Spasmodic swallowing of air.

Functional gastroduodenal disorders. (1/11)

While widely used in research, the 1991 Rome criteria for the gastroduodenal disorders, especially symptom subgroups in dyspepsia, remain contentious. After a comprehensive literature search, a consensus-based approach was applied, supplemented by input from international experts who reviewed the report. Three functional gastroduodenal disorders are defined. Functional dyspepsia is persistent or recurrent pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen; evidence of organic disease likely to explain the symptoms is absent, including at upper endoscopy. Discomfort refers to a subjective, negative feeling that may be characterized by or associated with a number of non-painful symptoms including upper abdominal fullness, early satiety, bloating, or nausea. A dyspepsia subgroup classification is proposed for research purposes, based on the predominant (most bothersome) symptom: (a) ulcer-like dyspepsia when pain (from mild to severe) is the predominant symptom, and (b) dysmotility-like dyspepsia when discomfort (not pain) is the predominant symptom. This classification is supported by recent evidence suggesting that predominant symptoms, but not symptom clusters, identify subgroups with distinct underlying pathophysiological disturbances and responses to treatment. Aerophagia is an unusual complaint characterized by air swallowing that is objectively observed and troublesome repetitive belching. Functional vomiting refers to frequent episodes of recurrent vomiting that is not self-induced nor medication induced, and occurs in the absence of eating disorders, major psychiatric diseases, abnormalities in the gut or central nervous system, or metabolic diseases that can explain the symptom. The current classification requires careful validation but the criteria should be of value in future research.  (+info)

Aerophagia, gastric, and supragastric belching: a study using intraluminal electrical impedance monitoring. (2/11)

BACKGROUND: Patients with aerophagia are believed to have excessive belches due to air swallowing. Intraluminal impedance monitoring has made it possible to investigate the validity of this concept. METHODS: The authors measured oesophageal pH and electrical impedance before and after a meal in 14 patients with excessive belching and 14 healthy controls and identified patterns of air transport through the oesophagus. The size of the gastric air bubble was measured radiographically. In four patients prolonged oesophageal manometry was performed simultaneously. RESULTS: In all subjects, impedance tracings showed that a significant amount of air is propulsed in front of about a third of the swallow induced peristaltic waves. Two types of retrograde gas flow through the oesophagus (belch) were observed. In the first type air flowed from the stomach through the oesophagus in oral direction ("gastric belch"). In the second type air entered the oesophagus rapidly from proximal and was expulsed almost immediately in oral direction ("supragastric belch"). The incidence of air-containing swallows and gastric belches was similar in patients and controls but supragastric belches occurred exclusively in patients. There was no evidence of lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation during supragastric belches. Gastric air bubble size was not different between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with excessive belching the incidence of gaseous reflux from stomach to oesophagus is similar to that in healthy subjects. Their excess belching activity follows a distinct pattern, characterised by rapid antegrade and retrograde flow of air in the oesophagus that does not reach the stomach.  (+info)

Aerophagia in adults: a comparison with functional dyspepsia. (3/11)

BACKGROUND: Aerophagia is a functional upper gastrointestinal disorder that has not previously been well described in a large patient group. AIMS: To describe the initial evaluation of patients who presented with symptoms of aerophagia at a tertiary medical centre. METHODS: A computerized search was used to identify all patients who were diagnosed with aerophagia at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester between 1996 and 2003 (n = 79). Individual medical charts were abstracted for information on the demographics, clinical features, co-morbid diagnoses, diagnostic workup and treatment. Information on presenting symptoms was also collected for a group of patients who were classified as having functional dyspepsia for comparison (n = 121). RESULTS: The median duration of symptoms in patients with aerophagia was 24 months. The most common symptoms were belching (56%), abdominal pain (19%), bloating (27%) and abdominal distension (19%). Patients with functional dyspepsia had a higher prevalence of reporting nausea, vomiting, early satiety, weight loss and abdominal pain (all P < 0.01, adjusting for age, gender and body mass index). Significantly more patients with aerophagia had anxiety (19%) than those with functional dyspepsia (6%, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with aerophagia experience prolonged upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Initial presenting symptoms appear to be distinctly different from those who have functional dyspepsia.  (+info)

Air swallowing caused recurrent ileus in Tourette's syndrome. (4/11)

This report describes an adolescent boy who has Tourette's syndrome and developed a subtle but significant increase in vocal tics after an 8-month respite. The increase in vocal tics was associated with an acute increase in psychological stressors and resulted in recurrent air swallowing, which, in turn, caused abdominal cramping, eructation, and flatus, eventually leading to aeroenteria. Air swallowing was recognized only after a second hospital admission for recurrent ileus. Air swallowing and associated symptoms were mitigated by reinstitution of psychopharmacologic treatment and an increase in the patient's self-awareness of the air-swallowing behavior. Clinically significant air swallowing has not been described previously in Tourette syndrome or a tic disorder. This case is important for pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists because either may be the first to evaluate a child or an adolescent with unexplained recurrent ileus. This report also documents the importance of the connection between the brain and the body.  (+info)

Air swallowing, belching, acid and non-acid reflux in patients with functional dyspepsia. (5/11)

BACKGROUND: Frequent belching is a common symptom in patients with functional dyspepsia with a reported incidence up to 80%. We hypothesized that patients with functional dyspepsia possibly have a higher frequency of belching than healthy subjects secondary to frequent air swallowing. AIM: To assess air swallowing, belching, acid and non-acid reflux patterns of patients with functional dyspepsia. METHODS: Combined 24-h oesophageal impedance and pH monitoring was performed in 10 functional dyspepsia patients and 10 controls. Analysis of the impedance-pH signals included incidence of air swallows, belching, acid and non-acid reflux. RESULTS: The incidence of air swallows in functional dyspepsia patients were significantly higher compared with controls (153 +/- 15 vs. 79 +/- 10, P < 0.001), while the incidence of liquid-only swallows were not significantly increased. The proportions of gas-containing reflux episodes (belches) and non-acid reflux episodes in functional dyspepsia patients were significantly higher when compared with controls (66.4 vs. 44.4%, P = 0.04 and 70.1 vs. 45.9%, P = 0.009, respectively). CONCLUSION: Patients with functional dyspepsia swallow air more frequently than controls and this is associated with an increased incidence of non-acid gaseous gastro-oesophageal reflux.  (+info)

Clinical review: long-term noninvasive ventilation. (6/11)

Noninvasive positive ventilation has undergone a remarkable evolution over the past decades and is assuming an important role in the management of both acute and chronic respiratory failure. Long-term ventilatory support should be considered a standard of care to treat selected patients following an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. In this setting, appropriate use of noninvasive ventilation can be expected to improve patient outcomes, reduce ICU admission, enhance patient comfort, and increase the efficiency of health care resource utilization. Current literature indicates that noninvasive ventilation improves and stabilizes the clinical course of many patients with chronic ventilatory failure. Noninvasive ventilation also permits long-term mechanical ventilation to be an acceptable option for patients who otherwise would not have been treated if tracheostomy were the only alternative. Nevertheless, these results appear to be better in patients with neuromuscular/-parietal disorders than in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This clinical review will address the use of noninvasive ventilation (not including continuous positive airway pressure) mainly in diseases responsible for chronic hypoventilation (that is, restrictive disorders, including neuromuscular disease and lung disease) and incidentally in others such as obstructive sleep apnea or problems of central drive.  (+info)

Clonazepam treatment of pathologic childhood aerophagia with psychological stresses. (7/11)

The treatment of pathologic aerophagia has rarely been discussed in the literature. In this retrospective study, the authors investigated the effects of clonazepam on the management of pathologic childhood aerophagia (PCA) with psychological stresses (PS), but not with mental retardation. Data from 22 consecutive PCA patients with PS (aged 2 to 10 yr), who had been followed up for over 1 yr, were reviewed. On the basis of videolaryngoscopic views, the authors observed that the pathology of aerophagia was the result of reflex-induced swallowing with paroxysmal openings of the upper esophageal sphincter due to unknown factors and also observed that these reflex-induced openings were subsided after intravenous low dose benzodiazepine administration. Hence, clonazepam was administered to treat paroxysmal openings in these PCA patients with PS. Remission positivity was defined as symptom-free for a consecutive 1 month within 6 months of treatment. The results of treatment in 22 PCA patients with PS were analyzed. A remission positive state was documented in 14.3% of PCA patients managed by reassurance, and in 66.7% of PCA patients treated with clonazepam (p=0.032). Thus, clonazepam may produce positive results in PCA with PS. Future studies by randomized and placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm the favorable effect of clonazepam in PCA.  (+info)

Aerophagia and gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients using continuous positive airway pressure: a preliminary observation. (8/11)

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Aerophagia is a complication of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for sleep disordered breathing (SDB), whereupon air is forced into the stomach and bowel. Associated discomfort can result in CPAP discontinuation. We hypothesize that aerophagia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) via mechanisms involving GERD related lower esophageal sphincter (LES) compromise. METHODS: Twenty-two subjects with aerophagia and 22 controls, matched for age, gender, and body mass index, who were being treated with CPAP for SDB were compared in regard to clinical aspects of GERD, GERD associated habits, SDB severity as measured by polysomnography, and mean CPAP pressure. RESULTS: More subjects with aerophagia had symptoms of GERD (77.3% vs. 36.4%; p < 0.01) and were on GERD related medications (45.5% vs. 18.2%, p < 0.05) than controls. Regarding polysomnography, mean oxygen saturation percentages were lower in the aerophagia group than controls (95.0% vs. 96.5%, p < 0.05). No other differences were observed, including mean CPAP pressures. No one in the aerophagia group (vs. 27.3% of the control group) was a current tobacco user (p < 0.01). There was no difference in caffeine or alcohol use between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results imply aerophagia is associated with GERD symptoms and GERD related medication use. This finding suggests a relationship between GERD related LES pathophysiology and the development of aerophagia in patients with SDB treated with CPAP.  (+info)

Aerophagy is the excessive swallowing of air, which can occur during activities such as eating, drinking, smoking, or chewing gum. This can lead to symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, and excessive burping or passing of gas. In some cases, aerophagy may be a sign of an underlying digestive disorder. It is generally not considered a serious medical condition, but if it becomes chronic or is accompanied by other symptoms, it is recommended to seek medical advice.

... (or aerophagy) is a condition of excessive air swallowing, which goes to the stomach instead of the lungs. ... Krasiuk MM, Kratinov VP (July 1993). "The characteristics of aerophagy and its treatment". Likars'ka Sprava. 7 (7): 114-6. PMID ...
The oxygen and nitrogen component of flatus can be accounted for by aerophagy while the CO2 component results from the reaction ...
... aerophagy MeSH C23.888.821.108 - anorexia MeSH C23.888.821.150 - constipation MeSH C23.888.821.192 - coprophagia MeSH C23.888. ...
... aerophagy; cyclical vomiting, psychogenic) 306.5 Genitourinary (Include: psychogenic dysmenorrhoea) 306.6 Endocrine 306.7 ...
Aerophagy. *Mesenteric vascular insufficiency. *Biliary colic. *Pancreatic or colon malignancy. Therefore, it is not easy to ...
Aerophagia (or aerophagy) is a condition of excessive air swallowing, which goes to the stomach instead of the lungs. ... Krasiuk MM, Kratinov VP (July 1993). "The characteristics of aerophagy and its treatment". Likarska Sprava. 7 (7): 114-6. PMID ...
aerophagy1201830326and appears on 3 listswas added by TechnoMom and appears on 3 lists ...
ஏப்பம் வளி விழுங்கலினால் (aerophagy) உண்டாகிறது. பொதுவாக மனிதர்கள் உண்ணும் போது சிறிதளவு காற்றையும் சேர்த்துத் தான் ...
aerophagia, aerophagy (s) (noun) (no pl) Excessive swallowing of air: Aerophagia is usually an unconscious process associated ...
Due to faulty technique of feeding and aerophagy. • Proper advice regarding feeding and burping, must be imparted to all ...
Aerophagy. *Damage to facial, nasal and oesophageal surgical sites or traumatic injuries, leading to surgical emphysema, ...
Swallowing air (aerophagy). People who rush through their meals swallow about twice as much air as slow eaters - and it ...
aerophagy Excessive swallowing of air, which may occur during rapid eating or drinking or be caused by anxiety. aetiology The ... air swallowing See aerophagy. airway A collective term for the passages through which air enters and leaves the lungs (see ...
Aerophagy is caused by a large amount of air in the stomach that causes swelling and pain in the intestine and rash. It usually ... Pregnant women are more likely to suffer from aerophagy. Irritable bowel syndrome (or functional colopathy) manifests as ...
As an antispasmodic it combats aerophagy and gastric and abdominal pain. It is also recommended for treating conditions of the ...
Spitting up can also be associated with overeating, frequent feeding, aerophagy (swallowing air). Yes, they can be a ...
Their fruit is indicated in cases of constipation and aerophagy because it reduces intestines and therefore facilitates the ...
... aerophagy (306.4) 787.4 Visible peristalsis 787.5 Abnormal bowel sounds 787.6 Incontinence of feces Encopresis NOS Excludes: ... Gastrointestinal Aerophagy Cyclical vomiting, psychogenic Excludes: cyclical vomiting NOS (536.2) globus hystericus (300.11) ...
Based upon ICD-10, conditions that can be categorized as being psychogenic include aerophagy, bruxism, cardiovascular disorder ...
... aerophagy (intestinal gas), tachycardia (increased heart beat), shortness of breath and excessive sighing. ...
... aerophagy (swallowing too much air), burping, diarrhea or constipation). ...
... aerophagy, colic, cystitis, digestive issues, edema, emotional exhaustion, flatulence, flu, gout, headaches, hemorrhoids, ...
aerophagy ವಾರೆಂ ಗಿಳ್ಚೆಂ. aerophobia ಉಬ್ಣೆಚೆಂ ಭಿಯೆಂ. aerophone ವಾರೆಂ ಸಂಗೀತ್ ಆಯ್ದ್. aerophyte ವಾರೆಂಝಡ್. aeroplane ವಿಮಾನ್. ...
Aerophagy [C23.888.821.061] * Anorexia [C23.888.821.108] * Constipation [C23.888.821.150] * Diarrhea [C23.888.821.214] ...
Descritores em Ciências da Saúde
Descritores em Ciências da Saúde
Humans , Key Symptoms/education , Signs and Symptoms , Abdominal Pain/physiopathology , Vomiting/drug therapy , Aerophagy , ...
Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of loperamide plus simethicone versus loperamide alone and simethicone alone in the treatment of acute diarrhea with gas-related abdominal discomfort. Curr Med Res Opin. 2007 May; 23(5):1033-43 ...
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acropetalacrophyteaerologicaerophagyaetiologyagrophyteallegoricalligatorallocatorallopathyallopatryallotropeallotypicaltigraph ...
Aerophagy [C23.888.821.061] * Anorexia [C23.888.821.108] * Constipation [C23.888.821.150] * Diarrhea [C23.888.821.214] ...
  • muscle pain, paresthesia (numbing sensations of the skin), tremor and tetany (muscular spasms caused by mineral deficiency), gastrointestinal dysfunction, aerophagy (intestinal gas), tachycardia (increased heart beat), shortness of breath and excessive sighing. (thereachapproach.co.uk)
  • These crises themselves are usually due to a malfunction of the gallbladder (which often causes pain in the right shoulder, abdominal pain, vomiting), stomach ulcers or gastric reflux (often calmed by taking medications) or intestinal problems (which manifest as gas, abdominal pain, aerophagy (swallowing too much air), burping, diarrhea or constipation). (shredded.com.au)
  • As an antispasmodic it combats aerophagy and gastric and abdominal pain. (anastore.com)
  • Aerophagia (or aerophagy) is a condition of excessive air swallowing, which goes to the stomach instead of the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their fruit is indicated in cases of constipation and aerophagy because it reduces intestines and therefore facilitates the exhaustion of gases. (visitkythera.com)
  • Classify works on aerophagy and flatulence in WI 143 . (nih.gov)
  • Thanks to anethole, one of the essential oils contained in the vegetable, fennel has the ability to counteract the formation of intestinal gas and relieve abdominal contractions and cramps, aerophagy and flatulence. (dmcoffee.blog)
  • Aerophagy can result in the distention of the stomach. (wordinfo.info)
  • Belching with air is characteristic, which develops as a result of aerophagy. (medic-journal.com)
  • There are two main types of aerophagy: gastroparesis and pulmonary oedema. (wetlab.org)