Aeromonas hydrophila: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that may be pathogenic for frogs, fish, and mammals, including man. In humans, cellulitis and diarrhea can result from infection with this organism.Aeromonas: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that occurs singly, in pairs, or in short chains. Its organisms are found in fresh water and sewage and are pathogenic to humans, frogs, and fish.Dibekacin: Analog of KANAMYCIN with antitubercular as well as broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties.Aeromonadaceae: A family of gram-negative facultatively anaerobic bacteria, ubiquitous in fresh and brackish water, and associated with GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES.Replication Origin: A unique DNA sequence of a replicon at which DNA REPLICATION is initiated and proceeds bidirectionally or unidirectionally. It contains the sites where the first separation of the complementary strands occurs, a primer RNA is synthesized, and the switch from primer RNA to DNA synthesis takes place. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Gammaproteobacteria: A group of the proteobacteria comprised of facultatively anaerobic and fermentative gram-negative bacteria.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Mimiviridae: A family of nucleocytoplasmic, large, double-stranded DNA viruses with extremely complex genomes.DNA Viruses: Viruses whose nucleic acid is DNA.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Aeromonas salmonicida: A species of gram-negative bacteria, in the family Aeromonadaceae. It is strictly parasitic and often pathogenic causing FURUNCULOSIS in SALMONIDS and ulcer disease in GOLDFISH.Biohazard Release: Uncontrolled release of biological material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a biological hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Gentian Violet: A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.PhenazinesAeromonas caviae: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that is found in domestic and wild animals including birds, and fish. In humans it causes GASTROENTERITIS in young children and some adults.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Prince Edward Island: An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)American Civil War: 1861-1865 conflict between the Union (Northern states) and the 11 Southern states that seceded and were organized as the Confederate States of America.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Prokaryotic Cells: Cells lacking a nuclear membrane so that the nuclear material is either scattered in the cytoplasm or collected in a nucleoid region.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Erwinia amylovora: A species of gram-negative bacteria, in the genus ERWINIA, causing a necrotic disease of plants.Cyclotrons: Devices for accelerating charged particles in a spiral path by a constant-frequency alternating electric field. This electric field is synchronized with the movement of the particles in a constant magnetic field.Erwinia: A genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are associated with plants as pathogens, saprophytes, or as constituents of the epiphytic flora.Noxae: Agents capable of exerting a harmful effect on the body.Pyrus: A plant genus of the family ROSACEAE known for the edible fruit.Malus: A plant genus in the family ROSACEAE, order Rosales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as a source of the edible fruit (apple) and is cultivated in temperate climates worldwide.Rosaceae: The rose plant family in the order ROSALES and class Magnoliopsida. They are generally woody plants. A number of the species of this family contain cyanogenic compounds.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization: A mass spectrometry technique used for analysis of nonvolatile compounds such as proteins and macromolecules. The technique involves preparing electrically charged droplets from analyte molecules dissolved in solvent. The electrically charged droplets enter a vacuum chamber where the solvent is evaporated. Evaporation of solvent reduces the droplet size, thereby increasing the coulombic repulsion within the droplet. As the charged droplets get smaller, the excess charge within them causes them to disintegrate and release analyte molecules. The volatilized analyte molecules are then analyzed by mass spectrometry.Tenebrio: A genus of beetles which infests grain products. Its larva is called mealworm.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Insect Proteins: Proteins found in any species of insect.Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein 1: A sterol regulatory element binding protein that regulates expression of GENES involved in FATTY ACIDS metabolism and LIPOGENESIS. Two major isoforms of the protein exist due to ALTERNATIVE SPLICING.Adipogenesis: The differentiation of pre-adipocytes into mature ADIPOCYTES.Adipocytes: Cells in the body that store FATS, usually in the form of TRIGLYCERIDES. WHITE ADIPOCYTES are the predominant type and found mostly in the abdominal cavity and subcutaneous tissue. BROWN ADIPOCYTES are thermogenic cells that can be found in newborns of some species and hibernating mammals.Hymenolepis: A genus of small tapeworms of birds and mammals.Hemolymph: The blood/lymphlike nutrient fluid of some invertebrates.Malpighian Tubules: Slender tubular or hairlike excretory structures found in insects. They emerge from the alimentary canal between the mesenteron (midgut) and the proctodeum (hindgut).Antifreeze Proteins: Proteins that bind to ice and modify the growth of ice crystals. They perform a cryoprotective role in a variety of organisms.Bacteroides fragilis: Gram-negative bacteria occurring in the lower intestinal tracts of man and other animals. It is the most common species of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human soft tissue infections.Bacteroidetes: A phylum of bacteria comprised of three classes: Bacteroides, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria.Bacteroides Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus BACTEROIDES.Bacteroides: A genus of gram-negative, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Its organisms are normal inhabitants of the oral, respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital cavities of humans, animals, and insects. Some species may be pathogenic.Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Microbiota: The full collection of microbes (bacteria, fungi, virus, etc.) that naturally exist within a particular biological niche such as an organism, soil, a body of water, etc.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Bass: Common name for FISHES belonging to the order Perciformes and occurring in three different families.Cichlids: Common name for perch-like fish of the family Cichlidae, belonging to the suborder Labroidei, order PERCIFORMES.Tilapia: A freshwater fish used as an experimental organism and for food. This genus of the family Cichlidae (CICHLIDS) inhabits Central and South America (one species extends north into Texas), West Indies, Africa, Madagascar, Syria, and coastal India.Gills: Paired respiratory organs of fishes and some amphibians that are analogous to lungs. They are richly supplied with blood vessels by which oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged directly with the environment.Fish Proteins: Proteins obtained from species of fish (FISHES).Agonistic Behavior: Any behavior associated with conflict between two individuals.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hepatopancreas: A primitive form of digestive gland found in marine ARTHROPODS, that contains cells similar to those found in the mammalian liver (HEPATOCYTES), and the PANCREAS.Chromium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain chromium as an integral part of the molecule.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Gonads: The gamete-producing glands, OVARY or TESTIS.Electronic Nose: A device used to detect airborne odors, gases, flavors, volatile substances or vapors.Volatile Organic Compounds: Organic compounds that have a relatively high VAPOR PRESSURE at room temperature.Volatilization: A phase transition from liquid state to gas state, which is affected by Raoult's law. It can be accomplished by fractional distillation.Food Contamination: The presence in food of harmful, unpalatable, or otherwise objectionable foreign substances, e.g. chemicals, microorganisms or diluents, before, during, or after processing or storage.Food Safety: Activities involved in ensuring the safety of FOOD including avoidance of bacterial and other contamination.Toxaphene: A very complex, but reproducible mixture of at least 177 C10 polychloro derivatives, having an approximate overall empirical formula of C10-H10-Cl8. It is used as an insecticide and may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen: Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Electronics: The study, control, and application of the conduction of ELECTRICITY through gases or vacuum, or through semiconducting or conducting materials. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)

Oceanisphaera litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel halophilic bacterium from marine bottom sediments. (1/11)

A polyphasic taxonomic study was performed to characterize a new bacterial isolate, designated KMM 3654(T), from a marine bottom sand sample. The strain was Gram-negative, encapsulated, aerobic, moderately halophilic and grew between 0.5 and 10 % NaCl and at 4-42 degrees C. Its DNA G+C content was 56.4 mol%. Isolate KMM 3654(T) was phylogenetically closely related to members of the genus Oceanimonas, showing 96.7 and 95.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Oceanimonas doudoroffii DSM 7028(T) and Oceanimonas baumannii ATCC 700832(T), respectively. Strain KMM 3654(T) shared some physiological and chemotaxonomic properties with these two Oceanimonas species, but differed from them in morphology, growth at 4 degrees C, urease activity, weak phenol degradation and utilization of phenylacetate. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence, Oceanisphaera litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain KMM 3654(T) (=DSM 15406(T)).  (+info)

Oceanisphaera donghaensis sp. nov., a halophilic bacterium from the East Sea, Korea. (2/11)

A taxonomic study was carried out on two isolates, strains BL1(T) and BL11, from marine sediment collected from the East Sea, Korea. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence studies showed that these isolates clearly affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria. BL1T and BL11 were most closely related to Oceanisphaera litoralis KMM 3654T (97.6 and 97.7 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). The level of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between strains BL1T and BL11 was 99.7 %. The two isolates were Gram-negative, aerobic, moderately halophilic, and grew in 0.5-8.0 % NaCl and at 4-42 degrees C. Strains BL1T and BL11 shared some physiological and biochemical properties with O. litoralis KMM 3654T, although they differed in that BL1T and BL11 were able to utilize ethanol, proline and alanine. The G+C contents of the genomic DNA of strains BL1T and BL11 were 56.6 and 57.1 mol%, respectively. Both strains possessed C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH, C(16 : 0) and C(18 : 1)omega7c as the major fatty acids. DNA-DNA relatedness data indicated that strains BL1T and BL11 represent a genomic species that is separate from O. litoralis KMM 3654T. On the basis of polyphasic evidence, it is proposed that strain BL1T (=KCTC 12522T = DSM 17589T) represents the type strain of a novel species, Oceanisphaera donghaensis sp. nov.  (+info)

Zobellella denitrificans gen. nov., sp. nov. and Zobellella taiwanensis sp. nov., denitrifying bacteria capable of fermentative metabolism. (3/11)

Two denitrifying strains of heterotrophic, facultatively anaerobic bacteria, designated ZD1(T) and ZT1(T), were isolated from sediment samples collected from mangrove ecosystems in Taiwan. The isolates were Gram-negative. Cells grown in broth cultures were straight rods that were motile by means of a single polar flagellum. The isolates grew optimally in 1-3 % NaCl, but NaCl was not an absolute requirement for growth; only strain ZT1(T) grew in 13-14 % NaCl. Both isolates grew between 10 and 45 degrees C, with optimum growth at 30-35 degrees C. They were capable of anaerobic growth by denitrifying metabolism using nitrate or nitrous oxide as terminal electron acceptors or, alternatively, by fermenting glucose, sucrose or mannitol as substrates. C(18 : 1)omega7c was the most abundant fatty acid (32.6-35.7 %). The other major fatty acids included C(16 : 1)omega7c (27.5-29.4 %) and C(16 : 0) (20.1-22.0 %). The two isolates had 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.8 % and shared 94.1-96.8 % sequence similarity with the most closely related species, Oceanimonas doudoroffii, Oceanimonas baumannii, Oceanimonas smirnovii and Oceanisphaera litoralis. They could be distinguished from these species in that they were capable of fermentative metabolism, had relatively high DNA G+C contents (62.0-64.0 mol%) and contained C(18 : 1)omega7c instead of C(16 : 1)omega7c as the most abundant fatty acid. Characterization data accumulated in this study revealed that the two denitrifying isolates could be classified as representatives of two novel species in a new genus, Zobellella gen. nov., with Zobellella denitrificans sp. nov. (type strain ZD1(T) = BCRC 17493(T) = JCM 13380(T)) as the type species and Zobellella taiwanensis sp. nov. (type strain ZT1(T) = BCRC 17494(T) = JCM 13381(T)) as a second species.  (+info)

Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) production from glycerol by Zobellella denitrificans MW1 via high-cell-density fed-batch fermentation and simplified solvent extraction. (4/11)

 (+info)

Zobellella aerophila sp. nov., isolated from seashore sand, and emended description of the genus Zobellella. (5/11)

 (+info)

Tolumonas osonensis sp. nov., isolated from anoxic freshwater sediment, and emended description of the genus Tolumonas. (6/11)

 (+info)

Oceanisphaera ostreae sp. nov., isolated from seawater of an oyster farm, and emended description of the genus Oceanisphaera Romanenko et al. 2003. (7/11)

 (+info)

Oceanisphaera sediminis sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment. (8/11)

 (+info)

*Aeromonadaceae

The Aeromonadaceae are Gram-negative bacteria. The species are facultative anaerobic organisms. The cells are rod-shaped. They ... Aeromonadaceae George M. Garrity: Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 2. Auflage. Springer, New York, 2005, Volume 2: ...

*International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes

These include the following: Aeromonadaceae, Vibrionaceae and related organisms; Genera Agrobacterium and Rhizobium; Bacillus ...

*List of MeSH codes (B03)

... aeromonadaceae MeSH B03.440.450.019.025 --- Aeromonas MeSH B03.440.450.019.025.380 --- Aeromonas hydrophila MeSH B03.440. ... aeromonadaceae MeSH B03.660.250.017.025 --- Aeromonas MeSH B03.660.250.017.025.380 --- Aeromonas hydrophila MeSH B03.660. ...
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas; Aeromonas ...
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas; Aeromonas ...
A representative genomic 16S rRNA sequence of T. auensis TA 4T was compared using NCBI BLAST [4] under default settings (e.g., considering only the high-scoring segment pairs (HSPs) from the best 250 hits) with the most recent release of the Greengenes database [5] and the relative frequencies of taxa and keywords (reduced to their stem [6]) were determined, weighted by BLAST scores. The most frequently occurring genera were Yersinia (72.3%), Escherichia (8.0%), Tolumonas (7.2%), Cronobacter (6.3%) and Enterobacter (3.6%) (219 hits in total). Regarding the ten hits to sequences from members of the species, the average identity within HSPs was 99.3%, whereas the average coverage by HSPs was 98.5%. Among all other species, the one yielding the highest score was Cronobacter sakazakii (NC_009778), which corresponded to an identity of 91.8% and an HSP coverage of 100.0%. (Note that the Greengenes database uses the INSDC (= EMBL/NCBI/DDBJ) annotation, which is not an authoritative source for ...
ID LOLB_AERHH Reviewed; 194 AA. AC A0KN00; DT 20-MAY-2008, integrated into UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. DT 12-DEC-2006, sequence version 1. DT 25-OCT-2017, entry version 70. DE RecName: Full=Outer-membrane lipoprotein LolB {ECO:0000255,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00233}; DE Flags: Precursor; GN Name=lolB {ECO:0000255,HAMAP-Rule:MF_00233}; GN OrderedLocusNames=AHA_3151; OS Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila (strain ATCC 7966 / DSM 30187 / OS JCM 1027 / KCTC 2358 / NCIMB 9240). OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; OC Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas. OX NCBI_TaxID=380703; RN [1] RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=ATCC 7966 / DSM 30187 / JCM 1027 / KCTC 2358 / NCIMB 9240; RX PubMed=16980456; DOI=10.1128/JB.00621-06; RA Seshadri R., Joseph S.W., Chopra A.K., Sha J., Shaw J., Graf J., RA Haft D.H., Wu M., Ren Q., Rosovitz M.J., Madupu R., Tallon L., Kim M., RA Jin S., Vuong H., Stine O.C., Ali A., Horneman A.J., Heidelberg J.F.; RT "Genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila ...
ID A0KM21_AERHH Unreviewed; 265 AA. AC A0KM21; DT 12-DEC-2006, integrated into UniProtKB/TrEMBL. DT 12-DEC-2006, sequence version 1. DT 07-JUN-2017, entry version 64. DE SubName: Full=Chromosomal replication initiator protein DnaA {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABK37762.1}; GN Name=dnaA-2 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABK37762.1}; GN OrderedLocusNames=AHA_2818 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABK37762.1}; OS Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila (strain ATCC 7966 / DSM 30187 / OS JCM 1027 / KCTC 2358 / NCIMB 9240). OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; OC Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas. OX NCBI_TaxID=380703 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABK37762.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000000756}; RN [1] {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABK37762.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000000756} RP NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCE [LARGE SCALE GENOMIC DNA]. RC STRAIN=ATCC 7966 / DSM 30187 / JCM 1027 / KCTC 2358 / NCIMB 9240 RC {ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000000756}; RX PubMed=16980456; DOI=10.1128/JB.00621-06; RA Seshadri R., Joseph S.W., Chopra A.K., Sha J., Shaw J., Graf J., RA ...
The gram-negative Aeromonas species from the family Aeromonadaceae occurs ubiquitously in aquatic environments. There are eight human and animal pathogenic species that can cause gastroenteritis after ingestion of contaminated food or water as well as wound infections after exposure to environmental waters. Of critical concern is when the Aeromonas spp. becomes resistant to extended-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics. All beta-lactam antibiotics contain a four membered lactam, or cyclic amide, called a beta-lactam ring that can be hydrolyzed by the bacterial enzymes beta-lactamases. We hypothesize that the environment can serve as a reservoir for beta-lactamase genes. The aim of this study is to assess the presence and range of beta-lactam resistance in Aeromonas spp. from aquatic environments as well as to detect the occurrence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in Aeromonas species. Water samples were collected from beaches and creeks in Orange County, California. Water samples were ...
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Aeromonadaceae - WikipediaAeromonadaceae - Wikipedia

The Aeromonadaceae are Gram-negative bacteria. The species are facultative anaerobic organisms. The cells are rod-shaped. They ... Aeromonadaceae George M. Garrity: Bergeys Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 2. Auflage. Springer, New York, 2005, Volume 2: ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeromonadaceae

SWISSPROT: A0KFJ3 AERHHSWISSPROT: A0KFJ3 AERHH

Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas. OX NCBI_TaxID=380703 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABK38101.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000000756}; RN [1] {ECO: ...
more infohttp://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/cgi-bin/acnuc-search-ac?query=A0KFJ3&db=SWISSPROT

International Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes - WikipediaInternational Committee on Systematics of Prokaryotes - Wikipedia

These include the following: Aeromonadaceae, Vibrionaceae and related organisms; Genera Agrobacterium and Rhizobium; Bacillus ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Committee_on_Systematics_of_Prokaryotes

UniProt: N9VG22 9GAMMUniProt: N9VG22 9GAMM

OC Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; OC Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas. OX NCBI_TaxID=1268237 {ECO: ...
more infohttp://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bget?uniprot:N9VG22_9GAMM

UniProt: A0KM21 AERHHUniProt: A0KM21 AERHH

Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas. OX NCBI_TaxID=380703 {ECO:0000313,EMBL:ABK37762.1, ECO:0000313,Proteomes:UP000000756}; RN [1] {ECO: ...
more infohttp://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bget?uniprot:A0KM21_AERHH

Aeromonas Hydrophila - microbewikiAeromonas Hydrophila - microbewiki

Aeromonas hydrophila is a member of the family Aeromonadaceae, and is only one of six species Aeromonas species that are known ... Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas Species. Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. ...
more infohttps://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php?title=Aeromonas_Hydrophila&oldid=1706

Aeromonas Hydrophila - microbewikiAeromonas Hydrophila - microbewiki

Cellular organism; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas. Species. NCBI: ...
more infohttps://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Aeromonas_Hydrophila

Bacterial Fish Pathogens: Disease of Farmed and Wild Fish - Brian Austin, D.A. Austin - Google  u b N XBacterial Fish Pathogens: Disease of Farmed and Wild Fish - Brian Austin, D.A. Austin - Google u b N X

The economic importance of bacterial fish diseases and the increased understanding of the taxonomy and pathology of fish that has occurred during the last ten years, has resulted in this completely revised and updated edition of Biological Fish Pathogens, first published in 1987. The book provides comprehensive coverage of bacterial fish pathogens and, crucially, diagnostic methods of identification and techniques for isolating those pathogens. The authors also discuss methods used to control bacterial fish diseases, and consider possible future trends in the study of pathogens. Finally, they review the emerging role of fish pathogens in human diseases. The book will be welcomed by practising aquaculturists, veterinary microbiologists, researchers in industry and in academia. It is an essential reference work for graduate and post-graduate students working in the areas of fish health.
more infohttps://books.google.co.jp/books/about/Bacterial_Fish_Pathogens.html?id=tUGAu8bVrrMC&redir_esc=y&hl=ja&output=html_text

CAZy - BacteriaCAZy - Bacteria

Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas; ...
more infohttp://www.cazy.org/b9889.html

CAZy - BacteriaCAZy - Bacteria

Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas; Aeromonas ...
more infohttp://www.cazy.org/b1632.html

Aeromonas ichthiosmiaAeromonas ichthiosmia

Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Aeromonadales; Aeromonadaceae; Aeromonas. Industrial uses or economic ...
more infohttp://thelabrat.com/protocols/Bacterialspecies/Aeromonasichthiosmia.shtml

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Aeromonadaceae representatives (motile aeromonads).- 5. Aeromonadaceae representative (Aeromonas salmonicida).- 6. ...
more infohttps://www.buecher.de/shop/ichtyologie/bacterial-fish-pathogens/austin-brian-austin-dawn-a-/products_products/detail/prod_id/35694334/

Tomás JM[au] - PubMed - NCBITomás JM[au] - PubMed - NCBI

Comparative Genomics of the Aeromonadaceae Core Oligosaccharide Biosynthetic Regions.. Forn-Cuní G, Merino S, Tomás JM. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Tom%C3%A1s+JM%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50

IJMS | Free Full-Text | Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora LipopolysaccharideIJMS | Free Full-Text | Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

Comparative Genomics of the Aeromonadaceae Core Oligosaccharide Biosynthetic Regions. Choose your preferred view mode. Please ...
more infohttp://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/18/3/559

IJMS | Free Full-Text | Tenebrio molitor Larvae Inhibit Adipogenesis through AMPK and MAPKs Signaling in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and...IJMS | Free Full-Text | Tenebrio molitor Larvae Inhibit Adipogenesis through AMPK and MAPKs Signaling in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes and...

Comparative Genomics of the Aeromonadaceae Core Oligosaccharide Biosynthetic Regions. Previous Article in Journal. ...
more infohttp://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/18/3/518

The intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation | BMC Genomics | Full TextThe intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation | BMC Genomics | Full Text

Significantly more reads were assigned to the Bacteroidetes phylum in the experimental sample (36%) as compared to the control sample (8.2%). At the class level, Bacteroidia (1.3% in the control sample vs. 24.4% in the experimental sample) and Sphingobacteria (1.1% in the control sample vs. 7.8% in the experimental sample) contributed to higher percentages of the microbiota in the experimental sample than in the control sample. The significant elevation of Bacteroidetes in the intestinal community of the starved seabass sample is in agreement with some other studies [2, 34, 35] on dietary shifts. For example, in mice [34], fasting was associated with a significant increase in the proportional representation of the Bacteroidetes [from 20.6% (fed) to 42.3% (fasted)]. Bacteroides with a much larger genome size (e.g., Bacteroides fragilis Strain NCTC9343: 5,205,140 bp) are normally mutualistic in the animal gastrointestinal flora. A large part of the proteins made by the Bacteroides genome are able ...
more infohttps://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2164-15-266

Frontiers | Biogenic Amines in Raw and Processed Seafood | MicrobiologyFrontiers | Biogenic Amines in Raw and Processed Seafood | Microbiology

Members of the Vibrionaceae (Vibrio and Photobacterium) and the Aeromonadaceae (Aeromonas spp.) families are also common ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2012.00188/full

Effect of intestinal tapeworms on the gut microbiota of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio | Parasites & Vectors | Full TextEffect of intestinal tapeworms on the gut microbiota of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio | Parasites & Vectors | Full Text

Aeromonadaceae (negative), Marinibacillus and Chitinilyticum (0.4, r , 0.7). These results suggest that the composition of gut ... 1b; Aeromonadaceae: t(23) = − 0.075, P = 0.941; Cetobacterium: t(23) = 0.245, P = 0.809; Enterobacteriaceae: t(23) = − 0.463, P ... 1a). At the genus/family level, Aeromonadaceae, Cetobacterium, Enterobacteriaceae and Mycoplasma were the relatively abundant ... Aeromonadaceae (t(23) = 0.651, P = 0.522), Enterobacteriaceae (t(23) = − 0.480, P = 0.636), Cetobacterium (t(23) = 0.519, P = ...
more infohttps://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-019-3510-z

Phylogenetic analysis of members of the genus Aeromonas based on gyrB gene sequences.  - PubMed - NCBIPhylogenetic analysis of members of the genus Aeromonas based on gyrB gene sequences. - PubMed - NCBI

The results support the recognition of the family Aeromonadaceae, as distinct from Plesiomonas shigelloides and other enteric ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12807216?dopt=Abstract

Antibiogram, Adhesive Characteristics, and Incidence of Class 1 Integron in Aeromonas Species Isolated from Two South African...Antibiogram, Adhesive Characteristics, and Incidence of Class 1 Integron in Aeromonas Species Isolated from Two South African...

R. R. Colwell, M. T. MacDonell, and J. De Ley, "Proposal to recognize the family Aeromonadaceae fam. nov," International ... the Aeromonadaceae [2, 3]. Aeromonads share in common many biochemical characteristics with members of the Enterobacteriaceae; ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2013/127570/

Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila in Liquid Media by Volatile Production Similarity Patterns, Using a FF-2A Electronic Nose.Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila in Liquid Media by Volatile Production Similarity Patterns, Using a FF-2A Electronic Nose.

Martin-Carnahan A.,Joseph S.W.,Family I.. Aeromonadaceae Colwell, MacDonell and De Ley 1986Bergeys Manual of Systematic ... Aeromonas species are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria that belong to the Aeromonadaceae family [21]. These ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Detection-Aeromonas-hydrophila-in-Liquid/23296330.html
  • Lower temperature (22 °C) showed the abundance of naturally occurring Pseudomonadaceae and Aeromonadaceae, whereas at high temperature (37 °C) numerous Enterobacteriaceae, Citrobacter spp. (doaj.org)
  • In contrast to the Betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria dominated enhanced biological phosphorus removal process, the functionally active polyP accumulators at pH 5.5 belonged to the Gammaproteobacteria, with key accumulators identified as members of the families Aeromonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae. (edu.au)