Aerococcus: A genus of gram-positive cocci in the family AEROCOCCACEAE, occurring as airborne saprophytes.Streptococcaceae: A family of gram-positive non-sporing bacteria including many parasitic, pathogenic, and saprophytic forms.Biohazard Release: Uncontrolled release of biological material from its containment. This either threatens to, or does, cause exposure to a biological hazard. Such an incident may occur accidentally or deliberately.Containment of Biohazards: Provision of physical and biological barriers to the dissemination of potentially hazardous biologically active agents (bacteria, viruses, recombinant DNA, etc.). Physical containment involves the use of special equipment, facilities, and procedures to prevent the escape of the agent. Biological containment includes use of immune personnel and the selection of agents and hosts that will minimize the risk should the agent escape the containment facility.Nephropidae: Family of large marine CRUSTACEA, in the order DECAPODA. These are called clawed lobsters because they bear pincers on the first three pairs of legs. The American lobster and Cape lobster in the genus Homarus are commonly used for food.Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections: Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method.Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Gentian Violet: A dye that is a mixture of violet rosanilinis with antibacterial, antifungal, and anthelmintic properties.PhenazinesRNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Abattoirs: Places where animals are slaughtered and dressed for market.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Enteritis: Inflammation of any segment of the SMALL INTESTINE.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Shiga Toxin: A toxin produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE. It is the prototype of class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS.Shiga Toxin 2: A toxin produced by certain pathogenic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157. It shares 50-60% homology with SHIGA TOXIN and SHIGA TOXIN 1.Escherichia coli O157: A verocytotoxin-producing serogroup belonging to the O subfamily of Escherichia coli which has been shown to cause severe food-borne disease. A strain from this serogroup, serotype H7, which produces SHIGA TOXINS, has been linked to human disease outbreaks resulting from contamination of foods by E. coli O157 from bovine origin.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Escherichia coli Infections: Infections with bacteria of the species ESCHERICHIA COLI.Shiga Toxins: A class of toxins that inhibit protein synthesis by blocking the interaction of ribosomal RNA; (RNA, RIBOSOMAL) with PEPTIDE ELONGATION FACTORS. They include SHIGA TOXIN which is produced by SHIGELLA DYSENTERIAE and a variety of shiga-like toxins that are produced by pathologic strains of ESCHERICHIA COLI such as ESCHERICHIA COLI O157.Tobacco, Smokeless: Powdered or cut pieces of leaves of NICOTIANA TABACUM which are inhaled through the nose, chewed, or stored in cheek pouches. It includes any product of tobacco that is not smoked.ArchivesBiological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Weevils: BEETLES in the family Curculionidae and the largest family in the order COLEOPTERA. They have a markedly convex shape and many are considered pests.Directories as Topic: Lists of persons or organizations, systematically arranged, usually in alphabetic or classed order, giving address, affiliations, etc., for individuals, and giving address, officers, functions, and similar data for organizations. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Nitrosamines: A class of compounds that contain a -NH2 and a -NO radical. Many members of this group have carcinogenic and mutagenic properties.Tobacco Products: Substances and products derived from NICOTIANA TABACUM.Bartonellaceae: A family of small gram-negative bacteria whose organisms are parasites of erythrocytes in man and other vertebrates and the etiologic agents of several diseases.Sphingomonas: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria characterized by an outer membrane that contains glycosphingolipids but lacks lipopolysaccharide. They have the ability to degrade a broad range of substituted aromatic compounds.Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.Sphingomonadaceae: A family of gram-negative, asporogenous rods or ovoid cells, aerobic or facultative anaerobic chemoorganotrophs. They are commonly isolated from SOIL, activated sludge, or marine environments.Bartonellaceae Infections: Infections with bacteria of the family BARTONELLACEAE.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Caulobacter: A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod- or vibroid-shaped or fusiform bacteria that commonly produce a stalk. They are found in fresh water and soil and divide by binary transverse fission.Caulobacteraceae: A family of stalked bacteria that reproduces by budding. There are four genera: CAULOBACTER, Asticcacaulis, Brevundimonas, and Phenylobacterium.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Avihepadnavirus: A genus of HEPADNAVIRIDAE infecting birds but rarely causing clinical problems. Transmission is predominantly vertical. HEPATITIS B VIRUS, DUCK is the type species.Encephalitis Virus, Eastern Equine: A species of ALPHAVIRUS causing encephalomyelitis in Equidae and humans. The virus ranges along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States and Canada and as far south as the Caribbean, Mexico, and parts of Central and South America. Infections in horses show a mortality of up to 90 percent and in humans as high as 80 percent in epidemics.Rift Valley fever virus: A mosquito-borne species of the PHLEBOVIRUS genus found in eastern, central, and southern Africa, producing massive hepatitis, abortion, and death in sheep, goats, cattle, and other animals. It also has caused disease in humans.Rift Valley Fever: An acute infection caused by the RIFT VALLEY FEVER VIRUS, an RNA arthropod-borne virus, affecting domestic animals and humans. In animals, symptoms include HEPATITIS; abortion (ABORTION, VETERINARY); and DEATH. In humans, symptoms range from those of a flu-like disease to hemorrhagic fever, ENCEPHALITIS, or BLINDNESS.Norwalk virus: The type species in the genus NOROVIRUS, first isolated in 1968 from the stools of school children in Norwalk, Ohio, who were suffering from GASTROENTERITIS. The virions are non-enveloped spherical particles containing a single protein. Multiple strains are named after the places where outbreaks have occurred.Rotavirus: A genus of REOVIRIDAE, causing acute gastroenteritis in BIRDS and MAMMALS, including humans. Transmission is horizontal and by environmental contamination. Seven species (Rotaviruses A thru G) are recognized.Hepatitis B Virus, Duck: A DNA virus that closely resembles human hepatitis B virus. It has been recovered from naturally infected ducks.Hepatitis B virus: The type species of the genus ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS which causes human HEPATITIS B and is also apparently a causal agent in human HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA. The Dane particle is an intact hepatitis virion, named after its discoverer. Non-infectious spherical and tubular particles are also seen in the serum.Rotavirus Infections: Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.Encephalomyelitis, Eastern Equine: A form of arboviral encephalitis (primarily affecting equines) endemic to eastern regions of North America. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, EASTERN EQUINE) may be transmitted to humans via the bite of AEDES mosquitoes. Clinical manifestations include the acute onset of fever, HEADACHE, altered mentation, and SEIZURES followed by coma. The condition is fatal in up to 50% of cases. Recovery may be marked by residual neurologic deficits and EPILEPSY. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp9-10)Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Reagent Kits, Diagnostic: Commercially prepared reagent sets, with accessory devices, containing all of the major components and literature necessary to perform one or more designated diagnostic tests or procedures. They may be for laboratory or personal use.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Gram-Negative Bacteria: Bacteria which lose crystal violet stain but are stained pink when treated by Gram's method.
(1/2) Globicatella sanguinis meningitis associated with human carriage.

 (+info)

(2/2) Globicatella sanguinis meningitis in a post head trauma patient: first case report from Asia.

Globicatella sanguinis is a rare isolate in clinical samples. We present a case of meningitis in a 70-year-old male patient after a head injury operation. Three consecutive cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained from the patient identified Globicatella sanguinis based on morphology, biochemical profile, and Vitek-2 identification. The patient recovered after antibiotic treatment with vancomycin. This is the first case report of Globicatella sanguinis from Asia from a case of meningitis.  (+info)

*  Aerococcaceae
The Aerococcaceae are a family of Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria, including the bacterium that causes gaffkaemia in ... "Aerococcaceae". Taxonomy Browser. NCBI. Retrieved 2008-09-10. Spencer J. Greenwood; Ian R. Keith; Béatrice M. Després; Richard ...
*  Facklamia
... is a Gram-positive genus of bacteria from the family of Aerococcaceae. Facklamia bacteria are pathogens in humans. ...
*  Eremococcus
... is a genus of bacteria from the family of Aerococcaceae with one known species (Eremococcus coleocola). " ...
*  Globicatella
... is a non-spore-forming and non-motile genus of bacteria from the family of Aerococcaceae. Parte, A.C. " ...
*  Dolosicoccus
... is a Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic and non-motile genus of bacteria from the family of Aerococcaceae with ...
*  Ignavigranum
... facultatively anaerobic non-spore-forming and non-motile genus of bacteria from the family of Aerococcaceae with one known ...
Aerococcaceae - Wikipedia  Aerococcaceae - Wikipedia
The Aerococcaceae are a family of Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria, including the bacterium that causes gaffkaemia in ... "Aerococcaceae". Taxonomy Browser. NCBI. Retrieved 2008-09-10. Spencer J. Greenwood; Ian R. Keith; Béatrice M. Després; Richard ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerococcaceae
Environmental Health Perspectives   -  Exposures Related to House Dust Microbiota in a U.S. Farming Population  Environmental Health Perspectives - Exposures Related to House Dust Microbiota in a U.S. Farming Population
Aerococcaceae. 0.209. 0.128. +. 16. 3. 3. Proteobacteria. Comamonadaceae. 0.087. 0.060. +. 12. 3. 3. ...
more infohttps://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/ehp3145/
Aerococcus urinaehominis  Aerococcus urinaehominis
Bacteria; Firmicutes; Bacilli; Lactobacillales; Aerococcaceae; Aerococcus. Industrial uses or economic implications:. not known ...
more infohttp://thelabrat.com/protocols/Bacterialspecies/Aerococcusurinaehominis.shtml
proteome:(*) in Taxonomy  proteome:(*) in Taxonomy
Bacteria › Firmicutes › Bacilli › Lactobacillales › Aerococcaceae › Abiotrophia. Proteomes (1) UniProtKB (1,945)- Unreviewed ( ... Bacteria › Firmicutes › Bacilli › Lactobacillales › Aerococcaceae › Abiotrophia. Proteomes (1) UniProtKB (1,780)- Unreviewed ( ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/taxonomy/complete-proteomes
Identification of natural antimicrobial peptides from bacteria through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of high...  Identification of natural antimicrobial peptides from bacteria through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis of high...
Anti-microbial peptides (AMPs), naturally encoded by genes and generally containing 12-100 amino acids, are crucial components of the innate immune system and can protect the host from various pathogenic bacteria and viruses. In recent years, the widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in the rapid growth of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms that often induce critical infection and pathogenesis. Recently, the advent of high-throughput technologies has led molecular biology into a data surge in both the amount and scope of data. For instance, next-generation sequencing technology has been applied to generate large-scale sequencing reads from foods, water, soil, air, and specimens to identify microbiota and their functions based on metagenomics and metatranscriptomics, respectively. In addition, oolong tea is partially fermented and is the most widely produced tea in Taiwan. Many studies have shown the benefits of oolong tea in inhibiting obesity, reducing dental plaque deposition, antagonizing
more infohttps://bmcsystbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12918-017-0503-4
ORBi: Browsing ORBi  ORBi: Browsing ORBi
This was also the case for Firmicutes bacterial populations (families of Aerococcaceae, Planococcaceae). Except for ...
more infohttp://orbi.ulg.ac.be/browse?type=author&value=Korsak%20Koulagenko,%20Nicolas%20p002297
Facklamia - Wikipedia  Facklamia - Wikipedia
Facklamia is a Gram-positive genus of bacteria from the family of Aerococcaceae. Facklamia bacteria are pathogens in humans. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facklamia
ABIS Encyclopedia  ABIS Encyclopedia
Phylum Firmicutes, Class Bacilli, Order Lactobacillales, Family Aerococcaceae, Genus Facklamia, Facklamia miroungae Hoyles et ...
more infohttp://tgw1916.net/Aerococcaceae/miroungae.html
IJERPH  | Free Full-Text | Diversity of Bacterial Communities of Fitness Center Surfaces in a U.S. Metropolitan Area | HTML  IJERPH | Free Full-Text | Diversity of Bacterial Communities of Fitness Center Surfaces in a U.S. Metropolitan Area | HTML
Aerococcaceae, and Microbacteriaceae. In general, the most common bacterial genus observed in this study was found to be ... Aerococcaceae, and Pseudomonadaceae have been found abundantly in all surface swab samples (Figure 2). ...
more infohttps://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/12/12544/htm
Humans differ in their personal microbial cloud [PeerJ]  Humans differ in their personal microbial cloud [PeerJ]
Aerococcaceae, and Tissierellaceae. Thus we didn't rarefy the second dataset, but rather created a subset of relative ... Aerococcaceae, and Tissierellaceae). These are hereafter referred to as "targeted OTUs." Specifically, we selected these ...
more infohttps://peerj.com/articles/1258/
Microbial gender- and tissue-specific biomarkers identi | Open-i  Microbial gender- and tissue-specific biomarkers identi | Open-i
4A). In contrast, Enterobacteriaceae and Aerococcaceae OTUs were significantly higher in male reproductive tissues (p , 0.01). ... 4A). In contrast, Enterobacteriaceae and Aerococcaceae OTUs were significantly higher in male reproductive tissues (p , 0.01). ...
more infohttps://openi.nlm.nih.gov/detailedresult.php?img=PMC4834568_srep24207-f4&req=4
ٶݤη??  ٶݤη??
Aerococcaceae) (Carnobacteriaceae) (Enterococcaceae) (Lactobacillaceae) (Leuconostocaceae) (Streptococcaceae) **** ???? ???? G+ ...
more infohttp://www.eps.nagoya-u.ac.jp/~seicoro/bio/bacteria.html
JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols  JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols
... the Family Aerococcaceae and Carnobacteriaceae, as well as the Genus Abiotrophia and Granulicatella were associated with ...
more infohttps://www.jove.com/visualize?author=Cheng-Zhi+Xu
JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols  JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols
... the Family Aerococcaceae and Carnobacteriaceae, as well as the Genus Abiotrophia and Granulicatella were associated with ...
more infohttps://www.jove.com/visualize?author=Lei%20Cheng%20
Altered Gut Microbiome and Intestinal Pathology in Parkinsons Disease  Altered Gut Microbiome and Intestinal Pathology in Parkinson's Disease
Eubacteriaceae (F), Bifidobacteriaceae (F), Aerococcaceae (F), Desulfovibrionaceae (F) (see footnote for genera composition). ...
more infohttps://www.e-jmd.org/journal/view.php?number=246&viewtype=pubreader
Altered Gut Microbiome and Intestinal Pathology in Parkinsons Disease  Altered Gut Microbiome and Intestinal Pathology in Parkinson's Disease
Eubacteriaceae (F), Bifidobacteriaceae (F), Aerococcaceae (F), Desulfovibrionaceae (F) (see footnote for genera composition). ...
more infohttps://www.e-jmd.org/journal/view.php?viewtype=pubreader&number=246
Differences in the Bacteriome of Smokeless Tobacco Products with Different Oral Carcinogenicity: Compositional and Predicted...  Differences in the Bacteriome of Smokeless Tobacco Products with Different Oral Carcinogenicity: Compositional and Predicted...
... and an unclassified genus of the family Aerococcaceae were identified as the predominant genera in the American moist snuff, ... and an unclassified genus of the family Aerococcaceae made up the bulk of the microbiome instead. While these vast differences ...
more infohttp://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC5406853/
HOMD Taxon Table Tab Delimit Text  HOMD Taxon Table Tab Delimit Text
389 Bacteria Firmicutes Bacilli Lactobacillales Aerococcaceae Abiotrophia defectiva Named ATCC 49176 AY207063 236 0.68 28 ...
more infohttp://homd.org/index.php?name=Download&file=download&table=tt&format=html
Category:Lactobacillales - Wikimedia Commons  Category:Lactobacillales - Wikimedia Commons
Aerococcaceae, Carnobacteriaceae, Enterococcaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Leuconostocaceae, Streptococcaceae *World Register of ...
more infohttps://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Lactobacillales
BIOLOGICAL SAMPLE TARGET CLASSIFICATION, DETECTION AND SELECTION METHODS,     AND RELATED ARRAYS AND OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES -...  BIOLOGICAL SAMPLE TARGET CLASSIFICATION, DETECTION AND SELECTION METHODS, AND RELATED ARRAYS AND OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES -...
Aerococcaceae, Aeromonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Anaeroplasmataceae, Anaplasmataceae, Bacillaceae, Bacteroidaceae, Bartonellaceae ... Aerococcaceae, Aeromonadaceae, Alcaligenaceae, Alcanivoracaceae, Alicyclobacillaceae, Alteromonadaceae, Alteromonadales, ...
more infohttp://www.patentsencyclopedia.com/app/20130267429