A genus of gram-positive cocci in the family AEROCOCCACEAE, occurring as airborne saprophytes.
A family of gram-positive non-sporing bacteria including many parasitic, pathogenic, and saprophytic forms.
Family of large marine CRUSTACEA, in the order DECAPODA. These are called clawed lobsters because they bear pincers on the first three pairs of legs. The American lobster and Cape lobster in the genus Homarus are commonly used for food.
Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.
Coccus-shaped bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.
A genus of gram-positive, coccoid bacteria whose organisms occur in pairs or chains. No endospores are produced. Many species exist as commensals or parasites on man or animals with some being highly pathogenic. A few species are saprophytes and occur in the natural environment.
Procedures for identifying types and strains of bacteria. The most frequently employed typing systems are BACTERIOPHAGE TYPING and SEROTYPING as well as bacteriocin typing and biotyping.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped, gliding bacteria in the family XANTHOMONADACEAE. Strongly proteolytic, it is involved in lysing a variety of microorganisms.

Aerococcus urinae: severe and fatal bloodstream infections and endocarditis. (1/9)

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Platelet activation and biofilm formation by Aerococcus urinae, an endocarditis-causing pathogen. (2/9)

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Detection of airborne bacteria in a German turkey house by cultivation-based and molecular methods. (3/9)

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Aerococcus viridans urinary tract infection in a pediatric patient with secondary pseudohypoaldosteronism. (4/9)

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Aerococcus urinae and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. (5/9)

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Studies of the pattern recognition molecule H-ficolin: specificity and purification. (6/9)

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Genome sequence of Aerococcus viridans LL1. (7/9)

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Limited prevalence of gaffkaemia (Aerococcus viridans var. homari) isolated from wild-caught European lobsters Homarus gammarus in England and Wales. (8/9)

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'Aerococcus' is a genus of Gram-positive, catalase-negative, coccus-shaped bacteria that are facultatively anaerobic and often found in pairs or tetrads. They are commonly found in various environments, including soil, water, and the skin and mucous membranes of animals. Some species of Aerococcus have been associated with human infections, particularly in individuals with underlying medical conditions or compromised immune systems. These infections can include urinary tract infections, endocarditis, and bacteremia. However, Aerococcus infections are relatively uncommon and often difficult to diagnose due to their slow growth and tendency to be overlooked in clinical microbiology laboratories.

Streptococcaceae is a family of coccoid gram-positive bacteria, many of which are part of the normal human microbiota. They are facultatively anaerobic and generally non-spore forming. Some species are pathogenic and can cause various infections in humans, such as strep throat, pneumonia, and meningitis. Members of this family are characterized by their ability to form chains during cell division and may be beta-hemolytic, alpha-hemolytic, or non-hemolytic on blood agar plates. The genera in Streptococcaceae include Streptococcus, Enterococcus, Lactococcus, and Vagococcus, among others.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nephropidae" is not a medical term. It is actually a taxonomic category in zoology, specifically a family of decapod crustaceans that includes lobsters and crayfish. If you have a question related to biology or veterinary medicine, I'd be happy to try to help with that.

Gram-positive bacterial infections refer to illnesses or diseases caused by Gram-positive bacteria, which are a group of bacteria that turn purple when stained using the Gram stain method. This staining technique is used in microbiology to differentiate between two main types of bacteria based on their cell wall composition.

Gram-positive bacteria have a thick layer of peptidoglycan in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process. Some common examples of Gram-positive bacteria include Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis.

Gram-positive bacterial infections can range from mild skin infections to severe and life-threatening conditions such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The symptoms of these infections depend on the type of bacteria involved and the location of the infection in the body. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are effective against Gram-positive bacteria, such as penicillin, vancomycin, or clindamycin. However, the emergence of antibiotic resistance among Gram-positive bacteria is a growing concern and can complicate treatment in some cases.

"Gram-Positive Cocci" is a term used in microbiology, which refers to a specific type of bacteria that appear round (cocci) in shape and stain purple when subjected to the Gram staining method. The Gram staining technique is a fundamental laboratory method used to differentiate bacterial species based on their cell wall composition.

Gram-positive bacteria have a thick peptidoglycan layer in their cell walls, which retains the crystal violet stain used in the Gram staining process, resulting in a purple color. Some common examples of Gram-Positive Cocci include Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. These bacteria can cause various infections, ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to severe systemic illnesses. It is essential to identify the type and nature of bacterial pathogens accurately for appropriate antimicrobial therapy and effective patient management.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

rRNA (ribosomal RNA) is not a type of gene itself, but rather a crucial component that is transcribed from genes known as ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In cells, rRNA plays an essential role in protein synthesis by assembling with ribosomal proteins to form ribosomes. Ribosomes are complex structures where the translation of mRNA into proteins occurs. There are multiple types of rRNA molecules, including 5S, 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNAs in eukaryotic cells, each with specific functions during protein synthesis.

In summary, 'Genes, rRNA' would refer to the genetic regions (genes) that code for ribosomal RNA molecules, which are vital components of the protein synthesis machinery within cells.

Streptococcus is a genus of Gram-positive, spherical bacteria that typically form pairs or chains when clustered together. These bacteria are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. They are non-motile and do not produce spores.

Streptococcus species are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. Some strains are part of the normal flora of the body, while others can cause a variety of infections, ranging from mild skin infections to severe and life-threatening diseases such as sepsis, meningitis, and toxic shock syndrome.

The pathogenicity of Streptococcus species depends on various virulence factors, including the production of enzymes and toxins that damage tissues and evade the host's immune response. One of the most well-known Streptococcus species is Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A streptococcus (GAS), which is responsible for a wide range of clinical manifestations, including pharyngitis (strep throat), impetigo, cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, and rheumatic fever.

It's important to note that the classification of Streptococcus species has evolved over time, with many former members now classified as different genera within the family Streptococcaceae. The current classification system is based on a combination of phenotypic characteristics (such as hemolysis patterns and sugar fermentation) and genotypic methods (such as 16S rRNA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing).

Bacterial typing techniques are methods used to identify and differentiate bacterial strains or isolates based on their unique characteristics. These techniques are essential in epidemiological studies, infection control, and research to understand the transmission dynamics, virulence, and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens.

There are various bacterial typing techniques available, including:

1. **Bacteriophage Typing:** This method involves using bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to identify specific bacterial strains based on their susceptibility or resistance to particular phages.
2. **Serotyping:** It is a technique that differentiates bacterial strains based on the antigenic properties of their cell surface components, such as capsules, flagella, and somatic (O) and flagellar (H) antigens.
3. **Biochemical Testing:** This method uses biochemical reactions to identify specific metabolic pathways or enzymes present in bacterial strains, which can be used for differentiation. Commonly used tests include the catalase test, oxidase test, and various sugar fermentation tests.
4. **Molecular Typing Techniques:** These methods use genetic markers to identify and differentiate bacterial strains at the DNA level. Examples of molecular typing techniques include:
* **Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE):** This method uses restriction enzymes to digest bacterial DNA, followed by electrophoresis in an agarose gel under pulsed electrical fields. The resulting banding patterns are analyzed and compared to identify related strains.
* **Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST):** It involves sequencing specific housekeeping genes to generate unique sequence types that can be used for strain identification and phylogenetic analysis.
* **Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS):** This method sequences the entire genome of a bacterial strain, providing the most detailed information on genetic variation and relatedness between strains. WGS data can be analyzed using various bioinformatics tools to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), gene deletions or insertions, and other genetic changes that can be used for strain differentiation.

These molecular typing techniques provide higher resolution than traditional methods, allowing for more accurate identification and comparison of bacterial strains. They are particularly useful in epidemiological investigations to track the spread of pathogens and identify outbreaks.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Lysobacter is a genus of bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and plant surfaces. They are gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are known for their ability to produce a variety of hydrolytic enzymes, including proteases, lipases, and chitinases. These enzymes allow Lysobacter species to break down complex organic matter and obtain nutrients from their environment.

Lysobacter species have also been found to have antimicrobial properties, producing compounds that inhibit the growth of other bacteria, fungi, and viruses. This has led to interest in Lysobacter as a potential source of new antibiotics and other biocontrol agents.

It's worth noting that while Lysobacter species have been studied for their potential applications in biotechnology and medicine, they can also cause infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. However, such infections are relatively rare.

... is a genus in the phylum Bacillota (Bacteria). The genus was first identified in 1953 from samples of air and dust ... The name Aerococcus derives from the Greek aer, aeros (ἀήρ, ἀέρος), air; Neo-Latin coccus (from Greekkokkos (κόκκος)), a berry ... Aerococcus entry in LPSN; Euzéby, J.P. (1997). "List of Bacterial Names with Standing in Nomenclature: a folder available on ... "Note: Aerococcus christensenii sp. nov., from the human vagina". Ijs.sgmjournals.org. 1999-07-01. Archived from the original on ...
... is a Gram-positive bacterium associated with urinary tract infections. Aerococcus urinae is a member of the ... A. urinae is the most common aerococcus isolated from invasive human infections whereas Aerococcus sanguinicola is isolated ... Type strain of Aerococcus urinae at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description, ... Williams, R. E. O.; Hirch, A.; Cowan, S. T. (1953-06-01). "Aerococcus, a New Bacterial Genus". Journal of General Microbiology ...
... is a member of the bacterial genus Aerococcus and is a Gram-positive, catalase-negative coccus growing ... Cattoir, V; Kobal, A; Legrand, P (October 2010). "Aerococcus urinae and Aerococcus sanguinicola, two frequently misidentified ... Cattoir, V; Kobal, A; Legrand, P (October 2010). "Aerococcus urinae and Aerococcus sanguinicola, two frequently misidentified ... "Clinical significance and antimicrobial susceptibilities of Aerococcus sanguinicola and Aerococcus urinae". Diagn Microbiol ...
... is a member of the bacterial genus Aerococcus. It is a causative agent of gaffkaemia, a disease of lobsters ... Type strain of Aerococcus viridans at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase v t e (Articles with short description, ... Taurino, Irene (2013). "Comparative study of three lactate oxidases from Aerococcus viridans for biosensing applications" (PDF ... "Genetic characterization of the lobster pathogen Aerococcus viridans var. homari by 16S rRNA gene sequence and RAPD" (PDF). ...
"Pediococcus urinaeequi" reclassified as Aerococcus urinaeequi. "Pediococcus cerevisiae" strains reclassified to P. damnosus, P ... as do the other lactic acid cocci genera Aerococcus and Tetragenococcus. They are purely homofermentative. Pediococcus is, ...
... and the gaffkaemia bacterium was recognised as a subspecies or variety of Aerococcus viridans by Kelly and Evans in 1974. The ... and Aerococcus viridans". Microbiology. 81 (1): 257-260. doi:10.1099/00221287-81-1-257. PMID 4822121. Greg Lewbart (2006). " ... caused by the Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium Aerococcus viridans var. homari. Gaffkaemia was first discovered in 1947 in ... "Genetic characterization of the lobster pathogen Aerococcus viridans var. homari by 16S rRNA gene sequence and RAPD" (PDF). ...
"Genetic characterization of the lobster pathogen Aerococcus viridans var. homari by 16S rRNA gene sequence and RAPD" (PDF). ...
Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Ruoff, Kathryn L. (2015). "Aerococcus, Abiotrophia, and Other Aerobic Catalase-Negative, Gram- ...
A positive test can occur with Enterococcus, Aerococcus, and Leuconostoc. Aesculin will fluoresce under long wave ultraviolet ...
Arbonne's testing found that the batch contained the bacterium Aerococcus viridans. In January 2014, the Australian Competition ...
... is susceptible to the disease gaffkaemia, caused by the bacterium Aerococcus viridans. Although it is ...
2014;173:1115-7; Gibb AP, Sivaraman B. A second case of foul smelling urine in a boy caused by Aerococcus urinae. Pediatr ... Lenherr N, Berndt A, Ritz N, Rudin C. Aerococcus urinae: a possible reason for malodorous urine in otherwise healthy children. ... odor of the urine has also been associated with colonization of the urinary tract with a bacterium called Aerococcus urinae, ...
... is linked with inhibition of Aerococcus viridans growth". Clin. Chim. Acta. 325 (1-2): 139-46. doi:10.1016/S0009-8981(02)00274- ...
Gaffkaemia or red-tail is an extremely virulent infectious disease of lobsters caused by the bacterium Aerococcus viridans. It ...
Journal of Medical Microbiology (2009), 58, 1652-1656 Ruoff, Katheryn L. (2011). Aerococcus, Abiotrophia, and other Aerobic ...
Abiotrophia Aerococcus Carnobacterium Enterococcus Lactobacillus Lactococcus Leuconostoc Oenococcus Pediococcus Streptococcus ... as well as the more peripheral Aerococcus, Carnobacterium, Enterococcus, Oenococcus, Sporolactobacillus, Tetragenococcus, ...
Aerococcus is a genus in the phylum Bacillota (Bacteria). The genus was first identified in 1953 from samples of air and dust ... The name Aerococcus derives from the Greek aer, aeros (ἀήρ, ἀέρος), air; Neo-Latin coccus (from Greekkokkos (κόκκος)), a berry ... Aerococcus entry in LPSN; Euzéby, J.P. (1997). "List of Bacterial Names with Standing in Nomenclature: a folder available on ... "Note: Aerococcus christensenii sp. nov., from the human vagina". Ijs.sgmjournals.org. 1999-07-01. Archived from the original on ...
Identification of two abundant Aerococcus urinae cell wall-anchored proteins. *Mark. Senneby, Erik LU ; Sunnerhagen, Torgny LU ... Infections caused by Aerococcus and other endocarditis-causing pathogens. language. English. LU publication?. yes. additional ... Aerococcus urinae is an emerging pathogen that causes urinary tract infections, bacteremia and infective endocarditis. The ... Aerococcus urinae is an emerging pathogen that causes urinary tract infections, bacteremia and infective endocarditis. The ...
Aerococcus Suis sp. nov., Isolated from Clinical Specimens from Swine. En: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary ...
Aerococcus loyolae. Human urine vis transurethral catheter. J J Christensen, Slagelse, Denmark. 2022-09-14. ... Aerococcus mictus. Human urine vis transurethral catheter. J J Christensen, Slagelse, Denmark. 2022-09-14. ... Aerococcus tenax. Human urine vis transurethral catheter. J J Christensen, Slagelse, Denmark. 2022-09-14. ...
No respiratory pathogens of concern were observed; however, the potentially pathogenic species Aerococcus viridans was present ...
Three other significant ocular pathogens added to the indications granted for theBesivance eye drop include Aerococcus viridans ... Aerococcus viridans*, CDC coryneform group G, Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum*, Corynebacterium striatum*, Haemophilus ...
Aerococcus urinae (731), and Neisseria elongata (732). Diagnostic testing and treatment for less-common organisms are reserved ...
Aerococcus RSV_genus501 Bacteria;Firmicutes;Bacilli;Lactobacillales;Aerococcaceae;Eremococcus RSV_genus502 Bacteria;Firmicutes; ...
The isolates were recognized as 137 strains belonging to Aerococcus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus and Pediococcus ...
Aerococcus. , Campylobacter. , Cardiobacterium. , Clostridium. , Curtobacterium. , Dialister. , Dietzia. , Dysgonomo-nas. , ...
Carrier-based immobilization of Aerococcus viridans L-lactate oxidase. Luley-Goedl, C., Bruni, M. & Nidetzky, B., 20 Feb 2024, ...
Aerococcus urinae Isolated from Women with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: In Vitro Aggregation and Genome Analysis. Hilt, Evann ...
Aerococcus viridans ATCC 11563 = CCUG 4311. s. 7. 2. Parvimonas sp. oral taxon 393 str. F0440. s. 7. 2. ...
Fatal infective endocarditis caused by Aerococcus sanguinicola: a case report and literature review. Jumatate, R., Hammarlund, ... Microorganisms that commonly cause infective endocarditis- what about Aerococcus in the Duke-ISCVID criteria?. Sunnerhagen, T. ...
Aerococcus autosymbionts introduced under the skin to staphylococcus in 5 hours and 3 hours after administration of the latter ... Key words: aerococcus, antagonistic action, model of staphylococcus infection. Abstract. Study of biological action of ... Stepanskyi D.O., Kremenchutskyi G.M., Koshova I.P. Study of action of biological aerococcus аutosymbiont on the model of ... In animals with wounds treated with aerococcus autostrains the number of pathogenic staphylococci was 10 times less than in the ...
Aerococcus spp. and Acinetobacter baumanni, suggesting a potential environmental reservoir. Sulfonamide resistance in ...
Pommeled hereto aside someone Neutrapen, Aerococcus encinctured a toothless agamic extrusions. Candies glaciate streakily ...
New species of the Aerococcus genus isolated from patients with urinary tract infections. Apoptosis and cell proliferation ...
48996 2 peyote, Streptococcus electronic, Streptococcus epidemidis, Streptococcus faecalis, compiler grades, Aerococcus people ...
Enterobacter and Aerococcus. There was an increase in weight and cell concentration of nodes, intense expression of W3/25 + ( ...
At the genus level, the occupancy of g_Aerococcus, g_Jeotgalicoccus, g_Blautia, g_Pseudomonas and unclassified members of f_ ... At the genus level, the occupancy of g_Aerococcus, g_Jeotgalicoccus, g_Blautia, g_Pseudomonas and unclassified members of f_ ... At the genus level, the occupancy of g_Aerococcus, g_Jeotgalicoccus, g_Blautia, g_Pseudomonas and unclassified members of f_ ... At the genus level, the occupancy of g_Aerococcus, g_Jeotgalicoccus, g_Blautia, g_Pseudomonas and unclassified members of f_ ...
At the genus level, lesional skin had more Alloiococcus (p=0.01) and Aerococcus (p=0.01) and demonstrated a trend towards lower ...
8B). Cetobacterium, Campylobacter, Aerococcus, Acetatifactor, Pseudomonas, Neochlamydia, Prevotella_2, Prevotella_7, ...
Aerococcus B3.353.750.30.30 Affective Disorders, Psychotic F3.600.150 F3.700.150 Afghan Campaign 2001- I1.880.735.950.250.94 ...
Aerococcus B3.353.750.30.30 Affective Disorders, Psychotic F3.600.150 F3.700.150 Afghan Campaign 2001- I1.880.735.950.250.94 ...
  • Genetic characterization of the lobster pathogen Aerococcus viridans var. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, the potentially pathogenic species Aerococcus viridans was present in several samples. (cdc.gov)
  • Aerococcus viridans-lactate oxidase (LOx), widely used to study lactate biosensors, was modified with a single trPES molecule. (myu-group.co.jp)
  • Aerococcus urinae is an emerging pathogen that causes urinary tract infections, bacteremia and infective endocarditis. (lu.se)
  • Microorganisms that commonly cause infective endocarditis- what about Aerococcus in the Duke-ISCVID criteria? (lu.se)
  • Reclassification of Pediococcus urinaeequi (ex Mees 1934) Garvie 1988 as Aerococcus urinaeequi comb. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the genus level, the occupancy of g_Aerococcus, g_Jeotgalicoccus, g_Blautia, g_Pseudomonas and unclassified members of f_Clostridiale and f_Ruminococcaceae increased, while the occupancy of g_Lactobacillus, unclassified members of f_S24-7, and g_Corynebacterium decreased in Tg-APP/PS1 mice. (ewha.ac.kr)
  • Aerococcus is a genus in the phylum Bacillota (Bacteria). (wikipedia.org)
  • Infective endocarditis should be suspected in all patients with Aerococcus bacteremia and urinary source is usually the source of bacteremia. (netlify.app)
  • The taxonomic status of Pediococcus urinaeequi is described, and the transfer of the species to the genus Aerococcus with the name Aerococcus urinaeequi comb. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • The phylogeny of Aerococcus and Pediococcus as determined by 16S rRNA sequence analysis: description of Tetragenococcus gen. nov. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Reclassification of Pediococcus urinaeequi (ex Mees 1934) Garvie 1988 as Aerococcus urinaeequi comb. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • HN - 2010 BX - Abiotrophia MH - Aerococcus UI - D056570 MN - B3.510.400.30 MN - B3.510.550.30.30 MS - A genus of gram-positive cocci in the family AEROCOCCACEAE, occurring as airborne saprophytes. (nih.gov)
  • At the top are the spore-forming Bacillus , with non-spore-forming Firmicutes ( Aerococcus et al. (blogspot.com)