Aeromonas hydrophila: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that may be pathogenic for frogs, fish, and mammals, including man. In humans, cellulitis and diarrhea can result from infection with this organism.Aeromonas: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Its organisms are found in fresh water and sewage and are pathogenic to humans, frogs, and fish.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.Aeromonas salmonicida: A species of gram-negative bacteria, in the family Aeromonadaceae. It is strictly parasitic and often pathogenic causing FURUNCULOSIS in SALMONIDS and ulcer disease in GOLDFISH.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Aeromonas caviae: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that is found in domestic and wild animals including birds, and fish. In humans it causes GASTROENTERITIS in young children and some adults.Vibrionaceae: A family of gram-negative bacteria whose members predominate in the bacterial flora of PLANKTON; FISHES; and SEAWATER. Some members are important pathogens for humans and animals.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Cytotoxins: Substances that are toxic to cells; they may be involved in immunity or may be contained in venoms. These are distinguished from CYTOSTATIC AGENTS in degree of effect. Some of them are used as CYTOTOXIC ANTIBIOTICS. The mechanism of action of many of these are as ALKYLATING AGENTS or MITOSIS MODULATORS.Hemolysin Proteins: Proteins from BACTERIA and FUNGI that are soluble enough to be secreted to target ERYTHROCYTES and insert into the membrane to form beta-barrel pores. Biosynthesis may be regulated by HEMOLYSIN FACTORS.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins: Proteins secreted from an organism which form membrane-spanning pores in target cells to destroy them. This is in contrast to PORINS and MEMBRANE TRANSPORT PROTEINS that function within the synthesizing organism and COMPLEMENT immune proteins. These pore forming cytotoxic proteins are a form of primitive cellular defense which are also found in human LYMPHOCYTES.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Enterotoxins: Substances that are toxic to the intestinal tract causing vomiting, diarrhea, etc.; most common enterotoxins are produced by bacteria.Leeching: The application of LEECHES to the body to draw blood for therapeutic purposes. Such medicinal leeching, an ancient medical practice, is still being used in microsurgery and the treatment of venous congestion or occlusion.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Catfishes: Common name of the order Siluriformes. This order contains many families and over 2,000 species, including venomous species. Heteropneustes and Plotosus genera have dangerous stings and are aggressive. Most species are passive stingers.Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Water Pollution: Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Wound Infection: Invasion of the site of trauma by pathogenic microorganisms.Bacterial Infections: Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.Hemolysis: The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.
(1/265) Quorum sensing-dependent regulation and blockade of exoprotease production in Aeromonas hydrophila.

In Aeromonas hydrophila, the ahyI gene encodes a protein responsible for the synthesis of the quorum sensing signal N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Inactivation of the ahyI gene on the A. hydrophila chromosome abolishes C4-HSL production. The exoprotease activity of A. hydrophila consists of both serine protease and metalloprotease activities; in the ahyI-negative strain, both are substantially reduced but can be restored by the addition of exogenous C4-HSL. In contrast, mutation of the LuxR homolog AhyR results in the loss of both exoprotease activities, which cannot be restored by exogenous C4-HSL. Furthermore, a substantial reduction in the production of exoprotease by the ahyI+ parent strain is obtained by the addition of N-acylhomoserine lactone analogs that have acyl side chains of 10, 12, or 14 carbons. The inclusion of N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone or N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone at 10 microM in overnight cultures of A. hydrophila abolishes exoprotease production in azocasein assays and reduces the activity of all the exoprotease species seen in zymograms.  (+info)

(2/265) Kinetic and spectroscopic characterization of native and metal-substituted beta-lactamase from Aeromonas hydrophila AE036.

Two metal ion binding sites are conserved in metallo-beta-lactamase from Aeromonas hydrophila. The ligands of a first zinc ion bound with picomolar dissociation constant were identified by EXAFS spectroscopy as one Cys, two His and one additional N/O donor. Sulfur-to-metal charge transfer bands are observed for all mono- and di-metal species substituted with Cu(II) or Co(II) due to ligation of the single conserved cysteine residue. Binding of a second metal ion results in non-competitive inhibition which might be explained by an alternative kinetic mechanism. A possible partition of metal ions between the two binding sites is discussed.  (+info)

(3/265) Cloning, sequencing, and role in serum susceptibility of porin II from mesophilic Aeromonas hydrophila.

We cloned and sequenced the structural gene for Aeromonas hydrophila porin II from strain AH-3 (serogroup O:34). The genetic position of this gene, like that of ompF in Escherichia coli, is adjacent to aspC and transcribed in the same direction. However, upstream of the porin II gene no similarities with E. coli were found. We obtained defined insertion mutants in porin II gene either in A. hydrophila (O:34) or A. veronii sobria (serogroup O:11) serum-resistant or -sensitive strains. Furthermore, we complemented these mutants with a plasmid harboring only the porin II gene, which allowed us to define the role of porin II as an important surface molecule involved in serum susceptibility and C1q binding in these strains.  (+info)

(4/265) The cytotoxic enterotoxin of Aeromonas hydrophila induces proinflammatory cytokine production and activates arachidonic acid metabolism in macrophages.

An aerolysin-related cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) of Aeromonas hydrophila possesses multiple biological activities, which include its ability to lyse red blood cells, destroy tissue culture cell lines, evoke a fluid secretory response in ligated intestinal loop models, and induce lethality in mice. The role of Act in the virulence of the organism has been demonstrated. In this study, we evaluated the potential of Act to induce production of proinflammatory cytokines associated with Act-induced tissue injury and Act's capacity to activate in macrophages arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism that leads to production of eicosanoids (e.g., prostaglandin E(2) [PGE(2)]). Our data indicated that Act stimulated the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha and upregulated the expression of genes encoding interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and IL-6 in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. Act also activated transcription of the gene encoding inducible nitric oxide synthase. Act evoked the production of PGE(2) coupled to the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) pathway. AA is a substrate for PGE(2), and Act produced AA from phospholipids by inducing group V secretory phospholipase A(2). We also demonstrated that Act increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production in macrophages. cAMP, along with PGE(2), could potentiate fluid secretion in animal models because of infiltration and activation of macrophages resulting from Act-induced tissue injury. After Act treatment of RAW cells, we detected an increased translocation of NF-kappaB and cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) to the nucleus using gel shift assays. Act also upregulated production of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in macrophages, suggesting a protective role for Bcl-2 against cell death induced by proinflammatory cytokines. The increased expression of genes encoding the proinflammatory cytokines, COX-2, and Bcl-2 appeared correlated with the activation of NF-kappaB and CREB. This is the first report of the detailed mechanisms of action of Act from A. hydrophila.  (+info)

(5/265) Molecular analysis of genetic differences between virulent and avirulent strains of Aeromonas hydrophila isolated from diseased fish.

Aeromonas hydrophila, a normal inhabitant of aquatic environments, is an opportunistic pathogen of a variety of aquatic and terrestrial animals, including humans. A. hydrophila PPD134/91 is defined as virulent whereas PPD35/85 is defined as avirulent on the basis of their different LD50 values in fish. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify genetic differences between these two strains. Sixty-nine genomic regions of differences were absent in PPD35/85, and the DNA sequences of these regions were determined. Sixteen ORFs encoded by 23 fragments showed high homology to known proteins of other bacteria. ORFs encoded by the remaining 46 fragments were identified as new proteins of A. hydrophila, showing no significant homology to any known proteins. Among these PPD134/91-specific genes, 22 DNA fragments (21 ORFs) were present in most of the eight virulent strains studied but mostly absent in the seven avirulent strains, suggesting that they are universal virulence genes in A. hydrophila. The PPD134/91-specific genes included five known virulence factors of A. hydrophila: haemolysin (hlyA), protease (oligopeptidase A), outer-membrane protein (Omp), multidrug-resistance protein and histone-like protein (HU-2). Another 47 DNA fragments (44 ORFs) were mainly present in PPD134/91, indicating the heterogeneity among motile aeromonads. Some of these fragments encoded virulence determinants. These included genes for the synthesis of O-antigen and type II restriction/modification system. The results indicated that SSH is successful in identifying genetic differences and virulence genes among different strains of A. hydrophila.  (+info)

(6/265) A major secreted elastase is essential for pathogenicity of Aeromonas hydrophila.

Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic pathogen and the leading cause of fatal hemorrhagic septicemia in rainbow trout. A gene encoding an elastolytic activity, ahyB, was cloned from Aeromonas hydrophila AG2 into pUC18 and expressed in Escherichia coli and in the nonproteolytic species Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. masoucida. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the ahyB gene revealed an open reading frame of 1,764 nucleotides with coding capacity for a 588-amino-acid protein with a molecular weight of 62,728. The first 13 N-terminal amino acids of the purified protease completely match those deduced from DNA sequence starting at AAG (Lys-184). This finding indicated that AhyB is synthesized as a preproprotein with a 19-amino-acid signal peptide, a 164-amino-acid N-terminal propeptide, and a 405-amino-acid intermediate which is further processed into a mature protease and a C-terminal propeptide. The protease hydrolyzed casein and elastin and showed a high sequence similarity to other metalloproteases, especially with the mature form of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (52% identity), Helicobacter pylori zinc metalloprotease (61% identity), or proteases from several species of Vibrio (52 to 53% identity). The gene ahyB was insertionally inactivated, and the construct was used to create an isogenic ahyB mutant of A. hydrophila. These first reports of a defined mutation in an extracellular protease of A. hydrophila demonstrate an important role in pathogenesis.  (+info)

(7/265) Microbial iron transport via a siderophore shuttle: a membrane ion transport paradigm.

A mechanism of ion transport across membranes is reported. Microbial transport of Fe(3+) generally delivers iron, a growth-limiting nutrient, to cells via highly specific siderophore-mediated transport systems. In contrast, iron transport in the fresh water bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila is found to occur by means of an indiscriminant siderophore transport system composed of a single multifunctional receptor. It is shown that (i) the siderophore and Fe(3+) enter the bacterium together, (ii) a ligand exchange step occurs in the course of the transport, and (iii) a redox process is not involved in iron exchange. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no other reports of a ligand exchange mechanism in bacterial iron transport. The ligand exchange step occurs at the cell surface and involves the exchange of iron from a ferric siderophore to an iron-free siderophore already bound to the receptor. This ligand exchange mechanism is also found in Escherichia coli and seems likely to be widely distributed among microorganisms.  (+info)

(8/265) Prevalence of enterotoxin genes in Aeromonas spp. isolated from children with diarrhea, healthy controls, and the environment.

Aeromonads are causative agents of a number of human infections. Even though aeromonads have been isolated from patients suffering from diarrhea, their etiological role in gastroenteritis is unclear. In spite of a number of virulence factors produced by Aeromonas species, their association with diarrhea has not been clearly linked. Recently, we have characterized a heat-labile cytotonic enterotoxin (Alt), a heat-stable cytotonic enterotoxin (Ast), and a cytotoxic enterotoxin (Act) from a diarrheal isolate of Aeromonas hydrophila. Alt and Ast are novel enterotoxins which are not related to cholera toxin; Act is aerolysin related and has hemolytic, cytotoxic, and enterotoxic activities. We studied the distribution of the alt, ast, and act enterotoxin genes in 115 of 125 aeromonads isolated from 1, 735 children with diarrhea, in all 27 aeromonads isolated from 830 control children (P = 7 x 10(-4) for comparison of rates of isolation of aeromonads from cases versus those from controls), and in 120 randomly selected aeromonads from different components of surface water in Bangladesh. Aeromonas isolates which were positive only for the presence of the alt gene had similar distributions in the three sources; the number of isolates positive only for the presence of the ast gene was significantly higher for the environmental samples than for samples from diarrheal children; and isolates positive only for the presence of the act gene were not found in any of the three sources. Importantly, the number of isolates positive for both the alt and ast genes was significantly higher for diarrheal children than for control children and the environment. Thus, this is the first study to indicate that the products of both the alt and ast genes may synergistically act to induce severe diarrhea. In 26 patients, Aeromonas spp. were isolated as the sole enteropathogen. Analysis of clinical data from 11 of these patients suggested that isolates positive for both the alt and ast genes were associated with watery diarrhea but that isolates positive only for the alt gene were associated with loose stools. Most of the isolates from the three sources could be classified into seven phenospecies and eight hybridization groups. For the first time, Aeromonas eucrenophila was isolated from two children, one with diarrhea and another without diarrhea.  (+info)

*  Aeromonas
"Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aeromonas hydrophila". Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and Critical Care. 29 (4): 306-308. ... Aeromonas aides leeches in digesting blood meals. H. medicinalis used after surgery has led to Aeromonas infections, most ... Aeromonas pneumonia due to episodes of near-drowning are frequently complicated by bacteremia and death. Aeromonas species are ... Members of the genus Aeromonas can be referred to as aeromonads (viz. trivialisation of names). Parte, A.C. "Aeromonas". www. ...
*  Aeromonas hydrophila
... Oregon State University. Arrow Scientific. Aeromonas hydrophila "Aeromonas hydrophila." Bad Bug Book ... "Georgia woman with flesh-eating disease leaves hospital" Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC7966 Type strain of Aeromonas hydrophila at ... Prevalence and distribution of Aeromonas hydrophila in the United States Clinical and microbiological features of Aeromonas ... A. hydrophila was isolated from humans and animals in the 1950s. It is the most well known of the species of Aeromonas. It is ...
*  Hypothiocyanite
Aeromonas hydrophila • Bacillus brevis • Bacillus Cereus • Bacillus megaterium • Bacillus subtilis • Burkholderia cepacia • ...
*  Flagellum
"Analysis of the Lateral Flagellar Gene System of Aeromonas hydrophila AH-3". Journal of Bacteriology. 188 (3): 852-862. doi: ... "Polar Flagellum Biogenesis in Aeromonas hydrophila". J. Bacteriol. 188 (2): 542-55. doi:10.1128/JB.188.2.542-555.2006. PMC ... particularly Vibrio parahemolyticus) and related proteobacteria such as Aeromonas, two flagellar systems co-exist, using ...
*  Aeromonas infection
Minnaganti, V.R.; Patel, P.J.; Iancu, D.; Schoch, P.E. "Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aeromonas hydrophila". Heart Lung. 29: ... Aeromonas infections may cause skin infections manifesting as cellulitis, pustules, and furuncles. An infection usually only ... ISBN 0-7216-2921-0. Abuhammour, W.; Hasan, R.A.; Rogers, D. "Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aeromonas hydrophilia in an ... causes mild infections of the skin but can also cause a more a serious infection called gastroenteritis? Aeromonas ...
*  Aztreonam
Furthermore, Aeromonas hydrophila, Citrobacter diversus, Enterobacter agglomerans, Haemophilus spp. and Streptococcus pyogenes ...
*  Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Aerolysin is a virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. Resistant strains of M. tuberculosis have ...
*  Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole
Aeromonas hydrophila Alcaligenes xylosoxidans Bartonella henselae Bordetella pertussis (pertussis) Brucella spp. Burkholderia ...
*  Wilderness-acquired diarrhea
More rarely, Yersinia enterocolitica, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Cyanobacterium may also cause disease. Giardia lamblia cysts ...
*  Microbial fuel cell
Aeromonas hydrophila and others. Some bacteria are able to transfer their electron production via the pili on their external ... reducing bacterium phylogenetically related to Aeromonas hydrophila, isolated from a microbial fuel cell". FEMS Microbiology ...
*  Aerolysin
In molecular biology, aerolysin is a cytolytic pore-forming toxin exported by Aeromonas hydrophila, a Gram-negative bacterium ... "Nucleotide sequence of the gene for the hole-forming toxin aerolysin of Aeromonas hydrophila". J. Bacteriol. 169 (6): 2869-71. ... Parker MW, Buckley JT, Postma JP, Tucker AD, Leonard K, Pattus F, Tsernoglou D (January 1994). "Structure of the Aeromonas ...
*  Clostridium septicum
"The primary structure of clostridium septicum alpha-toxin exhibits similarity with that of aeromonas hydrophila aerolysin". ...
*  Euphorbia hirta
"Effect of Euphorbia hirta plant leaf extract on immunostimulant response of Aeromonas hydrophila infected Cyprinus carpio". ...
*  Aeromonas veronii
"Ciprofloxacin-resistant Aeromonas hydrophila infection following leech therapy: A case report and review of the literature". ... Aeromonas veronii is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium found in fresh water and in association with animals. It can be a ... "Genus Aeromonas". List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature. Retrieved 16 November 2016. F. W. Hickman-Brenner; K ... Type strain of Aeromonas veronii at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase. ...
*  Quorum sensing
SdiA detects AHLs produced by other species of bacteria including Aeromonas hydrophila, Hafnia alvei, and Yersinia ... However, SdiA does become activated when Salmonella transits through turtles colonized with Aeromonas hydrophila or mice ... Aeromonas sp. have been isolated from various infected sites from patients (bile, blood, peritoneal fluid, pus, stool and urine ... It has been documented that Aeromonas sobria has produced C6-HSL and two additional AHLs with N-acyl side chain longer than C6 ...
*  Wyoming toad
1985). Their environment is conducive to the spread of other infectious fungi and bacteria (such as Aeromonas hydrophila). The ... The combination of malathion and bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) infection could be causing increased mortality rates (Taylor ...
*  Indole test
Bacteria that test positive for cleaving indole from tryptophan include: Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas punctata, Bacillus ... Aeromonas salmonicida, Alcaligenes sp., most Bacillus sp., Bordetella sp., Enterobacter sp., most Haemophilus sp., most ...
*  Euglandina rosea
However, one disease that is known to affect the snail is caused by the pseudomonad bacterium or Aeromonas hydrophila. ...
*  Necrotizing fasciitis
... and Aeromonas hydrophila, and others. Group A strep is considered the most common cause of necrotizing fasciitis. The majority ...
*  Fluorescein-labeled proaerolysin
... a virulence factor of the bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila. Proaerolysin binds to the glycophosphatidylinositol(GPI) anchor in ...
*  Nalidixic acid
Aeromonas hydrophila, Clostridium and Haemophilus are generally susceptible to nalidixic acid, while other bacteria such as ...
*  Stereospermum kunthianum
Aeromonas hydrophila and Klebsiella spp. Decoctions and infusions of the fruits, bark and roots are used in traditional ...
*  Imipenem
Acinetobacter anitratus, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacteroides distasonis, ...
*  Foodborne illness
Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas caviae, Aeromonas sobria Prevention is mainly the role of the state, through the definition of ...
*  Polyhydroxyalkanoates
A few bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila and Thiococcus pfennigii, synthesize copolyester from the above two types of ...
*  Aeromonas dhakensis
2008 as Aeromonas dhakensis sp. nov. Comb nov. And emendation of the species Aeromonas hydrophila". Systematic and Applied ... "Reclassification of Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. Dhakensis Huys et al. 2002 and Aeromonas aquariorum Martínez-Murcia et al. ... The two species differ in that A. hydrophila is able to produce acid from L-arabinose, while A. dhakensis cannot. A. hydrophila ... "Aeromonas aquariorum Is Widely Distributed in Clinical and Environmental Specimens and Can Be Misidentified as Aeromonas ...
Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier ATCC ® 7966™  Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier ATCC ® 7966™
Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC ® 7966™ Designation: TypeStrain=True Application: Quality control strain Reference material Testing ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : X60404 Aeromonas hydrophila 16S rRNA gene. Nucleotide (GenBank) : X67946 A.hydrophila rrn gene for 23S ... Popoff M, Veron M. A taxonomic study of the Aeromonas hydrophila-Aeromonas punctata group. J. Gen. Microbiol. 94: 11-22, 1976. ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : M59148 Aeromonas hydrophila 16S ribosomal RNA. Nucleotide (GenBank) : X74677 A.hydrophila (ATCC 7966T) ...
more infohttps://www.atcc.org/Global/Products/0/4/6/9/7966.aspx
The pili of Aeromonas hydrophila: identification of an environmentally regulated mini pilin. | JEM  The pili of Aeromonas hydrophila: identification of an environmentally regulated "mini pilin". | JEM
The pili of Aeromonas hydrophila: identification of an environmentally regulated "mini pilin".. A S Ho, T A Mietzner, A J Smith ... Ultrastructural studies of Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH26 revealed two distinctive pilus types: "straight" pili appear as ... The pili of Aeromonas hydrophila: identification of an environmentally regulated "mini pilin". ...
more infohttp://jem.rupress.org/content/172/3/795
A study of unusual metabolic variants of |italic|Aeromonas caviae|/italic| and |italic|Aeromonas hydrophila|/italic| using a...  A study of unusual metabolic variants of |italic|Aeromonas caviae|/italic| and |italic|Aeromonas hydrophila|/italic| using a...
A study of unusual metabolic variants of ,italic,Aeromonas caviae,/italic, and ,italic,Aeromonas hydrophila,/italic, using a ... hydrophila,/italic, subsp. ,italic,dhakensis,/italic, is correctly identified as a subspecies of ,italic,A. hydrophila,/italic ... Unusual arabinose negative strains of ,italic,A. hydrophila,/italic, (usually arabinose positive) were added to the project to ... Variation in acid production from carbohydrate metabolism has been identified in ,italic,Aeromonas,/italic, as a potential ...
more infohttps://drum.lib.umd.edu/handle/1903/10962
Incidence of oxidase-variable strains of Aeromonas hydrophila. - Semantic Scholar  Incidence of "oxidase-variable" strains of Aeromonas hydrophila. - Semantic Scholar
Of 100 strains of A. hydrophila examined, 8 were found to possess this characteristic. Information is provided on how to detect ... Certain strains of Aeromonas hydrophila are oxidase negative when grown on gram-negative selective and differential media. ... Aeromonas Hydrophila and Motile Aeromonad Septicemias of Fish. *Rocco C. Cipriano. , R. C. Cipriano. , G. L. Bullock ... Clinical and microbiological features of Aeromonas hydrophila-associated diarrhea.. *W A Agger. , J D McCormick. , M J Gurwith ...
more infohttps://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Incidence-of-oxidase-variable-strains-of-Aeromonas-Overman-D-amato/41d80cad3e4b80ba4f695a2c8ed6c436fd929d66
Microbiology Society Journals | Detection and genetic analysis of group II capsules in Aeromonas hydrophila  Microbiology Society Journals | Detection and genetic analysis of group II capsules in Aeromonas hydrophila
Group IIA capsules in the authors' collection of A. hydrophila strains are mainly found in the O : 18 and O : 34 ... In this study, the presence of group II capsules among 33 randomly chosen A. hydrophila strains was examined by electron ... The presence of group II capsules in A. hydrophila strongly correlates with the serum and phagocyte survival abilities (seven ... The genetic organization and sequences of the group II capsule gene cluster of Aeromonas hydrophila PPD134/91 have been ...
more infohttp://mic.microbiologyresearch.org/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.26144-0
Main reservoirs of the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila in commercial catfish raceways and ponds - Office of Undergraduate Research  Main reservoirs of the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila in commercial catfish raceways and ponds - Office of Undergraduate Research
Aeromonas hydrophila is a gram-negative bacteria that causes motile Aeromonas septicemia (MAS) in many fish species. Typically ... Main reservoirs of the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila in commercial catfish raceways and ponds. ... The emergent strain of A. hydrophila affects larger fish, which means that the fish are lost at market size. This results in ... The goal of this study was to determine a method for monitoring the number of Aeromonas spp. in catfish production ponds, and ...
more infohttp://our.auburn.edu/aujus/main-reservoirs-of-the-bacteria-aeromonas-hydrophila-in-commercial-catfish-raceways-and-ponds/
Publication : USDA ARS  Publication : USDA ARS
... in channel catfish was induced by infection of Aeromonas hydrophila, the transcriptional levels of Lys-c in skin, gut, liver, ... lysozyme activity and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection. Proceedings of Aquaculture America ... lysozyme activity and efficacy as immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection ... hydrophila strain AL-09-71 at 1-, 2-, 14-, and 28- days post treatment, pcDNA-Lys-c offered 75%, 100%, 60%, and 77% protection ...
more infohttps://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=298157
Preliminary crystallographic analysis of two oligomerization-deficient mutants of the aerolysin toxin, H132D and H132N, in...  Preliminary crystallographic analysis of two oligomerization-deficient mutants of the aerolysin toxin, H132D and H132N, in...
Aerolysin is a major virulence factor produced by the Gram-negative bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila and is a member of the beta- ... Keywords: aerolysin ; virulence factors ; Aeromonas hydrophila ; Site-Directed Mutagenesis ; Septicum Alpha-Toxin ; Channel ...
more infohttps://infoscience.epfl.ch/record/172149
The Phytochemistry and The Anti-Bacterial Activity of Yellow Root (Arcangelisia flava Merr.) against Aeromonas hydrophila  The Phytochemistry and The Anti-Bacterial Activity of Yellow Root (Arcangelisia flava Merr.) against Aeromonas hydrophila
... ... The use of chloroform solvent was producing the extract result with widest preventive zone (17.25 mm) on A. hydrophila. ... Home » The Phytochemistry and The Anti-Bacterial Activity of Yellow Root (Arcangelisia flava Merr.) against Aeromonas ...
more infohttp://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/90177091/phytochemistry-anti-bacterial-activity-yellow-root-arcangelisia-flava-merr-against-aeromonas-hydrophila
Aeromonas Hydrophila - microbewiki  Aeromonas Hydrophila - microbewiki
Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. dhakensis, Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila ATCC 7966, and Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. ranaei ... Aeromonas hydrophila Aeromonas hydrophila is a complex of three species including A.hydrophila sensu stricto, A.bestiarum, and ... Subspecies: Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. anaerogenes, Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. decolorationis, ... Aeromonas hydrophila can also digest gelatin, hemoglobin, and elastin [23, 24]. Aeromonas hydrophila has comprehensive ...
more infohttps://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Aeromonas_Hydrophila
Aeromonas hydrophila by Brianna Martz on Prezi  Aeromonas hydrophila by Brianna Martz on Prezi
Transcript of Aeromonas hydrophila. By Bri Martz Aeromonas hydrophila Morphology Prevention and Treatment Commonly Found In ... microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Aeromonas_Hydrophila http://cmr.asm.org/content/23/1/35.full#sec-13 http://iai.asm.org/content ...
more infohttps://prezi.com/hr8agq5od8ra/aeromonas-hydrophila/
Aeromonas Hydrophila - microbewiki  Aeromonas Hydrophila - microbewiki
Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. decolorationis Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. dhakensis Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila ... Aeromonas hydrophila are resistant to chlorine. Because it is so prevalent in aquatic environments, Aeromonas hydrophila can ... Scale protrustion on a carp infected with Aeromonas hydrophila. "Aeromonas hydrophila and Motile Aeromonad Septicemias of Fish ... Hemorrhage and ulcers on American shad, caused by Aeromonas hydrophila. "Aeromonas hydrophila and Motile Aeromonad Septicemias ...
more infohttps://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php?title=Aeromonas_Hydrophila&oldid=1706
Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier ATCC ® 7966™  Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier ATCC ® 7966™
Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC ® 7966™ Designation: TypeStrain=True Application: Quality control strain Reference material Testing ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : X60404 Aeromonas hydrophila 16S rRNA gene. Nucleotide (GenBank) : X67946 A.hydrophila rrn gene for 23S ... Popoff M, Veron M. A taxonomic study of the Aeromonas hydrophila-Aeromonas punctata group. J. Gen. Microbiol. 94: 11-22, 1976. ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : M59148 Aeromonas hydrophila 16S ribosomal RNA. Nucleotide (GenBank) : X74677 A.hydrophila (ATCC 7966T) ...
more infohttps://www.atcc.org/en/Products/Cells_and_Microorganisms/By_Focus_Area/Quality_Control_Strains/Water_Environmental/7966.aspx
Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier ATCC ® 35654™  Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier ATCC ® 35654™
Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC ® 35654™ Designation: LRA 3300 776 TypeStrain=False Application: Quality control strain Testing ... Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier (ATCC® 35654-MINI-PACK™) Add to frozen 6 ready-to-use vials of ATCC® 35654™ in glycerol ... Aeromonas hydrophila (Chester) Stanier (ATCC® 35654™) Strain Designations: LRA 3300 776 [API SA, DSM 6173] / Type Strain: no / ... Nucleotide (GenBank) : U20496 Aeromonas hydrophila ribosomal protein S20 homolog gene, partial cds. ...
more infohttps://atcc.org/en/Products/Collections/Preceptrol_Cultures/35654.aspx
Aeromonas hydrophila  Aeromonas hydrophila
... ...an emerging aquatic pathogen. Photo credit: Thomas Bresson Aeromonas hydrophila. Welcome to the world ... Aeromonas hydrophila. This typically unheard of species is microscopic, yet can be found anywhere and everywhere that there is ... The strong metabolic nutrition and reproductive mechanisms of the species, A. hydrophila, allow it to interact with its host ... It has also been referred to as 'Motile Aeromonas Septicemia,' 'Hemorrhagic Septicemia,' 'Ulcer Disease,' and 'Red-Sore Disease ...
more infohttp://bioweb.uwlax.edu/bio203/s2013/brusky_kell/index.htm
Aeromonas hydrophila, SEM - Stock Image - C032/2092 - Science Photo Library  Aeromonas hydrophila, SEM - Stock Image - C032/2092 - Science Photo Library
... of Aeromonas hydrophila, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, oxidase positive, rod bacterium (prokaryote). A. hydrophila is ... of Aeromonas hydrophila, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, oxidase positive, rod bacterium (prokaryote). A. hydrophila is ... In humans Aeromonas hydrophila causes gastroenteritis. It is also associated with cellulitis, and can cause diseases such as ... A. hydrophila causes diseases especially in freshwater fish including tail rot, fin rot, red fin disease and haemorrhagic ...
more infohttps://www.sciencephoto.com/media/798911/view/aeromonas-hydrophila-sem
Aeromonas hydrophila, SEM - Stock Image C032/2091 - Science Photo Library  Aeromonas hydrophila, SEM - Stock Image C032/2091 - Science Photo Library
... of Aeromonas hydrophila, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, oxidase positive, rod bacterium (prokaryote). A. hydrophila is ... In humans Aeromonas hydrophila causes gastroenteritis. It is also associated with cellulitis, and can cause diseases such as ... A. hydrophila causes diseases especially in freshwater fish including tail rot, fin rot, red fin disease and haemorrhagic ... of Aeromonas hydrophila, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, oxidase positive, rod bacterium (prokaryote). A. hydrophila is ...
more infohttp://www.sciencephoto.com/media/798910/view/aeromonas-hydrophila-sem
Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides as causes of intestinal infections | RTI  Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides as causes of intestinal infections | RTI
Despite difficulties in characterizing the exotoxins produced by Aeromonas species, there is accumulating evidence that these ... Infections due to Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides in immuno-compromised hosts have been well documented, but ... Infections due to Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides in immuno-compromised hosts have been well documented, but ... Holmberg, S., & Farmer, J. J. (1984). Aeromonas hydrophila and Plesiomonas shigelloides as causes of intestinal infections. ...
more infohttps://www.rti.org/publication/aeromonas-hydrophila-and-plesiomonas-shigelloides-causes-intestinal-infections
Aeromonas hydrophila fulminant pneumonia in a fit young man. | Thorax  Aeromonas hydrophila fulminant pneumonia in a fit young man. | Thorax
Aeromonas hydrophila was isolated from a blood culture taken at admission and from the lungs at necropsy. The infection may ...
more infohttps://thorax.bmj.com/content/47/6/482
Cytotoxic activity of Aeromonas hydrophila. | Infection and Immunity  Cytotoxic activity of Aeromonas hydrophila. | Infection and Immunity
Cytotoxic activity of Aeromonas hydrophila. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Infection and Immunity ... Most strains of Aeromonas hydrophila tested demonstrated cytotoxic activity on several tissue-cultured cell lines. The ... None of the aeromonas isolates was found to be enterotoxigenic by either tissue culture or rabbit ileal loop assays. ...
more infohttps://iai.asm.org/content/21/3/989
The regulation of biofilm development by quorum sensing in Aeromonas hydrophila.  - PubMed - NCBI  The regulation of biofilm development by quorum sensing in Aeromonas hydrophila. - PubMed - NCBI
The regulation of biofilm development by quorum sensing in Aeromonas hydrophila.. Lynch MJ1, Swift S, Kirke DF, Keevil CW, Dodd ... Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that readily attaches to stainless steel to produce a thin ... These data support a role for AHL-dependent quorum sensing in A. hydrophila biofilm development. Exposure of the A. hydrophila ... As A. hydrophila possesses an N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-dependent quorum-sensing system based on the ahyRI locus, the ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11966822?dopt=Abstract
Comparative sequence analysis of a multidrug-resistant plasmid from Aeromonas hydrophila. | Sigma-Aldrich  Comparative sequence analysis of a multidrug-resistant plasmid from Aeromonas hydrophila. | Sigma-Aldrich
Aeromonas hydrophila is a pathogenic bacterium that has been implicated in fish, animal, and human disease. Recently, a ... Comparative sequence analysis of a multidrug-resistant plasmid from Aeromonas hydrophila.. [Carmelo S Del Castillo, Jun-Ichi ... multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmid, pR148, was isolated from A. hydrophila obtained from a tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) farm ...
more infohttps://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/papers/23070174
AHGSH82 010320 - D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase - Aeromonas hydrophila - AHGSH82 010320 gene & protein  AHGSH82 010320 - D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase - Aeromonas hydrophila - AHGSH82 010320 gene & protein
tr,A0A2N0U7E6,A0A2N0U7E6_AERHY D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase OS=Aeromonas hydrophila OX=644 GN=AHGSH82_010320 PE=3 SV=1 ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A0A2N0U7E6
Frontiers | Morin Protects Channel Catfish From Aeromonas hydrophila Infection by Blocking Aerolysin Activity | Microbiology  Frontiers | Morin Protects Channel Catfish From Aeromonas hydrophila Infection by Blocking Aerolysin Activity | Microbiology
In vivo study showed that morin could provide a protection to channel catfish against A. hydrophila infection. These results ... In vivo study showed that morin could provide a protection to channel catfish against A. hydrophila infection. These results ... However, the application of antibiotics in treatment of A. hydrophila infections leads to the emergence of resistant strains. ... Aerolysin, the chief virulence factor produced by pathogenic A. hydrophila strains has been employed as target identifying new ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2018.02828/full
Aeromonas hydrophila - Wikipedia  Aeromonas hydrophila - Wikipedia
Aeromonas hydrophila Oregon State University. Arrow Scientific. Aeromonas hydrophila "Aeromonas hydrophila." Bad Bug Book ... "Georgia woman with flesh-eating disease leaves hospital" Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC7966 Type strain of Aeromonas hydrophila at ... Prevalence and distribution of Aeromonas hydrophila in the United States Clinical and microbiological features of Aeromonas ... A. hydrophila was isolated from humans and animals in the 1950s. It is the most well known of the species of Aeromonas. It is ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeromonas_hydrophila
  • A few bacteria, including Aeromonas hydrophila and Thiococcus pfennigii, synthesize copolyester from the above two types of hydroxy fatty acids, or at least possess enzymes that are capable of part of this synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another strain (A136m) was selected in vitro by culturing A136 in a subinhibitory concentration of cefotaxime, the β-lactam agent administered for the treatment of Aeromonas bacteremia in this patient. (asm.org)
  • Aeromonas hydrophila are gram- negative straight rods with rounded ends. (kenyon.edu)
  • Aeromonas hydrophila is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that readily attaches to stainless steel to produce a thin biofilm with a complex 3D structure covering 40-50% of the available surface and producing large microcolonies. (nih.gov)
  • A. hydrophila bacteria are Gram-negative, straight rods with rounded ends (bacilli to coccibacilli shape) usually from 0.3 to 1.0 μm in width, and 1.0 to 3.0 μm in length. (wikipedia.org)
  • A. hydrophila are Gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobes Footnote 2 , ranging in size from 0.3-1.0 µm wide by 1.0-3.5 µm long Footnote 1 . (canada.ca)
  • The recently proposed type-III secretion system (TTSS) has been linked to Aeromonas pathogenesis. (wikipedia.org)