Shewanella putrefaciens: A species of SHEWANELLA noted for its ability to reduce iron and manganese anaerobically.Nitrilotriacetic Acid: A derivative of acetic acid, N(CH2COOH)3. It is a complexing (sequestering) agent that forms stable complexes with Zn2+. (From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed.)Plasma Exchange: Removal of plasma and replacement with various fluids, e.g., fresh frozen plasma, plasma protein fractions (PPF), albumin preparations, dextran solutions, saline. Used in treatment of autoimmune diseases, immune complex diseases, diseases of excess plasma factors, and other conditions.Materia Medica: Materials or substances used in the composition of traditional medical remedies. The use of this term in MeSH was formerly restricted to historical articles or those concerned with traditional medicine, but it can also refer to homeopathic remedies. Nosodes are specific types of homeopathic remedies prepared from causal agents or disease products.Medicine, Traditional: Systems of medicine based on cultural beliefs and practices handed down from generation to generation. The concept includes mystical and magical rituals (SPIRITUAL THERAPIES); PHYTOTHERAPY; and other treatments which may not be explained by modern medicine.Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction: Methods for using more than one primer set in a polymerase chain reaction to amplify more than one segment of the target DNA sequence in a single reaction.Homeopathy: A system of therapeutics founded by Samuel Hahnemann (1755-1843), based on the Law of Similars where "like cures like". Diseases are treated by highly diluted substances that cause, in healthy persons, symptoms like those of the disease to be treated.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Herbal Medicine: The study of medicines derived from botanical sources.Proteomics: The systematic study of the complete complement of proteins (PROTEOME) of organisms.Aromatherapy: The use of fragrances and essences from plants to affect or alter a person's mood or behavior and to facilitate physical, mental, and emotional well-being. The chemicals comprising essential oils in plants has a host of therapeutic properties and has been used historically in Africa, Asia, and India. Its greatest application is in the field of alternative medicine. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; from Dr. Atiba Vheir, Dove Center, Washington, D.C.)Phencyclidine: A hallucinogen formerly used as a veterinary anesthetic, and briefly as a general anesthetic for humans. Phencyclidine is similar to KETAMINE in structure and in many of its effects. Like ketamine, it can produce a dissociative state. It exerts its pharmacological action through inhibition of NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE). As a drug of abuse, it is known as PCP and Angel Dust.Boswellia: A plant genus of the family BURSERACEAE used medicinally since ancient times. It is a source of salai guggal (the gum resin), boswellic acid (ursane type TRITERPENES), and FRANKINCENSE.Book Reviews as Topic: Critical analyses of books or other monographic works.Bible: The book composed of writings generally accepted by Christians as inspired by God and of divine authority. (Webster, 3d ed)Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Book ReviewsAngelica: A plant genus of the family Apiaceae.Chamomile: Common name for several daisy-like plants (MATRICARIA; TRIPLEUROSPERMUM; ANTHEMIS; CHAMAEMELUM) native to Europe and Western Asia, now naturalized in the United States and Australia.Massage: The systematic and methodical manipulations of body tissues best performed with the hands for the purpose of affecting the nervous and muscular systems and the general circulation.Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Hypnosis: A state of increased receptivity to suggestion and direction, initially induced by the influence of another person.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Ginger: Deciduous plant rich in volatile oil (OILS, VOLATILE). It is used as a flavoring agent and has many other uses both internally and topically.Colic: A clinical syndrome with intermittent abdominal pain characterized by sudden onset and cessation that is commonly seen in infants. It is usually associated with obstruction of the INTESTINES; of the CYSTIC DUCT; or of the URINARY TRACT.Renal Colic: A severe intermittent and spasmodic pain in the lower back radiating to the groin, scrotum, and labia which is most commonly caused by a kidney stone (RENAL CALCULUS) passing through the URETER or by other urinary track blockage. It is often associated with nausea, vomiting, fever, restlessness, dull pain, frequent urination, and HEMATURIA.Crying: To utter an inarticulate, characteristic sound in order to communicate or express a feeling, or desire for attention.ArchivesParents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Acoustics: The branch of physics that deals with sound and sound waves. In medicine it is often applied in procedures in speech and hearing studies. With regard to the environment, it refers to the characteristics of a room, auditorium, theatre, building, etc. that determines the audibility or fidelity of sounds in it. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Speech Acoustics: The acoustic aspects of speech in terms of frequency, intensity, and time.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Sound Spectrography: The graphic registration of the frequency and intensity of sounds, such as speech, infant crying, and animal vocalizations.Fecal Impaction: Formation of a firm impassable mass of stool in the RECTUM or distal COLON.Discriminant Analysis: A statistical analytic technique used with discrete dependent variables, concerned with separating sets of observed values and allocating new values. It is sometimes used instead of regression analysis.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)EuropeDrug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.Pasteurization: Treatment of food with physical methods such as heat, high pressure, radiation, or electric current to destroy organisms that cause disease or food spoilage.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.
(1/11) Functional gastroduodenal disorders.

While widely used in research, the 1991 Rome criteria for the gastroduodenal disorders, especially symptom subgroups in dyspepsia, remain contentious. After a comprehensive literature search, a consensus-based approach was applied, supplemented by input from international experts who reviewed the report. Three functional gastroduodenal disorders are defined. Functional dyspepsia is persistent or recurrent pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen; evidence of organic disease likely to explain the symptoms is absent, including at upper endoscopy. Discomfort refers to a subjective, negative feeling that may be characterized by or associated with a number of non-painful symptoms including upper abdominal fullness, early satiety, bloating, or nausea. A dyspepsia subgroup classification is proposed for research purposes, based on the predominant (most bothersome) symptom: (a) ulcer-like dyspepsia when pain (from mild to severe) is the predominant symptom, and (b) dysmotility-like dyspepsia when discomfort (not pain) is the predominant symptom. This classification is supported by recent evidence suggesting that predominant symptoms, but not symptom clusters, identify subgroups with distinct underlying pathophysiological disturbances and responses to treatment. Aerophagia is an unusual complaint characterized by air swallowing that is objectively observed and troublesome repetitive belching. Functional vomiting refers to frequent episodes of recurrent vomiting that is not self-induced nor medication induced, and occurs in the absence of eating disorders, major psychiatric diseases, abnormalities in the gut or central nervous system, or metabolic diseases that can explain the symptom. The current classification requires careful validation but the criteria should be of value in future research.  (+info)

(2/11) Aerophagia, gastric, and supragastric belching: a study using intraluminal electrical impedance monitoring.

BACKGROUND: Patients with aerophagia are believed to have excessive belches due to air swallowing. Intraluminal impedance monitoring has made it possible to investigate the validity of this concept. METHODS: The authors measured oesophageal pH and electrical impedance before and after a meal in 14 patients with excessive belching and 14 healthy controls and identified patterns of air transport through the oesophagus. The size of the gastric air bubble was measured radiographically. In four patients prolonged oesophageal manometry was performed simultaneously. RESULTS: In all subjects, impedance tracings showed that a significant amount of air is propulsed in front of about a third of the swallow induced peristaltic waves. Two types of retrograde gas flow through the oesophagus (belch) were observed. In the first type air flowed from the stomach through the oesophagus in oral direction ("gastric belch"). In the second type air entered the oesophagus rapidly from proximal and was expulsed almost immediately in oral direction ("supragastric belch"). The incidence of air-containing swallows and gastric belches was similar in patients and controls but supragastric belches occurred exclusively in patients. There was no evidence of lower oesophageal sphincter relaxation during supragastric belches. Gastric air bubble size was not different between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with excessive belching the incidence of gaseous reflux from stomach to oesophagus is similar to that in healthy subjects. Their excess belching activity follows a distinct pattern, characterised by rapid antegrade and retrograde flow of air in the oesophagus that does not reach the stomach.  (+info)

(3/11) Aerophagia in adults: a comparison with functional dyspepsia.

BACKGROUND: Aerophagia is a functional upper gastrointestinal disorder that has not previously been well described in a large patient group. AIMS: To describe the initial evaluation of patients who presented with symptoms of aerophagia at a tertiary medical centre. METHODS: A computerized search was used to identify all patients who were diagnosed with aerophagia at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester between 1996 and 2003 (n = 79). Individual medical charts were abstracted for information on the demographics, clinical features, co-morbid diagnoses, diagnostic workup and treatment. Information on presenting symptoms was also collected for a group of patients who were classified as having functional dyspepsia for comparison (n = 121). RESULTS: The median duration of symptoms in patients with aerophagia was 24 months. The most common symptoms were belching (56%), abdominal pain (19%), bloating (27%) and abdominal distension (19%). Patients with functional dyspepsia had a higher prevalence of reporting nausea, vomiting, early satiety, weight loss and abdominal pain (all P < 0.01, adjusting for age, gender and body mass index). Significantly more patients with aerophagia had anxiety (19%) than those with functional dyspepsia (6%, P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with aerophagia experience prolonged upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Initial presenting symptoms appear to be distinctly different from those who have functional dyspepsia.  (+info)

(4/11) Air swallowing caused recurrent ileus in Tourette's syndrome.

This report describes an adolescent boy who has Tourette's syndrome and developed a subtle but significant increase in vocal tics after an 8-month respite. The increase in vocal tics was associated with an acute increase in psychological stressors and resulted in recurrent air swallowing, which, in turn, caused abdominal cramping, eructation, and flatus, eventually leading to aeroenteria. Air swallowing was recognized only after a second hospital admission for recurrent ileus. Air swallowing and associated symptoms were mitigated by reinstitution of psychopharmacologic treatment and an increase in the patient's self-awareness of the air-swallowing behavior. Clinically significant air swallowing has not been described previously in Tourette syndrome or a tic disorder. This case is important for pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists because either may be the first to evaluate a child or an adolescent with unexplained recurrent ileus. This report also documents the importance of the connection between the brain and the body.  (+info)

(5/11) Air swallowing, belching, acid and non-acid reflux in patients with functional dyspepsia.

BACKGROUND: Frequent belching is a common symptom in patients with functional dyspepsia with a reported incidence up to 80%. We hypothesized that patients with functional dyspepsia possibly have a higher frequency of belching than healthy subjects secondary to frequent air swallowing. AIM: To assess air swallowing, belching, acid and non-acid reflux patterns of patients with functional dyspepsia. METHODS: Combined 24-h oesophageal impedance and pH monitoring was performed in 10 functional dyspepsia patients and 10 controls. Analysis of the impedance-pH signals included incidence of air swallows, belching, acid and non-acid reflux. RESULTS: The incidence of air swallows in functional dyspepsia patients were significantly higher compared with controls (153 +/- 15 vs. 79 +/- 10, P < 0.001), while the incidence of liquid-only swallows were not significantly increased. The proportions of gas-containing reflux episodes (belches) and non-acid reflux episodes in functional dyspepsia patients were significantly higher when compared with controls (66.4 vs. 44.4%, P = 0.04 and 70.1 vs. 45.9%, P = 0.009, respectively). CONCLUSION: Patients with functional dyspepsia swallow air more frequently than controls and this is associated with an increased incidence of non-acid gaseous gastro-oesophageal reflux.  (+info)

(6/11) Clinical review: long-term noninvasive ventilation.

Noninvasive positive ventilation has undergone a remarkable evolution over the past decades and is assuming an important role in the management of both acute and chronic respiratory failure. Long-term ventilatory support should be considered a standard of care to treat selected patients following an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. In this setting, appropriate use of noninvasive ventilation can be expected to improve patient outcomes, reduce ICU admission, enhance patient comfort, and increase the efficiency of health care resource utilization. Current literature indicates that noninvasive ventilation improves and stabilizes the clinical course of many patients with chronic ventilatory failure. Noninvasive ventilation also permits long-term mechanical ventilation to be an acceptable option for patients who otherwise would not have been treated if tracheostomy were the only alternative. Nevertheless, these results appear to be better in patients with neuromuscular/-parietal disorders than in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This clinical review will address the use of noninvasive ventilation (not including continuous positive airway pressure) mainly in diseases responsible for chronic hypoventilation (that is, restrictive disorders, including neuromuscular disease and lung disease) and incidentally in others such as obstructive sleep apnea or problems of central drive.  (+info)

(7/11) Clonazepam treatment of pathologic childhood aerophagia with psychological stresses.

The treatment of pathologic aerophagia has rarely been discussed in the literature. In this retrospective study, the authors investigated the effects of clonazepam on the management of pathologic childhood aerophagia (PCA) with psychological stresses (PS), but not with mental retardation. Data from 22 consecutive PCA patients with PS (aged 2 to 10 yr), who had been followed up for over 1 yr, were reviewed. On the basis of videolaryngoscopic views, the authors observed that the pathology of aerophagia was the result of reflex-induced swallowing with paroxysmal openings of the upper esophageal sphincter due to unknown factors and also observed that these reflex-induced openings were subsided after intravenous low dose benzodiazepine administration. Hence, clonazepam was administered to treat paroxysmal openings in these PCA patients with PS. Remission positivity was defined as symptom-free for a consecutive 1 month within 6 months of treatment. The results of treatment in 22 PCA patients with PS were analyzed. A remission positive state was documented in 14.3% of PCA patients managed by reassurance, and in 66.7% of PCA patients treated with clonazepam (p=0.032). Thus, clonazepam may produce positive results in PCA with PS. Future studies by randomized and placebo-controlled trials are needed to confirm the favorable effect of clonazepam in PCA.  (+info)

(8/11) Aerophagia and gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients using continuous positive airway pressure: a preliminary observation.

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Aerophagia is a complication of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for sleep disordered breathing (SDB), whereupon air is forced into the stomach and bowel. Associated discomfort can result in CPAP discontinuation. We hypothesize that aerophagia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) via mechanisms involving GERD related lower esophageal sphincter (LES) compromise. METHODS: Twenty-two subjects with aerophagia and 22 controls, matched for age, gender, and body mass index, who were being treated with CPAP for SDB were compared in regard to clinical aspects of GERD, GERD associated habits, SDB severity as measured by polysomnography, and mean CPAP pressure. RESULTS: More subjects with aerophagia had symptoms of GERD (77.3% vs. 36.4%; p < 0.01) and were on GERD related medications (45.5% vs. 18.2%, p < 0.05) than controls. Regarding polysomnography, mean oxygen saturation percentages were lower in the aerophagia group than controls (95.0% vs. 96.5%, p < 0.05). No other differences were observed, including mean CPAP pressures. No one in the aerophagia group (vs. 27.3% of the control group) was a current tobacco user (p < 0.01). There was no difference in caffeine or alcohol use between the 2 groups. CONCLUSIONS: These results imply aerophagia is associated with GERD symptoms and GERD related medication use. This finding suggests a relationship between GERD related LES pathophysiology and the development of aerophagia in patients with SDB treated with CPAP.  (+info)

*  Aerophagia
aerophagy) is a condition of excessive air swallowing, which goes to the stomach. Aerophagia may also refer to an unusual ... "The characteristics of aerophagy and its treatment". Likars'ka sprava. 7 (7): 114-6. PMID 8209520. Loening-Baucke V (2000). " ...
*  Fart lighting
The oxygen and nitrogen component of flatus can be accounted for by aerophagy, while the CO2 component results from the ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C23)
... aerophagy MeSH C23.888.821.108 --- anorexia MeSH C23.888.821.150 --- constipation MeSH C23.888.821.192 --- coprophagia MeSH ...
*  List of ICD-9 codes 290-319: mental disorders
... aerophagy; cyclical vomiting, psychogenic) (306.5 Genitourinary (Include: psychogenic dysmenorrhoea (306.6 Endocrine (306.7 ...
Rumination Syndrome | HealthyPlace  Rumination Syndrome | HealthyPlace
Rumination is the voluntary or involuntary regurgitation and rechewing of partially digested food that is either reswallowed or expelled. Read more about this eating disorder.
more infohttps://www.healthyplace.com/eating-disorders/other-eating-disorders/rumination-syndrome
DIPHENOXYLATE - Healthy Life Live  DIPHENOXYLATE - Healthy Life Live
Also known as cophentrope or Lomotil®. When mixed with ATROPINE sulphate, it is used as tretament for adult patients with DIARRHOEA, particularly if chronic. It has no antibacterial properties but is sometimes used to treat traveller's diarrhoea.. ...
more infohttp://www.healthylifelive.org/diphenoxylate/
UNDA Plex Remedies | Forrest Health  UNDA Plex Remedies | Forrest Health
Kalium Carbonicum Plex - Aerophagy, Gas, Bloating. *Lobelia Plex - Asthma, Bronchial asthma. *Magnelevures - Nervous System, ...
more infohttp://www.forresthealth.com/UNDA-Plex/
Hai Du LY-NGUYEN - TermWiki | TermWiki.com  Hai Du LY-NGUYEN - TermWiki | TermWiki.com
khí thực - aerophagy. Fármacos; nuốt quá nhiều không khí, thường là một quá trình vô thức có liên quan tới sự lo lắng, dẫn đến ...
more infohttp://es.termwiki.com/User/haiduvn
Hai Du LY-NGUYEN - TermWiki | TermWiki.com  Hai Du LY-NGUYEN - TermWiki | TermWiki.com
khí thực - aerophagy. الدوائية; nuốt quá nhiều không khí, thường là một quá trình vô thức có liên quan tới sự lo lắng, dẫn đến ...
more infohttp://ar.termwiki.com/User/haiduvn
Hai Du LY-NGUYEN - TermWiki | TermWiki.com  Hai Du LY-NGUYEN - TermWiki | TermWiki.com
khí thực - aerophagy. Pharmaceutical; nuốt quá nhiều không khí, thường là một quá trình vô thức có liên quan tới sự lo lắng, ...
more infohttp://ue.termwiki.com/User/haiduvn
Abd pain | definition of Abd pain by Medical dictionary  Abd pain | definition of Abd pain by Medical dictionary
Chronic abdominal pain may be functional or may result from overeating or aerophagy. When symptoms are recurrent, an organic ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Abd+pain
Basil essential oil - organic 10 ml | GPH Diffusion | buy online  Basil essential oil - organic 10 ml | GPH Diffusion | buy online
Nausea, aerophagy, flatulence, gastrointestinal spasms. - Viral hepatitis and liver congestion, gout. - Headaches. - ...
more infohttps://www.santi-shop.eu/en/p3347-Basil-essential-oil-organic-GPH-Diffusion.html
Aerophagia - Wikipedia  Aerophagia - Wikipedia
aerophagy) is a condition of excessive air swallowing, which goes to the stomach. Aerophagia may also refer to an unusual ... "The characteristics of aerophagy and its treatment". Likars'ka sprava. 7 (7): 114-6. PMID 8209520. Loening-Baucke V (2000). " ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerophagia
Docphin | Medical Research Articles Published in February 1940 | Page 1 of 1  Docphin | Medical Research Articles Published in February 1940 | Page 1 of 1
Aerophagy. (PubMedID: 20782968) British Medical Journal 02/24/1940 The Weak 'A' Reaction found in Some Cases of the Blood Group ...
more infohttps://www.docphin.com/medical-research-articles-published-in-month?month=2&year=1940&page=1
UNDA Numbers - Homeopathic Remedies & Products | Forrest Health  UNDA Numbers - Homeopathic Remedies & Products | Forrest Health
UNDA Number 13 , Seroyal - is indicated for conditions such as hepatic congestion, biliary deficiency, aerophagy of hepatic ... UNDA Number 13 , Seroyal - is indicated for conditions such as hepatic congestion, biliary deficiency, aerophagy of hepatic ...
more infohttps://www.forresthealth.com/unda-number/
Angels and Aromatherapy: Aromatherapy Glossary  Angels and Aromatherapy: Aromatherapy Glossary
AEROPHAGY. An excess of air in the alimentary canal that is relieved through burping or flatulence.. ALTERATIVE: Gradually ...
more infohttp://angelsandaromatherapy.blogspot.com/p/aromatherapy-glossary.html
Chinese star anise (anise) Illicium verum Fruit whole HERBORISTERIE  Chinese star anise (anise) Illicium verum Fruit whole HERBORISTERIE
Aerophagy - Colic - Dyspepsia - Nervousness. Dosage Badian China (Anise). Heat the water to a boil then add the boiling water ...
more infohttps://www.soin-et-nature.com/en/medicinal-plants/480-chinese-star-anise-anise-illicium-verum-fruit-herboristerie.html
Yellowstar*Essentials Blog: A Helpful Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms  Yellowstar*Essentials Blog: A Helpful Glossary of Aromatherapy Terms
AEROPHAGY. An excess of air in the alimentary canal that is relieved through burping or flatulence.. ALTERATIVE: Gradually ...
more infohttp://yellowstaressentials.blogspot.com/2008/12/helpful-glossary-of-aromatherapy-terms.html
Gluten Sensitivity Test  Gluten Sensitivity Test
Flatulence, aerophagy.. The most common general symptoms are:. *Hives, acne, dermatitis. *Asthma, cough, hoarseness, excess ...
more infohttp://www.natrixlab.com/range-of-diagnostic-tests/immunology/gluten-sensitivity-test/
Illustrated Medical Dictionary; Essential A-Z Quick Reference to over 5,500 Medical Terms - Dorling Kindersley DK Publishing |...  Illustrated Medical Dictionary; Essential A-Z Quick Reference to over 5,500 Medical Terms - Dorling Kindersley DK Publishing |...
aerophagy Excessive swallowing of air, which may occur during rapid eating or drinking or be caused by anxiety. aetiology The ... air swallowing See aerophagy. airway A collective term for the passages through which air enters and leaves the lungs (see ...
more infohttps://b-ok.xyz/book/2821391/171ad7
Ioanna Malagardi: HISTORY OF ONTOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGY AND A MODERN MEDICAL APPLICATION  Ioanna Malagardi: HISTORY OF ONTOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGY AND A MODERN MEDICAL APPLICATION
"aero"]+["phagy"]=["swallowing","of","air"]. explanation:. The compound consists of one entity-noun i.e. "aero" which is a gas ( ...
more infohttp://ioannamalagardi.blogspot.com/2009/11/my-publications-in-issues-of-human.html
Most Effective Sleep Apnea Treatment - ALPF Medical Research  Most Effective Sleep Apnea Treatment - ALPF Medical Research
Irritating side effects such as aerophagy.... Pressure Level and Airflow Last Updated on Sat, 14 Sep 2013 , Obstructive Sleep ...
more infohttps://www.alpfmedical.info/sleep-apnea.html
TheSynapse Magazine by Wilfred Galea - issuu  TheSynapse Magazine by Wilfred Galea - issuu
... which could lead to aerophagy No delay in gastric emptying - Homogeneous casein curd - Medium chain triglycerides - Low ...
more infohttps://issuu.com/thesynapse/docs/thesynapse_magazine
What is distinct about infants colic cries? | Archives of Disease in Childhood  What is distinct about infants' "colic" cries? | Archives of Disease in Childhood
... milk intolerance or aerophagy in the bottle fed group. There must be more to be written on cry characteristics other than in ...
more infohttp://adc.bmj.com/content/80/1/56