Agricultural Inoculants: Beneficial microorganisms (bacteria or fungi) encapsulated in carrier material and applied to the environment for remediation and enhancement of agricultural productivity.Soybeans: An annual legume. The SEEDS of this plant are edible and used to produce a variety of SOY FOODS.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Plant Root Nodulation: The formation of a nitrogen-fixing cell mass on PLANT ROOTS following symbiotic infection by nitrogen-fixing bacteria such as RHIZOBIUM or FRANKIA.Nitrogen Fixation: The process in certain BACTERIA; FUNGI; and CYANOBACTERIA converting free atmospheric NITROGEN to biologically usable forms of nitrogen, such as AMMONIA; NITRATES; and amino compounds.Vicia: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is widely used as ground cover and forage and known for the edible beans, VICIA FABA.Rhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that activate PLANT ROOT NODULATION in leguminous plants. Members of this genus are nitrogen-fixing and common soil inhabitants.Bradyrhizobium: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria usually containing granules of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. They characteristically invade the root hairs of leguminous plants and act as intracellular symbionts.Electronics: The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Industry: Any enterprise centered on the processing, assembly, production, or marketing of a line of products, services, commodities, or merchandise, in a particular field often named after its principal product. Examples include the automobile, fishing, music, publishing, insurance, and textile industries.Manufactured Materials: Substances and materials manufactured for use in various technologies and industries and for domestic use.Coronavirus: A genus of the family CORONAVIRIDAE which causes respiratory or gastrointestinal disease in a variety of vertebrates.Rubber: A high-molecular-weight polymeric elastomer derived from the milk juice (LATEX) of HEVEA brasiliensis and other trees and plants. It is a substance that can be stretched at room temperature to at least twice its original length and after releasing the stress, retract rapidly, and recover its original dimensions fully.Semiconductors: Materials that have a limited and usually variable electrical conductivity. They are particularly useful for the production of solid-state electronic devices.Occupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.IndianaUnited Nations: An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems.Vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus: The type species of VESICULOVIRUS causing a disease symptomatically similar to FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE in cattle, horses, and pigs. It may be transmitted to other species including humans, where it causes influenza-like symptoms.Vesiculovirus: A genus of the family RHABDOVIRIDAE that infects a wide range of vertebrates and invertebrates. The type species is VESICULAR STOMATITIS INDIANA VIRUS.ArchivesKansasIllinoisFood Service, Hospital: Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Cooking and Eating UtensilsCooking: The art or practice of preparing food. It includes the preparation of special foods for diets in various diseases.Waste Products: Debris resulting from a process that is of no further use to the system producing it. The concept includes materials discharged from or stored in a system in inert form as a by-product of vital activities. (From Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981)Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Yucca: A genus (and common name) in the AGAVACEAE family. It is known for SAPONINS in the root that are used in SOAPS.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Carbadox: An antibacterial agent that has been used in veterinary practice for treating swine dysentery and enteritis and for promoting growth. However, its use has been prohibited in the UK following reports of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p125)Murinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the Old World MICE and RATS.Pest Control, Biological: Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.Beauveria: A mitosporic fungal genus. Teleomorphs are found in the family Clavicipitaceae and include Cordyceps bassiana. The species Beauveria bassiana is a common pathogen of ARTHROPODS and is used in PEST CONTROL.Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis in which various denaturant gradients are used to induce nucleic acids to melt at various stages resulting in separation of molecules based on small sequence differences including SNPs. The denaturants used include heat, formamide, and urea.Rhizosphere: The immediate physical zone surrounding plant roots that include the plant roots. It is an area of intense and complex biological activity involving plants, microorganisms, other soil organisms, and the soil.Ipomoea batatas: A plant species of the genus IPOMOEA, family CONVOLVULACEAE. Some cultivars are sweet and edible whereas bitter varieties are a source of SAPONINS. This sweet potato is sometimes referred to as a yam (DIOSCOREA).Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Fertilizers: Substances or mixtures that are added to the soil to supply nutrients or to make available nutrients already present in the soil, in order to increase plant growth and productivity.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Crops, Agricultural: Cultivated plants or agricultural produce such as grain, vegetables, or fruit. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 1982)Hepatitis, Infectious Canine: A contagious disease caused by canine adenovirus (ADENOVIRUSES, CANINE) infecting the LIVER, the EYE, the KIDNEY, and other organs in dogs, other canids, and bears. Symptoms include FEVER; EDEMA; VOMITING; and DIARRHEA.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.BooksPesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Plant Pathology: The study of infectious diseases associated with plants.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Plants, Genetically Modified: PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.Forestry: The science of developing, caring for, or cultivating forests.

Root hairs play a key role in the endophytic colonization of olive roots by Pseudomonas spp. with biocontrol activity. (1/8)

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Induced terpene accumulation in Norway spruce inhibits bark beetle colonization in a dose-dependent manner. (2/8)

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Growth response of maize plantlets inoculated with Enterobacter spp., as a model for alternative agriculture. (3/8)

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Bioprospection of marine microorganisms: biotechnological applications and methods. (4/8)

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Genomic basis of broad host range and environmental adaptability of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 which are used in inoculants for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). (5/8)

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An invasive Mimosa in India does not adopt the symbionts of its native relatives. (6/8)

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Microbial inoculants and their impact on soil microbial communities: a review. (7/8)

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Impact of Azospirillum sp. B510 inoculation on rice-associated bacterial communities in a paddy field. (8/8)

Rice seedlings were inoculated with Azospirillum sp. B510 and transplanted into a paddy field. Growth in terms of tiller numbers and shoot length was significantly increased by inoculation. Principal-coordinates analysis of rice bacterial communities using the 16S rRNA gene showed no overall change from B510 inoculation. However, the abundance of Veillonellaceae and Aurantimonas significantly increased in the base and shoots, respectively, of B510-inoculated plants. The abundance of Azospirillum did not differ between B510-inoculated and uninoculated plants (0.02-0.50%). These results indicate that the application of Azospirillum sp. B510 not only enhanced rice growth, but also affected minor rice-associated bacteria.  (+info)

  • The aim of this trial was to study the effect of a silage inoculant on the nutrient content, the silage quality, the aerobic stability, and the nutritive value of whole plant ensiled corn, as well as on the feed intake and growth performance of fattening young cattle. (hindawi.com)
  • A trial was carried out with whole plant corn harvested at the milk/dough stage of maturity (32.3% DM, see Table 1 ) and used for ensiling, treated (BSM), or not (CT), with a silage inoculant. (hindawi.com)
  • Among the lactic acid bacteria Streptococcus bovis stands out, it is a lactic acid bacteria isolated from the rumen, with features that allow it to be used as a silage inoculant. (scirp.org)
  • Integrated Packaging's Agricultural Division is a leader in the development, manufacture and supply of integrated crop packaging, baling and silage inoculant solutions with an extensive and proven range of products under the SilaFARM product family brand name banner. (ferret.com.au)
  • Dallas, TX -- ( SBWIRE ) -- 01/19/2015 -- The report, "Agricultural Inoculants Market by Type (PGPMs, Bio-Control Agents, & Plant Resistance Stimulants), Source (Bacterial & Fungal), Mode of Application, Crop Type, & Geography - Global Trends & Forecasts to 2019", defines and segments of the agricultural inoculants market with analyses and projection of the size and trends in terms of value. (sbwire.com)
  • Successful silage production depends on the promotion of fermentation by beneficial bacteria [ 3 ], and therefore bacterial inoculants have been very popular, especially over the last 10 years. (hindawi.com)
  • A field experiment was carried out during the rabi season of 2004-05 to find out the effect of Rhizobium and phosphate solubilizing bacterial (PSB) inoculants on symbiotic traits, nodule leghemoglobin, and yield of five elite genotypes of chickpea. (oalib.com)
  • ] Many countries use bacterial inoculants containing ''A.brasilense'' alone or in concert with other plant growth promoting bacteria. (kenyon.edu)
  • Given this reality, Coelho notes that with advances in the agro-industrial sector, by-products arose from the processing of cereals, fruits and food products, as well as bacterial inoculants that have been suggested as an alternative to improve the fermentation pattern, nutritional value, degradability of silages and, therefore, improvements in animal performance. (scirp.org)
  • Major bacteria types that act as silage inoculants are Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus buchneri, Pediococcus pentosaceus and Enterococcus faecium. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • Seven strains of Leguminosae nodulating bacteria (LNB) were compared with one another and with a non-nodulating positive control, Burkholderia cepacia (LMG 1222 T ). Four of the strains are used as inoculants for cowpeas ( Vigna unguiculata ) ( Bradyrhizobium sp. (scielo.br)
  • It was the general practice, prior to the Bond patent, to manufacture and sell inoculants containing only one species of root nodule bacteria. (justia.com)
  • Its main feature concerns the specific growth rate of this species, 30% higher than the growth rate of the species of lactic acid bacteria used as inoculants for silage, which suggests that it may act as the starter culture of the fermentation process (starter), promoting rapid decrease in pH of the silage (Jones et al. (scirp.org)
  • Organic supplementation with organic sources such as manure, compost or vermiculite, along with agricultural inoculants such as Rhizobacteria and Azotobacter could further enhance crop yield and development. (sbwire.com)
  • 2005). The rhizobacteria commonly applied as inoculants include nitrogen-fixers and phosphate-solubilisers which enhance the availability of the macronutrients nitrogen and phosphorus to the host plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strains of the soil bacterium Azotobacter chroococcum (AC), plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria used as agricultural inoculants, require high Fe concentrations for aerobic respiration and nitrogen fixation. (rsc.org)
  • The effects of inoculant carrier, temperature, and storage period on the survival of Rhizobium strains were determined by plate count and most-probable-number analyses. (asm.org)
  • It was concluded that taken together, the symbiotic performance and grain yield data showed cultivar and inoculant specific effects and suggest that selection of rhizobial strains must be appropriate for the cultivars and newly released varieties. (scialert.net)
  • In culture, the inoculant could transfer Tn5 to Escherichia coli and E agglomerans, in addition to a range of Rhizobium species (in contrast to E agglomerans which transferred its plasmid only to closely related strains). (europa.eu)
  • Superior inoculant strains are necessary for these commercial seedlings. (up.ac.za)
  • The emphasis is on various species and strains of the spore-forming bacilli because spores of these PGPR remain viable as seed treatments for a long period of time, thereby increasing the opportunities of integrating the PGPR into current agricultural practices. (auburn.edu)
  • Novozymes A/S (Denmark), BASF SE (Germany), DuPont (U.S.), and Advanced Biological Marketing, Inc. (U.S.) collectively account for around 70% of the total agricultural inoculants market share. (sbwire.com)
  • Many agricultural and other land-use practices cause physical, biological, and chemical degradation of soil that weakens its ability to support plant life and to provide ecosystem services. (nap.edu)
  • The BASF Agricultural Specialities Limited production site in Littlehampton, acquired from Becker Underwood at the end of 2012, produces industry leading biological pest control products formulated from beneficial nematodes. (basf.com)
  • Clays are widely used as agricultural chemical carriers, but often, little thought is given to their use as biological carriers. (astm.org)
  • The incorporation of biological and ecological processes into agricultural and food production practices. (wikipedia.org)
  • The agricultural inoculants market is projected to grow at a CAGR of 9.5% between 2014 and 2019. (sbwire.com)
  • The agricultural biologicals market projected to reach a value of USD 11.35 Billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 12.76% from 2016 to 2022. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • There is a wide range of available inoculants and soil amendments that can be applied to change soil properties and to improve plant growth. (osu.edu)
  • Agricultural inoculants are the formulations of beneficial living organisms that when added to the soil, directly or indirectly improve their nutrient availability to the host plant and promote plant growth and development. (sbwire.com)
  • The inoculant could therefore be used successfully only in plants of the particular cross-inoculation group corresponding to this species. (justia.com)
  • Manufacturer and supplier of biopesticides and traditional chemistry pesticides that fill specialty niches in the agricultural and horticultural markets. (botw.org)
  • The agricultural inoculants market is highly fragmented with key market players driving the growth with agreements, expansions, acquisitions and new product launches. (sbwire.com)
  • Lack of awareness among the farmers and prevailing problems with manufacturers, marketing, and distribution issues are restricting the availability of inoculants at farm level and thus hindering the growth of the agricultural inoculants market. (sbwire.com)
  • The analytical tools such as investment return analysies, SWOT analysis and feasibility studyare used to analyze the key global market player's'growth in the Agricultural Inoculant industry. (ndmcolumns.com)
  • Ironically, B. cepacia is now being considered by agricultural microbiologists as an agent to promote crop growth. (cdc.gov)