Air Conditioning: The maintenance of certain aspects of the environment within a defined space to facilitate the function of that space; aspects controlled include air temperature and motion, radiant heat level, moisture, and concentration of pollutants such as dust, microorganisms, and gases. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Heat Exhaustion: A clinical syndrome caused by heat stress, such as over-exertion in a hot environment or excessive exposure to sun. It is characterized by SWEATING, water (volume) depletion, salt depletion, cool clammy skin, NAUSEA, and HEADACHE.Ventilation: Supplying a building or house, their rooms and corridors, with fresh air. The controlling of the environment thus may be in public or domestic sites and in medical or non-medical locales. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Heating: The application of heat to raise the temperature of the environment, ambient or local, or the systems for accomplishing this effect. It is distinguished from HEAT, the physical property and principle of physics.Air Pollution, Indoor: The contamination of indoor air.Automobiles: A usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger transportation and commonly propelled by an internal-combustion engine using a volatile fuel. (Webster, 1973)Conditioning, Classical: Learning that takes place when a conditioned stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus.Conditioning (Psychology): A general term referring to the learning of some particular response.Air: The mixture of gases present in the earth's atmosphere consisting of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases.Conditioning, Eyelid: Reflex closure of the eyelid occurring as a result of classical conditioning.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Thermometers: Measuring instruments for determining the temperature of matter. Most thermometers used in the field of medicine are designed for measuring body temperature or for use in the clinical laboratory. (From UMDNS, 1999)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)HistoryInventors: Persons or entities that introduce a novel composition, device, or process, as well as improvements thereof.Famous PersonsBook ImprintsClimate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Resource Guides: Works listing and describing various sources of information, from multiple media or in different formats, on a given subject.Burial: The act or ceremony of putting a corpse into the ground or a vault, or into the sea; or the inurnment of CREMAINS.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Seat Belts: Restraining belts fastened to the frame of automobiles, aircraft, or other vehicles, and strapped around the person occupying the seat in the car or plane, intended to prevent the person from being thrown forward or out of the vehicle in case of sudden deceleration.Refrigeration: The mechanical process of cooling.Ozone: The unstable triatomic form of oxygen, O3. It is a powerful oxidant that is produced for various chemical and industrial uses. Its production is also catalyzed in the ATMOSPHERE by ULTRAVIOLET RAY irradiation of oxygen or other ozone precursors such as VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS and NITROGEN OXIDES. About 90% of the ozone in the atmosphere exists in the stratosphere (STRATOSPHERIC OZONE).Methyl Chloride: A hydrocarbon used as an industrial solvent. It has been used as an aerosal propellent, as a refrigerant and as a local anesthetic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed, p1403)Chlorofluorocarbons: A series of hydrocarbons containing both chlorine and fluorine. These have been used as refrigerants, blowing agents, cleaning fluids, solvents, and as fire extinguishing agents. They have been shown to cause stratospheric ozone depletion and have been banned for many uses.Hydrocarbons, BrominatedNew YorkRegression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Ultraviolet Rays: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.Cosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)JapanGift Giving: The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.Parabens: Methyl, propyl, butyl, and ethyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid. They have been approved by the FDA as antimicrobial agents for foods and pharmaceuticals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed, p872)Beauty: Characteristics or attributes of persons or things which elicit pleasurable feelings.Preservatives, Pharmaceutical: Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.Hygroscopic Agents: Materials that readily absorb moisture from their surroundings.Diatomaceous Earth: A form of SILICON DIOXIDE composed of skeletons of prehistoric aquatic plants which is used for its ABSORPTION quality, taking up 1.5-4 times its weight in water. The microscopic sharp edges are useful for insect control but can also be an inhalation hazard. It has been used in baked goods and animal feed. Kieselguhr is German for flint + earthy sediment.Silica Gel: A non-crystalline form of silicon oxide that has absorptive properties. It is commonly used as a desiccating agent and as a stationary phase for CHROMATOGRAPHY. The fully hydrated form of silica gel has distinct properties and is referred to as SILICIC ACID.Bedbugs: Bugs of the family CIMICIDAE, genus Cimex. They are flattened, oval, reddish insects which inhabit houses, wallpaper, furniture, and beds. C. lectularius, of temperate regions, is the common bedbug that attacks humans and is frequently a serious pest in houses, hotels, barracks, and other living quarters. Experiments have shown that bedbugs can transmit a variety of diseases, but they are not normal vectors under natural conditions. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p272)Bathing Beaches: Beaches, both natural and man-made, used for bathing and other activities.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Baths: The immersion or washing of the body or any of its parts in water or other medium for cleansing or medical treatment. It includes bathing for personal hygiene as well as for medical purposes with the addition of therapeutic agents, such as alkalines, antiseptics, oil, etc.Skiing: A snow sport which uses skis to glide over the snow. It does not include water-skiing.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Solar Energy: Energy transmitted from the sun in the form of electromagnetic radiation.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Sunlight: Irradiation directly from the sun.Sick Building Syndrome: A group of symptoms that are two- to three-fold more common in those who work in large, energy-efficient buildings, associated with an increased frequency of headaches, lethargy, and dry skin. Clinical manifestations include hypersensitivity pneumonitis (ALVEOLITIS, EXTRINSIC ALLERGIC); allergic rhinitis (RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, PERENNIAL); ASTHMA; infections, skin eruptions, and mucous membrane irritation syndromes. Current usage tends to be less restrictive with regard to the type of building and delineation of complaints. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)

A community outbreak of Legionnaires' disease linked to hospital cooling towers: an epidemiological method to calculate dose of exposure. (1/184)

BACKGROUND: From July to September 1994, 29 cases of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease (LD) were reported in Delaware. The authors conducted an investigation to a) identify the source of the outbreak and risk factors for developing Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp-1) pneumonia and b) evaluate the risk associated with the components of cumulative exposure to the source (i.e. distance from the source, frequency of exposure, and duration of exposure). METHODS: A case-control study matched 21 patients to three controls per case by known risk factors for acquiring LD. Controls were selected from patients who attended the same clinic as the respective case-patients. Water samples taken at the hospital, from eight nearby cooling towers, and from four of the patient's homes were cultured for Legionella. Isolates were subtyped using monoclonal antibody (Mab) analysis and arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). RESULTS: Eleven (52%) of 21 case-patients worked at or visited the hospital compared with 17 (27%) of 63 controls (OR 5.0, 95% CI : 1.1-29). For those who lived, worked, or visited within 4 square miles of the hospital, the risk of illness decreased by 20% for each 0.10 mile from the hospital; it increased by 80% for each visit to the hospital; and it increased by 8% for each hour spent within 0.125 miles of the hospital. Lp-1 was isolated from three patients and both hospital cooling towers. Based on laboratory results no other samples contained Lp-1. The clinical and main-tower isolates all demonstrated Mab pattern 1,2,5,6. AP-PCR matched the main-tower samples with those from two case-patients. CONCLUSION: The results of our investigation suggested that the hospital cooling towers were the source of a community outbreak of LD. Increasing proximity to and frequency of exposure to the towers increased the risk of LD. New guidelines for cooling tower maintenance are needed. Knowing the location of cooling towers could facilitate maintenance inspections and outbreak investigations.  (+info)

Buildings operations and ETS exposure. (2/184)

Mechanical systems are used in buildings to provide conditioned air, dissipate thermal loads, dilute contaminants, and maintain pressure differences. The characteristics of these systems and their operations h implications for the exposures of workers to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and for the control of these exposures. This review describes the general features of building ventilation systems and the efficacy of ventilation for controlling contaminant concentrations. Ventilation can reduce the concentration of ETS through dilution, but central heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) can also move air throughout a building that has been contaminated by ETS. An understanding of HVAC systems is needed to develop models for exposures of workers to ETS.  (+info)

Germicidal ultraviolet irradiation in air conditioning systems: effect on office worker health and wellbeing: a pilot study. (3/184)

OBJECTIVES: The indoor environment of modern office buildings represents a new ecosystem that has been created totally by humans. Bacteria and fungi may contaminate this indoor environment, including the ventilation systems themselves, which in turn may result in adverse health effects. The objectives of this study were to test whether installation and operation of germicidal ultraviolet (GUV) lights in central ventilation systems would be feasible, without adverse effects, undetected by building occupants, and effective in eliminating microbial contamination. METHODS: GUV lights were installed in the ventilation systems serving three floors of an office building, and were turned on and off during a total of four alternating 3 week blocks. Workers reported their environmental satisfaction, symptoms, as well as sickness absence, without knowledge of whether GUV lights were on or off. The indoor environment was measured in detail including airborne and surface bacteria and fungi. RESULTS: Airborne bacteria and fungi were not significantly different whether GUV lights were on or off, but were virtually eliminated from the surfaces of the ventilation system after 3 weeks of operation of GUV light. Of the other environmental variables measured, only total airborne particulates were significantly different under the two experimental conditions--higher with GUV lights on than off. Of 113 eligible workers, 104 (87%) participated; their environmental satisfaction ratings were not different whether GUV lights were on or off. Headache, difficulty concentrating, and eye irritation occurred less often with GUV lights on whereas skin rash or irritation was more common. Overall, the average number of work related symptoms reported was 1.1 with GUV lights off compared with 0.9 with GUV lights on. CONCLUSION: Installation and operation of GUV lights in central heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems of office buildings is feasible, cannot be detected by workers, and does not seem to result in any adverse effects.  (+info)

Follow up investigation of workers in synthetic fibre plants with humidifier disease and work related asthma. (4/184)

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical and sociomedical outcome in patients with various clinical manifestations of humidifier disease and work related asthma after removal from further exposure. METHODS: Follow up investigation (range 1-13 years) of respiratory symptoms, spirometry, airway responsiveness, sickness absence, and working situation in patients with (I) humidifier fever (n = 12), (II) obstructive type of humidifier lung (n = 8), (III) restrictive type of humidifier lung (n = 4), and (IV) work related asthma (n = 22). All patients were working at departments in synthetic fibre plants with microbiological exposure from contaminated humidification systems or exposure to small particles (< 1 micron) of oil mist. RESULTS: At follow up patients with work related asthma were less often symptom free (37%, 7/19) than patients with humidifier disease (I, II, III) (67%, 16/24). Mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of patients with obstructive impairment had been increased significantly at follow up but still remained below the predicted value. Mean forced vital capacity (FVC) of patients with initially restrictive impairment had returned to normal values at follow up. Airway hyperresponsiveness at diagnosis persisted in patients with obstructive impairment (II + IV 14/17, but disappeared in patients with humidifier fever (3/3) and restrictive type of humidifier lung (2/2). In patients with obstructive impairment (II + IV), FVC and FEV1 at diagnosis were negatively associated with the duration between onset of symptoms and diagnosis and the number of years of exposure. Those with positive pre-employment history of respiratory disease had a lower FEV1 at diagnosis. Sickness absence due to respiratory symptoms decreased in all groups of patients after removal from further exposure, but this was most impressive in patients with the humidifier lung (II, III) and patients with work related asthma (IV). At follow up 83% of the patients were still at work at the same production site, whereas 11% received a disability pension because of respiratory disease. CONCLUSION: In patients with work related respiratory disease caused by exposure from contaminated humidification systems or oil mist, removal from further exposure resulted in clinical improvement, although, especially in those with obstructive impairment, signs persisted. Because of the possibility of transferring patients to exposure-free departments most patients could be kept at work.  (+info)

Airborne infection in a fully air-conditioned hospital. I. Air transfer between rooms. (5/184)

Measurements have been made of the extent of air exchange between patient rooms in a fully air-conditioned hospital using a tracer-gas method. When the rooms were ventilated at about six air changes per hour, had an excess airflow through the doorway of about 0.1 m.3/sec. and the temperature difference between rooms and corridor was less than 0.5 degrees C., concentrations of the tracer in rooms close to that in which it was being liberated were 1000-fold less than that in the source room. This ratio fell to about 200-fold in the absence of any excess airflow through the doorways. Considerable dilution took place along the corridors so that the concentration fell by around 10-fold for every 10 m. of corridor.  (+info)

Airborne infection in a fully air-conditioned hospital. II. Transfer of airborne particles between rooms resulting from the movement of air from one room to another. (6/184)

Experiments were conducted simultaneously with gas and particle tracers to determine the relative loss of particles between source and recipient sites in the hospital ward units. The magnitude of this loss could be accounted for by the assumption of sedimentation from well-mixed air masses during the time required for movement between source and recipients sites. As a consequence of this loss the degree of isolation between patient rooms for airborne particles was between 4 and 25 times greater than that for gaseous contamination, which reflects the actual transport of air between the rooms. The design and construction of portable spinning-disk particle generators suitable for field studies is discussed.  (+info)

Airborne infection in a fully air-conditioned hospital. II. Transport of gaseous and airborne particulate material along ventilated passageways. (7/184)

A mathematical model is described for the transport of gaseous or airborne particulate material between rooms along ventilated passageways. Experimental observations in three hospitals lead to a value of about 0.06 m.2/sec. for the effective diffusion constant in air without any systematic directional flow. The 'constant' appears to increase if there is any directional flow along the passage, reaching about 0.12 m. 2/sec. at a flow velocity of 0.04 m./sec. Together with previously published methods the present formulae make it possible to calculate the expected average amounts of gaseous or particulate material that will be transported from room to room in ventilated buildings in which the ventilation and exchange airflows can be calculated. The actual amounts transported in occupied buildings, however, vary greatly from time to time.  (+info)

Airborne infection in a fully air-conditioned hospital. IV. Airborne dispersal of Staphylococcus aureus and its nasal acquisition by patients. (8/184)

Studies in a newly built hospital furnished with complete air conditioning where most of the patients are nursed in 6-bed rooms showed that the transfer of air from one patient room to another was very small, especially when there was substantial flow of air in a consistent direction between the patient rooms and the corridor, and that the direct transfer of airborne particles was even less. There was, however, no evidence of any reduction in the rates of nasal acquisition of Staphylococcus aureus compared with those to be found in naturally ventilated hospitals. The numbers of Staph. aureus found in the air of a given room that appeared to have originated from patient carriers in other rooms were many times greater than could be accounted for by direct airborne transfer. Although there was evidence that many carriers were not detected, detailed study showed that this excess transfer to the air of other rooms was genuine. It seems probable on the basis of investigations in this hospital and elsewhere that this excess transfer occurs indirectly, through dispersal from the clothing of the nursing and medical staff into the air of another room of strains with which their outer clothes have become contaminated while dealing with patients. Reduction in direct airborne transfer of micro-organisms from one room to another, whether by ventilation or other means, can only be of clinical advantage if transfer by other routes is, or can be made, less than that by the direct airborne route.  (+info)

  • Modern air conditioning emerged from advances in chemistry during the 19th century, and the first large-scale electrical air conditioning was invented and used in 1902 by US inventor Willis Carrier . (wikipedia.org)
  • We install R1.0 thermal rated ducting as standard , rather than R0.6, to maximise air flow into your home, not your roof. (airandwater.com.au)
  • however, true air conditioning treats all aspects of indoor atmospheric comfort. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Comfort air conditioning, which accounts for most applications, is used to modify and maintain the indoor environment for habitation. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Process air conditioning is the modification of the indoor environment to enhance an industrial or a scientific process. (encyclopedia.com)
  • That means the hotter it is outside, the more indoor air recirculates, which means, "You're breathing a higher percentage of the same air that other people are exhaling," Nardell says. (webmd.com)
  • We're pushing because we need very clear, consistent messaging to the world," said Shelly Miller, PhD, a professor of mechanical engineering who studies indoor air quality at the University of Colorado at Boulder. (webmd.com)
  • This market leading Air Sterilisation technology works towards the inhibition of bacteria, viruses, allergens, pollens and mould within your indoor environment, whilst deodorising, keeping your home or office fresh and clean. (panasonic.com)
  • This reduction in humidity often results in a perceived improvement in indoor air quality. (georgiapower.com)
  • With this in mind, the testing and certification body will start running a new training course for persons seeking to become certified "Indoor Air Quality Managers" in 2012. (dguv.de)
  • Its goal is to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality . (wikipedia.org)
  • Ventilation often refers to the intentional delivery of the outside air to the building indoor environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is one of the most important factors for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The three major functions of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning are interrelated, especially with the need to provide thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality within reasonable installation, operation, and maintenance costs. (wikipedia.org)
  • A wide variety of indoor unit designs and outdoor unit capacities ensures the flexibility to meet the most challenging of air conditioning needs. (mitsubishielectric.com)
  • Installation flexibility and a wide selection of indoor unit designs and outdoor unit capacities ensure 'best match' solutions for air conditioning needs, even for the most diversified requirements. (mitsubishielectric.com)
  • Be sure you are not without cool indoor air this spring and summer! (sooperarticles.com)
  • As prices continue to rise and pressure to act on climate change becomes paramount, it is a good time for policy makers to ask if the trend towards air-conditioning indoor spaces is necessary, desirable or even possible. (theconversation.com)
  • To counteract the development of internal corrosion due to condensation or water ingress, internal air handler parts and ductwork can be coated. (belzona.com)
  • FILE PHOTO: FILE PHOTO: An Air France Airbus A321 lands at Charles de Gaulle airport near Paris, France, May 9, 2018. (reuters.com)
  • The research group has already developed an experimental model that can complete several key steps of the process, Dittmeyer says, adding, "The plan in two or three years is to have the first experimental showcase where I can show you a bottle of hydrocarbon fuel from carbon dioxide captured in an air-conditioning unit. (scientificamerican.com)
  • He says the carbon capture equipment could come from a Swiss "direct air capture" company called Climeworks, and the electrolyzers to convert carbon dioxide and water into hydrogen are available from Siemens, Hydrogenics or other companies. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Keith is already targeting some of these markets through Carbon Engineering, a company he founded focused on direct air capture of carbon dioxide for large-scale liquid fuel production. (scientificamerican.com)
  • He believes it is simply "faster and cheaper" to take carbon dioxide from the air and turn it into fuel "by doing it an appropriate scale. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The air-conditioning of America's homes, businesses schools, and vehicles causes the release of greenhouse gases equivalent to 400 million tons of carbon dioxide annually. (patheos.com)
  • Aloe vera and succulents are a good place to start, as well as any other greenery that doesn't require frequent watering, as these plants drink in their water from the humid air around them. (lifehacker.com)
  • Residential air-conditioning units in service in 2005 were an impressive 28 percent more energy-efficient on average than they were in 1993. (commondreams.org)
  • Company in the air conditioning field of business for both residential and corporate businesses. (botw.org)
  • Phoenix, AZ air conditioning and plumbing service company that is counted on by thousands of loyal residential and commercial customers. (botw.org)
  • U.S. air conditioning equipment and heat pump sales gains accelerated in 2014 as the recovery in nonresidential demand began to catch up with the recovery in residential sales that began in 2011. (marketresearch.com)
  • This regeneration energy reduction is accomplished through the use of two separate desiccant devices and an indirect evaporative cooler having both a wet and dry side for air flow-through. (google.es)
  • The first desiccant device regeneration air is first passed through the wet side of the indirect evaporative cooler wherein it is humidified and heated. (google.es)
  • The U.S. Department of Energy recommends setting the central air thermostat to 78 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer months to conserve energy and reduce energy costs. (reference.com)
  • Our people and our family of brands-including Club Car ®, Ingersoll Rand ®, Schlage®, Thermo King ® and Trane® -work together to enhance the quality and comfort of air in homes and buildings, transport and protect food and perishables, secure homes and commercial properties, and increase industrial productivity and efficiency. (thermoking.com)
  • In many buildings the same air is circulated over and over and so are the pollutants present in the very same air. (health24.com)
  • During January 26-February 10, 2020, an outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease in an air-conditioned restaurant in Guangzhou, China, involved 3 family clusters. (cdc.gov)
  • From January 26 through February 10, 2020, an outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVD-19) affected 10 persons from 3 families (families A-C) who had eaten at the same air-conditioned restaurant in Guangzhou, China. (cdc.gov)
  • Sketch showing arrangement of restaurant tables and air conditioning airflow at site of outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus disease, Guangzhou, China, 2020. (cdc.gov)
  • If someone in the building is shedding the new coronavirus , it can build up in the recirculated air. (webmd.com)
  • July 8, 2020 -- As COVID-19 cases rise rapidly throughout the South, some scientists believe there could be an important, but overlooked factor in the spread of the virus in the region--air conditioning. (webmd.com)
  • Not only this they also bring a wide range of services like air conditionings installations, repairs, maintenance solutions etc. (smore.com)
  • Provides heating, air conditioning, co monitors, furnace repairs and energy star solutions in New York. (botw.org)
  • That gives the smallest viral particles-aerosols--extra lift to say suspended in the air for longer. (webmd.com)
  • This happens when people breathe in small particles (aerosols) in the air after someone with the virus has occupied an enclosed area. (hse.gov.uk)
  • Walter Chrysler had seen to the invention of Airtemp air conditioning in the 1930s for the Chrysler Building, and had offered it on cars in 1941-42, and again in 1951-52. (wikipedia.org)
  • sleeping cabin through the use of the air conditioning unit disclosed in the invention is also provided. (google.com)
  • Warm air from the vents when you're asking for cold means it is time to have your dealer's service department diagnose the trouble. (imakenews.com)
  • If you clear any blocked vents or spaces in your attic, you may notice (and enjoy) better air circulation. (popsci.com)
  • Set a block of ice in a pan by the floor vents to cool the air. (wikihow.com)
  • The 2nd-century Chinese mechanical engineer and inventor Ding Huan of the Han Dynasty invented a rotary fan for air conditioning, with seven wheels 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and manually powered by prisoners. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mechanical ventilation brings fresh air into a building and can include air conditioning and/or heating. (hse.gov.uk)
  • The BOCA International Mechanical Code is hereby adopted as the mechanical code of Dorchester County, Maryland, and each and all of the regulations, provisions, conditions, penalties and terms thereof are hereby referred to, adopted, incorporated herein by reference and made a part of this chapter as if fully set out in this chapter, with additions, insertions and deletions and changes more fully set forth in this chapter. (ecode360.com)
  • This comprehensive program of technical and general education will give the graduate knowledge and hands-on experience in both the electrical and mechanical aspects of heating, ventilation and air conditioning. (northlandcollege.edu)
  • Selection of air diffusers is of particular importance to ensure adequate distribution at lower airflow volumes. (georgiapower.com)
  • 10. An air delivery device according to claim 5 , wherein the at least one fastening mechanism, the air delivery device, or both are arranged at a distance from the vehicle back support at a center of an upper back region or between a hollow back suspension on the solid structural frame or between two head rest casings. (google.com)
  • The basic concept behind air conditioning is said to have been applied in ancient Egypt , where reeds were hung in windows and were moistened with trickling water. (wikipedia.org)
  • The evaporation of water cooled the air blowing through the window. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 747, Emperor Xuanzong (r. 712-762) of the Tang Dynasty (618-907) had the Cool Hall ( Liang Dian 涼殿 ) built in the imperial palace, which the Tang Yulin describes as having water-powered fan wheels for air conditioning as well as rising jet streams of water from fountains. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 17th century, the Dutch inventor Cornelis Drebbel demonstrated "Turning Summer into Winter" as an early form of modern air conditioning for James I of England by adding salt to water. (wikipedia.org)
  • A presentation delivered by the Development Bank of Latin America on March 6, 2017 at the Sea Water Air Conditioning in the Caribbean Workshop at the Caribbean Development Bank. (slideshare.net)
  • and any greenery that doesn't require frequent watering-get their water from the air around them. (popsci.com)
  • measuring how effective your air conditioning is at the supply air diffusers will not be an accurate gauge of it's function. (answers.com)