A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.
Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.
An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.
Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.
The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.
A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.
A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.
An organothiophosphate insecticide.
An acute infectious disease primarily of the tropics, caused by a virus and transmitted to man by mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Haemagogus. The severe form is characterized by fever, HEMOLYTIC JAUNDICE, and renal damage.
A species of ALPHAVIRUS causing an acute dengue-like fever.
The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.
A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.
Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.
An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.
A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.
Proteins found in any species of insect.
The development by insects of resistance to insecticides.
Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.
Slender tubular or hairlike excretory structures found in insects. They emerge from the alimentary canal between the mesenteron (midgut) and the proctodeum (hindgut).
Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.
Virus diseases caused by members of the ALPHAVIRUS genus of the family TOGAVIRIDAE.
Substances causing insects to turn away from them or reject them as food.
A genus of bacteria comprised of a heterogenous group of gram-negative small rods and coccoid forms associated with arthropods. (From Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol 1, 1984)
A serotype of the species California encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, CALIFORNIA), in the genus ORTHOBUNYAVIRUS, causing human MENINGOENCEPHALITIS. This is the agent most responsible for California encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, CALIFORNIA), the most prevalent mosquito-borne disease recognized in the United States.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
A nutritional reservoir of fatty tissue found mainly in insects and amphibians.
Arthropod-borne viruses. A non-taxonomic designation for viruses that can replicate in both vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. Included are some members of the following families: ARENAVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; TOGAVIRIDAE; and FLAVIVIRIDAE. (From Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2nd ed)
A protozoan parasite that causes avian malaria (MALARIA, AVIAN), primarily in chickens, and is transmitted by the Aedes mosquito.
The capability of producing eggs (OVA) from which young are hatched outside the body. While mostly referring to nonmammalian species, this does include MAMMALS of the order MONOTREMATA.
Various material objects and items in the home. It includes temporary or permanent machinery and appliances. It does not include furniture or interior furnishings (FURNITURE see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS; INTERIOR FURNISHINGS see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS).
A genus of FLAVIVIRIDAE containing several subgroups and many species. Most are arboviruses transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks. The type species is YELLOW FEVER VIRUS.
The type species of ALPHAVIRUS normally transmitted to birds by CULEX mosquitoes in Egypt, South Africa, India, Malaya, the Philippines, and Australia. It may be associated with fever in humans. Serotypes (differing by less than 17% in nucleotide sequence) include Babanki, Kyzylagach, and Ockelbo viruses.

Newly recognized focus of La Crosse encephalitis in Tennessee. (1/2153)

La Crosse virus is a mosquito-borne arbovirus that causes encephalitis in children. Only nine cases were reported in Tennessee during the 33-year period from 1964-1996. We investigated a cluster of La Crosse encephalitis cases in eastern Tennessee in 1997. Medical records of all suspected cases of La Crosse virus infection at a pediatric referral hospital were reviewed, and surveillance was enhanced in the region. Previous unreported cases were identified by surveying 20 hospitals in the surrounding 16 counties. Mosquito eggs were collected from five sites. Ten cases of La Crosse encephalitis were serologically confirmed. None of the patients had been discharged from hospitals in the region with diagnosed La Crosse encephalitis in the preceding 5 years. Aedes triseriatus and Aedes albopictus were collected at the case sites; none of the mosquitos had detectable La Crosse virus. This cluster may represent an extension of a recently identified endemic focus of La Crosse virus infection in West Virginia.  (+info)

Sodalis gen. nov. and Sodalis glossinidius sp. nov., a microaerophilic secondary endosymbiont of the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans. (2/2153)

A secondary intracellular symbiotic bacterium was isolated from the haemolymph of the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans and cultured in Aedes albopictus cell line C6/36. Pure-culture isolation of this bacterium was achieved through the use of solid-phase culture under a microaerobic atmosphere. After isolation of strain M1T, a range of tests was performed to determine the phenotypic properties of this bacterium. Considering the results of these tests, along with the phylogenetic position of this micro-organism, it is proposed that this intracellular symbiont from G. m. morsitans should be classified in a new genus Sodalis gen. nov., as Sodalis glossinidius gen. nov., sp. nov. Strain M1T is the type strain for this new species.  (+info)

Vectors of Chikungunya virus in Senegal: current data and transmission cycles. (3/2153)

Chikungunya fever is a viral disease transmitted to human beings by Aedes genus mosquitoes. From 1972 to 1986 in Kedougou, Senegal, 178 Chikungunya virus strains were isolated from gallery forest mosquitoes, with most of them isolated from Ae. furcifer-taylori (129 strains), Ae. luteocephalus (27 strains), and Ae. dalzieli (12 strains). The characteristics of the sylvatic transmission cycle are a circulation periodicity with silent intervals that last approximately three years. Few epidemics of this disease have been reported in Senegal. The most recent one occurred in 1996 in Kaffrine where two Chikungunya virus strains were isolated from Ae. aegypti. The retrospective analysis of viral isolates from mosquitoes, wild vertebrates, and humans allowed to us to characterize Chikungunya virus transmission cycles in Senegal and to compare them with those of yellow fever virus.  (+info)

Variation in oral susceptibility to dengue type 2 virus of populations of Aedes aegypti from the islands of Tahiti and Moorea, French Polynesia. (4/2153)

Twenty three samples of Aedes aegypti populations from the islands of Tahiti and Moorea (French Polynesia) were tested for their oral susceptibility to dengue type 2 virus. The high infection rates obtained suggest that the artificial feeding protocol used was more efficient than those previously described. Statistical analysis of the results allowed us to define two distinct geographic areas on Tahiti with respect to the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti: the east coast, with homogeneous infection rates, and the west coast, with heterogeneous infection rates. No geographic differences could be demonstrated on Moorea. The possible mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed in connection with recent findings on the variability of susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to insecticides.  (+info)

Replication of dengue type 2 virus in Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). (5/2153)

We were able to infect Culex quinquefasciatus by the parenteral route with dengue virus type 2. The percentage of mosquitoes infected was dose dependent and we obtained a rate of 45.6% infected Cx. quinquefasciatus when a 10(5.9) MID50 (mosquito infectious dose for 50% of the individuals as measured in Aedes aegypti) of dengue virus type 2 per mosquito was used. Infection was detected by an immunofluorescent assay performed on mosquito head squashes 14 days after infection. The replication of dengue virus in Cx. quinquefasciatus was either at a very low level of magnitude or generated a large number of noninfectious particles since the triturated bodies of infected Cx. quinquefasciatus did not infect Ae. aegypti mosquitoes when inoculated parenterally. We were unable to infect Cx. quinquefasciatus females orally with an artificial meal that infected 100% of Ae. aegypti females. These findings lead us to agree with the consensus that Cx. quinquefasciatus should not be considered a biological vector of dengue viruses.  (+info)

Interleukin-10 and antigen-presenting cells actively suppress Th1 cells in BALB/c mice infected with the filarial parasite Brugia pahangi. (6/2153)

Infection with the third-stage larvae (L3) of the filarial nematode Brugia results in a Th2-biased immune response in mice and humans. Previously we have shown that the production of interleukin 4 (IL-4) is critical for down-regulating polyclonal Th1 responses in L3-infected mice. However, the in vitro neutralization of IL-4 did not fully recover the defective polyclonal Th1 responses, nor did it result in the production of any antigen (Ag)-specific Th1 cytokines, suggesting that perhaps infection with L3 does not result in priming of Th1 cells in vivo. In this study, we analyzed the role of IL-10 and Ag-presenting cells (APCs) in the spleen as additional factors controlling the Th2 bias in infected mice. Our data show that IL-10 and APCs also contribute to the suppression of mitogen-driven Th1 responses of spleen cells from infected mice. In addition, the neutralization of IL-10 or the replacement of the resident APC population from spleen cell cultures resulted in the production of Ag-specific Th1 cytokines. Irradiated spleen cells from either L3-infected or uninfected mice were able to restore Ag-specific Th1 responses in vitro. Therefore, it appears that Brugia-reactive Th1 cells are primed following infection with L3, but are actively suppressed in vivo by a mechanism that involves IL-10 and the resident APC population, but not IL-4. These results indicate that a complex interplay of cytokines and cell populations underscores the Th2-polarized response in L3-infected mice.  (+info)

The cholesterol requirement for sindbis virus entry and exit and characterization of a spike protein region involved in cholesterol dependence. (7/2153)

Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus (SIN) are enveloped alphaviruses that enter cells via low-pH-triggered fusion in the endocytic pathway and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. Previous studies with cholesterol-depleted insect cells have shown that SFV requires cholesterol in the cell membrane for both virus fusion and efficient exit of progeny virus. An SFV mutant, srf-3, shows efficient fusion and exit in the absence of cholesterol due to a single point mutation in the E1 spike subunit, proline 226 to serine. We have here characterized the role of cholesterol in the entry and exit of SIN, an alphavirus quite distantly related to SFV. Growth, primary infection, fusion, and exit of SIN were all dramatically inhibited in cholesterol-depleted cells compared to control cells. Based on sequence differences within the E1 226 region between SFV, srf-3, and SIN, we constructed six SIN mutants with alterations within this region and characterized their cholesterol dependence. A SIN mutant, SGM, that had the srf-3 amino acid sequence from E1 position 224 to 235 showed increases of approximately 100-fold in infection and approximately 250-fold in fusion with cholesterol-depleted cells compared with infection and fusion of wild-type SIN. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrated that SGM exit from cholesterol-depleted cells was markedly more efficient than that of wild-type SIN. Thus, similar to SFV, SIN was cholesterol dependent for both virus entry and exit, and the cholesterol dependence of both steps could be modulated by sequences within the E1 226 region.  (+info)

Genetic and fitness changes accompanying adaptation of an arbovirus to vertebrate and invertebrate cells. (8/2153)

The alternating host cycle and persistent vector infection may constrain the evolution of arboviruses. To test this hypothesis, eastern equine encephalitis virus was passaged in BHK or mosquito cells, as well as in alternating (both) host cell passages. High and low multiplicities were used to examine the effect of defective interfering particles. Clonal BHK and persistent mosquito cell infections were also evaluated. Fitness was measured with one-step growth curves and competition assays, and mutations were evaluated by nucleotide sequencing and RNA fingerprinting. All passages and assays were done at 32 degrees C to eliminate temperature as a selection factor. Viruses passaged in either cell type alone exhibited fitness declines in the bypassed cells, while high-multiplicity and clonal passages caused fitness declines in both types of cells. Bypassed cell fitness losses were mosquito and vertebrate specific and were not restricted to individual cell lines. Fitness increases occurred in the cell line used for single-host-adaptation passages and in both cells for alternately passaged viruses. Surprisingly, single-host-cell passage increased fitness in that cell type no more than alternating passages. However, single-host-cell adaptation resulted in more mutations than alternating cell passages. Mosquito cell adaptation invariably resulted in replacement of the stop codon in nsP3 with arginine or cysteine. In one case, BHK cell adaptation resulted in a 238-nucleotide deletion in the 3' untranslated region. Many nonsynonymous substitutions were shared among more than one BHK or mosquito cell passage series, suggesting positive Darwinian selection. Our results suggest that alternating host transmission cycles constrain the evolutionary rates of arboviruses but not their fitness for either host alone.  (+info)

"Aedes" is a genus of mosquitoes that are known to transmit various diseases, including Zika virus, dengue fever, chikungunya, and yellow fever. These mosquitoes are typically found in tropical and subtropical regions around the world. They are distinguished by their black and white striped legs and thorax. Aedes aegypti is the most common species associated with disease transmission, although other species such as Aedes albopictus can also transmit diseases. It's important to note that only female mosquitoes bite and feed on blood, while males feed solely on nectar and plant juices.

Insect vectors are insects that transmit disease-causing pathogens (such as viruses, bacteria, parasites) from one host to another. They do this while feeding on the host's blood or tissues. The insects themselves are not infected by the pathogen but act as mechanical carriers that pass it on during their bite. Examples of diseases spread by insect vectors include malaria (transmitted by mosquitoes), Lyme disease (transmitted by ticks), and plague (transmitted by fleas). Proper prevention measures, such as using insect repellent and reducing standing water where mosquitoes breed, can help reduce the risk of contracting these diseases.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection that is primarily transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus species of mosquitoes. It is caused by one of four closely related dengue viruses (DENV 1, DENV 2, DENV 3, or DENV 4). The infection can cause a wide range of symptoms, ranging from mild fever and headache to severe flu-like illness, which is often characterized by the sudden onset of high fever, severe headache, muscle and joint pain, nausea, vomiting, and skin rash. In some cases, dengue can progress to more severe forms, such as dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly and appropriately.

Dengue is prevalent in many tropical and subtropical regions around the world, particularly in urban and semi-urban areas with poor sanitation and inadequate mosquito control. There is no specific treatment for dengue, and prevention efforts focus on reducing mosquito populations and avoiding mosquito bites. Vaccines are available in some countries to prevent dengue infection, but they are not widely used due to limitations in their effectiveness and safety.

A larva is a distinct stage in the life cycle of various insects, mites, and other arthropods during which they undergo significant metamorphosis before becoming adults. In a medical context, larvae are known for their role in certain parasitic infections. Specifically, some helminth (parasitic worm) species use larval forms to infect human hosts. These invasions may lead to conditions such as cutaneous larva migrans, visceral larva migrans, or gnathostomiasis, depending on the specific parasite involved and the location of the infection within the body.

The larval stage is characterized by its markedly different morphology and behavior compared to the adult form. Larvae often have a distinct appearance, featuring unsegmented bodies, simple sense organs, and undeveloped digestive systems. They are typically adapted for a specific mode of life, such as free-living or parasitic existence, and rely on external sources of nutrition for their development.

In the context of helminth infections, larvae may be transmitted to humans through various routes, including ingestion of contaminated food or water, direct skin contact with infective stages, or transmission via an intermediate host (such as a vector). Once inside the human body, these parasitic larvae can cause tissue damage and provoke immune responses, leading to the clinical manifestations of disease.

It is essential to distinguish between the medical definition of 'larva' and its broader usage in biology and zoology. In those fields, 'larva' refers to any juvenile form that undergoes metamorphosis before reaching adulthood, regardless of whether it is parasitic or not.

'Mosquito Control' is not a medical term per se, but it is a public health concept that refers to the systematic reduction or elimination of mosquito populations through various methods to prevent or minimize the transmission of mosquito-borne diseases. This multidisciplinary field involves entomologists, ecologists, engineers, and public health professionals working together to manage mosquito habitats, apply insecticides, and educate communities about personal protection measures. By controlling mosquito populations, we can significantly reduce the risk of contracting vector-borne illnesses such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, Zika virus, and West Nile virus, among others.

Dengue virus (DENV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the genus Flavivirus in the family Flaviviridae. It is primarily transmitted to humans through the bites of infected female mosquitoes, mainly Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.

The DENV genome contains approximately 11,000 nucleotides and encodes three structural proteins (capsid, pre-membrane/membrane, and envelope) and seven non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5). There are four distinct serotypes of DENV (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4), each of which can cause dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease.

Infection with one serotype provides lifelong immunity against that particular serotype but only temporary and partial protection against the other three serotypes. Subsequent infections with different serotypes can increase the risk of developing severe dengue, such as dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome, due to antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) and original antigenic sin phenomena.

DENV is a significant public health concern in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide, with an estimated 390 million annual infections and approximately 100-400 million clinical cases. Preventive measures include vector control strategies to reduce mosquito populations and the development of effective vaccines against all four serotypes.

'Culicidae' is the biological family that includes all species of mosquitoes. It consists of three subfamilies: Anophelinae, Culicinae, and Toxorhynchitinae. Mosquitoes are small, midge-like flies that are known for their ability to transmit various diseases to humans and other animals, such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever, and Zika virus. The medical importance of Culicidae comes from the fact that only female mosquitoes require blood meals to lay eggs, and during this process, they can transmit pathogens between hosts.

Temefos is not a term that has a widely accepted medical definition. However, Temefos is an insecticide that belongs to the organophosphate group. It works by inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, leading to the accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and resulting in toxic effects on the nervous system.

Temefos is used to control a wide range of pests in agriculture, animal husbandry, and public health. It is also known as Abate, and it is commonly used in vector control programs to combat mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever.

However, the use of Temefos is regulated due to its potential toxicity to non-target organisms, including humans. Therefore, it is essential to follow safety guidelines when handling this chemical to minimize exposure and potential health risks.

Yellow fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic disease that's transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes. The "yellow" in the name refers to the jaundice that can occur in some patients, resulting from liver damage caused by the virus. The disease is endemic in tropical regions of Africa and Central and South America.

The yellow fever virus is a single-stranded RNA virus that belongs to the Flaviviridae family, genus Flavivirus. It's closely related to other mosquito-borne viruses like dengue and Zika. The virus has three distinct geographical variants (West African, East African, and South American), each with different epidemiological patterns and clinical features.

The incubation period for yellow fever is typically 3 to 6 days after infection. The initial symptoms include fever, chills, headache, back pain, myalgia, and fatigue. Most patients recover after this initial phase, but around 15% of those infected enter a more severe phase characterized by high fever, jaundice, abdominal pain, vomiting, bleeding, and often rapid death within 7 to 10 days.

There is no specific treatment for yellow fever, and management is focused on supportive care, including fluid replacement, blood transfusions, and addressing any complications that arise. Prevention relies on vaccination and mosquito control measures. The yellow fever vaccine is safe and highly effective, providing immunity in 95% of those who receive it. A single dose offers lifelong protection in most individuals. Mosquito control efforts, such as reducing breeding sites and using insecticide-treated materials, can help prevent the spread of the virus in affected areas.

Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an alphavirus from the Togaviridae family that is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes, primarily Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The name "Chikungunya" is derived from a Makonde word meaning "to become contorted," which describes the stooped posture developed as a result of severe arthralgia (joint pain) that is a primary symptom of infection with this virus.

CHIKV infection typically causes a febrile illness, characterized by an abrupt onset of high fever, severe joint pain, muscle pain, headache, nausea, fatigue, and rash. While the symptoms are usually self-limiting and resolve within 10 days, some individuals may experience persistent or recurring joint pain for several months or even years after the initial infection.

There is no specific antiviral treatment available for Chikungunya virus infection, and management primarily focuses on relieving symptoms with rest, fluids, and over-the-counter pain relievers such as acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites through the use of insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, staying in air-conditioned or screened rooms, and eliminating standing water where mosquitoes breed.

Chikungunya virus is found primarily in Africa, Asia, and the Indian subcontinent, but it has also caused outbreaks in Europe and the Americas due to the spread of its vectors, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The virus can cause large-scale epidemics, with millions of cases reported during outbreaks. There is currently no approved vaccine for Chikungunya virus infection.

Oviposition is a medical/biological term that refers to the process of laying or depositing eggs by female organisms, including birds, reptiles, insects, and fish. In humans and other mammals, the term is not applicable since they give birth to live young rather than laying eggs.

'Culex' is a genus of mosquitoes that includes many species that are vectors for various diseases, such as West Nile virus, filariasis, and avian malaria. They are often referred to as "house mosquitoes" because they are commonly found in urban environments. These mosquitoes typically lay their eggs in standing water and have a cosmopolitan distribution, being found on all continents except Antarctica. The life cycle of Culex mosquitoes includes four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Both male and female adults feed on nectar, but only females require blood meals to lay eggs.

Insecticides are substances or mixtures of substances intended for preventing, destroying, or mitigating any pest, including insects, arachnids, or other related pests. They can be chemical or biological agents that disrupt the growth, development, or behavior of these organisms, leading to their death or incapacitation. Insecticides are widely used in agriculture, public health, and residential settings for pest control. However, they must be used with caution due to potential risks to non-target organisms and the environment.

I must clarify that the term 'pupa' is not typically used in medical contexts. Instead, it is a term from the field of biology, particularly entomology, which is the study of insects.

In insect development, a pupa refers to a stage in the life cycle of certain insects undergoing complete metamorphosis. During this phase, the larval body undergoes significant transformation and reorganization within a protective casing called a chrysalis (in butterflies and moths) or a cocoon (in other insects). The old larval tissues are broken down and replaced with new adult structures. Once this process is complete, the pupal case opens, and the adult insect emerges.

Since 'pupa' is not a medical term, I couldn't provide a medical definition for it. However, I hope this explanation helps clarify its meaning in the context of biology.

Entomology is the scientific study of insects, including their behavior, classification, and evolution. It is a branch of zoology that deals with the systematic study of insects and their relationship with humans, animals, and the environment. Entomologists may specialize in various areas such as medical entomology, agricultural entomology, or forensic entomology, among others. Medical entomology focuses on the study of insects that can transmit diseases to humans and animals, while agricultural entomology deals with insects that affect crops and livestock. Forensic entomology involves using insects found in crime scenes to help determine the time of death or other relevant information for legal investigations.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Insect Proteins" is not a recognized medical term. However, I can provide some information about insect protein from a nutritional and food science perspective.

Insect proteins refer to the proteins that are obtained from insects. Insects are a rich source of protein, and their protein content varies by species. For example, mealworms and crickets have been found to contain approximately 47-63% and 60-72% protein by dry weight, respectively.

In recent years, insect proteins have gained attention as a potential sustainable source of nutrition due to their high protein content, low environmental impact, and the ability to convert feed into protein more efficiently compared to traditional livestock. Insect proteins can be used in various applications such as food and feed additives, nutritional supplements, and even cosmetics.

However, it's important to note that the use of insect proteins in human food is not widely accepted in many Western countries due to cultural and regulatory barriers. Nonetheless, research and development efforts continue to explore the potential benefits and applications of insect proteins in the global food system.

Insecticide resistance is a genetic selection process in insect populations that allows them to survive and reproduce despite exposure to insecticides. It's the result of changes in the genetic makeup of insects, which can be caused by natural selection when insecticides are used repeatedly. Over time, this leads to the prevalence of genes that provide resistance to the insecticide, making the pest control methods less effective. Insecticide resistance is a significant challenge in public health and agriculture, as it can reduce the efficacy of interventions aimed at controlling disease-carrying insects or protecting crops from pests.

A disease vector is a living organism that transmits infectious pathogens from one host to another. These vectors can include mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and other arthropods that carry viruses, bacteria, parasites, or other disease-causing agents. The vector becomes infected with the pathogen after biting an infected host, and then transmits the infection to another host through its saliva or feces during a subsequent blood meal.

Disease vectors are of particular concern in public health because they can spread diseases rapidly and efficiently, often over large geographic areas. Controlling vector-borne diseases requires a multifaceted approach that includes reducing vector populations, preventing bites, and developing vaccines or treatments for the associated diseases.

Malpighian tubules are specialized excretory structures found in the circulatory system of many arthropods, including insects. They are named after Marcello Malpighi, an Italian physician and biologist who was one of the first to describe them. These tubules play a crucial role in eliminating waste products and maintaining water and ion balance within the insect's body.

Functionally, Malpighian tubules are analogous to the vertebrate kidneys as they filter the hemolymph (insect blood) and reabsorb necessary substances while excreting waste materials. The main waste product excreted by these tubules is uric acid, which is a less toxic form of nitrogenous waste compared to urea or ammonia, making it more suitable for terrestrial arthropods.

Malpighian tubules originate from the midgut epithelium and extend into the hemocoel (insect body cavity). They are lined with a single layer of epithelial cells that contain microvilli, increasing their surface area for efficient filtration. The tubules receive nutrient-rich hemolymph from the hemocoel through open-ended or blind-ended structures called ostia.

The filtrate formed by Malpighian tubules passes through a series of cellular transport processes involving both active and passive transport mechanisms. These processes help in reabsorbing water, ions, and nutrients back into the hemolymph while concentrating waste products for excretion. The final waste-laden fluid is then released into the hindgut, where it gets mixed with fecal material before being eliminated from the body through the anus.

In summary, Malpighian tubules are vital excretory organs in arthropods that filter hemolymph, reabsorb essential substances, and excrete waste products to maintain homeostasis within their bodies.

Biological pest control, also known as biocontrol, is a method of managing or eliminating pests such as insects, mites, weeds, and plant diseases using natural enemies or other organisms. These biological control agents include predators, parasites, pathogens, and competitors that regulate pest populations and reduce the need for chemical pesticides. Biological pest control is a key component of integrated pest management (IPM) programs and has minimal impact on the environment compared to traditional pest control methods.

Alphavirus infections refer to a group of diseases caused by viruses belonging to the Alphavirus genus of the Togaviridae family. These viruses are transmitted to humans through the bite of infected mosquitoes, and can cause a range of symptoms depending on the specific virus and the individual's immune response.

Some of the more common alphaviruses that cause human disease include:

* Chikungunya virus (CHIKV): This virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes and can cause a fever, rash, and severe joint pain. While most people recover from CHIKV infection within a few weeks, some may experience long-term joint pain and inflammation.
* Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV): This virus is transmitted by mosquitoes that feed on both birds and mammals, including humans. EEEV can cause severe neurological symptoms such as fever, headache, seizures, and coma. It has a high mortality rate of up to 30-50% in infected individuals.
* Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV): This virus is also transmitted by mosquitoes that feed on both birds and mammals. WEEV can cause mild flu-like symptoms or more severe neurological symptoms such as fever, headache, and seizures. It has a lower mortality rate than EEEV but can still cause significant illness.
* Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV): This virus is transmitted by mosquitoes that feed on horses and other mammals, including humans. VEEV can cause mild flu-like symptoms or more severe neurological symptoms such as fever, headache, and seizures. It is considered a potential bioterrorism agent due to its ability to cause severe illness and death in large populations.

There are no specific treatments for alphavirus infections other than supportive care to manage symptoms. Prevention measures include avoiding mosquito bites through the use of insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, and staying indoors during peak mosquito hours. Public health efforts also focus on reducing mosquito populations through environmental controls such as eliminating standing water and using insecticides.

Insect repellents are substances that are applied to the skin, clothing, or other surfaces to deter insects from landing or crawling on that surface. They work by masking the scents that attract insects or by repelling them with unpleasant odors. Insect repellents can be chemical-based, such as those containing DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), picaridin, or IR3535, or they can be natural, such as those containing oil of lemon eucalyptus or citronella. These substances work by interfering with the insect's ability to detect human scent, making it less likely that they will come into contact with the person using the repellent. Insect repellents are an important tool in preventing insect-borne diseases such as Lyme disease, West Nile virus, and Zika virus.

Wolbachia is a genus of intracellular bacteria that naturally infects a wide variety of arthropods (insects, spiders, mites) and filarial nematodes (roundworms). These bacteria are transmitted vertically from mother to offspring, often through the cytoplasm of eggs. Wolbachia can manipulate the reproductive biology of their hosts in various ways, such as feminization, parthenogenesis, male killing, and cytoplasmic incompatibility, which favor the spread and maintenance of the bacteria within host populations. The interactions between Wolbachia and their hosts have implications for insect pest management, disease transmission, and evolutionary biology.

La Crosse virus (LACV) is an orthobunyavirus that belongs to the California serogroup and is the most common cause of pediatric arboviral encephalitis in the United States. It is named after La Crosse, Wisconsin, where it was first identified in 1963.

LACV is primarily transmitted through the bite of infected eastern treehole mosquitoes (Aedes triseriatus), which serve as the primary vector and amplifying host for the virus. The virus can also be found in other mosquito species, such as Aedes albopictus and Aedes japonicus.

The transmission cycle of LACV involves mosquitoes feeding on infected small mammals, particularly chipmunks and squirrels, which serve as the natural reservoirs for the virus. The virus then replicates in the salivary glands of the mosquito, making it possible to transmit the virus through their bite.

LACV infection can cause a range of symptoms, from mild flu-like illness to severe neurological complications such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) and meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord). Most cases occur in children under the age of 16, with peak transmission during summer months.

Preventive measures for LACV include using insect repellent, wearing protective clothing, eliminating standing water around homes to reduce mosquito breeding sites, and staying indoors during peak mosquito activity hours (dawn and dusk). There is currently no specific antiviral treatment available for LACV infection, and management typically involves supportive care to address symptoms.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "population density" is actually a term used in population geography and epidemiology, rather than medical terminology. It refers to the number of people living in a specific area or region, usually measured as the number of people per square mile or square kilometer.

However, understanding population density can be important in public health and medicine because it can influence various factors related to health outcomes and healthcare delivery, such as:

1. Disease transmission rates: Higher population densities can facilitate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly those that are transmitted through close contact between individuals.
2. Access to healthcare services: Areas with lower population density might have fewer healthcare resources and providers available, making it more challenging for residents to access necessary medical care.
3. Health disparities: Population density can contribute to health inequities, as urban areas often have better access to healthcare, education, and economic opportunities than rural areas, leading to differences in health outcomes between these populations.
4. Environmental factors: Higher population densities might lead to increased pollution, noise, and other environmental hazards that can negatively impact health.

Therefore, while "population density" is not a medical definition per se, it remains an essential concept for understanding various public health and healthcare issues.

A "fat body" is not a medical term that is typically used to describe human anatomy. It is more commonly used in the context of insects and other invertebrates, where it refers to a specialized tissue that functions to store energy in the form of fat.

However, in humans, we do have adipose tissue, which is the medical term for body fat. Adipose tissue is found throughout the body, but is particularly concentrated in certain areas such as the abdomen, hips, and thighs. It serves a variety of functions, including storing energy, insulating the body, and producing hormones that regulate metabolism and appetite.

If you are looking for information on obesity or excess body fat in humans, there are many medical resources available to help you understand these topics better.

Arboviruses are a group of viruses that are primarily transmitted to humans and animals through the bites of infected arthropods, such as mosquitoes, ticks, and sandflies. The term "arbovirus" is short for "arthropod-borne virus."

Arboviruses can cause a wide range of symptoms, depending on the specific virus and the individual host's immune response. Some common symptoms associated with arboviral infections include fever, headache, muscle and joint pain, rash, and fatigue. In severe cases, arboviral infections can lead to serious complications such as encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), or hemorrhagic fever (bleeding disorders).

There are hundreds of different arboviruses, and they are found in many parts of the world. Some of the most well-known arboviral diseases include dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika virus infection, West Nile virus infection, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis.

Prevention of arboviral infections typically involves avoiding mosquito bites and other arthropod vectors through the use of insect repellent, wearing long sleeves and pants, and staying indoors during peak mosquito feeding times. Public health efforts also focus on reducing vector populations through environmental management and the use of larvicides. Vaccines are available for some arboviral diseases, such as yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis.

"Plasmodium gallinaceum" is not a medical term per se, but it is a scientific name used in the field of parasitology. It refers to a species of protozoan parasites that belong to the genus Plasmodium, which are known to cause malaria in birds, particularly chickens and turkeys.

The life cycle of "Plasmodium gallinaceum" involves two hosts: an Anopheles mosquito vector and a bird host. When an infected mosquito bites a bird, the parasites enter the bloodstream and infect the red blood cells, where they multiply and cause damage, leading to symptoms of malaria in the bird host.

While "Plasmodium gallinaceum" is not a human pathogen, research on this species has contributed significantly to our understanding of the biology and epidemiology of Plasmodium parasites, including those that cause malaria in humans.

Oviparity is a form of reproduction in which an animal lays eggs with externally developing embryos. The eggs are usually equipped with a protective shell and all the nutrients necessary for the development of the embryo, which allows the female to lay and abandon them, without any further care. This method of reproduction is common in many species of fish, reptiles, insects, and birds.

In oviparous animals, the fertilization of the egg may occur either internally or externally. In internal fertilization, the male deposits sperm directly into the female's reproductive tract, which then travel to the ova and fertilize them. The fertilized eggs are subsequently laid by the female. In external fertilization, the male and female release their gametes (sperm and eggs) into the surrounding environment, where fertilization takes place.

Oviparity is distinct from viviparity, a reproductive strategy in which the embryo develops inside the mother's body and receives nutrients through a placenta. In viviparous animals, such as mammals (excluding monotremes), the young are born live instead of hatching from eggs.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Household Articles" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It generally refers to items or goods used in a household for everyday activities, such as cleaning supplies, dishes, furniture, and personal care products. However, in a medical context, it may refer to items that are commonly found in a household and could potentially pose a risk for injury or illness, such as medications, sharp objects, or cleaning products. It's always important to keep these items out of reach of children and pets, and to follow proper safety guidelines when using them.

Flavivirus is a genus of viruses in the family Flaviviridae. They are enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses that are primarily transmitted by arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes and ticks. Many flaviviruses cause significant disease in humans, including dengue fever, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile fever, and Zika fever. The name "flavivirus" is derived from the Latin word for "yellow," referring to the yellow fever virus, which was one of the first members of this genus to be discovered.

Sindbis virus is an alphavirus that belongs to the Togaviridae family. It's named after the location where it was first isolated, in Sindbis, Egypt, in 1952. This virus is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes and can infect a wide range of animals, including birds and humans. In humans, Sindbis virus infection often causes a mild flu-like illness characterized by fever, rash, and joint pain. However, some people may develop more severe symptoms, such as neurological disorders, although this is relatively rare. There is no specific treatment for Sindbis virus infection, and management typically involves supportive care to alleviate symptoms.

... plagosus Marks, 1959 Aedes quasirubithorax (Theobald, 1910) Aedes roai Belkin, 1962 Aedes rubiginosus Belkin, 1962 Aedes ... 1937 Aedes keefei King and Hoogstraal, 1946 Aedes peipingensis Feng, 1938 Aedes koreicoides Sasa, Kano and Hayashi, 1950 Aedes ... Aedes britteni Marks and Hodgkin, 1958 Aedes candidoscutellum Marks, 1947 Aedes crossi Lien, 1967 Aedes eatoni (Edwards, 1916) ... 1946 Aedes versicolor (Barraud, 1924) Aedes wasselli Marks, 1947 Aedes annuliventris Blanchard, 1852 Members of the genus Aedes ...
... seculatus is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in Sri Lanka. "Aedes (Aedes) ... v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Aedes, ...
... has a conspicuous band of white scales around the central area of the proboscis and the anterior portion of ... The female Aedes sollicitans lays her eggs on the dried out substrate of salt pannes, depressions within salt marshes which dry ... A. sollicitans resembles Aedes taeniorhynchus but the two species can be distinguished at the larval and adult stages. Larval A ... Aedes sollicitans, the eastern saltmarsh mosquito (also known as Ochlerotatus sollicitans), is a species of mosquito native to ...
... , the woodland pool mosquito, is an aggressive, day biting mosquito that can be a vector of a number of ... Female Aedes canadensis gain blood meals from a wide range of large and small animals, birds and reptiles. It is particularly ... Aedes canadensis occurs in North American from the Yukon Territory and Washington state east to Newfoundland and south to ... "Aedes (Och.) canadensis". Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved 22 September 2017. R.L. Berry; RM.A. Parsons; B.J. Lalonde-Weigert ...
... is a mosquito species in the genus Aedes. The common range Aedes cinereus is in North America and Europe. ... "Aedes cinereus Meigen, 1818". GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. GBIF Backbone Taxonomy. doi:10.15468/39omei. Retrieved 27 August 2016. ... Aedes, Insects described in 1818, All stub articles, Culicoidea stubs). ...
Aedes (Verrallina) lankaensis, or Verrallina (Neomacleaya) lankaensis, is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to ... the genus Aedes. It is endemic to Sri Lanka. It is sometimes treated as separate species of the genus Verrallina by some texts ...
Aedes (Neomacleaya) petroelephantus, or Verrallina (Neomacleaya) petroelephantus, is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito ... belonging to the genus Aedes. It is endemic to Sri Lanka "An annotated checklist of mosquitoes of Sri Lanka" (PDF). Man and ...
Wikimedia Commons has media related to Aedes aegypti. Scholia has a topic profile for Aedes aegypti. Aedes aegypti on the ... The ecology and biology of Aedes aegypti (L.) and Aedes albopictusand the resistance of Aedes albopictus against ... Aedes aegypti can be confused with Aedes albopictus without a magnifying glass: the latter have a white stripe on the top of ... Aedes aegypti University of Sydney, Australia Archived 2019-03-28 at the Wayback Machine very brief, undated Aedes aegypti and ...
... was named in 1913 as a nomen novum for nigra (Theobald). Aedes furcifer and Aedes taylori have been treated as ... Aedes furcifer (Edwards), Aedes taylori (Edwards), and Aedes cordellieri (Huang). Immature and adult female Ae. furcifer sensu ... Aedes furcifer is the type species for the Aedes (Diceromyia) furcifer group in the Afrotropical realm, comprising three ... Aedes (Diceromyia) furcifer (Edwards) and Aedes (Diceromyia) cordellieri Huang in Southern Africa: Distribution and ...
... is a species of mosquito primarily found in forests in sub-Saharan Africa. Aedes capensis is one of 9 species in ... Aedes capensis has been recorded from South Africa, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Malawi, and Uganda ... Studies on the biting habits and medical importance of East african mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. I. Subgenera Aedimorphus, ... Potential for dengue in South Africa: Mosquito ecology with particular reference to Aedes aegypti. Journal of the American ...
Aedes (Finlaya) chrysolineatus is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in Sri ... Hulecoeteomyia Theobald, 1904 The Aedes (Finlaya) Chrysolineatus Group of Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)1 Notes on the Aedes ( ... "Species Details : Aedes chrysolineatus (Theobald, 1907)". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 31 January 2017. ... Culicidae Archived 2017-08-15 at the Wayback Machine proposed system of classifying Aedes chrysolineatus and related species ...
... is a species of mosquito in the genus Aedes. It was described by Philip James Barraud in 1934. "ADW: Aedes ... Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Aedes, ...
Aedes (Phagomyia) gubernatoris is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in India, ... "Species Details : Aedes gubernatoris (Giles, 1901)". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 31 January 2017. Phagomyia Theobald, 1905 - ...
... is a species of mosquito (Culicidae) native to North America. Some mosquitoes in North America, such as Aedes ... Ostrum, Erik M.; Mutebi, John-Paul (March 2019). "New county records of Aedes aegypti and Aedes epactius in Colorado". Journal ... Louis encephalitis virus in mosquitoes [Aedes albopictus and Aedes epactius]". American Journal of Tropical Medicine and ... Lozano-Fuentes S (2014). "Aedes (Ochlerotatus) epactius Along an Elevation and Climate Gradient in Veracruz and Puebla States, ...
Aedes (Paraedes) ostentatio is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in Sri Lanka, ... AND LARVA OF AEDES (PARAEDES) BARRAUDI AND THE PUPA AND LARVA OF AEDES (PARAEDES) MENONZ (DIPTERA: CULICIDAE) Paraedes Edwards ... "Species Details : Aedes ostentatio (Leicester, 1908)". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 1 February 2017. "ostentatio (Leicester)". ... A note on the occurrence of Aedes (Paraedes) ostentatio (Leicester) in Dibrugarh District, Assam, India (Diptera: Culicidae) ...
... is an uncommon mosquito, although the species can be abundant along river floodlands. It has been known to be ... Aedes sticticus has a very patchy but wide distribution in temperate parts of Europe, Asia and North America. It has an ... doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2004.00144.x. Aedes sticticus Iowa-Mosquito.net Iowa State University Archived 2009-02-20 at the ...
"Aedes infirmatus, Aedes tormentor". www.coj.net. Retrieved 2023-06-23. Steck, Madeline; et al. (2021-06-10). "Relationship of ... Aedes infirmatus, informally referred to as the infirm American pointy mosquito or silverback mosquito, is a species of ... "Aedes infirmatus Dyar & Knab, 1906 , Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit (WRBU)". www.wrbu.si.edu. Retrieved 2023-06-23. McNelly, J ... Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Aedes, ...
Aedes (Aedimorphus) alboscutellatus is a species of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is a member in Aedes ... Description Of Aedes (Aedimorphus) Alboscutellatus Occuring [sic] In Korea The Larva and Pupa of Aedes (Aedimorphus) ... particular reference to Aedes alboscutellatus [1981]". AGRIS: INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR THE AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE AND ... Alboscutellatus (Diptera, Culicidae). Feeding activities of forest breeding mosquitoes, particular reference to Aedes ...
... show minimal to no evidence of mixed blood meals, meaning Aedes koreicus does not feed on multiple organisms or ... Aedes koreicus are able to act as a vector for native pathogens, as well as introduced pathogens. Aedes korecius are also ... Aedes Koreicus feed on the most available and locally abundant. There is no singular preference for Aedes Koreicus, while other ... Aedes koreicus vectoral capacities are estimated based on feeding habits and their blood meals. Aedes koreicus are known to ...
... is a species of mosquito. It was first described from specimens collected at Subic Bay, Republic of the ... The Aedes (Stegomyia) albolineatus Group (Diptera, Culicidae). Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington, 59(June 19 ... "Aedes » Scutomyia » hoogstraali Knight and Rozeboom" in: Systematic Catalog of Culicidae, Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit, http ... The Identity of Two Species of Stegomyia belonging to the Aedes albolineatus Group (Diptera: Culicidae). Mosquito Systematics ...
Linley; R., J; Geary, M.J; Russell, R.C (1992). "The eggs of Aedes australis and Aedes camptorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae)". ... Aedes australis is a brackish water mosquito species from the subgenus Halaedes. It is native to Australia. It was first found ... "Aedes(Halaedes) australis(Erichson)" (PDF). New Zealand Biosecure Entomology laboratory, A division of Southern Monitoring ... "Aedes australis (Erichson)". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 8 November 2013. Gardner, JM; Pillai, JS (1987 ...
"Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and Aedes (Howardina) cozumelensis in Yucatán State, México, with a summary of published collection ... Aedes (Howardina) bahamensis in the United States. Pafume, B A, et al. J. of the American Mosquito Control Assoc. Vol 4 No 3 Pg ... "Preliminary studies of Aedes bahamensis as a host and potential vector of St. Louis encephalitis virus". J Am Mosq Control ... Aedes bahamensis, also known as Howardina bahamensis, is a mosquito native to the Caribbean and Bahamas, which was first ...
... , or Verrallina srilankensis, is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is ... Description of a new species of Aedes (Verrallina) from Sri Lanka (Diptera: Culicidae). (Articles with short description, Short ... description matches Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Taxonbars with multiple manual Wikidata items, Aedes, ...
... is found throughout the Greater Antilles in the Caribbean where it often shares larval habitats with Aedes ... "Vertebrate Hosts of Aedes aegypti and Aedes mediovittatus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Rural Puerto Rico". Journal of Medical ... "Comparison of Vector Competence of Aedes mediovittatus and Aedes aegypti for Dengue Virus: Implications for Dengue Control in ... Aedes mediovittatus is a competent vector of Dengue virus, exhibiting high rates of vertical transmission in laboratory studies ...
Aedes is a genus of mosquitoes. Aedes or Ædes or AeDES may also refer to: Aedes (Roman religion), in ancient Roman religion, a ... shrine or temple AeDES (engineering), Italian document re earthquake damage Ædes Danielis, building in Malta Aedes de Venustas ... New York perfume store and perfume line This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Aedes. If an internal ...
Aedes (Dendroskusea) reginae is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in Sri Lanka ... "Species Details : Aedes reginae Edwards, 1922". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 1 February 2017. Dendroskusea Edwards, 1929 - ... Mosquito Taxonomic Inventory Tree-Hole Breeding of Aedes aegypti in Southern India: a Preliminary Report (Articles with short ... description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Aedes). ...
... is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is endemic to Sri Lanka "An annotated ... Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles with 'species' microformats, Aedes, ...
Aedes (Aedimorphus) pallidostriatus is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in Sri ... Aedes pallidostriatus (mosquito) - The Ecological Register Bio-variability of mosquitoes in an agro-ecosystem of Jameen ... "Species Details : Aedes pallidostriatus (Theobald, 1907)". Catalogue of Life. Retrieved 1 February 2017. "pallidostriatus ... Salvarpatti Archived 2017-02-03 at the Wayback Machine Morphology and Morphometry of Aedes aegypti Adult Mosquito GENUS AEDES. ...
Aedes (Verrallina) indicus is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in India and ... "Species Details : Aedes harveyi (Barraud, 1923)". Catalogue of Life. Archived from the original on 9 April 2018. Retrieved 1 ...
Finley, J.R.; Turell, M.J. (1994). "ULTRASTRUCTURAL DESCRIPTIONS OF THE EGGS OF AEDES MCINTOSHI AND AEDES CIRCUMLUTEOLUS ( ... Aedes circumluteolus is a species of mosquito that is found throughout much of Sub-Saharan Africa. It is often found in ... Immature stages of Aedes circumluteolus may be found in shallow temporary pools, and the species overwinters mainly in the form ... The eggs of Aedes circumluteolus are rhomboidal, with the ventral surface appearing more curved than the dorsal surface. The ...
Aedes plagosus Marks, 1959 Aedes quasirubithorax (Theobald, 1910) Aedes roai Belkin, 1962 Aedes rubiginosus Belkin, 1962 Aedes ... 1937 Aedes keefei King and Hoogstraal, 1946 Aedes peipingensis Feng, 1938 Aedes koreicoides Sasa, Kano and Hayashi, 1950 Aedes ... Aedes britteni Marks and Hodgkin, 1958 Aedes candidoscutellum Marks, 1947 Aedes crossi Lien, 1967 Aedes eatoni (Edwards, 1916) ... 1946 Aedes versicolor (Barraud, 1924) Aedes wasselli Marks, 1947 Aedes annuliventris Blanchard, 1852 Members of the genus Aedes ...
... seculatus is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. It is found in Sri Lanka. "Aedes (Aedes) ... v t e (Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Articles with species microformats, Aedes, ...
Aedes aegypti (yellow fever mosquito) Click on organism name to get more information. *Aedes aegypti aegypti *Aedes aegypti ...
Semua dengan topik Aedes Aegypti di VICE ...
Propagation of arboviruses in Singhs Aedes cell lines. I. Growth of arboviruses in Aedes albopictus and A. aegypti cell lines ... Cell cultures derived from larvae of Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes aegypti (L.). Curr. Sci. 36: 506-508, 1967. ... Multiplication of arboviruses in cell lines from from Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. Curr. Sci. 37: 65-67, 1968. ... To download a certificate of origin for Aedes albopictus [ATC-15] (CCL-126), enter the lot number exactly as it appears on your ...
Control activities are generally similar for Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. *Surveillance and Control of Aedes ... Surveillance and Control of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus in the United States. ... vector control professionals use integrated vector management strategies to control Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus ... aegypti and Aedes albopictus in the United States pdf icon[PDF - 16 pages]. ...
... in the 1990s: Top Down or Bottom Up ... Aedes Aegypti and Aedes Aegypti-borne Disease Control in the 1990s: Top Down or Bottom Up Duane J. Gubler 49th Franklin Craig ... The elimination of urban yellow fever in the Americas through the eradication of Aedes aegypti. Am J Pub Hlth 53:7-16. POINT OF ... Aedes aegypti is a highly domesticated mosquito and many adults are resting indoors in hidden places such as closets. Our ...
AEDES HERMAEUM HIPPODROMUS PALATII HOLOVITREUM HONOS, AEDES HONOS ET VIRTUS, AEDES HONOS ET VIRTUS, AEDES HORA QUIRINI HORREA ... AEDES HERCULES OLIVARIUS HERCULES POMPEIANUS, AEDES HERCULES PRIMIGENIUS HERCULES SULLANUS HERCULES VICTOR, AEDES HERCULES ... HERCULES CUSTOS, AEDES * a temple of Hercules, near the circus Flaminius, built in accordance with the command of the Sibyl, ... 4). If, as is probable, this aedes is that restored by Sulla, the original temple must have been erected before 218, probably ...
Aedes Architecture Forum. Christinenstr. 18-19. 10119 Berlin. Opening Hours Mon 1-5pm. Tue-Fri 11am-6.30pm. Sunday and public ... Hans-Jürgen Commerell Aedes, Berlin. Aric Chen Director, Het Nieuwe Instituut, Rotterdam. Li Xiangning Professor and Assistant ... After more than two decades in which the Aedes Architecture Forum in Berlin has dedicated itself with great continuity to ... The Chinese furniture manufacturer Camerich has been an Aedes Cooperation Partner since 2019. ...
... Asian Tiger mosquito or Forest mosquito (Aedes albopictus) are active all day and along ... with the Dengue vector Aedes aegypti theyre bringing a new tropical disease called Chikungunya to warm climates in the western ...
Aedes albopictus is a container-breeding Stegomyia mosquito that has dispersed widely from its origins in Southeast Asia. ... Aedes albopictus was detected on 10 islands and comprised 100% of the day-biting container-breeding mosquitoes on Yorke and ... Discovery of a Widespread Infestation of Aedes albopictus in the Torres Strait, Australia. ... "Discovery of a Widespread Infestation of Aedes albopictus in the Torres Strait, Australia," Journal of the American Mosquito ...
Vertical transmission in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus is considered a maintenance mechanism for dengue virus (DENV) ... albopictus24,25, followed by Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes fluviatilis, Aedes scapularis, Culex nigripalpus and Ae. aegypti25, ... Differential Susceptibilities of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus from the Americas to Zika. Virus. Plos Negl. Trop. Dis. 10 ... Stenn, T., Peck, K. J., Rocha Pereira, G. & Burkett-Cadena, N. D. Vertebrate Hosts of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and ...
6.30pm at Aedes Architecture Forum, Christinenstr Berlin ... Further information: www.aedes-arc.de. Good Vibrations, Aedes ... An Aedes catalogue will be published. Speaking at the opening. Dr. h.c. Kristin Feireiss Aedes, Berlin. H.E. Dr. Peter Huber ... Aedes Architecture Forum Exhibitions. edes Architecture Forum News in 2020. 4 Jun 2020. Water Garden at Aedes Architecture ... Good Vibrations, Aedes Exhibition. by Isabelle Lomholt , posted in: Exhibitions architecture , 0 ...
Shop the Parfums 06130 collection at AEDES.COM , Samples available , Free Shipping! ... AEDES DE VENUSTASAGRARIAAKROAMBRA DI VENEZIAAMENAMOUAGEASTIER DE VILLATTE ATTACHE MOI PARFUMSBELLA FREUDBLACKBIRDCARRIÉRE ... ABOUT AEDES PERFUMERY. The first perfumery dedicated to exclusive, artisanal scents. Established in 1995 in New Yorks West ...
AEDES DE VENUSTASAGRARIAAKROAMBRA DI VENEZIAAMENAMOUAGEASTIER DE VILLATTE ATTACHE MOI PARFUMSBELLA FREUDBLACKBIRDCARRIÉRE ... ABOUT AEDES PERFUMERY. The first perfumery dedicated to exclusive, artisanal scents. Established in 1995 in New Yorks West ...
In the continuation of this reciprocal exchange, Aedes and ANCB The Aedes Metropolitan Laboratory are now exploring Chinas ... An Aedes catalogue will be published on the topic of Rural Moves as well as a second catalogue on the oeuvre of DnA_Design and ... Aedes Architecture Forum. Christinenstr. 18-19. 10119 Berlin Opening Hours Tue-Fri 11am-6.30pm. Sun-Mon 1-5pm. Special Opening ... To stimulate the international discussion Aedes Architecture Forum Berlin is presenting a remarkable example from rural China. ...
... we believe that the salivary components of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can be employed in the prevention and/or treatment of ... acreditamos que os componentes salivares do mosquito Aedes aegypti possam ser empregados na prevenção e/ou tratamento de ...
Mars, Aedes makes connections with:. * Mars, Aedes part of (analytical) Regio I (Porta Capena) (unspecified date range) ... Mars, Aedes a Pleiades place resource. Creators: Jeffrey Becker Copyright © The Contributors. Sharing and remixing permitted ... Jeffrey Becker, Mars, Aedes: a Pleiades place resource, Pleiades: A Gazetteer of Past Places, 2021 ,https://pleiades.stoa.org ... cite web ,url=https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/699284690 ,title=Places: 699284690 (Mars, Aedes) ,author=Becker, J. ,accessdate= ...
... the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Issued by the OECD Working Group on the Harmonisation of Regulatory Oversight in Biotechnology, the ... OECD Consensus Document of the Biology of Mosquito Aedes aegypti. Volume 8 of the Series contains the first biosafety ... consensus document to deal with the biology of an insect, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Issued by the OECD Working Group on the ...
Aedes Servizi Srl is the result of the spin-off of the division of Aedes SpA related to asset management, finance and ... A new company, Aedes Servizi Srl, has been established for the provision of real estate services. The creation of this company ... Aedes Servizi Srl, which has â ¬60,000 in shareholdersâ equity, will receive 47 of the 70 employees which currently make up the ... Aedes Servizi Srl will be specialised in the provision of real estate management and administration services both to the ...
i,Aedes albopictus,/i, is an important invasive mosquito vector of dengue fever across urban and semiurban areas of India. In ... "Mosquitocidal and oviposition repellent activities of the extracts of seaweed Bryopsis pennata on Aedes aegypti and Aedes ... Aedes albopictus (Ae. albopictus and tiger mosquito) is a belligerent, and aggressive, is arising entirely global as a ... Aedes albopictus is an important invasive mosquito vector of dengue fever across urban and semiurban areas of India. In this ...
Tag: Aedes Aegypti. Bugging the county: Vector control program to fight mosquitoes. by Amy Byres , Assistant Editor , Feb 29, ...
Like dengue and chikungunya, Zika is spread by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and possibly, other species including Aedes albopictus ... Given the uncertainties surrounding the vectorial competence of Aedes mosquitoes, we compare the geographic risk profiles when ... Aedes aegypti Is the Subject Area "Aedes aegypti" applicable to this article? Yes. No. ...
pipiens biotype molestus and invasive German Aedes albopictus. All tested populations proved to be competent laboratory vectors ... Aedes albopictus. (J). 14/15. 4/41. (9.8). (2.7-23.1). 4/4. (100.0). (39.8-100). 4/4. (100.0). (39.8-100). 4/41. (9.8). (2.7- ... Aedes albopictus. (J) 25. 200/353. (56.7). (51.3-61.9). 84/196. (42.9). (35.8-50.1). 25/43. (58.1). (42.1-73.0). ... Aedes albopictus, however, showed a time-dependent decline in the mean viral load both in the mosquito bodies (6.9 × 105 to 7.7 ...
Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus transmitted diseases constitute a relevant and increasing public health threat in Brazil and ... Viruses carried by Aedes mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti and Ae. Albopictus) have become a major health issue in Latin America. This ... www.idrc.ca/en/funding/role-small-business-aedes-control-technologies) and submit their proposals to the email address: aedes_ ... Call for Proposals - The Role of Small-Business in Aedes Control Technologies Versão em português Summary ...
Kementerian Kesihatan Malaysia, Aras 1-3, Blok E10, Kompleks E ...
  • The Aedes albopictus [ATC-15] cell line was established from a pool of several hundred freshly hatched larvae. (atcc.org)
  • Additionally, 2 shipments were sent to the NYSDOH Arbovirus Laboratory, each with 1,000 larvae of Aedes caspius mosquitoes collected in marshlands of the Huelva province (southern Spain) in summer and autumn 2016. (cdc.gov)
  • We searched 17 730 houses, IDP camps and buildings of governmental corporations for Aedes larvae, and 6809 (38.4%) were positive for Aedes aquatic stages. (who.int)
  • Both Aedes aegypti and Aedes vittatus larvae were found. (who.int)
  • Six positive water containers were recorded: tyres, clay pots, barrels, plastic water tanks, flower vases and old cars: 26% of 92 tyres contained Aedes larvae compared to 23.8% of 21 old cars and 17.1% of 44 198 clay pots. (who.int)
  • Treatment and comparative analysis of the properties of aqueous extracts of seed kernel of Azadirachta indica A. Juss (neem) was carried out on Aedes aegypti larvae. (ajol.info)
  • The research aims to determine the effect of counseling using social capital implementation on Container Index (CI) of Aedes aegypti larvae in Panggungharjo, Sewon, Bantul. (atlantis-press.com)
  • The research results showed that counseling using social capital implementation and community trust to community leaders as the counselor, in this case was the head of the neighborhood had an influence to Container Index (CI) of Aedes aegypti larvae in Panggungharjo, Sewon, Bantul (p,0.001). (atlantis-press.com)
  • The impact of fish on Aedes larvae and disease was assessed based on baseline and post-intervention observations. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Larvivorous fish in natural habitats that feed on Anopheles larvae have been successfully used in malaria control [ 4 ], but their use in confined domestic containers against Aedes larvae has been very limited [ 5 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Angustifolium (tembetary hú) and Bixa orellana(uruku) in order to check the effectiveness and activity as larvicide of each plant gainst Aedes aegypti larvae. (bvsalud.org)
  • The genome of the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) was sequenced by the Broad Institute and the Institute for Genomic Research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Conhecendo as atividades biológicas das moléculas presentes na saliva dos insetos hematófagos, e com base em resultados anteriores do nosso grupo de pesquisa, acreditamos que os componentes salivares do mosquito Aedes aegypti possam ser empregados na prevenção e/ou tratamento de doenças inflamatórias. (usp.br)
  • Volume 8 of the Series contains the first biosafety 'consensus document' to deal with the biology of an insect, the mosquito Aedes aegypti. (oecd.org)
  • Como evitar a formação de criadouros do mosquito Aedes aegypti? (bvs.br)
  • Cuticular resistance characterization of the yellow fever mosquito , Aedes aegypti , is lacking. (bvsalud.org)
  • Aedes aegypti (L., 1762) (Diptera: Culicidae) is an important pest for human health. (tubitak.gov.tr)
  • The subgenus Stegomyia of Aedes in the Afrotropical Region I. The Africanus group of species (Diptera: Culicidae). (si.edu)
  • Larvicidal efficacy of different plant parts of railway creeper, ipomoea cairica extract against dengue vector mosquitoes, aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). (una.ac.cr)
  • Actividad insecticida de extractos vegetales sobre larvas de Aedes aegypti, Diptera: Culicidae. (una.ac.cr)
  • Insecticide resistance in two Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) strains from Costa Rica. (una.ac.cr)
  • Evaluación de la resistencia a insecticidas en cepas de Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) de la Región Caribe de Costa Rica. (una.ac.cr)
  • Monitoring Insecticide Resistance Profiles of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Sunda Islands of Indonesia Based on Diagnostic Doses of Larvicides. (una.ac.cr)
  • Aedes (also known as the tiger mosquito) is a genus of mosquitoes originally found in tropical and subtropical zones, but now found on all continents except Antarctica. (wikipedia.org)
  • As historically defined, the genus contains over 700 species (see the list of Aedes species). (wikipedia.org)
  • The genus has been divided into several subgenera (Aedes, Diceromyia, Finlaya, Stegomyia, etc.), most of which have been recently treated by some authorities as full genera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aedes (Verrallina) seculatus is a species complex of zoophilic mosquito belonging to the genus Aedes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mascot illustration of a yellow fever mosquito or Aedes aegypti, a mosquito that can spread dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever virus, flying on isolated background in retro black and white style. (clipartof.com)
  • Aedes transmitted diseases include Zika that causes severe congenital and neurological disorders, Chikungunya that can cause severe and disabling symptoms lasting many months and dengue fever that continues to represent an expanding threat to health systems. (fapesp.br)
  • The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and Stegomyia indices of Aedes aquatic stages in El Geneina town during an outbreak of DF and chikungunya. (who.int)
  • Aedes luteocephalus occurs widely across sub-Saharan Africa (north of South Africa), and serves as a major Afrotropical vector of chikungunya, dengue, yellow fever, and Zika viruses. (si.edu)
  • In 2006, severe outbreaks of Aedes aegypti -transmitted chikungunya occurred in villages in Karnataka, South India. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Chikungunya is a rare arboviral infection transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Informe de vigilancia de Arbovirus basada en laboratorio: Análisis de datos de virus Zika, dengue, chikungunya, mayaro y fiebre amarilla. (una.ac.cr)
  • Chikungunya disease is transmitted by the Aedes mosquito. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Aedes albopictus is a container-breeding Stegomyia mosquito that has dispersed widely from its origins in Southeast Asia. (bioone.org)
  • To determine the prevalence and Stegomyia indices of Aedes aquatic stages in El Geneina town, Western Darfur. (who.int)
  • Despite the fact that Aedes-borne diseases are reported in Elgenina town, there is a lack of published data concerning Stegomyia indices of Aedes mosquitoes. (who.int)
  • First confirmed occurrence of the yellow fever virus and dengue virus vector Aedes ( Stegomyia ) luteocephalus (Newstead, 1907) in Mozambique. (si.edu)
  • Azadirachta indica (neem) Aedes aegypti (mosquito) LC50 emergency histopathology. (ajol.info)
  • In the continental United States, vector control professionals use integrated vector management strategies to control Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. (cdc.gov)
  • Control activities are generally similar for Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. (cdc.gov)
  • Female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are deadly vectors of arboviral pathogens and breed in containers of freshwater associated with human habitation. (elifesciences.org)
  • albopictus are important vectors and Aedes japonicus also may be involved in virus maintenance and transmission (ref https://read.qxmd.com/doi/10.2987/moco-31-03-233-241.1) Alternating cycles of infection occur between the mosquito and the vertebrate hosts, including humans. (medscape.com)
  • Perfil de resistencia a insecticidas en una cepa de Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) de la región Caribe de Costa Rica. (una.ac.cr)
  • Pyrethroid and organophosphate susceptibility status of Aedes aegypti (Linnaeus) and Aedes Albopictus (Skuse) in Penag, Malaysia. (una.ac.cr)
  • albopictus is a known dengue vector and a potential vector of a variety of arboviruses and it can tolerate cooler climates than Aedes aegypti , Australian quarantine and health authorities have strategies to detect and eliminate it from international ports. (bioone.org)
  • In February 2004, the discovery of an incursion of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti into the town of Tennant Creek in the Northern Territory caused concern for the Northern Territory health authorities who proceeded to implement a Commonwealth-funded eradication program. (health.gov.au)
  • An updated and improved version of the Aedes aegypti genome was released in 2018. (wikipedia.org)
  • The goal was to analyze the (persuasive) communication strategies used in Brazilian campaigns to prevent the spread of Aedes aegypti between 2013 and 2018. (bvsalud.org)
  • 2022 [www.reciis.icict.fiocruz.br] e-ISSN 1981-6278 de prevenção ao Aedes aegypti , veiculadas entre 2013-2018. (bvsalud.org)
  • Some species have been spread by human activity: Aedes albopictus, a particularly invasive species, was spread to the Americas, including the United States, in the 1980s, by the used-tire trade. (wikipedia.org)
  • The type species for Aedes is Aedes cinereus. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Polynesia, the species Aedes polynesiensis is responsible for the transmission of human lymphatic filariasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dengue fever is an arbovirus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes (both Ae . (who.int)
  • Knowing the biological activities of the compounds present in the saliva of hematophagous insects, and based on previous results from our group, we believe that the salivary components of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes can be employed in the prevention and/or treatment of inflammatory diseases. (usp.br)
  • Commonly, public alertness and general knowledge of Aedes -transmitted diseases may improve the likelihood of patients being discussed with a doctor. (hindawi.com)
  • Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus transmitted diseases constitute a relevant and increasing public health threat in Brazil and most countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. (fapesp.br)
  • In order to prevent Aedes transmitted diseases, the Call targets applied research for the development of mosquito control technologies effective to decrease the abundance and/or exposure to Aedes . (fapesp.br)
  • The purpose of the Call is to promote new vector control technologies that in a subsequent stage can help the public health system in Brazil and other countries of Latin America prevent viral diseases carried by the Aedes mosquitoes. (fapesp.br)
  • The experience of Brazil and other countries in the region with Aedes transmitted diseases demonstrate that evidence-based locally adapted technologies can contribute to public health by improving vector control strategies and interventions. (fapesp.br)
  • Multisectoral response coupled with community participation are urgently needed to reduce the burden of Aedes-borne diseases in the unstable El Geneina town. (who.int)
  • This movement raises special concern about the transmission of Aedes-borne diseases across the countries' borders. (who.int)
  • There are several diseases transmitted by Aedes aegypti in Brazil. (bvsalud.org)
  • 1960. The arrival of Aedes (Ochlerotatus) vigilax (Skuse) in Fiji. (hawaii.edu)
  • For the purpose of this Call, new vector control technologies are understood to be those that reduce the abundance of the mosquito Aedes or reduce the exposure of persons to Aedes mosquito bites. (fapesp.br)
  • The results showed high infestation of El Geneina town with Aedes immature stages in all study sites including public buildings and residential areas with no IDP camps. (who.int)
  • B ) Mortality of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes aegypti by targeted indoor residual spraying (TIRS) with a household aerosolized insecticide over time. (ajtmh.org)
  • Cuticular profiling of insecticide resistant Aedes aegypti. (bvsalud.org)
  • Vertical transmission in Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus is considered a maintenance mechanism for dengue virus (DENV) during unfavorable conditions and may be implicated in dengue outbreaks. (nature.com)
  • This article presents the results of a dialogue between decision-makers and experts in Latin America and the Caribbean on priority-setting for interventions and studies on Aedes aegypti control. (bvsalud.org)
  • El autoritarismo se deriva de la atribución por parte del Estado de culpabilidad individual al ciudadano, por la supuesta participación ineficaz de éste en la prevención, y no garantiza la efectividad en la educación en salud pública. (bvsalud.org)
  • Colección de documentos que contribuye a los procesos de toma de decisiones políticas informadas por la mejor evidencia científica disponible, incluyendo procesos de traducción del conocimiento y de intercambio entre gestores, investigadores y representantes de la sociedad civil en la gestión de los servicios y sistemas de salud. (bvsalud.org)
  • Várias doenças transmitidas pelo vetor Aedes aegypti persistem neste século XXI no Brasil. (bvsalud.org)
  • Varias enfermedades transmitidas por el vector Aedes aegypti persisten en este siglo XXI en Brasil. (bvsalud.org)
  • Desde una perspectiva discursiva y el paradigma indiciario, se analizaron nueve declaraciones publicadas en campañas en Brasil. (bvsalud.org)
  • Aedes albopictus is an important invasive mosquito vector of dengue fever across urban and semiurban areas of India. (hindawi.com)
  • Cross-sectional entomological surveys of immature stages of Aedes were carried out during August-November 2019 in 4 sites with IDP camps and a residential area with no camp. (who.int)
  • Actividad larvicida de extractos vegetales acuosos en larvas de Aedesaegypti: primeros ens. (bvsalud.org)
  • Angustifolium (tembetary hú) y Bixaorellana (urukú), para comprobar en cada planta, su actividad y eficacia como larvicida, contra larvas del mosquito Aedes agypti. (bvsalud.org)
  • En cambio, M. aezsederach (paraíso) y Z. chiloperone (tembetary hú) no mostraron actividad larvicida a esa dosis, ni aún a otras superiores. (bvsalud.org)
  • Imunomodulação da hepatite experimental aguda pela saliva de mosquito Aedes aegy. (usp.br)
  • In addition, Aedes aegypti has repopulated large swaths of Central America, as well as the Caribbean coastal areas of the United States and most of Florida, allowing the potential reemergence of yellow fever in these areas. (medscape.com)
  • We evaluated the effectiveness of combined information, education and communication (IEC) campaigns using two potential poeciliid larvivorous fish guppy ( Poecilia reticulata ) and mosquitofish ( Gambusia affinis ), in indoor cement tanks for Aedes larval control. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the continuation of this reciprocal exchange, Aedes and ANCB The Aedes Metropolitan Laboratory are now exploring China's countryside. (aedes-arc.de)
  • First, to put things in perspective, I will briefly review the current problem of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and of Aedes aegypti-borne disease prevention and control from a historical standpoint. (cdc.gov)
  • Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and the Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) are pleased to announce the competitive Call for Proposals on The Role of Small-Business in Aedes mosquitoes Control Technologies. (fapesp.br)
  • It is therefore imperative to develop other preventive strategic approaches with a focus on Aedes mosquitoes control. (fapesp.br)
  • Proper water storage practices, focused IEC with Poecilia introductions and vector sanitation involving the local administration and community, is suggested as the best strategy for Aedes control. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Dado que el eucalipto puede afectar los niveles de azúcar en sangre, existe la preocupación de que pueda dificultar el control del azúcar en sangre durante y después de la cirugía. (medlineplus.gov)
  • La eliminación de criaderos y el control vectorial se encuentran entre las medidas en la lucha contra la enfermedad. (bvsalud.org)
  • Infected humans are the main carriers and multipliers of the virus, serving a source of the virus for uninfected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes which maintain the urban dengue transmission cycle. (who.int)
  • Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of dengue virus. (health.gov.au)
  • Aedes Servizi Srl is the result of the spin-off of the division of Aedes SpA related to asset management, finance and administration, human resources, information systems, and general services. (europe-re.com)