Agnosia: Loss of the ability to comprehend the meaning or recognize the importance of various forms of stimulation that cannot be attributed to impairment of a primary sensory modality. Tactile agnosia is characterized by an inability to perceive the shape and nature of an object by touch alone, despite unimpaired sensation to light touch, position, and other primary sensory modalities.Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Apraxia, Ideomotor: A form of apraxia characterized by an acquired inability to carry out a complex motor activity despite the ability to mentally formulate the action. This condition has been attributed to a disruption of connections between the dominant parietal cortex and supplementary and premotor cortical regions in both hemispheres. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p57)Gait Apraxia: Impaired ambulation not attributed to sensory impairment or motor weakness. FRONTAL LOBE disorders; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES (e.g., PARKINSONIAN DISORDERS); DEMENTIA, MULTI-INFARCT; ALZHEIMER DISEASE; and other conditions may be associated with gait apraxia.Gerstmann Syndrome: A disorder of cognition characterized by the tetrad of finger agnosia, dysgraphia, DYSCALCULIA, and right-left disorientation. The syndrome may be developmental or acquired. Acquired Gerstmann syndrome is associated with lesions in the dominant (usually left) PARIETAL LOBE which involve the angular gyrus or subjacent white matter. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p457)Kinesics: Systematic study of the body and the use of its static and dynamic position as a means of communication.Aphasia: A cognitive disorder marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or express language in its written or spoken form. This condition is caused by diseases which affect the language areas of the dominant hemisphere. Clinical features are used to classify the various subtypes of this condition. General categories include receptive, expressive, and mixed forms of aphasia.Kluver-Bucy Syndrome: A neurobehavioral syndrome associated with bilateral medial temporal lobe dysfunction. Clinical manifestations include oral exploratory behavior; tactile exploratory behavior; hypersexuality; BULIMIA; MEMORY DISORDERS; placidity; and an inability to recognize objects or faces. This disorder may result from a variety of conditions, including CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; infections; ALZHEIMER DISEASE; PICK DISEASE OF THE BRAIN; and CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS.Occipital Lobe: Posterior portion of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES responsible for processing visual sensory information. It is located posterior to the parieto-occipital sulcus and extends to the preoccipital notch.Speech Disorders: Acquired or developmental conditions marked by an impaired ability to comprehend or generate spoken forms of language.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Agraphia: Loss or impairment of the ability to write (letters, syllables, words, or phrases) due to an injury to a specific cerebral area or occasionally due to emotional factors. This condition rarely occurs in isolation, and often accompanies APHASIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p485; APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Prosopagnosia: The inability to recognize a familiar face or to learn to recognize new faces. This visual agnosia is most often associated with lesions involving the junctional regions between the temporal and occipital lobes. The majority of cases are associated with bilateral lesions, however unilateral damage to the right occipito-temporal cortex has also been associated with this condition. (From Cortex 1995 Jun;31(2):317-29)Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Dominance, Cerebral: Dominance of one cerebral hemisphere over the other in cerebral functions.Gestures: Movement of a part of the body for the purpose of communication.Toes: Any one of five terminal digits of the vertebrate FOOT.Thalamic Diseases: Disorders of the centrally located thalamus, which integrates a wide range of cortical and subcortical information. Manifestations include sensory loss, MOVEMENT DISORDERS; ATAXIA, pain syndromes, visual disorders, a variety of neuropsychological conditions, and COMA. Relatively common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; BRAIN NEOPLASMS; BRAIN HYPOXIA; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; and infectious processes.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Ataxia: Impairment of the ability to perform smoothly coordinated voluntary movements. This condition may affect the limbs, trunk, eyes, pharynx, larynx, and other structures. Ataxia may result from impaired sensory or motor function. Sensory ataxia may result from posterior column injury or PERIPHERAL NERVE DISEASES. Motor ataxia may be associated with CEREBELLAR DISEASES; CEREBRAL CORTEX diseases; THALAMIC DISEASES; BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; injury to the RED NUCLEUS; and other conditions.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Hypoalbuminemia: A condition in which albumin level in blood (SERUM ALBUMIN) is below the normal range. Hypoalbuminemia may be due to decreased hepatic albumin synthesis, increased albumin catabolism, altered albumin distribution, or albumin loss through the urine (ALBUMINURIA).Basal Ganglia Diseases: Diseases of the BASAL GANGLIA including the PUTAMEN; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; claustrum; AMYGDALA; and CAUDATE NUCLEUS. DYSKINESIAS (most notably involuntary movements and alterations of the rate of movement) represent the primary clinical manifestations of these disorders. Common etiologies include CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS; NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES; and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Articulation Disorders: Disorders of the quality of speech characterized by the substitution, omission, distortion, and addition of phonemes.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)BooksCognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Vision, Low: Vision considered to be inferior to normal vision as represented by accepted standards of acuity, field of vision, or motility. Low vision generally refers to visual disorders that are caused by diseases that cannot be corrected by refraction (e.g., MACULAR DEGENERATION; RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA; DIABETIC RETINOPATHY, etc.).Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Dementia: An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.EncyclopediasDictionaries, MedicalDementia, Vascular: An imprecise term referring to dementia associated with CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS, including CEREBRAL INFARCTION (single or multiple), and conditions associated with chronic BRAIN ISCHEMIA. Diffuse, cortical, and subcortical subtypes have been described. (From Gerontol Geriatr 1998 Feb;31(1):36-44)Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Molecular Sequence Annotation: The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.Cellular Phone: Analog or digital communications device in which the user has a wireless connection from a telephone to a nearby transmitter. It is termed cellular because the service area is divided into multiple "cells." As the user moves from one cell area to another, the call is transferred to the local transmitter.Mobile Applications: Computer programs or software installed on mobile electronic devices which support a wide range of functions and uses which include television, telephone, video, music, word processing, and Internet service.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Computers, Handheld: A type of MICROCOMPUTER, sometimes called a personal digital assistant, that is very small and portable and fitting in a hand. They are convenient to use in clinical and other field situations for quick data management. They usually require docking with MICROCOMPUTERS for updates.Neuroblastoma: A common neoplasm of early childhood arising from neural crest cells in the sympathetic nervous system, and characterized by diverse clinical behavior, ranging from spontaneous remission to rapid metastatic progression and death. This tumor is the most common intraabdominal malignancy of childhood, but it may also arise from thorax, neck, or rarely occur in the central nervous system. Histologic features include uniform round cells with hyperchromatic nuclei arranged in nests and separated by fibrovascular septa. Neuroblastomas may be associated with the opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2099-2101; Curr Opin Oncol 1998 Jan;10(1):43-51)Repetition Priming: A type of procedural memory manifested as a change in the ability to identify an item as a result of a previous encounter with the item or stimuli.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Secondary Prevention: The prevention of recurrences or exacerbations of a disease or complications of its therapy.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Serum Amyloid A Protein: An ACUTE PHASE REACTION protein present in low concentrations in normal sera, but found at higher concentrations in sera of older persons and in patients with AMYLOIDOSIS. It is the circulating precusor of amyloid A protein, which is found deposited in AA type AMYLOID FIBRILS.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Hostility: Tendency to feel anger toward and to seek to inflict harm upon a person or group.
p. 141). Barraquer Bordas, L. (1974). Afasias, Apraxias, Agnosias. Barcelona: Toray. ISBN 84-310-0866-0. p. 141. Siguan, M. ( ...
ISBN 978-0-930405-26-7. Walton, J. N.; Ellis, E.; Court, S. D. M. (1962). "Clumsy children: developmental apraxia and agnosia ... Gerstmann, Josef (1940). "Syndrome of finger agnosia, disorientation for right and left, agraphia and acalculia: local ...
... agnosia, and apraxia. The study of individuals with agraphia may provide more information about the pathways involved in ... In global apraxia, spelling knowledge is lost to such a degree that the individual can only write very few meaningful words, or ... Apraxic agraphia without ideomotor apraxia may be caused by damage to either of the parietal lobes, the dominant frontal lobe, ... Apraxic agraphia with ideomotor apraxia is typically caused by damage to the superior parietal lobe (where graphomotor plans ...
Nielsen J.:Agnosia, Apraxia, Aphasia: Their Value in Cerebral Localization, 2nd ed. New York, Hoeber,1946. Chokroverty Seds. ... Wilbrand's contribution revolves around the complete inability to produce dreams with the presence of agnosias as possible side ... Charcot-Wilbrand syndrome (CWS) describes dream loss following focal brain damage specifically characterized by visual agnosia ... and topographic agnosia. However due to significant differences in the observations of Charcot and Wilbrand's case work, this ...
These terms were later used in psychological descriptions of agnosia and apraxia. Also, he was the first to describe the ...
Apraxia - inability to perform complex movements in the presence of normal motor, sensory and cerebellar function. Agnosia ( ... The concept of apraxia was shaped by Hugo Liepmann about a hundred years ago. Apraxia is predominantly a symptom of left brain ... Non dominant hemisphere Spatial disorientation Constructional apraxia Dressing apraxia Anosognosia - a condition in which a ... Apraxia is a disorder of motor control which can be referred neither to "elemental" motor deficits nor to general cognitive ...
Neuroscience portal Apraxia Hemispatial neglect Synesthesia Hemiplegia Hysteria Agnosia Brain damage Halligan, P. W., Marshall ...
Many studies have shown that disconnection syndromes such as aphasia, agnosia, apraxia, pure alexia and many others are not ... agnosia, apraxia, pure alexia, etc. The concept of disconnection syndrome emerged in the late nineteenth century when ... Movement - Apraxia and agraphia may occur where responding to any verbal instructions by movement or writing in the left hand ... Lissauer, a pupil of Wernicke, described a case of visual agnosia as a disconnection between the visual and language areas. ...
In addition to memory loss and cognitive impairment, other symptoms include aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, loss of abstract thought ...
Of all the agnosias, visual agnosia is the most common subject of investigation because it is easiest to assess and has the ... Other related disorders include: Apraxia: an inability to perform skilled movements despite understanding of the movements and ... Pick's studies introduced autotopagnosia and other category specific agnosias, such as visual and tactile agnosia. Josef ... Finger agnosia: An inability to name the fingers, move a specific finger upon being asked, and/or recognize which finger has ...
Additional symptoms include apraxia, a disorder of movement planning, alexia, an impaired ability to read, and visual agnosia, ... such as navigation and apraxia. As neurodegeneration spreads, more severe symptoms emerge, including the inability to recognize ...
... constructional apraxia, disorientation of space, agnosia of the left portion of space, anaesthoagnosia, and Balint optic ataxia ... Parietal apraxia: A patient is unable to understand or execute actions. Constructional apraxia: A patient has trouble drawing. ... He further argues that lesions in the dominant lobe cause both amorphosynthesis and agnosia - the agnosia just obscures the ... Agnosia of left portion of space: A patient is unable to perceive sensation on the left of her body. A patient is unable to see ...
... apraxias MeSH F01.700.080.500 --- gait apraxia MeSH F01.700.165 --- catatonia MeSH F01.700.250 --- confusion MeSH F01.700. ... agnosia MeSH F01.700.750.100.300 --- gerstmann syndrome MeSH F01.700.750.100.650 --- prosopagnosia MeSH F01.700.750.200 --- ... apraxias MeSH F01.700.875.350.200 --- apraxia, ideomotor MeSH F01.700.875.700 --- psychomotor agitation MeSH F01.752.049 --- ...
... construction apraxia, dressing apraxia, contralateral sensory neglect, contralateral hemianopia, or lower quadrantanopia. ... finger agnosia, dysgraphia and dyslexia, dyscalculia, contralateral hemianopia, or lower quadrantanopia. Destruction to the ...
... apraxias MeSH C10.597.606.881.350.200 --- apraxia, ideomotor MeSH C10.597.606.881.350.600 --- gait apraxia MeSH C10.597.606.881 ... agnosia MeSH C10.597.606.762.100.300 --- gerstmann syndrome MeSH C10.597.606.762.100.650 --- prosopagnosia MeSH C10.597.606.762 ... gait apraxia MeSH C10.597.404.450 --- gait ataxia MeSH C10.597.606.115 --- catatonia MeSH C10.597.606.150 --- communication ...
... apraxia), and recognition (agnosia), and functions such as decision-making and planning become impaired. Parkinson's disease ( ...
Agraphia Agnosia Alexia Amnesia Anosognosia Aphasia Apraxia Dementia Dyslexia Hemispatial Neglect Neurobiological effects of ...
Syndromes and diseases commonly studied by behavioral neurology include but are not limited to: Agraphia Agnosias ... Agraphesthesia Alexia (acquired dyslexia) Amnesias Anosognosia Aphasias Apraxias Aprosodias Attention deficit/hyperactivity ...
Aphasia Apraxia Agnosia A deficit in executive functions In addition, the DSM-IV indicates that normal activities and function ...
Agnosia (R48.2) Apraxia (R48.8) Other and unspecified Symbolic dysfunctions Acalculia Agraphia (R49) Voice disturbances (R49.0 ...
His work covers a wide range of neuropsychological disorders including agnosia, apraxia, action disorganisation syndrome, ...
... apraxia or agnosia). It is suggested that these cognitive involvements are related and closely linked to psychiatric ...
Apraxia (impaired ability to carry out motor activities despite intact motor function) c) Agnosia (failure to recognize or ...
Oral sensory awareness techniques Oral sensory awareness techniques can be used with patients who have a swallow apraxia, ... tactile agnosia for food, delayed onset of the oral swallow, reduced oral sensation, or delayed onset of the pharyngeal swallow ...
Apraxia (patterns or sequences of movements) Agnosia (identifying things or people) Amnesia (memory) Spinal cord disorders (see ...
Developmental verbal dyspraxia/‎Apraxia of speech. *Auditory verbal agnosia. *Dysarthria. *Schizophasia. *Aprosodia/Dysprosody ...
Aphasia, Apraxia and Agnosia. Clinical and Theoretical Aspects. Jason W. Brown. Thomas, Springfield, Ill., 1972. x, 310 pp., ...
As apraxia, neglect, and agnosia have important clinical implications, it is important to possess a working knowledge of the ... Article 5: Apraxia, Neglect, and Agnosia. H. Branch Coslett, MD, FAAN. Continuum (Minneap Minn). June 2018; 24 (3 Behavioral ... Ideomotor apraxia is conceptualized as a loss of knowledge regarding skilled action. Ideational apraxia is often considered to ... Apraxia of speech involves impaired coordination and planning of the motor articulators. Clinical characteristics of apraxia of ...
p. 141). Barraquer Bordas, L. (1974). Afasias, Apraxias, Agnosias. Barcelona: Toray. ISBN 84-310-0866-0. p. 141. Siguan, M. ( ...
The Syndrome Apraxia - Aphasia - Agnosia. Apraxia. is the term used to describe the inability to carry out voluntary and ... Agnosia. is the term used to describe the loss of the ability to recognise what objects are and what they are used for. For ... example, a person with agnosia might attempt to use a fork instead of a spoon, a shoe instead of a cup or a knife instead of a ...
ISBN 978-0-930405-26-7. Walton, J. N.; Ellis, E.; Court, S. D. M. (1962). "Clumsy children: developmental apraxia and agnosia ... Gerstmann, Josef (1940). "Syndrome of finger agnosia, disorientation for right and left, agraphia and acalculia: local ...
Chapter 4 Apraxia Chapter 5 Body Scheme Disorders Chapter 6 Visual Discrimination Skills Chapter 7 Agnosia Chapter 8 ...
Aphasia, apraxia, and agnosia in the diagnosis of dementia.. Dementia (Basel, Switzerland) ... Buccofacial apraxia without aphasia due to a right parietal lesion.. Annals of neurology ...
Constructional Apraxia. *Orientation. *Finger Agnosia. *Form Discrimination. *Depth Perception. *Figure Ground Perception ...
Presence of aphasia, apraxia, or agnosia. Recommended Maps. Create your own maps. with MindMeister ...
Agnosia. Agnosia refers to loss of the ability to recognize objects even though the persons sight and sense of touch are ... Apraxia. Apraxia refers to loss of the ability to perform intentional movements even though the person is not paralyzed, has ... People with severe agnosia may fail to recognize family members or even their own face reflected in a mirror. ... Other symptoms of dementia are agnosia, which is the technical term for not being able to recognize familiar objects, facial ...
Apraxia. Agnosia 61 Subcortical neural lesions presentation? (3) Dense unilat motor or sensory. Face/Arm/Leg equally affected. ...
Key features of dementia include: memory loss; aphasia (inability to speak); apraxia (disorder of motor planning and clumsiness ... agnosia (inability to recognise shapes, objects and individuals); and executive dysfunction, which affects planning, sequencing ...
List of 31 causes for Babinskis reflex and Facial apraxia and Ocular deviation, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, ... AND Agnosia (1 match). *AND Agnosia in children (1 match). *AND Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis (1 match) ... Facial apraxia:*Causes: Facial apraxia *Introduction: Facial apraxia *Facial apraxia: Add a 4th symptom *Facial apraxia: Remove ... Babinskis reflex AND Facial apraxia AND Ocular deviation - Causes of All Symptoms *Babinskis reflex OR Facial apraxia OR ...
Absence of cortical dysfunction (aphasia, apraxia, agnosia). *No ipsilateral cervical carotid stenosis (,= 50%) if S3 is ...
... such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognised visual field defects, are reviewed, along ... such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognised visual field defects, are reviewed, along ... Apraxia, agnosias, and higher visual function abnormalities. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry (2005) 76(Suppl 5):v25-34. doi: ... Visual Agnosia. Visual agnosia is a visuoperceptual disorder. It is defined as the inability to recognize objects presented ...
our 28 mo little girl was just diagnosed with verbal auditory agnosia. i know very little about this disorder other than it ... We usually use the term oral-buccal apraxia. When speech difficulties occur after a stroke, it is usually called aphasia. There ... our 28 mo little girl was just diagnosed with verbal auditory agnosia. i know very little about this disorder other than it ...
... agnosia, or apraxia; ongoing or past treatment of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cardiac disease, malignancy ...
Upper limb apraxia, a disorder of higher motor cognition, is a common consequence of left-hemispheric stroke. Contrary to ... Rothi LJG, Mack L, Heilman KM (1986) Pantomime agnosia. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 49:451-454PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar ... Note that we purposely refrain from using terms like ideo-motor apraxia or ideational apraxia, as the different apraxia ... neither of the two apraxia test batteries based on cognitive models of apraxia (see part "Apraxia tests primarily applicable ...
agnosia: A loss of the ability to recognize objects, persons, sounds, shapes or smells without injury to the primary sensory ... apraxia: The loss of the ability to perform tasks that require remembering patterns or sequences of movements (like waving ... associative agnosia: A failure to assign meaning to an object, animal or building that is clearly perceived. For example, a ...
Apraxia (patterns or sequences of movements). *Agnosia (identifying things or people). *Amnesia (memory) ...
7] Cortical signs, including apraxia, aphasia, and agnosia, typically are absent.. The terminal stage of ADC, after progression ... over several months, includes severe psychomotor retardation and dementia, apraxia, paraparesis, and akinetic mutism. Death ...
Additionally, deterioration in memory, learning and orientation preceded the acquisition of aphasia, agnosia and apraxia.The ... These included tests of learning, memory, orientation, agnosia, apraxia and aphasia. The individual growth trajectory ... apraxia and agnosia, was evident in 28.3% of those aged over 30 and a higher prevalence of these impairments was associated ...
... agnosia), and or purposeful movement (apraxia). The fundamental neurology of these disturbances had been described in Brown s ...
Agnosia inability to recognize an object as tested by STEREOGNOSIS test (eyes closed, object in palm) "O in agnOsia, Object, ... Apraxia inability to perform previously learned task (no idea how to brush teeth or tie shoes; prompting them to do so does not ...
Encephalopathy with transitory amaurosis, visual agnosia and oculomotor apraxia following high-dose intravenous penicillin ...
  • An important gene associated with Gait Apraxia is GRN (Granulin Precursor), and among its related pathways/superpathways are Neuroscience and A-beta Signaling Pathways . (malacards.org)
  • Heilman defined apraxia in negative terms, characterizing it as "a disorder of skilled movement not caused by weakness, akinesia, deafferentation, abnormal tone or posture, movement disorders such as tremors or chorea, intellectual deterioration, poor comprehension, or uncooperativeness. (medscape.com)
  • A dysfunction of this region would result in a disorder of recognition of the orientation of objects and images that the investigators call orientation agnosia. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The objectives of this study are (1) detect the existence of orientation agnosia in case of right parietal lesion, and (2) to improve the understanding of such a deficit allowing better management of this disorder. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Apraxia has a neurologic cause that localizes fairly well to the left inferior parietal lobule, the frontal lobes (especially the premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, and convexity), or the corpus callosum. (medscape.com)
  • Persistence of apraxia of speech after 12 months is associated with larger volume of the left-hemispheric stroke involving the Broca area. (medscape.com)
  • Although currently only a few randomized controlled studies investigate the efficacy of different apraxia treatments, the gesture training suggested by Smania and colleagues can be recommended for the therapy of apraxia, the effects of which were shown to extend to activities of daily living and to persist for at least 2 months after completion of the training. (springer.com)