly and leave behind smaller particles called aerosols, which can remain suspended in the air for hours and potentially be inhaled by others. This is one way that respiratory viruses can spread between people in close proximity to each other.

Aerosols can also be generated through medical procedures such as bronchoscopy, suctioning, or nebulizer treatments, which can produce aerosols containing bacteria, viruses, or other particles that may pose an infection risk to healthcare workers or other patients. Therefore, appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and airborne precautions are often necessary to reduce the risk of transmission in these settings.

Medical Definition of Respiration:

Respiration, in physiology, is the process by which an organism takes in oxygen and gives out carbon dioxide. It's also known as breathing. This process is essential for most forms of life because it provides the necessary oxygen for cellular respiration, where the cells convert biochemical energy from nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and releases waste products, primarily carbon dioxide.

In humans and other mammals, respiration is a two-stage process:

1. Breathing (or external respiration): This involves the exchange of gases with the environment. Air enters the lungs through the mouth or nose, then passes through the pharynx, larynx, trachea, and bronchi, finally reaching the alveoli where the actual gas exchange occurs. Oxygen from the inhaled air diffuses into the blood, while carbon dioxide, a waste product of metabolism, diffuses from the blood into the alveoli to be exhaled.

2. Cellular respiration (or internal respiration): This is the process by which cells convert glucose and other nutrients into ATP, water, and carbon dioxide in the presence of oxygen. The carbon dioxide produced during this process then diffuses out of the cells and into the bloodstream to be exhaled during breathing.

In summary, respiration is a vital physiological function that enables organisms to obtain the necessary oxygen for cellular metabolism while eliminating waste products like carbon dioxide.

A laryngeal mask is a type of supraglottic airway device that is used in anesthesia and critical care to secure the airway during procedures or respiratory support. It consists of an inflatable cuff that is inserted into the hypopharynx, behind the tongue, and above the laryngeal opening. The cuff forms a low-pressure seal around the laryngeal inlet, allowing for the delivery of ventilated gases to the lungs while minimizing the risk of aspiration.

Laryngeal masks are often used as an alternative to endotracheal intubation, especially in cases where intubation is difficult or contraindicated. They are also used in emergency situations for airway management and during resuscitation efforts. Laryngeal masks come in various sizes and designs, with some models allowing for the placement of a gastric tube to decompress the stomach and reduce the risk of regurgitation and aspiration.

Overall, laryngeal masks provide a safe and effective means of securing the airway while minimizing trauma and discomfort to the patient.

Inhalation is the act or process of breathing in where air or other gases are drawn into the lungs. It's also known as inspiration. This process involves several muscles, including the diaphragm and intercostal muscles between the ribs, working together to expand the chest cavity and decrease the pressure within the thorax, which then causes air to flow into the lungs.

In a medical context, inhalation can also refer to the administration of medications or therapeutic gases through the respiratory tract, typically using an inhaler or nebulizer. This route of administration allows for direct delivery of the medication to the lungs, where it can be quickly absorbed into the bloodstream and exert its effects.

I understand you are asking for a medical definition of "Horse Diseases." However, it's important to note that there isn't a specific medical field dedicated to horse diseases as we typically categorize medical fields by human diseases and conditions. Veterinary medicine is the field responsible for studying, diagnosing, and treating diseases in animals, including horses.

Here's a general definition of 'Horse Diseases':

Horse diseases are health issues or medical conditions that affect equine species, particularly horses. These diseases can be caused by various factors such as bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic infections; genetic predispositions; environmental factors; and metabolic disorders. Examples of horse diseases include Strangles (Streptococcus equi), Equine Influenza, Equine Herpesvirus, West Nile Virus, Rabies, Potomac Horse Fever, Lyme Disease, and internal or external parasites like worms and ticks. Additionally, horses can suffer from musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis, laminitis, and various injuries. Regular veterinary care, preventative measures, and proper management are crucial for maintaining horse health and preventing diseases.

Mucus is a viscous, slippery secretion produced by the mucous membranes that line various body cavities such as the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. It serves to lubricate and protect these surfaces from damage, infection, and foreign particles. Mucus contains water, proteins, salts, and other substances, including antibodies, enzymes, and glycoproteins called mucins that give it its characteristic gel-like consistency.

In the respiratory system, mucus traps inhaled particles such as dust, allergens, and pathogens, preventing them from reaching the lungs. The cilia, tiny hair-like structures lining the airways, move the mucus upward toward the throat, where it can be swallowed or expelled through coughing or sneezing. In the gastrointestinal tract, mucus helps protect the lining of the stomach and intestines from digestive enzymes and other harmful substances.

Excessive production of mucus can occur in various medical conditions such as allergies, respiratory infections, chronic lung diseases, and gastrointestinal disorders, leading to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, nasal congestion, and diarrhea.

High-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) is a type of mechanical ventilation that delivers breaths at a frequency greater than 100 times per minute, typically in the range of 240-360 breaths per minute. It uses a high-pressure jet of gas to deliver small tidal volumes (usually less than 2 ml/kg of ideal body weight) into the airway.

The jet ventilation is often combined with a low-level positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to maintain some lung volume and prevent atelectasis during exhalation. HFJV can be used in both invasive and noninvasive modes, depending on the patient's condition and requirements.

This mode of ventilation is particularly useful in patients with severe respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), bronchopleural fistula, or air leaks from lung injury, as it minimizes gas flow and reduces the risk of air leakage while still maintaining adequate oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination. However, HFJV requires careful monitoring and expertise to ensure proper settings and avoid complications such as barotrauma, hemodynamic instability, or inadequate ventilation.

A cough is a reflex action that helps to clear the airways of irritants, foreign particles, or excess mucus or phlegm. It is characterized by a sudden, forceful expulsion of air from the lungs through the mouth and nose. A cough can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term), and it can be accompanied by other symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fever. Coughing can be caused by various factors, including respiratory infections, allergies, asthma, environmental pollutants, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and bronchitis. In some cases, a cough may be a symptom of a more serious underlying condition, such as heart failure or lung cancer.

Bronchial spasm refers to a sudden constriction or tightening of the muscles in the bronchial tubes, which are the airways that lead to the lungs. This constriction can cause symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing. Bronchial spasm is often associated with respiratory conditions such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis. In these conditions, the airways are sensitive to various triggers such as allergens, irritants, or infections, which can cause the muscles in the airways to contract and narrow. This can make it difficult for air to flow in and out of the lungs, leading to symptoms such as shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing. Bronchial spasm can be treated with medications that help to relax the muscles in the airways and open up the airways, such as bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory drugs.

Airway management is a set of procedures and techniques used to maintain or restore the flow of air into and out of the lungs, ensuring adequate ventilation and oxygenation of the body. This is critical in medical emergencies such as respiratory arrest, cardiac arrest, trauma, and other situations where a patient may have difficulty breathing on their own.

Airway management includes various interventions, such as:

1. Basic airway maneuvers: These include chin lift, jaw thrust, and suctioning to clear the airway of obstructions.
2. Use of adjuncts: Devices like oropharyngeal (OPA) and nasopharyngeal airways (NPA) can be used to maintain an open airway.
3. Bag-valve-mask (BVM) ventilation: This is a technique where a mask is placed over the patient's face, and positive pressure is applied to the bag to help move air in and out of the lungs.
4. Endotracheal intubation: A flexible plastic tube is inserted through the mouth or nose and advanced into the trachea (windpipe) to secure the airway and allow for mechanical ventilation.
5. Supraglottic airway devices (SADs): These are alternatives to endotracheal intubation, such as laryngeal mask airways (LMAs), that provide a temporary seal over the upper airway to facilitate ventilation.
6. Surgical airway: In rare cases, when other methods fail or are not possible, a surgical airway may be established by creating an opening through the neck (cricothyrotomy or tracheostomy) to access the trachea directly.

Proper airway management requires knowledge of anatomy, understanding of various techniques and devices, and the ability to quickly assess and respond to changing clinical situations. Healthcare professionals, such as physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and paramedics, receive extensive training in airway management to ensure competency in managing this critical aspect of patient care.

Respiratory sounds are the noises produced by the airflow through the respiratory tract during breathing. These sounds can provide valuable information about the health and function of the lungs and airways. They are typically categorized into two main types: normal breath sounds and adventitious (or abnormal) breath sounds.

Normal breath sounds include:

1. Vesicular breath sounds: These are soft, low-pitched sounds heard over most of the lung fields during quiet breathing. They are produced by the movement of air through the alveoli and smaller bronchioles.
2. Bronchovesicular breath sounds: These are medium-pitched, hollow sounds heard over the mainstem bronchi and near the upper sternal border during both inspiration and expiration. They are a combination of vesicular and bronchial breath sounds.

Abnormal or adventitious breath sounds include:

1. Crackles (or rales): These are discontinuous, non-musical sounds that resemble the crackling of paper or bubbling in a fluid-filled container. They can be heard during inspiration and are caused by the sudden opening of collapsed airways or the movement of fluid within the airways.
2. Wheezes: These are continuous, musical sounds resembling a whistle. They are produced by the narrowing or obstruction of the airways, causing turbulent airflow.
3. Rhonchi: These are low-pitched, rumbling, continuous sounds that can be heard during both inspiration and expiration. They are caused by the vibration of secretions or fluids in the larger airways.
4. Stridor: This is a high-pitched, inspiratory sound that resembles a harsh crowing or barking noise. It is usually indicative of upper airway narrowing or obstruction.

The character, location, and duration of respiratory sounds can help healthcare professionals diagnose various respiratory conditions, such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and bronchitis.

The pharynx is a part of the digestive and respiratory systems that serves as a conduit for food and air. It is a musculo-membranous tube extending from the base of the skull to the level of the sixth cervical vertebra where it becomes continuous with the esophagus.

The pharynx has three regions: the nasopharynx, oropharynx, and laryngopharynx. The nasopharynx is the uppermost region, which lies above the soft palate and is connected to the nasal cavity. The oropharynx is the middle region, which includes the area between the soft palate and the hyoid bone, including the tonsils and base of the tongue. The laryngopharynx is the lowest region, which lies below the hyoid bone and connects to the larynx.

The primary function of the pharynx is to convey food from the oral cavity to the esophagus during swallowing and to allow air to pass from the nasal cavity to the larynx during breathing. It also plays a role in speech, taste, and immune defense.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a sleep-related breathing disorder that occurs when the upper airway becomes partially or completely blocked during sleep, leading to pauses in breathing or shallow breaths. These episodes, known as apneas or hypopneas, can last for 10 seconds or longer and may occur multiple times throughout the night, disrupting normal sleep patterns and causing oxygen levels in the blood to drop.

The obstruction in OSA is typically caused by the relaxation of the muscles in the back of the throat during sleep, which allows the soft tissues to collapse and block the airway. This can result in snoring, choking, gasping for air, or awakening from sleep with a start.

Contributing factors to OSA may include obesity, large neck circumference, enlarged tonsils or adenoids, alcohol consumption, smoking, and use of sedatives or muscle relaxants. Untreated OSA can lead to serious health consequences such as high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and cognitive impairment. Treatment options for OSA include lifestyle changes, oral appliances, positive airway pressure therapy, and surgery.

Tongue diseases refer to various medical conditions that affect the structure, function, or appearance of the tongue. These conditions can be categorized into several types, including:

1. Infections: Bacterial, viral, or fungal infections can cause tongue inflammation (glossitis), pain, and ulcers. Common causes include streptococcus, herpes simplex, and candida albicans.
2. Traumatic injuries: These can result from accidental bites, burns, or irritation caused by sharp teeth, dental appliances, or habitual habits like tongue thrusting or chewing.
3. Neoplasms: Both benign and malignant growths can occur on the tongue, such as papillomas, fibromas, and squamous cell carcinoma.
4. Congenital disorders: Some individuals may be born with abnormalities of the tongue, like ankyloglossia (tongue-tie) or macroglossia (enlarged tongue).
5. Neurological conditions: Certain neurological disorders can affect tongue movement and sensation, such as Bell's palsy, stroke, or multiple sclerosis.
6. Systemic diseases: Various systemic conditions can have symptoms that manifest on the tongue, like diabetes mellitus (which can cause dryness and furring), iron deficiency anemia (which may lead to atrophic glossitis), or Sjögren's syndrome (which can result in xerostomia).
7. Idiopathic: In some cases, the cause of tongue symptoms remains unknown, leading to a diagnosis of idiopathic glossitis or burning mouth syndrome.

Proper diagnosis and treatment of tongue diseases require a thorough examination by a healthcare professional, often involving a dental or medical specialist such as an oral pathologist, otolaryngologist, or dermatologist.

Sleep apnea syndromes refer to a group of disorders characterized by abnormal breathing patterns during sleep. These patterns can result in repeated pauses in breathing (apneas) or shallow breaths (hypopneas), causing interruptions in sleep and decreased oxygen supply to the body. There are three main types of sleep apnea syndromes:

1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA): This is the most common form, caused by the collapse or obstruction of the upper airway during sleep, often due to relaxation of the muscles in the throat and tongue.

2. Central Sleep Apnea (CSA): This type is less common and results from the brain's failure to send proper signals to the breathing muscles. It can be associated with conditions such as heart failure, stroke, or certain medications.

3. Complex/Mixed Sleep Apnea: In some cases, a person may experience both obstructive and central sleep apnea symptoms, known as complex or mixed sleep apnea.

Symptoms of sleep apnea syndromes can include loud snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, morning headaches, difficulty concentrating, and mood changes. Diagnosis typically involves a sleep study (polysomnography) to monitor breathing patterns, heart rate, brain activity, and other physiological factors during sleep. Treatment options may include lifestyle modifications, oral appliances, positive airway pressure therapy, or even surgery in severe cases.

A laryngocele is an abnormal, air-filled sac or diverticulum that forms in the larynx (voice box), specifically in the saccule of the ventricle. It can be congenital or acquired and is often caused by increased pressure in the surrounding tissues, such as from playing wind instruments, glassblowing, or chronic coughing. Laryngoceles may be asymptomatic or can cause symptoms like voice changes, difficulty breathing, or a neck mass, depending on their size and location. They are typically diagnosed through physical examination, laryngoscopy, or imaging studies and can be treated with surgical excision if necessary.

Air pressure, also known as atmospheric pressure, is the force exerted by the weight of air in the atmosphere on a surface. It is measured in units such as pounds per square inch (psi), hectopascals (hPa), or inches of mercury (inHg). The standard atmospheric pressure at sea level is defined as 101,325 Pa (14.7 psi/1013 hPa/29.92 inHg). Changes in air pressure can be used to predict weather patterns and are an important factor in the study of aerodynamics and respiratory physiology.

Bronchography is a medical imaging technique that involves the injection of a contrast material into the airways (bronchi) of the lungs, followed by X-ray imaging to produce detailed pictures of the bronchial tree. This diagnostic procedure was commonly used in the past to identify abnormalities such as narrowing, blockages, or inflammation in the airways, but it has largely been replaced by newer, less invasive techniques like computed tomography (CT) scans and bronchoscopy.

The process of bronchography involves the following steps:

1. The patient is sedated or given a local anesthetic to minimize discomfort during the procedure.
2. A radiopaque contrast material is introduced into the bronchi through a catheter that is inserted into the trachea, either via a nostril or through a small incision in the neck.
3. Once the contrast material has been distributed throughout the bronchial tree, X-ray images are taken from various angles to capture detailed views of the airways.
4. The images are then analyzed by a radiologist to identify any abnormalities or irregularities in the structure and function of the bronchi.

Although bronchography is considered a relatively safe procedure, it does carry some risks, including allergic reactions to the contrast material, infection, and bleeding. Additionally, the use of ionizing radiation during X-ray imaging should be carefully weighed against the potential benefits of the procedure.

Atropine derivatives are a class of drugs that are chemically related to atropine, an alkaloid found in the nightshade family of plants. These drugs have anticholinergic properties, which means they block the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the body.

Atropine derivatives can be used for a variety of medical purposes, including:

1. Treating motion sickness and vertigo
2. Dilating the pupils during eye examinations
3. Reducing saliva production during surgical procedures
4. Treating certain types of poisoning, such as organophosphate or nerve gas poisoning
5. Managing symptoms of some neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and myasthenia gravis

Some examples of atropine derivatives include hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and ipratropium. These drugs can have side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, and rapid heartbeat. They should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare provider.

Fiber optic technology in the medical context refers to the use of thin, flexible strands of glass or plastic fibers that are designed to transmit light and images along their length. These fibers are used to create bundles, known as fiber optic cables, which can be used for various medical applications such as:

1. Illumination: Fiber optics can be used to deliver light to hard-to-reach areas during surgical procedures or diagnostic examinations.
2. Imaging: Fiber optics can transmit images from inside the body, enabling doctors to visualize internal structures and tissues. This is commonly used in medical imaging techniques such as endoscopy, colonoscopy, and laparoscopy.
3. Sensing: Fiber optic sensors can be used to measure various physiological parameters such as temperature, pressure, and strain within the body. These sensors can provide real-time data during surgical procedures or for monitoring patients' health status.

Fiber optic technology offers several advantages over traditional medical imaging techniques, including high resolution, flexibility, small diameter, and the ability to bend around corners without significant loss of image quality. Additionally, fiber optics are non-magnetic and can be used in MRI environments without causing interference.

Plethysmography is a non-invasive medical technique used to measure changes in volume or blood flow within an organ or body part, typically in the lungs or extremities. There are several types of plethysmography, including:

1. **Whole Body Plethysmography (WBP):** This type of plethysmography is used to assess lung function and volumes by measuring changes in pressure within a sealed chamber that contains the patient's entire body except for their head. The patient breathes normally while wearing a nose clip, allowing technicians to analyze respiratory patterns, airflow, and lung volume changes.
2. **Segmental or Local Plethysmography:** This technique measures volume or blood flow changes in specific body parts, such as the limbs or digits. It can help diagnose and monitor conditions affecting peripheral circulation, like deep vein thrombosis, arterial occlusive disease, or Raynaud's phenomenon.
3. **Impedance Plethysmography (IPG):** This non-invasive method uses electrical impedance to estimate changes in blood volume within an organ or body part. By applying a small electrical current and measuring the opposition to flow (impedance), technicians can determine variations in blood volume, which can help diagnose conditions like deep vein thrombosis or heart failure.
4. **Optical Plethysmography:** This technique uses light to measure changes in blood volume, typically in the skin or mucous membranes. By shining a light on the area and analyzing the reflected or transmitted light, technicians can detect variations in blood volume related to cardiac output, respiration, or other physiological factors.

Overall, plethysmography is an essential tool for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions affecting circulation, respiratory function, and organ volumes.

X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging method that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional (tomographic) images (virtual "slices") of the body. These cross-sectional images can then be used to display detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body.

The term "computed tomography" is used instead of "CT scan" or "CAT scan" because the machines take a series of X-ray measurements from different angles around the body and then use a computer to process these data to create detailed images of internal structures within the body.

CT scanning is a noninvasive, painless medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT imaging provides detailed information about many types of tissue including lung, bone, soft tissue and blood vessels. CT examinations can be performed on every part of the body for a variety of reasons including diagnosis, surgical planning, and monitoring of therapeutic responses.

In computed tomography (CT), an X-ray source and detector rotate around the patient, measuring the X-ray attenuation at many different angles. A computer uses this data to construct a cross-sectional image by the process of reconstruction. This technique is called "tomography". The term "computed" refers to the use of a computer to reconstruct the images.

CT has become an important tool in medical imaging and diagnosis, allowing radiologists and other physicians to view detailed internal images of the body. It can help identify many different medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, lung nodules, liver tumors, and internal injuries from trauma. CT is also commonly used for guiding biopsies and other minimally invasive procedures.

In summary, X-ray computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a medical imaging technique that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images taken from different angles to produce cross-sectional images of the body. It provides detailed internal views of organs, bones, and soft tissues in the body, allowing physicians to diagnose and treat medical conditions.

Croup is a common respiratory condition that mainly affects young children. It is characterized by a harsh, barking cough and difficulty breathing, which can sometimes be accompanied by stridor (a high-pitched, wheezing sound that occurs when breathing in). Croup is typically caused by a viral infection that leads to inflammation of the upper airway, including the larynx (voice box) and trachea (windpipe).

The medical definition of croup is:

* Acute laryngotracheitis or laryngotracheobronchitis
* Inflammation of the larynx and trachea, often with involvement of the bronchi
* Characterized by a barking cough, stridor, and hoarseness
* Most commonly caused by viral infections, such as parainfluenza virus
* Typically affects children between 6 months and 3 years of age.

Smoking is not a medical condition, but it's a significant health risk behavior. Here is the definition from a public health perspective:

Smoking is the act of inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning tobacco that is commonly consumed through cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. The smoke contains over 7,000 chemicals, including nicotine, tar, carbon monoxide, and numerous toxic and carcinogenic substances. These toxins contribute to a wide range of diseases and health conditions, such as lung cancer, heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and various other cancers, as well as adverse reproductive outcomes and negative impacts on the developing fetus during pregnancy. Smoking is highly addictive due to the nicotine content, which makes quitting smoking a significant challenge for many individuals.

Laryngoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the examination of the larynx, which is the upper part of the windpipe (trachea), and the vocal cords using a specialized instrument called a laryngoscope. The laryngoscope is inserted through the mouth or nose to provide a clear view of the larynx and surrounding structures. This procedure can be performed for diagnostic purposes, such as identifying abnormalities like growths, inflammation, or injuries, or for therapeutic reasons, such as removing foreign objects or taking tissue samples for biopsy. There are different types of laryngoscopes and techniques used depending on the reason for the examination and the patient's specific needs.

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) is a mode of non-invasive ventilation that delivers pressurized room air or oxygen to maintain airway patency and increase functional residual capacity in patients with respiratory disorders. A CPAP device, which typically includes a flow generator, tubing, and a mask, provides a constant positive pressure throughout the entire respiratory cycle, preventing the collapse of the upper airway during inspiration and expiration.

CPAP is commonly used to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a condition characterized by repetitive narrowing or closure of the upper airway during sleep, leading to intermittent hypoxia, hypercapnia, and sleep fragmentation. By delivering positive pressure, CPAP helps to stent open the airway, ensuring unobstructed breathing and reducing the frequency and severity of apneic events.

Additionally, CPAP can be used in other clinical scenarios, such as managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations, or postoperative respiratory insufficiency, to improve oxygenation and reduce the work of breathing. The specific pressure settings and device configurations are tailored to each patient's needs based on their underlying condition, severity of symptoms, and response to therapy.

Auscultation is a medical procedure in which a healthcare professional uses a stethoscope to listen to the internal sounds of the body, such as heart, lung, or abdominal sounds. These sounds can provide important clues about a person's health and help diagnose various medical conditions, such as heart valve problems, lung infections, or digestive issues.

During auscultation, the healthcare professional places the stethoscope on different parts of the body and listens for any abnormal sounds, such as murmurs, rubs, or wheezes. They may also ask the person to perform certain movements, such as breathing deeply or coughing, to help identify any changes in the sounds.

Auscultation is a simple, non-invasive procedure that can provide valuable information about a person's health. It is an essential part of a physical examination and is routinely performed by healthcare professionals during regular checkups and hospital visits.

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play an important role in the body's immune response. They are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream, where they can travel to different tissues and organs throughout the body. Eosinophils are characterized by their granules, which contain various proteins and enzymes that are toxic to parasites and can contribute to inflammation.

Eosinophils are typically associated with allergic reactions, asthma, and other inflammatory conditions. They can also be involved in the body's response to certain infections, particularly those caused by parasites such as worms. In some cases, elevated levels of eosinophils in the blood or tissues (a condition called eosinophilia) can indicate an underlying medical condition, such as a parasitic infection, autoimmune disorder, or cancer.

Eosinophils are named for their staining properties - they readily take up eosin dye, which is why they appear pink or red under the microscope. They make up only about 1-6% of circulating white blood cells in healthy individuals, but their numbers can increase significantly in response to certain triggers.

Ipratropium is an anticholinergic bronchodilator medication that is often used to treat respiratory conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. It works by blocking the action of acetylcholine, a chemical messenger in the body that causes muscles around the airways to tighten and narrow. By preventing this effect, ipratropium helps to relax the muscles around the airways, making it easier to breathe.

Ipratropium is available in several forms, including an aerosol spray, nebulizer solution, and dry powder inhaler. It is typically used in combination with other respiratory medications, such as beta-agonists or corticosteroids, to provide more effective relief of symptoms. Common side effects of ipratropium include dry mouth, throat irritation, and headache.

Lung compliance is a measure of the ease with which the lungs expand and is defined as the change in lung volume for a given change in transpulmonary pressure. It is often expressed in units of liters per centimeter of water (L/cm H2O). A higher compliance indicates that the lungs are more easily distensible, while a lower compliance suggests that the lungs are stiffer and require more force to expand. Lung compliance can be affected by various conditions such as pulmonary fibrosis, pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Laryngospasm, often mistakenly referred to as "laryngismus," is a medical condition characterized by an involuntary and sustained closure of the vocal cords (the structures that form the larynx or voice box). This spasm can occur in response to various stimuli, such as irritation, aspiration, or emotional distress, leading to difficulty breathing, coughing, and stridor (a high-pitched sound during inspiration).

The term "laryngismus" is not a widely accepted medical term; however, it may be used informally to refer to any condition affecting the larynx. The correct term for a prolonged or chronic issue with the larynx would be "laryngeal dyskinesia."

The hypopharynx is the lower part of the pharynx, which is the muscular tube that extends from the back of the nasal cavity and mouth to the esophagus and trachea. The hypopharynx lies posterior to the larynx and is divided into three regions: the pyriform (or piriform) sinuses, the postcricoid area, and the posterior pharyngeal wall. It serves as a passageway for both food and air, and any abnormalities or diseases in this region can lead to swallowing difficulties, aspiration, and other serious medical conditions.

The Maximal Mid-Expiratory Flow Rate (MMEFR), also known as Maximum Expiratory Flow at 50% of the FVC (FEF50%), is a measure of pulmonary function that reflects the rate of airflow during the middle portion of a forced expiratory maneuver. It is calculated as the maximum flow rate achieved during the expiration of air from the lungs, starting at 50% of the Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) and ending at the residual volume.

MMEFR is expressed in liters per second (L/s) or seconds (s). A decreased MMEFR may indicate obstruction in the smaller airways, such as bronchitis or asthma, while a normal value suggests that the small airways are functioning properly. However, it's important to note that MMEFR is just one of several measures used to assess pulmonary function and should be interpreted in conjunction with other test results and clinical findings.

Respiratory muscles are a group of muscles involved in the process of breathing. They include the diaphragm, intercostal muscles (located between the ribs), scalene muscles (located in the neck), and abdominal muscles. These muscles work together to allow the chest cavity to expand or contract, which draws air into or pushes it out of the lungs. The diaphragm is the primary muscle responsible for breathing, contracting to increase the volume of the chest cavity and draw air into the lungs during inhalation. The intercostal muscles help to further expand the ribcage, while the abdominal muscles assist in exhaling by compressing the abdomen and pushing up on the diaphragm.

Sputum is defined as a mixture of saliva and phlegm that is expelled from the respiratory tract during coughing, sneezing or deep breathing. It can be clear, mucoid, or purulent (containing pus) depending on the underlying cause of the respiratory issue. Examination of sputum can help diagnose various respiratory conditions such as infections, inflammation, or other lung diseases.

The trachea, also known as the windpipe, is a tube-like structure in the respiratory system that connects the larynx (voice box) to the bronchi (the two branches leading to each lung). It is composed of several incomplete rings of cartilage and smooth muscle, which provide support and flexibility. The trachea plays a crucial role in directing incoming air to the lungs during inspiration and outgoing air to the larynx during expiration.

Emphysema is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by abnormal, permanent enlargement of the airspaces called alveoli in the lungs, accompanied by destruction of their walls. This results in loss of elasticity and decreased gas exchange efficiency, causing shortness of breath and coughing. It is often caused by smoking or exposure to harmful pollutants. The damage to the lungs is irreversible, but quitting smoking and using medications can help alleviate symptoms and slow disease progression.

Methacholine chloride is a medication that is used as a diagnostic tool to help identify and assess the severity of asthma or other respiratory conditions that cause airway hyperresponsiveness. It is a synthetic derivative of acetylcholine, which is a neurotransmitter that causes smooth muscle contraction in the body.

When methacholine chloride is inhaled, it stimulates the muscarinic receptors in the airways, causing them to constrict or narrow. This response is measured and used to determine the degree of airway hyperresponsiveness, which can help diagnose asthma and assess its severity.

The methacholine challenge test involves inhaling progressively higher doses of methacholine chloride until a significant decrease in lung function is observed or until a maximum dose is reached. The test results are then used to guide treatment decisions and monitor the effectiveness of therapy. It's important to note that this test should be conducted under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it carries some risks, including bronchoconstriction and respiratory distress.

Lung diseases refer to a broad category of disorders that affect the lungs and other structures within the respiratory system. These diseases can impair lung function, leading to symptoms such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and wheezing. They can be categorized into several types based on the underlying cause and nature of the disease process. Some common examples include:

1. Obstructive lung diseases: These are characterized by narrowing or blockage of the airways, making it difficult to breathe out. Examples include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis.
2. Restrictive lung diseases: These involve stiffening or scarring of the lungs, which reduces their ability to expand and take in air. Examples include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and asbestosis.
3. Infectious lung diseases: These are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites that infect the lungs. Examples include pneumonia, tuberculosis, and influenza.
4. Vascular lung diseases: These affect the blood vessels in the lungs, impairing oxygen exchange. Examples include pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).
5. Neoplastic lung diseases: These involve abnormal growth of cells within the lungs, leading to cancer. Examples include small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
6. Other lung diseases: These include interstitial lung diseases, pleural effusions, and rare disorders such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).

It is important to note that this list is not exhaustive, and there are many other conditions that can affect the lungs. Proper diagnosis and treatment of lung diseases require consultation with a healthcare professional, such as a pulmonologist or respiratory therapist.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Tidal volume (Vt) is the amount of air that moves into or out of the lungs during normal, resting breathing. It is the difference between the volume of air in the lungs at the end of a normal expiration and the volume at the end of a normal inspiration. In other words, it's the volume of each breath you take when you are not making any effort to breathe more deeply.

The average tidal volume for an adult human is around 500 milliliters (ml) per breath, but this can vary depending on factors such as age, sex, size, and fitness level. During exercise or other activities that require increased oxygen intake, tidal volume may increase to meet the body's demands for more oxygen.

Tidal volume is an important concept in respiratory physiology and clinical medicine, as it can be used to assess lung function and diagnose respiratory disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma.

Intubation is a medical procedure in which a flexible plastic tube called an endotracheal tube (ETT) is inserted into the patient's windpipe (trachea) through the mouth or nose. This procedure is performed to maintain an open airway and ensure adequate ventilation and oxygenation of the lungs during surgery, critical illness, or trauma.

The ETT is connected to a breathing circuit and a ventilator, which delivers breaths and removes carbon dioxide from the lungs. Intubation allows healthcare professionals to manage the patient's airway, control their breathing, and administer anesthesia during surgical procedures. It is typically performed by trained medical personnel such as anesthesiologists, emergency medicine physicians, or critical care specialists.

There are two main types of intubation: oral and nasal. Oral intubation involves inserting the ETT through the patient's mouth, while nasal intubation involves passing the tube through the nostril and into the trachea. The choice of technique depends on various factors, including the patient's medical condition, anatomy, and the reason for intubation.

Oscillometry is a non-invasive method to measure various mechanical properties of the respiratory system, including lung volumes and airway resistance. It involves applying small pressure oscillations to the airways and measuring the resulting flow or volume changes. The technique can be used to assess lung function in patients with obstructive or restrictive lung diseases, as well as in healthy individuals. Oscillometry is often performed during tidal breathing, making it a comfortable method for both children and adults who may have difficulty performing traditional spirometry maneuvers.

Polysomnography (PSG) is a comprehensive sleep study that monitors various body functions during sleep, including brain activity, eye movement, muscle tone, heart rate, respirations, and oxygen levels. It is typically conducted in a sleep laboratory under the supervision of a trained technologist. The data collected during PSG is used to diagnose and manage various sleep disorders such as sleep-related breathing disorders (e.g., sleep apnea), movement disorders (e.g., periodic limb movement disorder), parasomnias, and narcolepsy.

The study usually involves the attachment of electrodes to different parts of the body, such as the scalp, face, chest, and legs, to record electrical signals from the brain, eye movements, muscle activity, and heartbeats. Additionally, sensors may be placed on or near the nose and mouth to measure airflow, and a belt may be worn around the chest and abdomen to monitor breathing efforts. Oxygen levels are also monitored through a sensor attached to the finger or ear.

Polysomnography is often recommended when a sleep disorder is suspected based on symptoms or medical history, and other diagnostic tests have been inconclusive. The results of the study can help guide treatment decisions and improve overall sleep health.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

Cholestasis is a medical condition characterized by the interruption or reduction of bile flow from the liver to the small intestine. Bile is a digestive fluid produced by the liver that helps in the breakdown and absorption of fats. When the flow of bile is blocked or reduced, it can lead to an accumulation of bile components, such as bilirubin, in the blood, which can cause jaundice, itching, and other symptoms.

Cholestasis can be caused by various factors, including liver diseases (such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, or cancer), gallstones, alcohol abuse, certain medications, pregnancy, and genetic disorders. Depending on the underlying cause, cholestasis may be acute or chronic, and it can range from mild to severe in its symptoms and consequences. Treatment for cholestasis typically involves addressing the underlying cause and managing the symptoms with supportive care.

Respiratory tract diseases refer to a broad range of medical conditions that affect the respiratory system, which includes the nose, throat (pharynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs. These diseases can be categorized into upper and lower respiratory tract infections based on the location of the infection.

Upper respiratory tract infections affect the nose, sinuses, pharynx, and larynx, and include conditions such as the common cold, flu, sinusitis, and laryngitis. Symptoms often include nasal congestion, sore throat, cough, and fever.

Lower respiratory tract infections affect the trachea, bronchi, bronchioles, and lungs, and can be more severe. They include conditions such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and tuberculosis. Symptoms may include cough, chest congestion, shortness of breath, and fever.

Respiratory tract diseases can also be caused by allergies, irritants, or genetic factors. Treatment varies depending on the specific condition and severity but may include medications, breathing treatments, or surgery in severe cases.

Smooth muscle, also known as involuntary muscle, is a type of muscle that is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and functions without conscious effort. These muscles are found in the walls of hollow organs such as the stomach, intestines, bladder, and blood vessels, as well as in the eyes, skin, and other areas of the body.

Smooth muscle fibers are shorter and narrower than skeletal muscle fibers and do not have striations or sarcomeres, which give skeletal muscle its striped appearance. Smooth muscle is controlled by the autonomic nervous system through the release of neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine and norepinephrine, which bind to receptors on the smooth muscle cells and cause them to contract or relax.

Smooth muscle plays an important role in many physiological processes, including digestion, circulation, respiration, and elimination. It can also contribute to various medical conditions, such as hypertension, gastrointestinal disorders, and genitourinary dysfunction, when it becomes overactive or underactive.

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. It is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene, which regulates the movement of salt and water in and out of cells. When this gene is not functioning properly, thick, sticky mucus builds up in various organs, leading to a range of symptoms.

In the lungs, this mucus can clog the airways, making it difficult to breathe and increasing the risk of lung infections. Over time, lung damage can occur, which may lead to respiratory failure. In the digestive system, the thick mucus can prevent the release of digestive enzymes from the pancreas, impairing nutrient absorption and leading to malnutrition. CF can also affect the reproductive system, liver, and other organs.

Symptoms of cystic fibrosis may include persistent coughing, wheezing, lung infections, difficulty gaining weight, greasy stools, and frequent greasy diarrhea. The severity of the disease can vary significantly among individuals, depending on the specific genetic mutations they have inherited.

Currently, there is no cure for cystic fibrosis, but treatments are available to help manage symptoms and slow the progression of the disease. These may include airway clearance techniques, medications to thin mucus, antibiotics to treat infections, enzyme replacement therapy, and a high-calorie, high-fat diet. Lung transplantation is an option for some individuals with advanced lung disease.

Respiratory physiological phenomena refer to the various mechanical, chemical, and biological processes and functions that occur in the respiratory system during breathing and gas exchange. These phenomena include:

1. Ventilation: The movement of air into and out of the lungs, which is achieved through the contraction and relaxation of the diaphragm and intercostal muscles.
2. Gas Exchange: The diffusion of oxygen (O2) from the alveoli into the bloodstream and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the bloodstream into the alveoli.
3. Respiratory Mechanics: The physical properties and forces that affect the movement of air in and out of the lungs, such as lung compliance, airway resistance, and chest wall elasticity.
4. Control of Breathing: The regulation of ventilation by the central nervous system through the integration of sensory information from chemoreceptors and mechanoreceptors in the respiratory system.
5. Acid-Base Balance: The maintenance of a stable pH level in the blood through the regulation of CO2 elimination and bicarbonate balance by the respiratory and renal systems.
6. Oxygen Transport: The binding of O2 to hemoglobin in the red blood cells and its delivery to the tissues for metabolic processes.
7. Defense Mechanisms: The various protective mechanisms that prevent the entry and colonization of pathogens and foreign particles into the respiratory system, such as mucociliary clearance, cough reflex, and immune responses.

Positive-pressure respiration is a type of mechanical ventilation where positive pressure is applied to the airway and lungs, causing them to expand and inflate. This can be used to support or replace spontaneous breathing in patients who are unable to breathe effectively on their own due to conditions such as respiratory failure, neuromuscular disorders, or sedation for surgery.

During positive-pressure ventilation, a mechanical ventilator delivers breaths to the patient through an endotracheal tube or a tracheostomy tube. The ventilator is set to deliver a specific volume or pressure of air with each breath, and the patient's breathing is synchronized with the ventilator to ensure proper delivery of the breaths.

Positive-pressure ventilation can help improve oxygenation and remove carbon dioxide from the lungs, but it can also have potential complications such as barotrauma (injury to lung tissue due to excessive pressure), volutrauma (injury due to overdistention of the lungs), hemodynamic compromise (decreased blood pressure and cardiac output), and ventilator-associated pneumonia. Therefore, careful monitoring and adjustment of ventilator settings are essential to minimize these risks and provide safe and effective respiratory support.

Hydronephrosis is a medical condition characterized by the swelling of one or both kidneys due to the accumulation of urine. This occurs when the flow of urine from the kidney to the bladder is obstructed, causing urine to back up into the kidney. The obstruction can be caused by various factors such as kidney stones, tumors, or congenital abnormalities. If left untreated, hydronephrosis can lead to serious complications including kidney damage and infection. It is typically diagnosed through imaging tests such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI.

Vocal cords, also known as vocal folds, are specialized bands of muscle, membrane, and connective tissue located within the larynx (voice box). They are essential for speech, singing, and other sounds produced by the human voice. The vocal cords vibrate when air from the lungs is passed through them, creating sound waves that vary in pitch and volume based on the tension, length, and mass of the vocal cords. These sound waves are then further modified by the resonance chambers of the throat, nose, and mouth to produce speech and other vocalizations.

Extrahepatic cholestasis is a medical condition characterized by the impaired flow of bile outside of the liver. Bile is a digestive fluid produced by the liver that helps in the absorption and digestion of fats. When the flow of bile is obstructed or blocked, it can lead to an accumulation of bile components, such as bilirubin, in the bloodstream, resulting in jaundice, dark urine, light-colored stools, and itching.

Extrahepatic cholestasis can be caused by various factors, including gallstones, tumors, strictures, or inflammation of the bile ducts. It is essential to diagnose and treat extrahepatic cholestasis promptly to prevent further complications, such as liver damage or infection. Treatment options may include medications, endoscopic procedures, or surgery, depending on the underlying cause of the condition.

Bronchioles are the smallest airways in the respiratory system that carry air into the lungs. They are branching tubes within the lungs that further divide and become smaller than bronchi, ending in tiny air sacs called alveoli where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide occurs. Bronchioles do not have cartilage in their walls, unlike larger bronchi, making them more flexible and able to adjust to changes in lung volume during breathing.

Substernal goiter refers to an enlarged thyroid gland that extends below the sternum or breastbone. It is also known as a retrosternal goiter. This condition can cause compression of surrounding structures such as the trachea and esophagus, leading to symptoms like difficulty swallowing, shortness of breath, and cough. Substernal goiters may be asymptomatic or may require treatment, including surgery, to alleviate symptoms and prevent complications.

Histamine is defined as a biogenic amine that is widely distributed throughout the body and is involved in various physiological functions. It is derived primarily from the amino acid histidine by the action of histidine decarboxylase. Histamine is stored in granules (along with heparin and proteases) within mast cells and basophils, and is released upon stimulation or degranulation of these cells.

Once released into the tissues and circulation, histamine exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions through its interaction with four types of G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors). Histamine's effects are diverse and include modulation of immune responses, contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle, increased vascular permeability, stimulation of gastric acid secretion, and regulation of neurotransmission.

Histamine is also a potent mediator of allergic reactions and inflammation, causing symptoms such as itching, sneezing, runny nose, and wheezing. Antihistamines are commonly used to block the actions of histamine at H1 receptors, providing relief from these symptoms.

The oropharynx is the part of the throat (pharynx) that is located immediately behind the mouth and includes the back one-third of the tongue, the soft palate, the side and back walls of the throat, and the tonsils. It serves as a passageway for both food and air, and is also an important area for the immune system due to the presence of tonsils.

Hyperventilation is a medical condition characterized by an increased respiratory rate and depth, resulting in excessive elimination of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the body. This leads to hypocapnia (low CO2 levels in the blood), which can cause symptoms such as lightheadedness, dizziness, confusion, tingling sensations in the extremities, and muscle spasms. Hyperventilation may occur due to various underlying causes, including anxiety disorders, lung diseases, neurological conditions, or certain medications. It is essential to identify and address the underlying cause of hyperventilation for proper treatment.

Ludwig's angina is a severe cellulitis (a bacterial infection of the connective tissues) of the floor of the mouth, below the tongue, and around the neck area. It's named after Wilhelm Friedrich von Ludwig, who first described it in 1836. The condition can lead to airway obstruction and significant swelling in the neck, making swallowing difficult or impossible. If not treated promptly with antibiotics and sometimes surgical drainage, it can be life-threatening due to the potential for spread of infection to the brain or other critical areas. It's typically caused by mixed oral flora, often including Streptococcus species, Staphylococcus aureus, and anaerobes.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Respiratory therapy is a healthcare profession that specializes in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of respiratory disorders and diseases. Respiratory therapists (RTs) work under the direction of physicians to provide care for patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, cystic fibrosis, sleep apnea, and neuromuscular diseases that affect breathing.

RTs use a variety of techniques and treatments to help patients breathe more easily, including oxygen therapy, aerosol medication delivery, chest physiotherapy, mechanical ventilation, and patient education. They also perform diagnostic tests such as pulmonary function studies to assess lung function and help diagnose respiratory conditions.

RTs work in a variety of healthcare settings, including hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities, and home health agencies. They may provide care for patients of all ages, from premature infants to the elderly. The overall goal of respiratory therapy is to help patients achieve and maintain optimal lung function and quality of life.

The pharyngeal muscles, also known as the musculature of the pharynx, are a group of skeletal muscles that make up the walls of the pharynx, which is the part of the throat located just above the esophagus and behind the nasal and oral cavities. These muscles play a crucial role in several vital functions, including:

1. Swallowing (deglutition): The pharyngeal muscles contract in a coordinated sequence to propel food or liquids from the mouth through the pharynx and into the esophagus during swallowing.
2. Speech: The contraction and relaxation of these muscles help shape the sounds produced by the vocal cords, contributing to the production of speech.
3. Respiration: The pharyngeal muscles assist in maintaining an open airway during breathing, especially during sleep and when the upper airways are obstructed.

The pharyngeal muscles consist of three layers: the outer circular muscle layer, the middle longitudinal muscle layer, and the inner inferior constrictor muscle layer. The specific muscles that make up these layers include:

1. Superior constrictor muscle (outer circular layer)
2. Middle constrictor muscle (middle longitudinal layer)
3. Inferior constrictor muscle (inner inferior constrictor layer)
4. Stylopharyngeus muscle
5. Salpingopharyngeus muscle
6. Palatopharyngeus muscle
7. Buccinator muscle (partially contributes to the middle longitudinal layer)

These muscles work together to perform their various functions, and any dysfunction in these muscles can lead to problems like swallowing difficulties (dysphagia), speech impairments, or respiratory issues.

General anesthesia is a state of controlled unconsciousness, induced by administering various medications, that eliminates awareness, movement, and pain sensation during medical procedures. It involves the use of a combination of intravenous and inhaled drugs to produce a reversible loss of consciousness, allowing patients to undergo surgical or diagnostic interventions safely and comfortably. The depth and duration of anesthesia are carefully monitored and adjusted throughout the procedure by an anesthesiologist or certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) to ensure patient safety and optimize recovery. General anesthesia is typically used for more extensive surgical procedures, such as open-heart surgery, major orthopedic surgeries, and neurosurgery.

Respiratory disorders are a group of conditions that affect the respiratory system, including the nose, throat (pharynx), windpipe (trachea), bronchi, lungs, and diaphragm. These disorders can make it difficult for a person to breathe normally and may cause symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

There are many different types of respiratory disorders, including:

1. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disease that causes the airways to become narrow and swollen, leading to difficulty breathing.
2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): A group of lung diseases, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis, that make it hard to breathe.
3. Pneumonia: An infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
4. Lung cancer: A type of cancer that forms in the tissues of the lungs and can cause symptoms such as coughing, chest pain, and shortness of breath.
5. Tuberculosis (TB): A bacterial infection that mainly affects the lungs but can also affect other parts of the body.
6. Sleep apnea: A disorder that causes a person to stop breathing for short periods during sleep.
7. Interstitial lung disease: A group of disorders that cause scarring of the lung tissue, leading to difficulty breathing.
8. Pulmonary fibrosis: A type of interstitial lung disease that causes scarring of the lung tissue and makes it hard to breathe.
9. Pleural effusion: An abnormal accumulation of fluid in the space between the lungs and chest wall.
10. Lung transplantation: A surgical procedure to replace a diseased or failing lung with a healthy one from a donor.

Respiratory disorders can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, exposure to environmental pollutants, smoking, and infections. Treatment for respiratory disorders may include medications, oxygen therapy, breathing exercises, and lifestyle changes. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to treat the disorder.

Pulmonary heart disease, also known as cor pulmonale, is a type of heart disease that occurs as a complication of chronic lung diseases or hypoxia (low oxygen levels in the body). The condition is characterized by enlargement and thickening of the right ventricle of the heart, which results from increased pressure in the pulmonary artery due to damaged or narrowed blood vessels in the lungs. This can lead to symptoms such as shortness of breath, fatigue, swelling in the legs and abdomen, and irregular heart rhythms. The condition can be managed with medications, oxygen therapy, and lifestyle changes, but if left untreated, it can lead to serious complications such as heart failure.

Terbutaline is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called beta-2 adrenergic agonists. It works by relaxing muscles in the airways and increasing the flow of air into the lungs, making it easier to breathe. Terbutaline is used to treat bronchospasm (wheezing, shortness of breath) associated with asthma, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and other lung diseases. It may also be used to prevent or treat bronchospasm caused by exercise or to prevent premature labor in pregnant women.

The medical definition of Terbutaline is: "A synthetic sympathomimetic amine used as a bronchodilator for the treatment of asthma, bronchitis, and emphysema. It acts as a nonselective beta-2 adrenergic agonist, relaxing smooth muscle in the airways and increasing airflow to the lungs."

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "horses" is not a medical term. It is the common name given to the species *Equus ferus caballus*, which are large domesticated mammals used for transportation, work, and recreation. If you have any questions about horses or a related topic that you would like a medical perspective on, please let me know and I'd be happy to help!

Dilation, also known as dilatation, refers to the process of expanding or enlarging a body passage or cavity. In medical terms, it typically refers to the widening of a bodily opening or hollow organ, allowing for increased flow or access. This can occur naturally, such as during childbirth when the cervix dilates to allow for the passage of a baby, or it can be induced through medical procedures or interventions.

For example, dilation of the pupils is a natural response to darkness or certain medications, while dilation of blood vessels is a common side effect of some drugs and can also occur in response to changes in temperature or emotional state. Dilation of the stomach or intestines may be necessary for medical procedures such as endoscopies or surgeries.

It's important to note that dilation can also refer to the abnormal enlargement of a body part, such as dilated cardiomyopathy, which refers to an enlarged and weakened heart muscle.

Vocal cord paralysis is a medical condition characterized by the inability of one or both vocal cords to move or function properly due to nerve damage or disruption. The vocal cords are two bands of muscle located in the larynx (voice box) that vibrate to produce sound during speech, singing, and breathing. When the nerves that control the vocal cord movements are damaged or not functioning correctly, the vocal cords may become paralyzed or weakened, leading to voice changes, breathing difficulties, and other symptoms.

The causes of vocal cord paralysis can vary, including neurological disorders, trauma, tumors, surgery, or infections. The diagnosis typically involves a physical examination, including a laryngoscopy, to assess the movement and function of the vocal cords. Treatment options may include voice therapy, surgical procedures, or other interventions to improve voice quality and breathing functions.

Bronchoconstrictor agents are substances that cause narrowing or constriction of the bronchioles, the small airways in the lungs. This can lead to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Bronchoconstrictor agents include certain medications (such as some beta-blockers and prostaglandin F2alpha), environmental pollutants (such as tobacco smoke and air pollution particles), and allergens (such as dust mites and pollen).

In contrast to bronchodilator agents, which are medications that widen the airways and improve breathing, bronchoconstrictor agents can make it more difficult for a person to breathe. People with respiratory conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may be particularly sensitive to bronchoconstrictor agents and may experience severe symptoms when exposed to them.

Exhalation is the act of breathing out or exhaling, which is the reverse process of inhalation. During exhalation, the diaphragm relaxes and moves upwards, while the chest muscles also relax, causing the chest cavity to decrease in size. This decrease in size puts pressure on the lungs, causing them to deflate and expel air.

Exhalation is a passive process that occurs naturally after inhalation, but it can also be actively controlled during activities such as speaking, singing, or playing a wind instrument. In medical terms, exhalation may also be referred to as expiration.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

A chronic disease is a long-term medical condition that often progresses slowly over a period of years and requires ongoing management and care. These diseases are typically not fully curable, but symptoms can be managed to improve quality of life. Common chronic diseases include heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). They are often associated with advanced age, although they can also affect children and younger adults. Chronic diseases can have significant impacts on individuals' physical, emotional, and social well-being, as well as on healthcare systems and society at large.

Bronchiectasis is a medical condition characterized by permanent, abnormal widening and thickening of the walls of the bronchi (the airways leading to the lungs). This can lead to recurrent respiratory infections, coughing, and the production of large amounts of sputum. The damage to the airways is usually irreversible and can be caused by various factors such as bacterial or viral infections, genetic disorders, immune deficiencies, or exposure to environmental pollutants. In some cases, the cause may remain unknown. Treatment typically includes chest physiotherapy, bronchodilators, antibiotics, and sometimes surgery.

Hypersensitivity is an exaggerated or inappropriate immune response to a substance that is generally harmless to most people. It's also known as an allergic reaction. This abnormal response can be caused by various types of immunological mechanisms, including antibody-mediated reactions (types I, II, and III) and cell-mediated reactions (type IV). The severity of the hypersensitivity reaction can range from mild discomfort to life-threatening conditions. Common examples of hypersensitivity reactions include allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, food allergies, and anaphylaxis.

A bezoar is a mass trapped in the gastrointestinal tract, typically in the stomach, that is composed of indigestible materials such as hair, fibers, or food particles. Bezoars can cause various symptoms including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and obstruction. They are more commonly found in people with certain conditions such as diabetes, mental health disorders, or those who have had gastric surgery. Treatment may involve medication or endoscopic removal of the bezoar.

Apnea is a medical condition defined as the cessation of breathing for 10 seconds or more. It can occur during sleep (sleep apnea) or while awake (wakeful apnea). There are different types of sleep apnea, including obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and complex sleep apnea syndrome. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when the airway becomes blocked during sleep, while central sleep apnea occurs when the brain fails to signal the muscles to breathe. Complex sleep apnea syndrome, also known as treatment-emergent central sleep apnea, is a combination of obstructive and central sleep apneas. Sleep apnea can lead to various complications, such as fatigue, difficulty concentrating, high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke.

In medical terms, "dust" is not defined as a specific medical condition or disease. However, generally speaking, dust refers to small particles of solid matter that can be found in the air and can come from various sources, such as soil, pollen, hair, textiles, paper, or plastic.

Exposure to certain types of dust, such as those containing allergens, chemicals, or harmful pathogens, can cause a range of health problems, including respiratory issues like asthma, allergies, and lung diseases. Prolonged exposure to certain types of dust, such as silica or asbestos, can even lead to serious conditions like silicosis or mesothelioma.

Therefore, it is important for individuals who work in environments with high levels of dust to take appropriate precautions, such as wearing masks and respirators, to minimize their exposure and reduce the risk of health problems.

Pulmonary atelectasis is a medical condition characterized by the collapse or closure of the alveoli (tiny air sacs) in the lungs, leading to reduced or absent gas exchange in the affected area. This results in decreased lung volume and can cause hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the blood). Atelectasis can be caused by various factors such as obstruction of the airways, surfactant deficiency, pneumothorax, or compression from outside the lung. It can also occur after surgical procedures, particularly when the patient is lying in one position for a long time. Symptoms may include shortness of breath, cough, and chest discomfort, but sometimes it may not cause any symptoms, especially if only a small area of the lung is affected. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include bronchodilators, chest physiotherapy, or even surgery in severe cases.

The cricoid cartilage is a ring-like piece of cartilage that forms the lower part of the larynx, or voice box. It is located in the front portion of the neck, and lies just below the thyroid cartilage, which is the largest cartilage in the larynx and forms the Adam's apple.

The cricoid cartilage serves as a attachment site for several important structures in the neck, including the vocal cords and the trachea (windpipe). It plays an important role in protecting the airway during swallowing by providing a stable platform against which the food pipe (esophagus) can open and close.

In medical procedures such as rapid sequence intubation, the cricoid cartilage may be pressed downward to compress the esophagus and help prevent stomach contents from entering the airway during intubation. This maneuver is known as the "cricoid pressure" or "Sellick's maneuver."

A nose, in a medical context, refers to the external part of the human body that is located on the face and serves as the primary organ for the sense of smell. It is composed of bone and cartilage, with a thin layer of skin covering it. The nose also contains nasal passages that are lined with mucous membranes and tiny hairs known as cilia. These structures help to filter, warm, and moisturize the air we breathe in before it reaches our lungs. Additionally, the nose plays an essential role in the process of verbal communication by shaping the sounds we make when we speak.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

In medical terms, pressure is defined as the force applied per unit area on an object or body surface. It is often measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) in clinical settings. For example, blood pressure is the force exerted by circulating blood on the walls of the arteries and is recorded as two numbers: systolic pressure (when the heart beats and pushes blood out) and diastolic pressure (when the heart rests between beats).

Pressure can also refer to the pressure exerted on a wound or incision to help control bleeding, or the pressure inside the skull or spinal canal. High or low pressure in different body systems can indicate various medical conditions and require appropriate treatment.

Oxygen is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that constitutes about 21% of the earth's atmosphere. It is a crucial element for human and most living organisms as it is vital for respiration. Inhaled oxygen enters the lungs and binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carries it to tissues throughout the body where it is used to convert nutrients into energy and carbon dioxide, a waste product that is exhaled.

Medically, supplemental oxygen therapy may be provided to patients with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia, heart failure, or other medical conditions that impair the body's ability to extract sufficient oxygen from the air. Oxygen can be administered through various devices, including nasal cannulas, face masks, and ventilators.

Aortic arch syndromes are a group of conditions that affect the aortic arch, which is the curved portion of the aorta that arises from the left ventricle of the heart and gives rise to the major branches of the arterial system. These syndromes are typically caused by congenital abnormalities or degenerative changes in the aorta and can result in various complications, such as obstruction of blood flow, aneurysm formation, and dissection.

There are several types of aortic arch syndromes, including:

1. Coarctation of the Aorta: This is a narrowing of the aorta at the point where it leaves the heart, just distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery. It can cause hypertension in the upper extremities and reduced blood flow to the lower extremities.
2. Aortic Arch Aneurysm: This is a localized dilation or bulging of the aorta in the region of the aortic arch. It can lead to dissection, rupture, or embolism.
3. Aortic Arch Dissection: This is a separation of the layers of the aortic wall, which can result from hypertension, trauma, or genetic disorders such as Marfan syndrome. It can cause severe chest pain, shortness of breath, and shock.
4. Kommerell's Diverticulum: This is an outpouching or bulge in the aorta at the origin of the ligamentum arteriosum, which is a remnant of the ductus arteriosus. It can cause compression of the airways or esophagus and increase the risk of dissection or rupture.
5. Abernethy Malformation: This is a rare congenital anomaly in which there is an abnormal connection between the portal vein and systemic venous circulation, leading to the bypass of the liver. It can cause various complications such as hepatic encephalopathy, pulmonary hypertension, and liver tumors.

The diagnosis and management of aortic arch syndromes require a multidisciplinary approach involving cardiologists, radiologists, surgeons, and other specialists. Treatment options may include medications, endovascular procedures, or surgical interventions depending on the severity and location of the lesion.

Eosinophilia is a medical condition characterized by an abnormally high concentration of eosinophils in the circulating blood. Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell that play an important role in the immune system, particularly in fighting off parasitic infections and regulating allergic reactions. However, when their numbers become excessively high, they can contribute to tissue damage and inflammation.

Eosinophilia is typically defined as a count of more than 500 eosinophils per microliter of blood. Mild eosinophilia (up to 1,500 cells/μL) may not cause any symptoms and may be discovered during routine blood tests. However, higher levels of eosinophilia can lead to various symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, skin rashes, and organ damage, depending on the underlying cause.

The causes of eosinophilia are varied and can include allergic reactions, parasitic infections, autoimmune disorders, certain medications, and some types of cancer. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of eosinophilia require identification and management of the underlying cause.

Endoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the use of an endoscope, which is a flexible tube with a light and camera at the end, to examine the interior of a body cavity or organ. The endoscope is inserted through a natural opening in the body, such as the mouth or anus, or through a small incision. The images captured by the camera are transmitted to a monitor, allowing the physician to visualize the internal structures and detect any abnormalities, such as inflammation, ulcers, or tumors. Endoscopy can also be used for diagnostic purposes, such as taking tissue samples for biopsy, or for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps or performing minimally invasive surgeries.

Smoke inhalation injury is a type of damage that occurs to the respiratory system when an individual breathes in smoke, most commonly during a fire. This injury can affect both the upper and lower airways and can cause a range of symptoms, including coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

Smoke inhalation injury can also lead to more severe complications, such as chemical irritation of the airways, swelling of the throat and lungs, and respiratory failure. In some cases, it can even be fatal. The severity of the injury depends on several factors, including the duration and intensity of the exposure, the individual's underlying health status, and the presence of any pre-existing lung conditions.

Smoke inhalation injury is caused by a combination of thermal injury (heat damage) and chemical injury (damage from toxic substances present in the smoke). The heat from the smoke can cause direct damage to the airways, leading to inflammation and swelling. At the same time, the chemicals in the smoke can irritate and corrode the lining of the airways, causing further damage.

Some of the toxic substances found in smoke include carbon monoxide, cyanide, and various other chemicals released by burning materials. These substances can interfere with the body's ability to transport oxygen and can cause metabolic acidosis, a condition characterized by an excessively acidic environment in the body.

Treatment for smoke inhalation injury typically involves providing supportive care to help the individual breathe more easily, such as administering oxygen or using mechanical ventilation. In some cases, medications may be used to reduce inflammation and swelling in the airways. Severe cases of smoke inhalation injury may require hospitalization and intensive care.

A stent is a small mesh tube that's used to treat narrow or weak arteries. Arteries are blood vessels that carry blood away from your heart to other parts of your body. A stent is placed in an artery as part of a procedure called angioplasty. Angioplasty restores blood flow through narrowed or blocked arteries by inflating a tiny balloon inside the blocked artery to widen it.

The stent is then inserted into the widened artery to keep it open. The stent is usually made of metal, but some are coated with medication that is slowly and continuously released to help prevent the formation of scar tissue in the artery. This can reduce the chance of the artery narrowing again.

Stents are also used in other parts of the body, such as the neck (carotid artery) and kidneys (renal artery), to help maintain blood flow and prevent blockages. They can also be used in the urinary system to treat conditions like ureteropelvic junction obstruction or narrowing of the urethra.

The soft palate, also known as the velum, is the rear portion of the roof of the mouth that is made up of muscle and mucous membrane. It extends from the hard palate (the bony front part of the roof of the mouth) to the uvula, which is the small piece of tissue that hangs down at the back of the throat.

The soft palate plays a crucial role in speech, swallowing, and breathing. During swallowing, it moves upward and backward to block off the nasal cavity, preventing food and liquids from entering the nose. In speech, it helps to direct the flow of air from the mouth into the nose, which is necessary for producing certain sounds.

Anatomically, the soft palate consists of several muscles that allow it to change shape and move. These muscles include the tensor veli palatini, levator veli palatini, musculus uvulae, palatopharyngeus, and palatoglossus. The soft palate also contains a rich supply of blood vessels and nerves that provide sensation and help regulate its function.

Leukotriene antagonists are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of leukotrienes, which are chemicals released by the immune system in response to an allergen or irritant. Leukotrienes cause airway muscles to tighten and inflammation in the airways, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, shortness of breath, and coughing. By blocking the action of leukotrienes, leukotriene antagonists can help relieve these symptoms and improve lung function. These medications are often used to treat asthma and allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Examples of leukotriene antagonists include montelukast, zafirlukast, and pranlukast.

Artificial respiration is an emergency procedure that can be used to provide oxygen to a person who is not breathing or is breathing inadequately. It involves manually forcing air into the lungs, either by compressing the chest or using a device to deliver breaths. The goal of artificial respiration is to maintain adequate oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs until the person can breathe on their own or until advanced medical care arrives. Artificial respiration may be used in conjunction with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in cases of cardiac arrest.

Epithelial cells are types of cells that cover the outer surfaces of the body, line the inner surfaces of organs and glands, and form the lining of blood vessels and body cavities. They provide a protective barrier against the external environment, regulate the movement of materials between the internal and external environments, and are involved in the sense of touch, temperature, and pain. Epithelial cells can be squamous (flat and thin), cuboidal (square-shaped and of equal height), or columnar (tall and narrow) in shape and are classified based on their location and function.

Insufflation is a medical term that refers to the act of introducing a gas or vapor into a body cavity or passage, typically through a tube or surgical instrument. This procedure is often used in medical and surgical settings for various purposes, such as:

* To administer anesthesia during surgery (e.g., introducing nitrous oxide or other gases into the lungs)
* To introduce medication or other substances into the body (e.g., insufflating steroids into a joint)
* To perform diagnostic procedures (e.g., insufflating air or a contrast agent into the gastrointestinal tract to visualize it with X-rays)
* To clean out a body cavity (e.g., irrigating and insufflating the bladder during urological procedures).

It's important to note that insufflation should be performed under controlled conditions, as there are potential risks associated with introducing gases or vapors into the body, such as barotrauma (damage caused by changes in pressure) and infection.

An acute disease is a medical condition that has a rapid onset, develops quickly, and tends to be short in duration. Acute diseases can range from minor illnesses such as a common cold or flu, to more severe conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, or a heart attack. These types of diseases often have clear symptoms that are easy to identify, and they may require immediate medical attention or treatment.

Acute diseases are typically caused by an external agent or factor, such as a bacterial or viral infection, a toxin, or an injury. They can also be the result of a sudden worsening of an existing chronic condition. In general, acute diseases are distinct from chronic diseases, which are long-term medical conditions that develop slowly over time and may require ongoing management and treatment.

Examples of acute diseases include:

* Acute bronchitis: a sudden inflammation of the airways in the lungs, often caused by a viral infection.
* Appendicitis: an inflammation of the appendix that can cause severe pain and requires surgical removal.
* Gastroenteritis: an inflammation of the stomach and intestines, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.
* Migraine headaches: intense headaches that can last for hours or days, and are often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound.
* Myocardial infarction (heart attack): a sudden blockage of blood flow to the heart muscle, often caused by a buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries.
* Pneumonia: an infection of the lungs that can cause coughing, chest pain, and difficulty breathing.
* Sinusitis: an inflammation of the sinuses, often caused by a viral or bacterial infection.

It's important to note that while some acute diseases may resolve on their own with rest and supportive care, others may require medical intervention or treatment to prevent complications and promote recovery. If you are experiencing symptoms of an acute disease, it is always best to seek medical attention to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

In medical terms, the tongue is a muscular organ in the oral cavity that plays a crucial role in various functions such as taste, swallowing, and speech. It's covered with a mucous membrane and contains papillae, which are tiny projections that contain taste buds to help us perceive different tastes - sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. The tongue also assists in the initial process of digestion by moving food around in the mouth for chewing and mixing with saliva. Additionally, it helps in forming words and speaking clearly by shaping the sounds produced in the mouth.

A tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure in which the tonsils, two masses of lymphoid tissue located on both sides of the back of the throat, are removed. This procedure is typically performed to treat recurrent or severe cases of tonsillitis (inflammation of the tonsils), sleep-disordered breathing such as obstructive sleep apnea, and other conditions where the tonsils are causing problems or complications. The surgery can be done under general anesthesia, and there are various methods for removing the tonsils, including traditional scalpel excision, electrocautery, and laser surgery. After a tonsillectomy, patients may experience pain, swelling, and difficulty swallowing, but these symptoms typically improve within 1-2 weeks post-surgery.

Micrognathism is a medical term that refers to a condition where the lower jaw (mandible) is abnormally small or underdeveloped. This can result in various dental and skeletal problems, including an improper bite (malocclusion), difficulty speaking, chewing, or swallowing, and sleep apnea. Micrognathism may be congenital or acquired later in life due to trauma, disease, or surgical removal of part of the jaw. Treatment options depend on the severity of the condition and can include orthodontic treatment, surgery, or a combination of both.

Ileal diseases refer to conditions that primarily affect the ileum, which is the final portion of the small intestine. The ileum plays a crucial role in nutrient absorption, particularly vitamin B12 and bile salts. Ileal diseases can cause various symptoms, including diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and malnutrition, depending on their nature and extent. Some common ileal diseases include:

1. Crohn's disease: A type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, including the ileum. Crohn's disease causes chronic inflammation, which can lead to symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fatigue.
2. Celiac disease: An autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. In celiac disease, the immune system attacks the lining of the small intestine, including the ileum, causing inflammation and impaired nutrient absorption.
3. Intestinal tuberculosis: A bacterial infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, including the ileum. Intestinal tuberculosis can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.
4. Typhlitis: Also known as neutropenic enterocolitis, typhlitis is an inflammatory condition that affects the cecum and terminal ileum, typically in immunocompromised individuals. It can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, fever, and diarrhea.
5. Meckel's diverticulum: A congenital condition characterized by a small pouch protruding from the wall of the ileum. While many people with Meckel's diverticulum do not experience symptoms, it can sometimes become inflamed or bleed, causing abdominal pain and rectal bleeding.
6. Lymphoma: A type of cancer that originates in the lymphatic system and can affect any part of the body, including the ileum. Ileal lymphoma can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss.

Work of breathing (WOB) is a term used in respiratory physiology to describe the amount of energy expended by the respiratory muscles to overcome the elastic and resistive forces in the lungs and chest wall during breathing. It is usually measured in joules per liter (J/L) or in breaths per minute (BPM).

WOB can be increased in various lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and interstitial lung disease, due to increased airway resistance or decreased lung compliance. Increased WOB can lead to respiratory muscle fatigue, decreased exercise tolerance, and reduced quality of life.

WOB can be measured noninvasively using techniques such as esophageal pressure monitoring or transdiaphragmatic pressure measurement, or invasively through the use of indwelling catheters in the pleural space or within the airways. These measurements are often used in research settings to evaluate the effectiveness of various treatments for respiratory disorders.

"Failure to Thrive" is a medical term used to describe a condition in infants and children who are not growing and gaining weight as expected. It is typically defined as significant deviation from normal growth patterns, such as poor weight gain or loss, slow increase in length/height, and delayed developmental milestones. The condition can have various causes, including medical, psychological, social, and environmental factors. Early identification and intervention are crucial to address the underlying cause and promote healthy growth and development.

Cyanates are a class of chemical compounds that contain the functional group -O-C≡N, which consists of a carbon atom triple-bonded to a nitrogen atom and double-bonded to an oxygen atom. In medical terms, cyanates are not commonly used, but potassium cyanate has been studied in the past as a possible treatment for certain conditions such as angina and cyanide poisoning. However, its use is limited due to potential side effects and the availability of safer and more effective treatments. It's important to note that cyanides are highly toxic substances, and exposure to them can be life-threatening.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Pneumonia is an infection or inflammation of the alveoli (tiny air sacs) in one or both lungs. It's often caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. Accumulated pus and fluid in these air sacs make it difficult to breathe, which can lead to coughing, chest pain, fever, and difficulty breathing. The severity of symptoms can vary from mild to life-threatening, depending on the underlying cause, the patient's overall health, and age. Pneumonia is typically diagnosed through a combination of physical examination, medical history, and diagnostic tests such as chest X-rays or blood tests. Treatment usually involves antibiotics for bacterial pneumonia, antivirals for viral pneumonia, and supportive care like oxygen therapy, hydration, and rest.

In a medical context, masks are typically used as personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect the wearer from inhaling airborne particles and contaminants. They can also help prevent the spread of respiratory droplets from the wearer to others, which is particularly important in clinical settings where patients may have infectious diseases.

There are several types of masks used in medical settings, including:

1. Medical Masks: These are loose-fitting, disposable masks that create a physical barrier between the mouth and nose of the wearer and potential contaminants in the immediate environment. They are commonly used by healthcare professionals during medical procedures to protect themselves and patients from respiratory droplets and aerosols.
2. N95 Respirators: These are tight-fitting masks that can filter out both large droplets and small aerosol particles, including those containing viruses. They offer a higher level of protection than medical masks and are recommended for use in healthcare settings where there is a risk of exposure to airborne contaminants, such as during certain medical procedures or when caring for patients with infectious diseases like tuberculosis or COVID-19.
3. Surgical N95 Respirators: These are a specialized type of N95 respirator designed for use in surgical settings. They have a clear plastic window that allows the wearer's mouth and nose to be visible, which is useful during surgery where clear communication and identification of the wearer's facial features are important.
4. Powered Air-Purifying Respirators (PAPRs): These are motorized masks that use a fan to draw air through a filter, providing a continuous supply of clean air to the wearer. They offer a high level of protection and are often used in healthcare settings where there is a risk of exposure to highly infectious diseases or hazardous substances.

It's important to note that masks should be used in conjunction with other infection prevention measures, such as hand hygiene and social distancing, to provide the best possible protection against respiratory illnesses.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

Pulmonary eosinophilia is a condition characterized by an increased number of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the lungs or pulmonary tissues. Eosinophils play a role in the body's immune response to parasites and allergens, but an overabundance can contribute to inflammation and damage in the lungs.

The condition may be associated with various underlying causes, such as:

1. Asthma or allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA)
2. Eosinophilic lung diseases, like eosinophilic pneumonia or idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome
3. Parasitic infections, such as ascariasis or strongyloidiasis
4. Drug reactions, including certain antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs
5. Connective tissue disorders, like rheumatoid arthritis or Churg-Strauss syndrome
6. Malignancies, such as lymphoma or leukemia
7. Other less common conditions, like tropical pulmonary eosinophilia or cryptogenic organizing pneumonia

Symptoms of pulmonary eosinophilia can vary but often include cough, shortness of breath, wheezing, and chest discomfort. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies, and laboratory tests, such as complete blood count (CBC) with differential, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), or lung biopsy. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and may include corticosteroids, antibiotics, or antiparasitic medications.

Rhinitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation and irritation of the nasal passages, leading to symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, congestion, and postnasal drip. It can be caused by various factors, including allergies (such as pollen, dust mites, or pet dander), infections (viral or bacterial), environmental irritants (such as smoke or pollution), and hormonal changes. Depending on the cause, rhinitis can be classified as allergic rhinitis, non-allergic rhinitis, infectious rhinitis, or hormonal rhinitis. Treatment options vary depending on the underlying cause but may include medications such as antihistamines, decongestants, nasal sprays, and immunotherapy (allergy shots).

Adenoids are a pair of masses of lymphoid tissue located in the nasopharynx, which is the upper part of the throat behind the nose. They are part of the immune system and help to protect against infection. Adenoids are largest in children and tend to shrink in size as people get older. In some cases, adenoids can become enlarged or infected, leading to problems such as breathing difficulties, ear infections, and sleep disorders. Treatment for enlarged or infected adenoids may include antibiotics, medications to reduce swelling, or surgical removal of the adenoids (adenoidectomy).

A hematoma is defined as a localized accumulation of blood in a tissue, organ, or body space caused by a break in the wall of a blood vessel. This can result from various causes such as trauma, surgery, or certain medical conditions that affect coagulation. The severity and size of a hematoma may vary depending on the location and extent of the bleeding. Symptoms can include swelling, pain, bruising, and decreased mobility in the affected area. Treatment options depend on the size and location of the hematoma but may include observation, compression, ice, elevation, or in some cases, surgical intervention.

Sinusitis, also known as rhinosinusitis, is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, which are air-filled cavities located within the skull near the nose. The inflammation can be caused by viral, bacterial, or fungal infections, as well as allergies, structural issues, or autoimmune disorders.

In sinusitis, the mucous membranes lining the sinuses become swollen and may produce excess mucus, leading to symptoms such as nasal congestion, thick green or yellow nasal discharge, facial pain or pressure, reduced sense of smell, cough, fatigue, and fever.

Sinusitis can be classified into acute (lasting less than 4 weeks), subacute (lasting 4-12 weeks), chronic (lasting more than 12 weeks), or recurrent (multiple episodes within a year). Treatment options depend on the underlying cause and severity of symptoms, and may include antibiotics, nasal corticosteroids, decongestants, saline irrigation, and in some cases, surgery.

Mucin 5AC, also known as MUC5AC, is a type of mucin protein that is heavily glycosylated and secreted by the goblet cells in the mucous membranes of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. It plays an essential role in the protection and lubrication of these surfaces, as well as in the clearance of inhaled particles and microorganisms from the lungs.

MUC5AC is a high molecular weight mucin that forms a gel-like substance when secreted, which traps foreign particles and pathogens, facilitating their removal from the body. Abnormalities in MUC5AC production or function have been implicated in various respiratory and gastrointestinal diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, cystic fibrosis, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

In summary, Mucin 5AC is a crucial component of the mucosal defense system in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, contributing to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and protection against infection and injury.

Adenosine A1 receptor agonists are medications or substances that bind to and activate the adenosine A1 receptors, which are found on the surface of certain cells in the body, including those in the heart, brain, and other organs.

Adenosine is a naturally occurring molecule in the body that helps regulate various physiological processes, such as cardiovascular function and neurotransmission. The adenosine A1 receptor plays an important role in modulating the activity of the heart, including reducing heart rate and lowering blood pressure.

Adenosine A1 receptor agonists are used clinically to treat certain medical conditions, such as supraventricular tachycardia (a rapid heart rhythm originating from above the ventricles), and to prevent cerebral vasospasm (narrowing of blood vessels in the brain) following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Examples of adenosine A1 receptor agonists include adenosine, regadenoson, and capadenoson. These medications work by mimicking the effects of naturally occurring adenosine on the A1 receptors, leading to a decrease in heart rate and blood pressure.

It's important to note that adenosine A1 receptor agonists can have side effects, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and flushing, which are usually transient and mild. However, they should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as they can also have more serious side effects in certain individuals.

Adenoidectomy is a surgical procedure in which the adenoids are removed. The adenoids are a patch of tissue located behind the nasal cavity, near the roof of the mouth. They help to filter out germs that are breathed in through the nose. However, sometimes the adenoids can become enlarged or infected, leading to problems such as difficulty breathing through the nose, recurrent ear infections, and sleep apnea. In these cases, an adenoidectomy may be recommended to remove the adenoids and alleviate these symptoms.

The procedure is typically performed on an outpatient basis, which means that the patient can go home the same day as the surgery. The surgeon will use a special instrument to remove the adenoids through the mouth, without making any external incisions. After the surgery, the patient may experience some discomfort, sore throat, and difficulty swallowing for a few days. However, these symptoms usually resolve within a week or two.

It is important to note that an adenoidectomy is not the same as a tonsillectomy, which is the surgical removal of the tonsils. While the tonsils and adenoids are both part of the immune system and located in the same area of the mouth, they serve different functions and may be removed separately or together depending on the individual's medical needs.

Hypoventilation is a medical condition that refers to the decreased rate and depth of breathing, which leads to an inadequate exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the lungs. As a result, there is an increase in the levels of carbon dioxide (hypercapnia) and a decrease in the levels of oxygen (hypoxemia) in the blood. Hypoventilation can occur due to various reasons such as respiratory muscle weakness, sedative or narcotic overdose, chest wall deformities, neuromuscular disorders, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and sleep-disordered breathing. Prolonged hypoventilation can lead to serious complications such as respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias, and even death.

"Foreign bodies" refer to any object or substance that is not normally present in a particular location within the body. These can range from relatively harmless items such as splinters or pieces of food in the skin or gastrointestinal tract, to more serious objects like bullets or sharp instruments that can cause significant damage and infection.

Foreign bodies can enter the body through various routes, including ingestion, inhalation, injection, or penetrating trauma. The location of the foreign body will determine the potential for harm and the necessary treatment. Some foreign bodies may pass through the body without causing harm, while others may require medical intervention such as removal or surgical extraction.

It is important to seek medical attention if a foreign body is suspected, as untreated foreign bodies can lead to complications such as infection, inflammation, and tissue damage.

Bronchial neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead into the lungs. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Malignant bronchial neoplasms are often referred to as lung cancer and can be further classified into small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, depending on the type of cells involved.

Benign bronchial neoplasms are less common than malignant ones and may include growths such as papillomas, hamartomas, or chondromas. While benign neoplasms are not cancerous, they can still cause symptoms and complications if they grow large enough to obstruct the airways or if they become infected.

Treatment for bronchial neoplasms depends on several factors, including the type, size, location, and stage of the tumor, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Pathological constriction refers to an abnormal narrowing or tightening of a body passage or organ, which can interfere with the normal flow of blood, air, or other substances through the area. This constriction can occur due to various reasons such as inflammation, scarring, or abnormal growths, and can affect different parts of the body, including blood vessels, airways, intestines, and ureters. Pathological constriction can lead to a range of symptoms and complications depending on its location and severity, and may require medical intervention to correct.

Thyroid cartilage is the largest and most superior of the laryngeal cartilages, forming the front and greater part of the larynx, also known as the "Adam's apple" in humans. It serves to protect the vocal cords and provides attachment for various muscles involved in voice production. The thyroid cartilage consists of two laminae that join in front at an angle, creating a noticeable prominence in the anterior neck. This structure is crucial in speech formation and swallowing functions.

A negative pressure ventilator, also known as an iron lung, is a type of mechanical ventilator that creates a negative pressure environment around the patient's chest and abdomen to assist with breathing. This technology was widely used during the polio epidemic in the mid-20th century to help patients with respiratory paralysis caused by the disease.

In a negative pressure ventilator, the patient is placed inside an airtight chamber that is connected to a pump. The pump changes the air pressure within the chamber, creating a vacuum effect that causes the chest and abdomen to expand and contract, which in turn facilitates breathing. As the pressure around the chest decreases, the chest wall expands, allowing the lungs to fill with air. When the pressure increases, the chest wall contracts, pushing air out of the lungs.

Negative pressure ventilators have largely been replaced by positive pressure ventilators, which are more commonly used today. Positive pressure ventilators work by actively pushing air into the lungs, rather than relying on negative pressure to create a vacuum effect. However, negative pressure ventilators may still be used in certain situations where positive pressure ventilation is not appropriate or feasible.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Fenoterol is a short-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, which is a type of medication used to treat respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It works by relaxing the muscles in the airways and increasing the flow of air into the lungs, making it easier to breathe.

Fenoterol is available in various forms, including inhalation solution, nebulizer solution, and dry powder inhaler. It is usually used as a rescue medication to relieve sudden symptoms or during an asthma attack. Like other short-acting β2-agonists, fenoterol has a rapid onset of action but its effects may wear off quickly, typically within 4-6 hours.

It is important to note that the use of fenoterol has been associated with an increased risk of severe asthma exacerbations and cardiovascular events, such as irregular heartbeat and high blood pressure. Therefore, it should be used with caution and only under the supervision of a healthcare professional.

Hemoptysis is the medical term for coughing up blood that originates from the lungs or lower respiratory tract. It can range in severity from streaks of blood mixed with mucus to large amounts of pure blood. Hemoptysis may be a sign of various underlying conditions, such as bronchitis, pneumonia, tuberculosis, cancer, or blood disorders. Immediate medical attention is required when hemoptysis occurs, especially if it's in significant quantities, to determine the cause and provide appropriate treatment.

Respiratory insufficiency is a condition characterized by the inability of the respiratory system to maintain adequate gas exchange, resulting in an inadequate supply of oxygen and/or removal of carbon dioxide from the body. This can occur due to various causes, such as lung diseases (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia), neuromuscular disorders (e.g., muscular dystrophy, spinal cord injury), or other medical conditions that affect breathing mechanics and/or gas exchange.

Respiratory insufficiency can manifest as hypoxemia (low oxygen levels in the blood) and/or hypercapnia (high carbon dioxide levels in the blood). Symptoms of respiratory insufficiency may include shortness of breath, rapid breathing, fatigue, confusion, and in severe cases, loss of consciousness or even death. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and severity of the condition and may include oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, medications, and/or other supportive measures.

Nebulizer: A nebulizer is a medical device that delivers medication in the form of a mist to the respiratory system. It is often used for people who have difficulty inhaling medication through traditional inhalers, such as young children or individuals with severe respiratory conditions. The medication is placed in the nebulizer cup and then converted into a fine mist by the machine. This allows the user to breathe in the medication directly through a mouthpiece or mask.

Vaporizer: A vaporizer, on the other hand, is a device that heats up a liquid, often water or essential oils, to produce steam or vapor. While some people use vaporizers for therapeutic purposes, such as to help relieve congestion or cough, it is important to note that vaporizers are not considered medical devices and their effectiveness for these purposes is not well-established.

It's worth noting that nebulizers and vaporizers are different from each other in terms of their purpose and usage. Nebulizers are used specifically for delivering medication, while vaporizers are used to produce steam or vapor, often for non-medical purposes.

Jejunal diseases refer to a range of medical conditions that affect the jejunum, which is the middle section of the small intestine. These diseases can cause various symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Some examples of jejunal diseases include:

1. Jejunal inflammation or infection (jejunitis)
2. Crohn's disease, which can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract including the jejunum
3. Intestinal lymphoma, a type of cancer that can develop in the small intestine
4. Celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that causes damage to the small intestine when gluten is consumed
5. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), which can occur due to various reasons including structural abnormalities or motility disorders of the jejunum
6. Meckel's diverticulum, a congenital condition where a small pouch protrudes from the wall of the intestine, usually located in the ileum but can also affect the jejunum
7. Intestinal strictures or obstructions caused by scarring, adhesions, or tumors
8. Radiation enteritis, damage to the small intestine caused by radiation therapy for cancer treatment.

The diagnosis and management of jejunal diseases depend on the specific condition and its severity. Treatment options may include medications, dietary modifications, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Pulmonary gas exchange is the process by which oxygen (O2) from inhaled air is transferred to the blood, and carbon dioxide (CO2), a waste product of metabolism, is removed from the blood and exhaled. This process occurs in the lungs, primarily in the alveoli, where the thin walls of the alveoli and capillaries allow for the rapid diffusion of gases between them. The partial pressure gradient between the alveolar air and the blood in the pulmonary capillaries drives this diffusion process. Oxygen-rich blood is then transported to the body's tissues, while CO2-rich blood returns to the lungs to be exhaled.

The glottis is a medical term that refers to the opening between the vocal cords (the ligaments in the larynx that produce sound when air passes through them during speech) in the human throat or larynx. It is an important structure for breathing, swallowing, and producing sounds or speech. The glottis opens during inhalation to allow air into the lungs and closes during swallowing to prevent food or liquids from entering the trachea (windpipe) and lungs.

Transcutaneous blood gas monitoring (TcBGM) is a non-invasive method to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) and carbon dioxide (pCO2) in the blood. This technique uses heated sensors placed on the skin, typically on the ear lobe or the soles of the feet, to estimate the gas tensions in the capillary blood.

The sensors contain a electrochemical or optical sensor that measures the pO2 and pCO2 levels in the tiny amount of gas that diffuses through the skin from the underlying capillaries. The measurements are then adjusted to reflect the actual blood gas values based on calibration curves and other factors, such as the patient's age, temperature, and skin perfusion.

TcBGM is commonly used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) to monitor oxygenation and ventilation in premature infants, who may have immature lungs or other respiratory problems that make invasive blood gas sampling difficult or risky. It can also be used in adults with conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sleep apnea, or neuromuscular disorders, where frequent blood gas measurements are needed to guide therapy and monitor response to treatment.

Overall, TcBGM provides a safe, painless, and convenient way to monitor blood gases in real-time, without the need for repeated arterial punctures or other invasive procedures. However, it is important to note that TcBGM may not always provide accurate measurements in certain situations, such as when the skin perfusion is poor or when there are significant differences between the capillary and arterial blood gases. Therefore, clinical judgment and other diagnostic tests should be used in conjunction with TcBGM to ensure appropriate patient management.

Tracheobronchomegaly is a rare condition characterized by an abnormal dilatation or widening of the trachea and bronchi, which are the airway tubes leading to the lungs. This condition is also known as Mounier-Kuhn syndrome. It is typically associated with recurrent respiratory infections, coughing, and difficulty breathing, especially during physical exertion. The exact cause of tracheobronchomegaly is not well understood, but it may be related to a congenital abnormality or connective tissue disorder. Diagnosis is often made through imaging studies such as chest X-rays or CT scans. Treatment typically involves managing symptoms and preventing complications, and may include bronchodilators, antibiotics, and respiratory therapy. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or reinforce the airway walls.

Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is a type of asthma that is triggered by physical activity or exercise. Officially known as exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), this condition causes the airways in the lungs to narrow and become inflamed, leading to symptoms such as wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness. These symptoms typically occur during or after exercise and can last for several minutes to a few hours.

EIA is caused by the loss of heat and moisture from the airways during exercise, which leads to the release of inflammatory mediators that cause the airways to constrict. People with EIA may have underlying asthma or may only experience symptoms during exercise. Proper diagnosis and management of EIA can help individuals maintain an active lifestyle and participate in physical activities without experiencing symptoms.

Blood gas analysis is a medical test that measures the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood, as well as the pH level, which indicates the acidity or alkalinity of the blood. This test is often used to evaluate lung function, respiratory disorders, and acid-base balance in the body. It can also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatments for conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and other respiratory illnesses. The analysis is typically performed on a sample of arterial blood, although venous blood may also be used in some cases.

The arytenoid cartilages are paired, irregularly shaped pieces of elastic cartilage located in the larynx (voice box) of mammals. They play a crucial role in the process of vocalization and breathing.

Each arytenoid cartilage has a body and two projections: the vocal process, which provides attachment for the vocal cord, and the muscular process, which serves as an attachment site for various intrinsic laryngeal muscles. The arytenoid cartilages are connected to the cricoid cartilage below by the synovial cricoarytenoid joints, allowing for their movement during respiration and phonation.

These cartilages help in adjusting the tension of the vocal cords and controlling the opening and closing of the rima glottidis (the space between the vocal cords), which is essential for breathing, swallowing, and producing sounds. Any abnormalities or injuries to the arytenoid cartilages may result in voice disturbances or respiratory difficulties.

Laryngitis is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the larynx, or voice box. This inflammation can lead to hoarseness, throat pain, and difficulty speaking or swallowing. Laryngitis can be caused by viral infections, bacterial infections, vocal strain, or other factors such as exposure to irritants like smoke or chemicals. In some cases, laryngitis may be a symptom of a more serious underlying condition, so it is important to seek medical attention if symptoms persist for more than a few days or are accompanied by other concerning symptoms.

A breath test is a medical or forensic procedure used to analyze a sample of exhaled breath in order to detect and measure the presence of various substances, most commonly alcohol. The test is typically conducted using a device called a breathalyzer, which measures the amount of alcohol in the breath and converts it into a reading of blood alcohol concentration (BAC).

In addition to alcohol, breath tests can also be used to detect other substances such as drugs or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that may indicate certain medical conditions. However, these types of breath tests are less common and may not be as reliable or accurate as other diagnostic tests.

Breath testing is commonly used by law enforcement officers to determine whether a driver is impaired by alcohol and to establish probable cause for arrest. It is also used in some healthcare settings to monitor patients who are being treated for alcohol abuse or dependence.

Intrinsic Positive-Pressure Respiration (IPPR) is a type of positive-pressure breathing that occurs naturally within the body, without the use of mechanical ventilation or other external devices. It is also known as "auto-PEEP" or "occult PEEP," where PEEP stands for Positive End-Expiratory Pressure.

In normal, spontaneous breathing, the pressure inside the alveoli (air sacs) in the lungs becomes slightly negative during inhalation and returns to atmospheric pressure during exhalation. However, certain lung conditions or patient efforts can lead to an increase in resistance to airflow during exhalation, causing positive pressure to persist within the alveoli at the end of expiration. This results in intrinsic PEEP or auto-PEEP.

IPPR can be caused by several factors, including:

1. Air trapping due to obstructive lung diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma
2. High respiratory rates leading to incomplete exhalation before the next inspiration begins
3. Inadequate expiratory time, often seen in mechanically ventilated patients with high tidal volumes and/or low respiratory rates
4. Dynamic hyperinflation due to increased minute ventilation or high inspiratory flow rates
5. Bronchoconstriction or airway narrowing, which can occur during an asthma attack or in certain other lung conditions

IPPR has several clinical implications, such as reduced venous return and cardiac output, increased work of breathing, and potential for lung injury due to overdistension (volutrauma). Healthcare providers must consider IPPR when managing patients with respiratory distress, especially those on mechanical ventilation, to optimize their care and prevent complications.

Betamethasone valerate is a synthetic corticosteroid drug, which is a derivative of betamethasone. It is used as a topical preparation for the treatment of various skin conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. The valerate ester of betamethasone provides a sustained release of the active steroid, allowing for less frequent application and improved penetration into the skin.

Betamethasone valerate works by reducing inflammation, suppressing the immune system, and relieving itching and redness in the affected area. It is available in various forms, including creams, ointments, and lotions, and should be used under the direction of a healthcare professional to ensure proper use and minimize potential side effects.

Like other corticosteroids, betamethasone valerate can cause thinning of the skin, increased hair growth, and acne with prolonged or excessive use. It is important to follow the recommended dosage and duration of treatment to avoid these side effects.

Nonparametric statistics is a branch of statistics that does not rely on assumptions about the distribution of variables in the population from which the sample is drawn. In contrast to parametric methods, nonparametric techniques make fewer assumptions about the data and are therefore more flexible in their application. Nonparametric tests are often used when the data do not meet the assumptions required for parametric tests, such as normality or equal variances.

Nonparametric statistical methods include tests such as the Wilcoxon rank-sum test (also known as the Mann-Whitney U test) for comparing two independent groups, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for comparing two related groups, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for comparing more than two independent groups. These tests use the ranks of the data rather than the actual values to make comparisons, which allows them to be used with ordinal or continuous data that do not meet the assumptions of parametric tests.

Overall, nonparametric statistics provide a useful set of tools for analyzing data in situations where the assumptions of parametric methods are not met, and can help researchers draw valid conclusions from their data even when the data are not normally distributed or have other characteristics that violate the assumptions of parametric tests.

Suppuration is the process of forming or discharging pus. It is a condition that results from infection, tissue death (necrosis), or injury, where white blood cells (leukocytes) accumulate to combat the infection and subsequently die, forming pus. The pus consists of dead leukocytes, dead tissue, debris, and microbes (bacteria, fungi, or protozoa). Suppuration can occur in various body parts such as the lungs (empyema), brain (abscess), or skin (carbuncle, furuncle). Treatment typically involves draining the pus and administering appropriate antibiotics to eliminate the infection.

Inflammation is a complex biological response of tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. It is characterized by the following signs: rubor (redness), tumor (swelling), calor (heat), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The process involves the activation of the immune system, recruitment of white blood cells, and release of inflammatory mediators, which contribute to the elimination of the injurious stimuli and initiation of the healing process. However, uncontrolled or chronic inflammation can also lead to tissue damage and diseases.

The adrenal cortex hormones are a group of steroid hormones produced and released by the outer portion (cortex) of the adrenal glands, which are located on top of each kidney. These hormones play crucial roles in regulating various physiological processes, including:

1. Glucose metabolism: Cortisol helps control blood sugar levels by increasing glucose production in the liver and reducing its uptake in peripheral tissues.
2. Protein and fat metabolism: Cortisol promotes protein breakdown and fatty acid mobilization, providing essential building blocks for energy production during stressful situations.
3. Immune response regulation: Cortisol suppresses immune function to prevent overactivation and potential damage to the body during stress.
4. Cardiovascular function: Aldosterone regulates electrolyte balance and blood pressure by promoting sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys.
5. Sex hormone production: The adrenal cortex produces small amounts of sex hormones, such as androgens and estrogens, which contribute to sexual development and function.
6. Growth and development: Cortisol plays a role in normal growth and development by influencing the activity of growth-promoting hormones like insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1).

The main adrenal cortex hormones include:

1. Glucocorticoids: Cortisol is the primary glucocorticoid, responsible for regulating metabolism and stress response.
2. Mineralocorticoids: Aldosterone is the primary mineralocorticoid, involved in electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation.
3. Androgens: Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate derivative (DHEAS) are the most abundant adrenal androgens, contributing to sexual development and function.
4. Estrogens: Small amounts of estrogens are produced by the adrenal cortex, mainly in women.

Disorders related to impaired adrenal cortex hormone production or regulation can lead to various clinical manifestations, such as Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), Cushing's syndrome (hypercortisolism), and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).

It can be broadly classified into being either in the upper airway (UPA) or lower airway (LOA). Airway obstruction is a life- ... Diseases that cause lower airway obstruction are termed obstructive lung diseases. Lower airway obstruction can be measured ... Management of airways relies on both minimal-invasive and invasive techniques. Lower airway obstruction is mainly caused by ... Stridor Recurrent airway obstruction Aboussouan, L.S.; Stoller, J.K (15 March 1994). "Diagnosis and management of upper airway ...
"The airway response of horses with recurrent airway obstruction (heaves) to aerosol administration of ipratropium bromide", ... Recurrent airway obstruction, also known as broken wind, heaves, wind-broke horse, or sometimes by the term usually reserved ... 432-438 N. E. Robinson, (2001) "Recurrent Airway Obstruction (Heaves)", Equine Respiratory Diseases, International Veterinary ... "Persistent mucin glycoprotein alterations in equine recurrent airway obstruction",Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 281: L704- ...
Airway obstruction. Sedation can hinder the patient's gag reflex. Therefore, patients can find it difficult to remove a foreign ... In more serious cases of airway obstruction, up to 5 back blows and abdominal thrusts should be given while the patient is ... They include over-sedation, respiratory depression/apnoea, unconscious patient, airway obstruction, vomiting, idiosyncratic ... Inability to use a mask can either be due to anatomic and/or disease-induced nasopharyngeal obstructions, or due to ...
doi:10.1016/B978-1-4377-0774-8.10020-X. ISBN 978-1-4377-0774-8. Kumar, S.; Salib, R. (2006). "Upper Airway Obstruction". ...
"Brachycephalic Airway Obstruction Syndrome". Genetic Welfare Problems of Companion Animals. ufaw.org.uk: Universities ... In some cases, the dog could pass out from blocked airways. If this happens, one should inquire with their veterinarian whether ... Pugs are prone to brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS) which causes respiratory distress in short-snouted breeds. ...
Airway obstruction, choking, drowning. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Neuromuscular diseases or interstitial lung ... Stridor may be heard in upper airway obstruction, and cyanosis may indicate severe hypoxia. Neurological symptoms and organ ... X-rays or CT scans of the chest and airways can reveal abnormalities that may affect ventilation or perfusion. A ventilation/ ... More serious cases are treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Hypoxia exists when there is a reduced amount ...
Airway obstruction, choking, drowning. Abnormal pulmonary function[citation needed] Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD ... Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask may be used to treat sleep apnea. Bilevel positive airway pressure (BIPAP) may ... Inhaled steroids that can dilate the airways may be used to treat asthma or other lung disease. Diuretics may be used to reduce ...
In patients with airway obstruction due to bulbar palsy, intubation may be used. This can be tracheal intubation or ... difficulty breathing (airway obstruction). dysphonia (defective use of the voice, inability to produce sound due to laryngeal ... When there is airway obstruction, intubation is used. dysphagia (difficulty in swallowing). difficulty in chewing. nasal ...
Biller JA (2007). "Airway obstruction, bronchospasm, and cough". In Berger AM, Shuster JL, Von Roenn JH (eds.). Principles and ...
"English Bulldog - Brachycephalic Airway Obstruction Syndrome (BAOS)". www.ufaw.org.uk. Retrieved 29 January 2023. Haughney, ... "Brachycephalic Airway Obstruction Syndrome and the English Bulldog". Universities Federation for Animal Welfare. The ... The English Bulldog is among the breeds that are most severely affected by brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome, due to ... Like all brachycephalic dogs, bully breeds often suffer from brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS). A degree of ...
Airway obstruction is the most common complication. Implant migration or extrusion in cases where proper stitches are not taken ... in case of airway insufficiency after Laryngeal trauma). Type 3 thyroplasty - Shortening of the vocal folds (done to lower the ...
"Fourteen cases of imposed upper airway obstruction". Archives of Disease in Childhood. BMJ Publishing Group. 67 (2): 162-170. ...
Chou, Yu-Kung; Lee, Chao-Yi; Chao, Hai-Hsuan (December 2007). "An upper airway obstruction emergency: Ludwig angina". Pediatric ... Chou YK, Lee CY, Chao HH (December 2007). "An upper airway obstruction emergency: Ludwig angina". Pediatric Emergency Care. 23 ... secondary to obstruction of the airway, which is the most serious potential complication of this condition. Anticor Gottlieb, M ... Airway management has been found to be the most important factor in treating patients with Ludwig's Angina, i.e. it is the " ...
Intrathoracic major airway obstruction produces inspiratory as well as expiratory sounds. Distal airway obstruction ... The fraction of the respiratory cycle during which a wheeze is produced roughly corresponds to the degree of airway obstruction ... As a rule, extrathoracic airway obstruction produce inspiratory sounds. ... Stridor in the inspiratory phase is usually heard with obstruction in the upper airways, such as the trachea, epiglottis, or ...
Aspiration can cause airway obstruction, air-trapping, pneumonia, lung inflammation, and inactivated surfactant. It presents as ... This inflammation can lead to airway obstruction. From tonsillitis can come a peritonsillar abscess which is the most common ... are all obstructive lung diseases characterised by airway obstruction. This limits the amount of air that is able to enter ... Chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) are long-term diseases of the airways and other structures of the lung. They are ...
Aortic valve disease may occur.[citation needed] Airway obstruction is frequent, usually secondary to abnormal cervical ... Myer CM (July 1991). "Airway obstruction in Hurler's syndrome--radiographic features". International Journal of Pediatric ...
January 2023). "Small airways obstruction and its risk factors in the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study: a ... In horses it is known as recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) or heaves. RAO can be quite severe and most often is linked to ... "Recurrent Airway Obstruction in Horses - Respiratory System". Veterinary Manual. Retrieved 7 July 2021. Miller MS, Tilley LP, ... Thus, airway remodelling with narrowing of peripheral airway and emphysema are responsible for the alteration of lung function ...
This causes another obstruction that blocks the airway. Treatment for this involves cutting out the everted saccules. This also ... This reduces the chances of secondary airway changes happening. It has also shown that the two surgeries paired together it has ... Nasopharyngeal Noise: noise created due to stenotic nares; a nasal obstruction caused by altered growth of the scrolls within ... Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Syndrome - Cambridge Veterinary School (Dog anatomy, Dog diseases, Veterinary procedures). ...
Brooks (DVM, DABVP), Wendy (May 5, 2021). "Brachycephalic Airway Obstruction Syndrome in Flat-Faced Dogs". Veterinary ... The condition is part of the brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome syndrome common to short-nosed dog and cat breeds. Dog ... Keats (DVM, DACVS), Matthew M (April 1, 2012). "Brachycephalic airway syndrome, Part 1: Correcting stenotic nares". DVM 360. ...
Upper airway obstruction from tonsillar hypertrophy is rare. Fulminant disease course of immunocompromised people are rare. ... are not recommended for routine use but may be useful if there is a risk of airway obstruction, a very low platelet count, or ...
"Severe Hajdu-Cheney syndrome with upper airway obstruction". American Journal of Medical Genetics. 70 (3): 261-6. doi:10.1002/( ...
Injuries to this area can cause airway obstruction. Ingestion of corrosive chemicals can cause chemical burns to the larynx. ... The airway is evaluated, clearing bodily fluids with suctioning or creating an artificial airway if necessary. Breathing is ... The primary concerns regarding oral injuries are that the airway is clear and that there are no concurrent injuries to other ... It can be caused by drowning, inhalation of certain substances, strangulation, blockage of the airway, traumatic injury to the ...
It is caused by partial obstruction of the upper airways, at the level of the pharynx and nasopharynx. It is distinguished from ... Upper Airway Obstruction. In: StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing, Treasure Island (FL); 2020. Englar, Ryane E. (3 July 2019). " ... Emergency management of the paediatric airway". In John M. Graham (ed.). Pediatric ENT. Glenis K. Scadding, Peter D. Bull. ...
Kilburn KH, Warshaw RH (October 1994). "Airways obstruction from asbestos exposure. Effects of asbestosis and smoking". Chest. ... Large airway function, as reflected by FEV1/FVC, is generally well preserved. In severe cases, the drastic reduction in lung ... Figure A shows the location of the lungs, airways, pleura, and diaphragm in the body. Figure B shows lungs with asbestos- ...
... or by preventing airway obstruction in cases such as anaphylaxis, the obtunded patient, or medical sedation. Airway obstruction ... may lodge in various levels of the airway tract and cause significant obstruction of the airway. Complete obstruction of the ... Airway management includes a set of maneuvers and medical procedures performed to prevent and relieve airway obstruction. This ... Basic airway management can be divided into treatment and prevention of an obstruction in the airway. [citation needed] ...
In order to stabilize the baby, the umbilical cord is kept intact to provide oxygen to the fetus in case of airway obstruction ... The main priority for treating epignathus is to establish a usable airway free of obstruction and then to feed the baby. This ... The tumor can grow within the oral cavity and protrude out of the mouth, causing obstruction of the airway and therefore ... Jadhav SS, Korday CS, Malik S, Shah VK, Lad SK (January 2017). "Epignathus Leading to Fatal Airway Obstruction in a Neonate". ...
Rarely, children will have significant life-threatening airway obstruction. The vast majority, however, will only have stridor ... cartilages or the mucosa/tissue over the arytenoid cartilages can collapse into the airway and cause airway obstruction.[ ... causing airway obstruction. It can also be seen in older patients, especially those with neuromuscular conditions resulting in ... Laryngomalacia results in partial airway obstruction, most commonly causing a characteristic high-pitched squeaking noise on ...
TO can cause airway obstruction, bleeding and chronic cough. Treatment involves the use of bronchodilators, and physical ... The nodules usually spare the posterior wall of the airway because they are of cartilaginous origin, while the posterior wall ... of the airway is membranous (does not contain cartilage). This is as opposed to tracheobronchial amyloidosis, which does not ...
These levels have also been associated with airway obstruction. From the same research, they proposed that airway blockage ... When the airways of individuals with atopic asthma were compared to the airways of normal individuals, the atopic individuals ... 1997). "The role of the eosinophil-selective chemokine, eotaxin, in allergic and non-allergic airways inflammation". Memórias ... The increased levels are associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. ...
"Preliminary experience with bronchotherapeutic procedures in central airway obstruction". Chang Gung Med J. 26 (4): 240-9. PMID ... "Early endoscopic treatment of acute inflammatory airway lesions improves the outcome of postintubation airway stenosis". ... In babies and young children however, the subglottis is the narrowest part of the airway and most stenoses do in fact occur at ... Wassermann K, Mathen F, Edmund Eckel H (October 2000). "Malignant laryngotracheal obstruction: a way to treat serial stenoses ...
It can be broadly classified into being either in the upper airway (UPA) or lower airway (LOA). Airway obstruction is a life- ... Diseases that cause lower airway obstruction are termed obstructive lung diseases. Lower airway obstruction can be measured ... Management of airways relies on both minimal-invasive and invasive techniques. Lower airway obstruction is mainly caused by ... Stridor Recurrent airway obstruction Aboussouan, L.S.; Stoller, J.K (15 March 1994). "Diagnosis and management of upper airway ...
It is defined by complete or near-complete obstruction of the upper airway and appears radiographically as echogenic large ... Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a rare prenatal diagnosis whose true incidence is unknown. ... Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is defined by complete or near-complete obstruction of the fetal airway. ... Fetal Surgery for Congenital High Airway Obstruction) and Fetal Surgery for Congenital High Airway Obstruction What to Read ...
The duration of an exposure response gradient between incident obstructive airways disease and work at the World Trade Center ... Is the relationship between WTC exposure and incident obstructive airway disease limited to a single subtype of obstructive ... The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway ... Estimating the time interval between exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and incident diagnoses of obstructive airway ...
It is important for the otolaryngologist to be aware of the myriad of causes of nasal airway obstruction. An accurate history ... The different causes of nasal airway obstruction are very wide-ranging, spanning from congenital life threatening causes to ... the physician should be aware of the possibility of a widened posterior septum as a cause of nasal airway obstruction. ... Herein, we present a case of nasal obstruction caused by widening of the posterior septum. A 52-year-old gentleman presented to ...
FEV(1)/FEV(6) can be used as a valid alternative for FEV(1)/FVC in the diagnosis of airway obstruction. ... is a sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of airway obstruction. ... Should FEV1/FEV6 replace FEV1/FVC ratio to detect airway obstruction? A metaanalysis Chest. 2009 Apr;135(4):991-998. doi: ... Conclusions: FEV(1)/FEV(6) is a sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of airway obstruction. FEV(1)/FEV(6) can be used ...
The cause for the acute upper airway obstruction has been identified and symptoms and signs of acute upper airway obstruction ... Children with moderate to severe upper airway obstruction are at high risk of deterioration and complete obstruction if they ... Decompensation of acute upper airway obstruction can be rapid and requires emergency airway management ... X-ray (chest and/or soft tissue neck) or CT may be helpful in identifying the location and nature of upper airway obstruction ...
... had airway obstruction during the baseline examination. The validated smoking cessation rate in those with airway obstruction ... 1177 (26.2%) subjects had airway obstruction and were told that they had COPD and that smoking cessation would halt rapid ... A study was undertaken to determine if diagnosis of airway obstruction was associated with subsequent success in smoking ... 10 pack-years of smoking were recruited from 100 000 subjects screened by spirometric testing for signs of airway obstruction. ...
This study evaluated the impact of different definitions of airway obstruction on the estimated prevalence of obstruction in a ... Population impact of different definitions of airway obstruction. B.R. Celli, R.J. Halbert, S. Isonaka, B. Schau ... Vital capacities in acute and chronic airway obstruction: dependence on flow and volume histories. Eur Respir J 1997;10:1316- ... Population impact of different definitions of airway obstruction Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from ...
Copyright © 2023 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & British Thoracic Society. All rights reserved.. ...
airway obstruction. An 83 year old man presented to the emergency department for a gradually growing, painless soft mass ...
ElectricAirway: Upper Airway Problems in Children Discussion of Treatment of Acute Airway Obstruction. Donna M. Santer, M.D., ... If a child acutely obstructs his airway and respiratory arrest occurs, attempt to position the child to open the airway using ... If this is inadequate, begin bag and mask ventilation with 100% oxygen, and again re-evaluate for patency of the airway. If ...
Pulmonary effects of exposure to fine fiberglass: irregular opacities and small airways obstruction. ... Pulmonary effects of exposure to fine fiberglass: irregular opacities and small airways obstruction. ... Pulmonary effects of exposure to fine fibreglass: irregular opacities and small airways obstruction. ...
The ERS-education website provides centralised access to all educational material produced by the European Respiratory Society. It is the worlds largest CME collection for lung diseases and treatment offering high quality e-learning and teaching resources for respiratory specialists. This distance learning portal contains up-to-date study material for the state-of-the-art in Pulmonology.
... inflammation in airway obstruction and that trials of specific anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of airway obstruction ... Increases in plasma concentrations of a prostaglandin metabolite in acute airway obstruction. ... Increases in plasma concentrations of a prostaglandin metabolite in acute airway obstruction. ... Increases in plasma concentrations of a prostaglandin metabolite in acute airway obstruction. ...
Accidental aspiration of denture cleanser tablets caused severe mucosal edema in upper airway. The clinical respiratory journal ...
RAO, Recurrent airway obstruction, is a non-infectious airway disease of horses. The disease is characterized by periods of ... Recurrent Airway Obstruction, RAO, är en icke infektiös luftvägssjukdom hos häst. Sjukdomen karaktäriseras av perioder med ... Kloning av hästens TLR-4 som verktyg för att se betydelsen av hästens medfödda immunitet vid recurrent airway obstruction. ... Kloning av hästens TLR-4 som verktyg för att se betydelsen av hästens medfödda immunitet vid recurrent airway obstruction. ...
Epidemiologic Evidence Linking Antioxidant Vitamins to Pulmonary Function and Airway Obstruction Academic Article ...
Initial treatment of airway obstruction may include: basic airway manoeuvres, positioning, suctioning, oro- or naso-pharyngeal ... Respiratory distress, stridor, and dysphagia/drooling with dyspnoea all suggest a possible airway obstruction. Obstructions can ... Airway obstruction_foreignbody.pdf.. 5. Rehn, M. et al. Scandinavian SSAI clinical practice guideline on pre-hospital airway ... position should initially be used to attempt to establish an airway in a patient with an airway obstruction 3. ...
The pediatric pulmonologists with Norton Childrens Pulmonology offer care for upper airway obstruction in children from ... What Is an Upper Airway Obstruction?. An upper airway obstruction is when a part of the upper airway, including the nasal ... An upper airway obstruction is a common cause of respiratory distress and failure in children. The upper airway includes the ... Foreign body airway obstruction: This is when a foreign object is ingested or inserted, causing a blockage in the airway ...
Bowel Injury - Adhesions Causing Obstruction of Mesenteric Arteries with Bowel Necrosis (Death) - Image ... Inflammation and Adhesions of the Pelvis with Obstruction of the Fallopian Tubes - Image ...
James Brokenshire on management controversies airway obstruction, awake intubation, BiPAP, PEEP, Ketamine, tracheal stent ... The airway is usually compromised by 50% in patients with acute resting stridor. Complete obstruction from this point is often ... What is your management for this airway obstruction now?. The differential for high peak inspiratory pressures in the post ... Ideally I would use no sedation as even ketamine in patients with upper airway obstruction may cause problems. I agree that the ...
Airway obstruction. Ameille et al found no causal relationship between airway obstruction and asbestos exposure. Their study ... Does asbestos exposure cause airway obstruction, in the absence of confirmed asbestosis?. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2010 Aug ... Churg A, Stevens B. Enhanced retention of asbestos fibers in the airways of human smokers. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 May ... People who smoke are likely to develop chronic bronchitis and obstructive airway disease, and they are prone to respiratory ...
Palavras-chave : Airway Obstruction [complications]; Ambulatory Surgical Procedures; Laryngeal Muscles. · resumo em Português ... The acute obstruction of the upper airways is a serious complication requiring the professionals immediate attention to ... Crycothyroidotomy in the treatment of acute airway obstruction. Rev. cir. traumatol. buco-maxilo-fac. [online]. 2010, vol.10, n ... It has been restricted to situations of extreme obstruction above the vocal cords, such as anaphylactic reactions or severe ...
This eLearning module fits within the Mainpro+ Self-Learning Activities Section. You may submit this non-certified* activity for one non-certified credit per hour.. *Non-certified activities have not been formally reviewed by the College but comply with the Colleges definition of CPD, are non-promotional in nature, and provide valuable professional learning opportunities.. ...
... require quck thinking - John Bielinski shares his mnemonic to help with AMBU bagging a patient. ... Blog » Emergency Airway Obstructions. Airway obstruction is a very real emergency medicine issue. When a person is losing his ... AMBU bag and emergency airway obstructions. We need to handle airway obstructions with "TLC." TLC means noting the TIMING, ... How fast did the airway obstruction come on?. When looking at an airway, there are two big issues: can I AMBU bag them to ...
Snoring & Upper Airway Obstruction. Snoring is a sound produced by the vibrations of the tissues of the nose and throat on ... The most common cause of snoring is nasal passage obstruction caused from nasal septum deviation, allergies, sinus infections, ... These procedures are designed to optimise the upper airway size and shape. ... and pharynx leading to smaller airway and greater tissue vibration resulting in snoring. ...
ANZCOR Guidelines , Algorithms and Flowcharts , Choking (Management of Foreign Body Airway Obstruction) ... ANZCOR Guidelines , Algorithms and Flowcharts , Choking (Management of Foreign Body Airway Obstruction) ...
Nasal airway obstruction feels like you have a congested or blocked nose. VIVAER® is a non-invasive procedure that is performed ... Thats The First Symptom of Nasal Airway Obstruction.. Nasal airway obstruction feels like you have a congested or blocked nose ... Traditional Nasal Obstruction Treatments. Home remedies for nasal airway obstruction include breathing strips, nasal dilators, ... VIVAER® Non-Invasive Nasal Airway Remodeling Is A Better Solution.. VIVAER® gives you a treatment for nasal airway obstruction ...
Partial upper airway obstruction or UARS is most prevalent in women, and treatable with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or ... Prolonged partial upper airway obstruction or UARS is a common phenotype of sleep disordered breathing which is largely ... Partial upper airway obstruction is underrepresented because there is no consensus of its etection, qualification, or clinical ... In clinical practice a Level 1 study is helpful to detect partial upper airway obstruction. Periods longer than a hypopnea are ...
  • Pulmonary effects of exposure to fine fiberglass: irregular opacities and small airways obstruction. (bmj.com)
  • The disease is characterized by periods of reversible obstruction and inflammation of the small airways caused by bronchospasm and accumulation of mucus and neutrophils in the airways. (slu.se)
  • Sampling of biological material from the lung is performed by bronchoscopy where tissues and cells from the large and from the small airways are harvested. (ki.se)
  • In addition, it has been shown that employees exposed to sidestream tobacco smoke in the work environment are at greater risk of developing small airways dysfunction than are nonexposed employees (2). (cdc.gov)
  • Small airways disease, which is the first pathological change seen in beginning smokers (3), may increase the risk of developing disabling chronic airways obstruction (4). (cdc.gov)
  • Exercise, if the patient can manage it comfortably, should be encouraged as it promotes the movement of airway mucus and improves the circulation of blood to the lungs. (parksidevets.com)
  • Stridor Recurrent airway obstruction Aboussouan, L.S. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recurrent Airway Obstruction, RAO, är en icke infektiös luftvägssjukdom hos häst. (slu.se)
  • RAO, Recurrent airway obstruction, is a non-infectious airway disease of horses. (slu.se)
  • Horses and ponies diagnosed with RAO (Recurrent Airway Obstruction), formerly known as COPD, heaves or dust allergy are highly susceptible to the effects of inhaling allergens from their environment. (parksidevets.com)
  • The medications for a Recurrent Airway Obstruction initially may be required to treat the inflammation in the lungs and to relieve symptoms such as coughing, wheezing and nasal discharge. (parksidevets.com)
  • Most horses with Recurrent Airway Obstruction are sensitive to inhaled allergens inside the stable. (parksidevets.com)
  • The best place for horse or pony with Recurrent Airway Obstruction is outside! (parksidevets.com)
  • Respiratory Emergencies, section Acute Upper Airway Obstruction[permanent dead link]. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is defined by complete or near-complete obstruction of the fetal airway. (medscape.com)
  • Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome. (nel.edu)
  • Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS) is a very rare fetal malformation caused by obstruction of fetal airway because of l. (nel.edu)
  • Hamid-Sowinska A, Ropacka-Lesiak M, Breborowicz G. Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome. (nel.edu)
  • There are a number of other risk factors besides smoking for development of chronic airway obstruction. (ki.se)
  • The study will explore one explanation to chronic airway obstruction not caused by tobacco smoke. (ki.se)
  • Recently, it has become evident that chronic airway obstruction in never-smokers is more prevalent than previously known. (ki.se)
  • In this national multicenter study we will identify factors associated with chronic airway obstruction in never-smokers and to determine the molecular mechanisms of this disease in order to find potential targets for intervention. (ki.se)
  • In this group, we have identified persons with chronic airway obstruction who have never smoked. (ki.se)
  • A decentralized rehabilitation program for chronic airway obstruction disease patients in small urban and rural areas of Wisconsin: a preliminary report. (cdc.gov)
  • Lower airway obstruction is mainly caused by increased resistance in the bronchioles (usually from a decreased radius of the bronchioles) that reduces the amount of air inhaled in each breath and the oxygen that reaches the pulmonary arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases that cause lower airway obstruction are termed obstructive lung diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lower airway obstruction can be measured using spirometry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lower airway obstruction can occur in patients of any age, usually as a result of drowning, bronchospasm, aspiration, infection, swelling or bleeding. (advancedmedicalcertification.com)
  • A lower airway obstruction was found in all women consumer of water pipe. (who.int)
  • Introduction: Central airway obstruction (CAO) often requires repeated interventional procedures which offer variable efficacy, a time-limited effect, and have inherent limitations. (elsevierpure.com)
  • METHODS: Th is was a multicenter registry study of patients undergoing therapeutic bronchoscopy for malignant central airway obstruction. (psu.edu)
  • Scientists have identified diverse pathways associated with normal lung function, as well as with airflow obstruction and emphysema, by data-mining large-scale genetic information from over 50,000 subjects. (uw.edu)
  • The paper, "Integrated Pathway Genomics of Lung Function and Airflow Obstruction" is featured on the cover of the December issue of the journal. (uw.edu)
  • Cover image in Human Molecular Genetics for the paper, "Integrative Pathway Genomics of Lung Function and Airflow Obstruction. (uw.edu)
  • The investigators then applied a similar pathway analysis to a large airflow obstruction genome-wide association study and found many similar gene sets and biological processes. (uw.edu)
  • Asthma is a common chronic airway disorder characterized by periods of airflow obstruction known as asthma attacks. (cdc.gov)
  • Airway obstruction is a blockage of respiration in the airway that hinders the free flow of air. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is different from airway restriction (which prevents air from diffusing into the pulmonary arteries because of some kind of blockage in the lungs). (wikipedia.org)
  • Upper airway obstruction may occur in infants 3 months, who are usually nose breathers and thus may have upper airway obstruction secondary to nasal blockage. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Upper-airway obstruction may occur at the level of the larynx (laryngeal atresia, rings, webs, or cysts) or along the trachea (tracheal agenesis, rings, webs, and stenosis or subglottic stenosis). (medscape.com)
  • The upper airway includes the nasal cavity, pharynx (back of throat) and larynx (upper end of trachea, where the vocal chords are). (nortonchildrens.com)
  • Bronchoscopy is a procedure that allows your doctor to examine your child's throat, larynx, trachea, and lower airways through a tool called a bronchoscope. (childrenshospital.org)
  • Seventeen dogs with clinical signs attributable to nonneoplastic obstruction of the larynx, trachea, or large bronchi underwent computed tomography (CT) imaging. (avmi.net)
  • Accidental aspiration of denture cleanser tablets caused severe mucosal edema in upper airway. (pneumotox.com)
  • This paper discusses the case of and treatment methods fora patient who was initially suspected to have a foreign body aspiration because of presenting to hospital with acute airway obstruction. (tgcd.org.tr)
  • The study uses innovative statistical methods - parametric survival models with change points - to study the incidence of new onset obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses and symptoms over the first ten years following WTC exposure, with the goal of determining the length of time that exposure response gradients are observed among exposed FDNY firefighters. (cdc.gov)
  • For how long is WTC exposure associated with incident obstructive airway disease? (cdc.gov)
  • What is the magnitude of the exposure-response relationship between WTC exposure and incident obstructive airway disease? (cdc.gov)
  • Is the relationship between WTC exposure and incident obstructive airway disease limited to a single subtype of obstructive airway disease? (cdc.gov)
  • The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. (cdc.gov)
  • Conventional wisdom has been that new incident obstructive airway disease (OAD) that is associated with environmental or occupational exposure would present weeks to months, not years, after exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • Plasma concentrations of a stable prostaglandin F2 alpha metabolite were measured by radioimmunoassay during and after recovery from acute airway obstruction in 15 infants. (bmj.com)
  • Infants under the age of three months, as well as patients who have loss of muscle tone and decreased consciousness, may experience upper airway obstruction. (advancedmedicalcertification.com)
  • An upper airway obstruction is when a part of the upper airway, including the nasal cavity, pharynx and larynx, becomes blocked. (nortonchildrens.com)
  • The risk of worsening airway injuries (eg, turning a partial tear of the larynx into a total one) through injudicious airway instrumentation must be avoided. (medscape.com)
  • These data suggest that prostaglandin F2 alpha mediates respiratory inflammation in airway obstruction and that trials of specific anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of airway obstruction may be warranted. (bmj.com)
  • The immunological background of the disease is still ambiguous and both innate and acquired immunity have been implicated as contributing to airway inflammation. (slu.se)
  • The analysis can be used to more accurately measure the expression of TLR-4 mRNA in equine samples and thereby enhance the ability to evaluate contribution of the innate immunity to triggering airway inflammation in horses with RAO. (slu.se)
  • In a cohort of 40 COPD-patients, 40 smokers with normal lung function and 40 neversmokers (Karolinska COSMIC study) we have made significant attempts, by performing bronchoscopy, to characterize inflammation and structural changes in various levels in the airways as well as in the systemic circulation. (ki.se)
  • After establishment of a secure airway and postnatal recovery, laryngeal or tracheal reconstruction is generally planned as an elective procedure at a later age. (medscape.com)
  • Type 1: foreign body situated between the oral cavity and oropharynx, while the epiglottis sits in normal position, Type 2: foreign body situated in the oropharynx just above the epiglottis pushing it posteriorly and obstructing the airway, and Type 3: foreign body obstructing the laryngeal inlet while pushing the epiglottis anteriorly. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Visual laryngeal examination, endoscopy, video fluoroscopy, and necropsy were used for achieving the cause of the upper airway obstruction. (avmi.net)
  • An accurate history and physical examination including anterior and posterior rhinoscopy is important in the diagnosis of nasal airway obstruction. (scirp.org)
  • This case highlights the importance of nasal endoscopy in the diagnosis of nasal airway obstruction. (scirp.org)
  • Many studies have investigated the usefulness of FEV(1)/forced expired volume in 6 s (FEV(6)) measurements as an alternative for FEV(1)/FVC for diagnosis of airway obstruction. (nih.gov)
  • We conducted a meta-analysis to determine the FEV(1)/FEV(6) substitute for FEV(1)/FVC in the diagnosis of airway obstruction. (nih.gov)
  • After a systematic review of all-language studies, sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of FEV(1)/FEV(6) in the diagnosis of airway obstruction were pooled using random-effects models. (nih.gov)
  • FEV(1)/FEV(6) is a sensitive and specific test for the diagnosis of airway obstruction. (nih.gov)
  • FEV(1)/FEV(6) can be used as a valid alternative for FEV(1)/FVC in the diagnosis of airway obstruction. (nih.gov)
  • A study was undertaken to determine if diagnosis of airway obstruction was associated with subsequent success in smoking cessation, as advised by a physician. (bmj.com)
  • Impulse oscillometry has been advocated as a supplemental pulmonary function test to aid in the diagnosis of airway obstruction . (bvsalud.org)
  • The use of IOS has been primarily used in pediatrics and elderly populations as a validated tool to establish a diagnosis of airway obstruction but is limited in the adult population because of a well-validated set of reference values . (bvsalud.org)
  • When one is faced with airway emergencies, critical action within a limited time frame is of paramount importance. (medscape.com)
  • Another pertinent consideration in dealing with airway emergencies is the ability to preoxygenate effectively in a timely fashion. (medscape.com)
  • Airway remodeling and destruction is a characteristic finding in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema. (uw.edu)
  • The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether biomarkers of lung injury and remodeling are responsive to effective continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in adults with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). (nih.gov)
  • This study aims to evaluate the utility of impulse oscillometry (IOS) in diagnosing airway obstruction in patients undergoing multiple pulmonary function testing (PFT) studies. (bvsalud.org)
  • Material and methods: We performed a retrospective review of all patients who underwent PCB airway dilation. (elsevierpure.com)
  • METHODS: Over the years 2000-2006, 153 patients underwent revision operation for nasal obstruction in our rhinoplastic center. (marinosvafiadis.gr)
  • METHODS: C57Bl/6J (wild type) and TCR-delta-/- mice exposed to Cl2 (400 ppm) for 5 minutes underwent measurements of airway responses to i.v. methacholine (MCh) at 1, 3, and 5 days after exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • The different causes of nasal airway obstruction are very wide-ranging, spanning from congenital life threatening causes to acquired benign causes. (scirp.org)
  • In the rare and desperate situation of a CICV patient a surgical airway should be established 1 5 7. (paramedicine.com)
  • A difficult airway is one for which a preintubation examination identifies attributes that are likely to make laryngoscopy, intubation, bag-mask ventilation (BMV), the use of a supraglottic device, or surgical airway management more difficult than would be the case for a normal airway. (medscape.com)
  • [ 2 ] have created difficult airway algorithms to help guide clinicians with airway management. (medscape.com)
  • A key point in managing the unanticipated difficult airway is the importance of maximizing the safe apnea oxygenation time by providing optimal preoxygenation. (medscape.com)
  • Partial upper airway obstruction or UARS is most prevalent in women, and treatable with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure or CPAP. (perfectsleepsolutions.ca)
  • This study aims to learn about the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on people with autonomic failure and high blood pressure when lying down (supine hypertension) to determine if it can be used to treat their high blood pressure during the night. (nih.gov)
  • Although asthma and airway hyperreactivity have been the most common diagnoses , the clinical findings in these patients may be multifactorial. (bvsalud.org)
  • Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the upper airway obstruction. (nortonchildrens.com)
  • The initial evaluation of UAO is focused on determining the severity and suspected site of the obstruction. (mhmedical.com)
  • CONCLUSION: The severity of airway epithelial injury after Cl2 is greater in TCR-delta-/- mice but the inflammatory response and the change in airway responsiveness to methacholine are reduced. (cdc.gov)
  • The acute obstruction of the upper airways is a serious complication requiring the professional's immediate attention to reverse the picture. (bvsalud.org)
  • often have abnormal upper airways that are more easily obstructed. (msdmanuals.com)
  • 1177 (26.2%) subjects had airway obstruction and were told that they had COPD and that smoking cessation would halt rapid progression of their lung disease. (bmj.com)
  • Functional upper airway obstruction may occur in patients who exhibit abnormal glottic closure during inspiration and/or expiration. (mhmedical.com)
  • Four proteins associated with only FVC and none with FEV 1 /FVC ratio, suggesting associations mainly through lung volume, not airway obstruction. (lu.se)
  • The conventional FEV(1)/FVC test is the "gold standard" to quantitate airway obstruction, but elderly subjects or patients with severe respiratory diseases quite frequently cannot make such an effort. (nih.gov)
  • In the challenging airway patient consideration should be given to attempting intubation with the patient in the 'ramped' position (achieving horizontal alignment between the middle of the ear and the sternal notch), especially in obese patients 10 11. (paramedicine.com)
  • There is an urgent need to recognize partial obstruction as a treatable form of sleep disordered breathing as these patients are symptomatic. (perfectsleepsolutions.ca)
  • In these five patients, the CV was clearly the most sensitive parameter of airway obstruction . (onlineasthmainhalers.com)
  • Early laryngoscopic examination of the upper airway is crucial in the evaluation of burn patients with suspected inhalation injury. (mhmedical.com)
  • If this is inadequate, begin bag and mask ventilation with 100% oxygen, and again re-evaluate for patency of the airway. (virtualpediatrichospital.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Acute exposure to chlorine (Cl2) gas causes epithelial injury and airway dysfunction. (cdc.gov)
  • The most common cause of snoring is nasal passage obstruction caused from nasal septum deviation, allergies, sinus infections, swollen turbinates (nasal concha) and enlarged tonsils. (canberrasleepclinic.com.au)
  • Children with moderate to severe upper airway obstruction are at high risk of deterioration and complete obstruction if they are upset, sedated or repositioned. (rch.org.au)
  • It has been restricted to situations of extreme obstruction above the vocal cords, such as anaphylactic reactions or severe facial trauma. (bvsalud.org)
  • All the limitations of CV determination (nitrogen bolus technique) are not yet known, but it certainly appears CV is a technique best suited for detection of minimal and early airway obstruction rather than severe or established airway obstruction. (onlineasthmainhalers.com)
  • This study is a retrospective analysis of 14 cases with food bolus upper airway obstruction as the defined cause of death where both postmortem computed tomography and autopsy were performed. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Iino, M & O'Donnell, C 2010, ' Postmortem computed tomography findings of upper airway obstruction by food ', Journal of Forensic Sciences , vol. 55, no. 5, pp. 1251-1258. (elsevierpure.com)
  • The mnemonic DOPE can be used to remember common causes for being unable to ventilate subsequent to intubation: Displacement (of the ETT), Obstruction (both in the ETI and in the lower airway, such as asthma), Pneumothorax, and Equipment failure (consider failure from the source of oxygen, to the tip of the ETT and then back again) 9. (paramedicine.com)
  • 4494 current smokers (57.4% men) with a history of at least 10 pack-years of smoking were recruited from 100 000 subjects screened by spirometric testing for signs of airway obstruction. (bmj.com)
  • The study will, in particular, gain knowledge on predisposing factors for developing of airway obstruction in smokers. (ki.se)
  • A clinical study done in the US and Europe has shown that VIVAER® significantly improves nasal obstruction symptoms, previously seen only in invasive surgical treatment. (dallasent.com)
  • A decreased FEV1/FVC ratio (versus the normal of about 80%) is indicative of airway obstruction, as the normal amount of air can no longer be exhaled in the first second of expiration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The validated smoking cessation rate in those with airway obstruction was 16.3% compared with 12.0% in those with normal spirometric parameters (p = 0.0003). (bmj.com)
  • Simple smoking cessation advice combined with spirometric testing resulted in good 1 year cessation rates, especially in subjects with airway obstruction. (bmj.com)
  • Since the spirometric testing used in NHANES III did not include reversibility testing, it was not possible to distinguish reversible from irreversible obstruction. (ersjournals.com)
  • A comparison among R5 (resistance at 5 Hz), R20 (resistance at 20 Hz), and X5 (reactance at 5 Hz) was performed in those individuals with and without spirometric obstruction. (bvsalud.org)
  • Eight PCB dilations were performed for CAO related to distal airway stent stenosis. (elsevierpure.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Technical success rates were high overall, with the highest success rates associated with stent placement and endobronchial obstruction. (psu.edu)
  • The role of gamma delta T cells in airway epithelial injury and bronchial responsiveness after chlorine gas exposure in mice. (cdc.gov)
  • A proximal bronchial obstruction was found at 11 women who were consumer of the "neffa" and cigarettes. (who.int)
  • Spirometry in this dataset did not include reversibility testing, making it impossible to distinguish reversible from irreversible obstruction. (ersjournals.com)
  • Correlation of Impulse Oscillometry with Spirometry in Deployed Military Personnel with Airway Obstruction. (bvsalud.org)
  • Only 32 (8.9%) had evidence of obstruction by both spirometry and IOS, whereas 210 (57.3%) had neither. (bvsalud.org)
  • If a child acutely obstructs his airway and respiratory arrest occurs, attempt to position the child to open the airway using the chin-lift or jaw thrust maneuvers. (virtualpediatrichospital.org)
  • The duration of an exposure response gradient between incident obstructive airways disease and work at the World Trade Center site: 2001-2011. (cdc.gov)
  • 6 demonstrated that the measured prevalence of disease depends upon the criterion used to define obstruction. (ersjournals.com)
  • The goal of this study is to identify the perceptions, beliefs, and family-relevant outcomes regarding the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) with positive airway pressure (PAP) in children with Down's Syndrome (DS). (nih.gov)
  • There is a correlation between clinical manifestation of RAO and exposure of airways to endotoxins. (slu.se)
  • Mild sedation (e.g. benzodiazepines) may be used to permit basic airway management as the clinical situation permits 2. (paramedicine.com)
  • Partial upper airway obstruction is underrepresented because there is no consensus of its etection, qualification, or clinical impact. (perfectsleepsolutions.ca)
  • In clinical practice a Level 1 study is helpful to detect partial upper airway obstruction. (perfectsleepsolutions.ca)
  • Nearly 70% attended a follow up visit (n = 3077): 61% were men, mean (SD) age was 52 (10) years, mean (SD) tobacco exposure 30 (17) pack-years, and 33.3% had airway obstruction during the baseline examination. (bmj.com)
  • Using several widely used definitions of airway obstruction, the impact of these definitions on overall prevalence estimates for the USA was compared using the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). (ersjournals.com)
  • That's The First Symptom of Nasal Airway Obstruction. (dallasent.com)
  • Mean (SEM) metabolite concentrations (ng/l) in plasma obtained both before (1033 (418)) and after (1470 (413)) initial treatment for airway obstruction were significantly higher than those obtained from the same subjects after resolution of the obstruction--25.5 (6.6)--and those obtained from two comparison groups. (bmj.com)
  • Initial treatment of airway obstruction may include: basic airway manoeuvres, positioning, suctioning, oro- or naso-pharyngeal airways, and/or LMA. (paramedicine.com)
  • VIVAER® gives you a treatment for nasal airway obstruction that offers significant benefits without disadvantages. (dallasent.com)
  • This study is investigating if the Self-Supporting Nasopharyngeal Airway (ssNPA) device can be used in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea in children with Hypotonic Upper Airway Obstruction (HUAO). (nih.gov)
  • CPAP (a widely used treatment for sleep apnea) involves using a machine that blows air into a tube connected to a mask covering the nose, or nose and mouth, to apply a low air pressure in the airways. (nih.gov)

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