Groups set up to advise governmental bodies, societies, or other institutions on policy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)
The composition of a committee; the state or status of being a member of a committee.
Schedule giving optimum times usually for primary and/or secondary immunization.
Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.
The term "United States" in a medical context often refers to the country where a patient or study participant resides, and is not a medical term per se, but relevant for epidemiological studies, healthcare policies, and understanding differences in disease prevalence, treatment patterns, and health outcomes across various geographic locations.
Committees established by professional societies, health facilities, or other institutions to consider decisions that have bioethical implications. The role of these committees may include consultation, education, mediation, and/or review of policies and practices. Committees that consider the ethical dimensions of patient care are ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL; committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects are ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH.
Vaccines used to prevent infection by viruses in the family ORTHOMYXOVIRIDAE. It includes both killed and attenuated vaccines. The composition of the vaccines is changed each year in response to antigenic shifts and changes in prevalence of influenza virus strains. The vaccine is usually bivalent or trivalent, containing one or two INFLUENZAVIRUS A strains and one INFLUENZAVIRUS B strain.
Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.
Combined vaccines consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and an acellular form of PERTUSSIS VACCINE. At least five different purified antigens of B. pertussis have been used in various combinations in these vaccines.
The legal authority or formal permission from authorities to carry on certain activities which by law or regulation require such permission. It may be applied to licensure of institutions as well as individuals.
Recommendations for directing health planning functions and policies. These may be mandated by PL93-641 and issued by the Department of Health and Human Services for use by state and local planning agencies.
An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.
Organized services to administer immunization procedures in the prevention of various diseases. The programs are made available over a wide range of sites: schools, hospitals, public health agencies, voluntary health agencies, etc. They are administered to an equally wide range of population groups or on various administrative levels: community, municipal, state, national, international.
Two or more vaccines in a single dosage form.
The process of keeping pharmaceutical products in an appropriate location.
Vaccines used to prevent infection by MUMPS VIRUS. Best known is the live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had mumps or been immunized with live mumps vaccine. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine.
A live, attenuated varicella virus vaccine used for immunization against chickenpox. It is recommended for children between the ages of 12 months and 13 years.
Hospital or other institutional committees established to protect the welfare of research subjects. Federal regulations (the "Common Rule" (45 CFR 46)) mandate the use of these committees to monitor federally-funded biomedical and behavioral research involving human subjects.
A combined vaccine used to prevent MEASLES; MUMPS; and RUBELLA.
An RNA synthesis inhibitor that is used as an antiviral agent in the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with hepatitis A virus (HEPATOVIRUS).
Committees of professional personnel who have responsibility for determining policies, procedures, and controls related to professional matters in health facilities.
An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.
Hospital or other institutional ethics committees established to consider the ethical dimensions of patient care. Distinguish from ETHICS COMMITTEES, RESEARCH, which are established to monitor the welfare of patients or healthy volunteers participating in research studies.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.
An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.
The promotion and support of consumers' rights and interests.
Vaccines in which the infectious microbial nucleic acid components have been destroyed by chemical or physical treatment (e.g., formalin, beta-propiolactone, gamma radiation) without affecting the antigenicity or immunogenicity of the viral coat or bacterial outer membrane proteins.
Species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS B that cause HUMAN INFLUENZA and other diseases primarily in humans. Antigenic variation is less extensive than in type A viruses (INFLUENZA A VIRUS) and consequently there is no basis for distinct subtypes or variants. Epidemics are less likely than with INFLUENZA A VIRUS and there have been no pandemics. Previously only found in humans, Influenza B virus has been isolated from seals which may constitute the animal reservoir from which humans are exposed.
A vaccine consisting of DIPHTHERIA TOXOID; TETANUS TOXOID; and whole-cell PERTUSSIS VACCINE. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough.
The prevention of infection or disease following exposure to a pathogen.
A disease caused by tetanospasmin, a powerful protein toxin produced by CLOSTRIDIUM TETANI. Tetanus usually occurs after an acute injury, such as a puncture wound or laceration. Generalized tetanus, the most common form, is characterized by tetanic muscular contractions and hyperreflexia. Localized tetanus presents itself as a mild condition with manifestations restricted to muscles near the wound. It may progress to the generalized form.
A suspension of formalin-inactivated poliovirus grown in monkey kidney cell tissue culture and used to prevent POLIOMYELITIS.
Semisynthetic vaccines consisting of polysaccharide antigens from microorganisms attached to protein carrier molecules. The carrier protein is recognized by macrophages and T-cells thus enhancing immunity. Conjugate vaccines induce antibody formation in people not responsive to polysaccharide alone, induce higher levels of antibody, and show a booster response on repeated injection.
An antiviral that is used in the prophylactic or symptomatic treatment of influenza A. It is also used as an antiparkinsonian agent, to treat extrapyramidal reactions, and for postherpetic neuralgia. The mechanisms of its effects in movement disorders are not well understood but probably reflect an increase in synthesis and release of dopamine, with perhaps some inhibition of dopamine uptake.
Organized groups serving in advisory capacities related to health planning activities.
Institutional committees established to protect the welfare of animals used in research and education. The 1971 NIH Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals introduced the policy that institutions using warm-blooded animals in projects supported by NIH grants either be accredited by a recognized professional laboratory animal accrediting body or establish its own committee to evaluate animal care; the Public Health Service adopted a policy in 1979 requiring such committees; and the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act mandate review and approval of federally funded research with animals by a formally designated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).
A formal process of examination of patient care or research proposals for conformity with ethical standards. The review is usually conducted by an organized clinical or research ethics committee (CLINICAL ETHICS COMMITTEES or RESEARCH ETHICS COMMITTEES), sometimes by a subset of such a committee, an ad hoc group, or an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS).
An advisory group composed primarily of staff physicians and the pharmacist which serves as the communication link between the medical staff and the pharmacy department.
A respiratory infection caused by BORDETELLA PERTUSSIS and characterized by paroxysmal coughing ending in a prolonged crowing intake of breath.
An ethylmercury-sulfidobenzoate that has been used as a preservative in VACCINES; ANTIVENINS; and OINTMENTS. It was formerly used as a topical antiseptic. It degrades to ethylmercury and thiosalicylate.
Any immunization following a primary immunization and involving exposure to the same or a closely related antigen.
A highly contagious infectious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN). It usually affects children, is spread by direct contact or respiratory route via droplet nuclei, and is characterized by the appearance on the skin and mucous membranes of successive crops of typical pruritic vesicular lesions that are easily broken and become scabbed. Chickenpox is relatively benign in children, but may be complicated by pneumonia and encephalitis in adults. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.
A situation in which an individual might benefit personally from official or professional actions. It includes a conflict between a person's private interests and official responsibilities in a position of trust. The term is not restricted to government officials. The concept refers both to actual conflict of interest and the appearance or perception of conflict.
A localized infection of mucous membranes or skin caused by toxigenic strains of CORYNEBACTERIUM DIPHTHERIAE. It is characterized by the presence of a pseudomembrane at the site of infection. DIPHTHERIA TOXIN, produced by C. diphtheriae, can cause myocarditis, polyneuritis, and other systemic toxic effects.
The formaldehyde-inactivated toxin of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. It is generally used in mixtures with TETANUS TOXOID and PERTUSSIS VACCINE; (DTP); or with tetanus toxoid alone (DT for pediatric use and Td, which contains 5- to 10-fold less diphtheria toxoid, for other use). Diphtheria toxoid is used for the prevention of diphtheria; DIPHTHERIA ANTITOXIN is for treatment.
Surveillance of drugs, devices, appliances, etc., for efficacy or adverse effects, after they have been released for general sale.
Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.
Infections with bacteria of the species NEISSERIA MENINGITIDIS.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by a member of the HEPATOVIRUS genus, HUMAN HEPATITIS A VIRUS. It can be transmitted through fecal contamination of food or water.
Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infections with STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.
An acute infectious disease caused by RUBULAVIRUS, spread by direct contact, airborne droplet nuclei, fomites contaminated by infectious saliva, and perhaps urine, and usually seen in children under the age of 15, although adults may also be affected. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with administering those agencies and offices having programs pertaining to health and human services.
A live attenuated virus vaccine of duck embryo or human diploid cell tissue culture origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of nonpregnant adolescent and adult females of childbearing age who are unimmunized and do not have serum antibodies to rubella. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (Dorland, 28th ed)
An attenuated vaccine used to prevent and/or treat HERPES ZOSTER, a disease caused by HUMAN HERPESVIRUS 3.
Substances added to pharmaceutical preparations to protect them from chemical change or microbial action. They include ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS and antioxidants.
A live VACCINIA VIRUS vaccine of calf lymph or chick embryo origin, used for immunization against smallpox. It is now recommended only for laboratory workers exposed to smallpox virus. Certain countries continue to vaccinate those in the military service. Complications that result from smallpox vaccination include vaccinia, secondary bacterial infections, and encephalomyelitis. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.
Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.
Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.
Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.
Rapid and extreme blood loss leading to HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK.
A strain of HEPATITIS A VIRUS which causes hepatitis in humans. The virus replicates in hepatocytes and is presumed to reach the intestine via the bile duct. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with ROTAVIRUS.
A live attenuated virus vaccine of chick embryo origin, used for routine immunization of children and for immunization of adolescents and adults who have not had measles or been immunized with live measles vaccine and have no serum antibodies against measles. Children are usually immunized with measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Administration of a vaccine to large populations in order to elicit IMMUNITY.
The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing inactivated hepatitis B or some of its component antigens and designed to prevent hepatitis B. Some vaccines may be recombinantly produced.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with Japanese B encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, JAPANESE).
A specialized agency of the United Nations designed as a coordinating authority on international health work; its aim is to promote the attainment of the highest possible level of health by all peoples.
A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.
Systems developed for collecting reports from government agencies, manufacturers, hospitals, physicians, and other sources on adverse drug reactions.
Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.
Aspects of health and disease related to travel.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS comprised of the surface proteins hemagglutinin 3 and neuraminidase 2. The H3N2 subtype was responsible for the Hong Kong flu pandemic of 1968.
Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.
Tetanus toxoid is a purified and chemically inactivated form of the tetanus toxin, used as a vaccine to induce active immunity against tetanus disease by stimulating the production of antibodies.
Any vaccine raised against any virus or viral derivative that causes hepatitis.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines containing antigenic polysaccharides from Haemophilus influenzae and designed to prevent infection. The vaccine can contain the polysaccharides alone or more frequently polysaccharides conjugated to carrier molecules. It is also seen as a combined vaccine with diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.
Deliberate stimulation of the host's immune response. ACTIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of ANTIGENS or IMMUNOLOGIC ADJUVANTS. PASSIVE IMMUNIZATION involves administration of IMMUNE SERA or LYMPHOCYTES or their extracts (e.g., transfer factor, immune RNA) or transplantation of immunocompetent cell producing tissue (thymus or bone marrow).
Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Committees established to review interim data and efficacy outcomes in clinical trials. The findings of these committees are used in deciding whether a trial should be continued as designed, changed, or terminated. Government regulations regarding federally-funded research involving human subjects (the "Common Rule") require (45 CFR 46.111) that research ethics committees reviewing large-scale clinical trials monitor the data collected using a mechanism such as a data monitoring committee. FDA regulations (21 CFR 50.24) require that such committees be established to monitor studies conducted in emergency settings.
Seizures that occur during a febrile episode. It is a common condition, affecting 2-5% of children aged 3 months to five years. An autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance has been identified in some families. The majority are simple febrile seizures (generally defined as generalized onset, single seizures with a duration of less than 30 minutes). Complex febrile seizures are characterized by focal onset, duration greater than 30 minutes, and/or more than one seizure in a 24 hour period. The likelihood of developing epilepsy (i.e., a nonfebrile seizure disorder) following simple febrile seizures is low. Complex febrile seizures are associated with a moderately increased incidence of epilepsy. (From Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p784)
The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.
Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.
An agency in the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. It was created as an independent regulatory agency responsible for the implementation of federal laws designed to protect the environment. Its mission is to protect human health and the ENVIRONMENT.
A suspension of killed Bordetella pertussis organisms, used for immunization against pertussis (WHOOPING COUGH). It is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids (DTP). There is an acellular pertussis vaccine prepared from the purified antigenic components of Bordetella pertussis, which causes fewer adverse reactions than whole-cell vaccine and, like the whole-cell vaccine, is generally used in a mixture with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
An acute infectious disease caused by the RUBELLA VIRUS. The virus enters the respiratory tract via airborne droplet and spreads to the LYMPHATIC SYSTEM.
A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.
A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.
The ability of lymphoid cells to mount a humoral or cellular immune response when challenged by antigen.
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent and treat RABIES. The inactivated virus vaccine is used for preexposure immunization to persons at high risk of exposure, and in conjunction with rabies immunoglobulin, for postexposure prophylaxis.
The circulation or wide dispersal of information.
An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.
Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.
An acute infectious, usually self-limited, disease believed to represent activation of latent varicella-zoster virus (HERPESVIRUS 3, HUMAN) in those who have been rendered partially immune after a previous attack of CHICKENPOX. It involves the SENSORY GANGLIA and their areas of innervation and is characterized by severe neuralgic pain along the distribution of the affected nerve and crops of clustered vesicles over the area. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Acute VIRAL CNS INFECTION affecting mammals, including humans. It is caused by RABIES VIRUS and usually spread by contamination with virus-laden saliva of bites inflicted by rabid animals. Important animal vectors include the dog, cat, bat, fox, raccoon, skunk, and wolf.
Freedom from exposure to danger and protection from the occurrence or risk of injury or loss. It suggests optimal precautions in the workplace, on the street, in the home, etc., and includes personal safety as well as the safety of property.
Great Britain is not a medical term, but a geographical name for the largest island in the British Isles, which comprises England, Scotland, and Wales, forming the major part of the United Kingdom.
Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.
Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.
A highly contagious infectious disease caused by MORBILLIVIRUS, common among children but also seen in the nonimmune of any age, in which the virus enters the respiratory tract via droplet nuclei and multiplies in the epithelial cells, spreading throughout the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM.
Immunoglobulin preparations used in intravenous infusion, containing primarily IMMUNOGLOBULIN G. They are used to treat a variety of diseases associated with decreased or abnormal immunoglobulin levels including pediatric AIDS; primary HYPERGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA; SCID; CYTOMEGALOVIRUS infections in transplant recipients, LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC; Kawasaki syndrome, infection in neonates, and IDIOPATHIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA.
Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic BACTERIA. It is a commensal and pathogen only of humans, and can be carried asymptomatically in the NASOPHARYNX. When found in cerebrospinal fluid it is the causative agent of cerebrospinal meningitis (MENINGITIS, MENINGOCOCCAL). It is also found in venereal discharges and blood. There are at least 13 serogroups based on antigenic differences in the capsular polysaccharides; the ones causing most meningitis infections being A, B, C, Y, and W-135. Each serogroup can be further classified by serotype, serosubtype, and immunotype.
The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.
The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.
An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)
The utilization of drugs as reported in individual hospital studies, FDA studies, marketing, or consumption, etc. This includes drug stockpiling, and patient drug profiles.
Infections with bacteria of the species STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Infection with any of the rotaviruses. Specific infections include human infantile diarrhea, neonatal calf diarrhea, and epidemic diarrhea of infant mice.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.
Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.
Use of antibiotics before, during, or after a diagnostic, therapeutic, or surgical procedure to prevent infectious complications.
Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.
Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.
Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
The use of humans as investigational subjects.
The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
The co-occurrence of pregnancy and an INFECTION. The infection may precede or follow FERTILIZATION.
Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
The moral obligations governing the conduct of research. Used for discussions of research ethics as a general topic.
Suspensions of attenuated or killed viruses administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious viral disease.
Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.
Educational institutions.
The principles of professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the physician, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the physician in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families.
The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by a member of the ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS genus, HEPATITIS B VIRUS. It is primarily transmitted by parenteral exposure, such as transfusion of contaminated blood or blood products, but can also be transmitted via sexual or intimate personal contact.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified.
The use of animals as investigational subjects.

Genetic testing: a conceptual exploration. (1/415)

This paper attempts to explore a number of conceptual issues surrounding genetic testing. It looks at the meaning of the terms, genetic information and genetic testing in relation to the definition set out by the Advisory Committee on Genetic Testing in the UK, and by the Task Force on Genetic Testing in the USA. It argues that the special arrangements that may be required for the regulation of genetic tests should not be determined by reference to the nature or technology of the test, but by considering those morally relevant features that justify regulation. Failure to do so will lead to the regulation of genetic tests that need not be regulated, and would fail to cover other tests which should be regulated. The paper also argues that there is little in the nature of the properties of gene tests, using DNA or chromosomes, that in itself justifies a special approach.  (+info)

Research, ethics and conflicts of interest. (2/415)

In this paper, I have tried to develop a critique of committee procedures and conflict of interest within research advisory committees and ethical review committees (ERCs). There are specific features of conflict of interest in medical research. Scientists, communities and the subjects of research all have legitimate stakeholdings. The interests of medical scientists are particularly complex, since they are justified by the moral and physical welfare of their research subjects, while the reputations and incomes of scientists depend on the success of their science. Tensions of this kind must at times produce conflict of interest. It is important to recognise that conflicts of interest may unwittingly lead to manipulation of research subjects and their lay representatives on research committees. It is equally important to recognise distinctions between the legal and moral aspects of conflict of interest. Some practical suggestions are made which may go some way towards resolving these difficulties. They indicate what might be needed to ensure the validity of ethical discourse, and to reduce the risks associated with conflict of interest.  (+info)

Withholding/withdrawing treatment from neonates: legislation and official guidelines across Europe. (3/415)

Representatives from eight European countries compared the legal, ethical and professional settings within which decision making for neonates takes place. When it comes to limiting treatment there is general agreement across all countries that overly aggressive treatment is to be discouraged. Nevertheless, strong emphasis has been placed on the need for compassionate care even where cure is not possible. Where a child will die irrespective of medical intervention, there is widespread acceptance of the practice of limiting aggressive treatment or alleviating suffering even if death may be hastened as a result. Where the infant could be saved but the future outlook is bleak there is more debate, but only two countries have tested the courts with such cases. When it comes to the active intentional ending of life, the legal position is standard across Europe; it is prohibited. However, recognising those intractable situations where death may be lingering and unpleasant, Dutch paediatricians have reported that they do sometimes assist babies to die with parental consent. Two cases have been tried through the courts and recent official recommendations have set out standards by which such actions may be assessed.  (+info)

Commercial predictive testing: the desirability of one overseeing body. (4/415)

In Europe a process of harmonisation of standards and regulations on genetic testing has started. Public discussion and consultation are recommended, but it is not clear in every European country how the decision making process as regards the further introduction of genetic testing services should be formed. In this paper the usefulness and importance of an overseeing body for genetic screening and testing is founded on four lines of reasoning: (1) analysis of the role of value judgments in the use of the concept of (genetic) abnormality; (2) a balancing of potential benefits for all parties involved; (3) a balancing of potential disadvantages, and (4) the greater availability of commercial genetic tests in the future. It is further argued that such an overseeing body has advantages for all the interested parties.  (+info)

Danish ethics council rejects brain death as the criterion of death -- commentary 2: return to Elsinore. (5/415)

No discussion of when an individual is dead is meaningful in the absence of a definition of death. If human death is defined as the irreversible loss of the capacity for consciousness combined with the irreversible loss of the capacity to breathe spontaneously (and hence to maintain a spontaneous heart beat) the death of the brainstem will be seen to be the necessary and sufficient condition for the death of the individual. Such a definition of death is not something radically new. It is merely the reformulation -- in the language of the neurophysiologist -- of much older concepts such as the 'departure of the (conscious) soul from the body' and the 'loss of the breath of life'. All death -- in this perspective -- is, and always has been, brainstem death....  (+info)

Danish ethics council rejects brain death as the criterion of death -- commentary 1: wanting it both ways. (6/415)

In this commentary on the recommendations of the Danish Council of Ethics (DCE) concerning criteria for death it is argued that whilst the DCE is correct in stressing the cultural aspects of death, its adoption of cardiac-oriented criteria raises several problems. There are problems with its notion of a 'death process', which purportedly begins with brain death and ends with cessation of cardiac function, and there are serious problems regarding its commitment to a cardiac-oriented definition whilst permitting transplantation when the heart is still beating.  (+info)

The Council of Europe's first Symposium on Bioethics: Strasbourg, Dec 5-7 1989. (7/415)

This symposium discussed bioethics teaching, research and documentation and also research ethics committees. An international convention for the protection of the integrity of the human body was called for, as was a new European Committee on Ethics. 'The genetic impact' was a major preoccupation of the symposium.  (+info)

Review article: Warnock and surrogacy.(8/415)

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Advisory committees, in the context of medicine and healthcare, are groups of experts that provide guidance and recommendations to organizations or governmental bodies on medical and health-related matters. These committees typically consist of physicians, researchers, scientists, and other healthcare professionals who have expertise in a specific area.

Their roles can include:

1. Providing expert advice on clinical guidelines, treatment protocols, and diagnostic criteria.
2. Evaluating the safety and efficacy of medical products, such as drugs and devices.
3. Making recommendations on public health policies and regulations.
4. Assessing the impact of new research findings on clinical practice.
5. Providing education and training to healthcare professionals.

Advisory committees can be found at various levels, including within hospitals and medical institutions, as well as at the state and federal level. Their recommendations are intended to help inform decision-making and improve the quality of care delivered to patients. However, it's important to note that these committees do not have legislative or regulatory authority, and their recommendations are non-binding.

Committee membership, in a medical context, refers to the role of an individual serving on a committee that is responsible for making decisions or providing guidance related to medical issues or healthcare delivery. This could include committees within a hospital or healthcare organization, professional medical societies, or governmental bodies. Committee members may be involved in developing policies, guidelines, or standards; overseeing research or quality improvement initiatives; or addressing ethical or regulatory concerns. Membership on such committees is often composed of medical professionals with relevant expertise and experience.

An immunization schedule is a series of planned dates when a person, usually a child, should receive specific vaccines in order to be fully protected against certain preventable diseases. The schedule is developed based on scientific research and recommendations from health organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The immunization schedule outlines which vaccines are recommended, the number of doses required, the age at which each dose should be given, and the minimum amount of time that must pass between doses. The schedule may vary depending on factors such as the individual's age, health status, and travel plans.

Immunization schedules are important for ensuring that individuals receive timely protection against vaccine-preventable diseases, and for maintaining high levels of immunity in populations, which helps to prevent the spread of disease. It is important to follow the recommended immunization schedule as closely as possible to ensure optimal protection.

Vaccination is a simple, safe, and effective way to protect people against harmful diseases, before they come into contact with them. It uses your body's natural defenses to build protection to specific infections and makes your immune system stronger.

A vaccination usually contains a small, harmless piece of a virus or bacteria (or toxins produced by these germs) that has been made inactive or weakened so it won't cause the disease itself. This piece of the germ is known as an antigen. When the vaccine is introduced into the body, the immune system recognizes the antigen as foreign and produces antibodies to fight it.

If a person then comes into contact with the actual disease-causing germ, their immune system will recognize it and immediately produce antibodies to destroy it. The person is therefore protected against that disease. This is known as active immunity.

Vaccinations are important for both individual and public health. They prevent the spread of contagious diseases and protect vulnerable members of the population, such as young children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems who cannot be vaccinated or for whom vaccination is not effective.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "United States" is a geopolitical entity, specifically the name of the country consisting of 50 states, and it is not a medical term or concept. Therefore, I can't provide a medical definition for it. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or biology, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

Ethics committees, also known as institutional review boards (IRBs), are groups responsible for reviewing and approving research studies involving human subjects. The primary goal of these committees is to ensure that the rights and welfare of study participants are protected, and that the research is conducted in an ethical manner.

Ethics committees typically consist of a diverse group of individuals with expertise in various fields, such as medicine, law, ethics, and community representation. They review the proposed research protocol, informed consent documents, and other relevant materials to ensure that they meet ethical standards and regulations.

The committee assesses several key factors when reviewing a study, including:

1. Risks vs. benefits: The potential risks of the study must be minimized and reasonable in relation to the anticipated benefits.
2. Informed consent: Participants must be adequately informed about the study's purpose, procedures, risks, and benefits, and provide their voluntary consent.
3. Selection and recruitment: Participants should be selected fairly and without discrimination, and recruitment methods should be unbiased.
4. Confidentiality: The privacy and confidentiality of participants' information must be protected throughout the study.
5. Monitoring and reporting: There should be mechanisms in place for monitoring the study's progress and ensuring that any adverse events are reported and addressed promptly.

Ethics committees play a critical role in protecting human subjects and upholding ethical standards in research. They provide oversight and guidance to researchers, helping to ensure that studies are conducted with integrity and respect for participants' rights and welfare.

Influenza vaccines, also known as flu shots, are vaccines that protect against the influenza virus. Influenza is a highly contagious respiratory illness that can cause severe symptoms and complications, particularly in young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with certain underlying health conditions.

Influenza vaccines contain inactivated or weakened viruses or pieces of the virus, which stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies that recognize and fight off the virus. The vaccine is typically given as an injection into the muscle, usually in the upper arm.

There are several different types of influenza vaccines available, including:

* Trivalent vaccines, which protect against three strains of the virus (two A strains and one B strain)
* Quadrivalent vaccines, which protect against four strains of the virus (two A strains and two B strains)
* High-dose vaccines, which contain a higher amount of antigen and are recommended for people aged 65 and older
* Adjuvanted vaccines, which contain an additional ingredient to boost the immune response and are also recommended for people aged 65 and older
* Cell-based vaccines, which are produced using cultured cells rather than eggs and may be recommended for people with egg allergies

It's important to note that influenza viruses are constantly changing, so the vaccine is updated each year to match the circulating strains. It's recommended that most people get vaccinated against influenza every year to stay protected.

A vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity to a particular infectious disease. It typically contains an agent that resembles the disease-causing microorganism and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe, its toxins, or one of its surface proteins. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as a threat, destroy it, and "remember" it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it encounters in the future.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by a natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (to fight disease that is already present). The administration of vaccines is called vaccination. Vaccinations are generally administered through needle injections, but can also be administered by mouth or sprayed into the nose.

The term "vaccine" comes from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of cowpox to create immunity to smallpox. The first successful vaccine was developed in 1796 by Edward Jenner, who showed that milkmaids who had contracted cowpox did not get smallpox. He reasoned that exposure to cowpox protected against smallpox and tested his theory by injecting a boy with pus from a cowpox sore and then exposing him to smallpox, which the boy did not contract. The word "vaccine" is derived from Variolae vaccinae (smallpox of the cow), the term devised by Jenner to denote cowpox. He used it in 1798 during a conversation with a fellow physician and later in the title of his 1801 Inquiry.

Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis (DTaP) vaccines are a type of combination vaccine that protect against three serious diseases caused by bacteria: diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (also known as whooping cough).

Diphtheria is a highly contagious respiratory infection that can cause breathing difficulties, heart failure, paralysis, and even death. Tetanus, also known as lockjaw, is a bacterial infection that affects the nervous system and causes muscle stiffness and spasms, which can be severe enough to cause broken bones or suffocation. Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory infection that causes severe coughing fits, making it difficult to breathe, eat, or drink.

The "a" in DTaP stands for "acellular," which means that the pertussis component of the vaccine contains only parts of the bacteria, rather than the whole cells used in older vaccines. This reduces the risk of side effects associated with the whole-cell pertussis vaccine while still providing effective protection against the disease.

DTaP vaccines are typically given as a series of five shots, starting at 2 months of age and ending at 4-6 years of age. Booster doses may be recommended later in life to maintain immunity. DTaP vaccines are an essential part of routine childhood immunization schedules and have significantly reduced the incidence of these diseases worldwide.

Licensure is the process by which a government regulatory agency grants a license to a physician (or other healthcare professional) to practice medicine (or provide healthcare services) in a given jurisdiction. The licensing process typically requires the completion of specific educational and training requirements, passing written and/or practical exams, and meeting other state-specific criteria.

The purpose of licensure is to ensure that healthcare professionals meet minimum standards of competence and safety in order to protect the public. Licensure laws vary by state, so a physician who is licensed to practice medicine in one state may not be able to practice in another state without obtaining additional licensure.

Health planning guidelines are a set of recommendations and principles that provide direction for the development, implementation, and evaluation of health services and public health programs. These guidelines serve as a framework to ensure that health planning is evidence-based, equitable, efficient, and effective in addressing the priority health needs of a population. They typically cover various aspects such as:

1. Needs assessment: Identifying and prioritizing the health needs of a population through data collection, analysis, and consultation with stakeholders.
2. Resource allocation: Determining how to distribute resources fairly and efficiently to address priority health issues and ensure equitable access to healthcare services.
3. Service delivery: Establishing standards for the provision of high-quality, patient-centered care that is accessible, affordable, and culturally sensitive.
4. Monitoring and evaluation: Developing systems to track progress towards health goals, measure outcomes, and make data-driven decisions for continuous quality improvement.
5. Stakeholder engagement: Encouraging collaboration and partnership among various stakeholders, including healthcare providers, policymakers, community organizations, and the public, to ensure that health planning efforts are inclusive, participatory, and responsive to local needs and preferences.
6. Ethical considerations: Ensuring that health planning processes and decisions respect human rights, promote social justice, and protect vulnerable populations from discrimination and marginalization.
7. Flexibility and adaptability: Recognizing the need for regular review and revision of health planning guidelines to accommodate changing circumstances, emerging evidence, and new priorities.

Immunization programs, also known as vaccination programs, are organized efforts to administer vaccines to populations or communities in order to protect individuals from vaccine-preventable diseases. These programs are typically implemented by public health agencies and involve the planning, coordination, and delivery of immunizations to ensure that a high percentage of people are protected against specific infectious diseases.

Immunization programs may target specific age groups, such as infants and young children, or populations at higher risk of certain diseases, such as travelers, healthcare workers, or individuals with weakened immune systems. The goals of immunization programs include controlling and eliminating vaccine-preventable diseases, reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases, and protecting vulnerable populations from outbreaks and epidemics.

Immunization programs may be delivered through a variety of settings, including healthcare facilities, schools, community centers, and mobile clinics. They often involve partnerships between government agencies, healthcare providers, non-governmental organizations, and communities to ensure that vaccines are accessible, affordable, and acceptable to the populations they serve. Effective immunization programs require strong leadership, adequate funding, robust data systems, and ongoing monitoring and evaluation to assess their impact and identify areas for improvement.

Combined vaccines are defined in medical terms as vaccines that contain two or more antigens from different diseases, which are given to provide protection against multiple diseases at the same time. This approach reduces the number of injections required and simplifies the immunization schedule, especially during early childhood. Examples of combined vaccines include:

1. DTaP-Hib-IPV (e.g., Pentacel): A vaccine that combines diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease, and poliovirus components in one injection to protect against these five diseases.
2. MMRV (e.g., ProQuad): A vaccine that combines measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (chickenpox) antigens in a single injection to provide immunity against all four diseases.
3. HepA-HepB (e.g., Twinrix): A vaccine that combines hepatitis A and hepatitis B antigens in one injection, providing protection against both types of hepatitis.
4. MenACWY-TT (e.g., MenQuadfi): A vaccine that combines four serogroups of meningococcal bacteria (A, C, W, Y) with tetanus toxoid as a carrier protein in one injection for the prevention of invasive meningococcal disease caused by these serogroups.
5. PCV13-PPSV23 (e.g., Vaxneuvance): A vaccine that combines 13 pneumococcal serotypes with PPSV23, providing protection against a broader range of pneumococcal diseases in adults aged 18 years and older.

Combined vaccines have been thoroughly tested for safety and efficacy to ensure they provide a strong immune response and an acceptable safety profile. They are essential tools in preventing various infectious diseases and improving overall public health.

"Drug storage" refers to the proper handling, maintenance, and preservation of medications in a safe and suitable environment to ensure their effectiveness and safety until they are used. Proper drug storage includes:

1. Protecting drugs from light, heat, and moisture: Exposure to these elements can degrade the quality and potency of medications. Therefore, it is recommended to store most drugs in a cool, dry place, away from direct sunlight.

2. Keeping drugs out of reach of children and pets: Medications should be stored in a secure location, such as a locked cabinet or medicine chest, to prevent accidental ingestion or harm to young children and animals.

3. Following storage instructions on drug labels and packaging: Some medications require specific storage conditions, such as refrigeration or protection from freezing. Always follow the storage instructions provided by the manufacturer or pharmacist.

4. Regularly inspecting drugs for signs of degradation or expiration: Check medications for changes in color, consistency, or odor, and discard any that have expired or show signs of spoilage.

5. Storing drugs separately from one another: Keep different medications separate to prevent cross-contamination, incorrect dosing, or accidental mixing of incompatible substances.

6. Avoiding storage in areas with high humidity or temperature fluctuations: Bathrooms, kitchens, and garages are generally not ideal for storing medications due to their exposure to moisture, heat, and temperature changes.

Proper drug storage is crucial for maintaining the safety, efficacy, and stability of medications. Improper storage can lead to reduced potency, increased risk of adverse effects, or even life-threatening situations. Always consult a healthcare professional or pharmacist for specific storage instructions and recommendations.

The Mumps Vaccine is a biological preparation intended to induce immunity against mumps, a contagious viral infection that primarily affects the salivary glands. The vaccine contains live attenuated (weakened) mumps virus, which stimulates the immune system to develop a protective response without causing the disease.

There are two types of mumps vaccines available:

1. The Jeryl Lynn strain is used in the United States and is part of the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine and the Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella (MMRV) vaccine. This strain is derived from a clinical isolate obtained from the throat washings of a child with mumps in 1963.
2. The Urabe AM9 strain was used in some countries but has been discontinued in many places due to an increased risk of meningitis as a rare complication.

The MMR vaccine is typically given to children at 12-15 months of age and again at 4-6 years of age, providing long-lasting immunity against mumps in most individuals. The vaccine has significantly reduced the incidence of mumps and its complications worldwide.

The chickenpox vaccine, also known as varicella vaccine, is a preventive measure against the highly contagious viral infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. The vaccine contains a live but weakened form of the virus, which stimulates the immune system to produce a response without causing the disease itself.

The chickenpox vaccine is typically given in two doses, with the first dose administered between 12 and 15 months of age and the second dose between 4 and 6 years of age. In some cases, the vaccine may be given to older children, adolescents, or adults who have not previously been vaccinated or who have never had chickenpox.

The chickenpox vaccine is highly effective at preventing severe cases of the disease and reducing the risk of complications such as bacterial infections, pneumonia, and encephalitis. It is also effective at preventing transmission of the virus to others.

Like any vaccine, the chickenpox vaccine can cause mild side effects such as soreness at the injection site, fever, or a mild rash. However, these side effects are generally mild and short-lived. Serious side effects are rare but may include allergic reactions or severe immune responses.

Overall, the chickenpox vaccine is a safe and effective way to prevent this common childhood disease and its potential complications.

An Ethics Committee for Research, also known as an Institutional Review Board (IRB), is a group that has been formally designated to review, approve, monitor, and revise biomedical and behavioral research involving humans. The purpose of the committee is to ensure that the rights and welfare of the participants are protected and that the risks involved in the research are minimized and reasonable in relation to the anticipated benefits.

The committee typically includes members with various backgrounds, including scientists, non-scientists, and community members. They review the research protocol, informed consent documents, and any other relevant materials to ensure that they meet ethical standards and regulations. The committee also monitors the progress of the research to ensure that it continues to be conducted in an ethical manner.

The role of ethics committees for research is critical in protecting human subjects from harm and ensuring that research is conducted with integrity, respect, and transparency.

The Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine is a combination immunization that protects against three infectious diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella. It contains live attenuated viruses of each disease, which stimulate an immune response in the body similar to that produced by natural infection but do not cause the diseases themselves.

The MMR vaccine is typically given in two doses, the first at 12-15 months of age and the second at 4-6 years of age. It is highly effective in preventing these diseases, with over 90% effectiveness reported after a single dose and near 100% effectiveness after the second dose.

Measles is a highly contagious viral disease that can cause fever, rash, cough, runny nose, and red, watery eyes. It can also lead to serious complications such as pneumonia, encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and even death.

Mumps is a viral infection that primarily affects the salivary glands, causing swelling and tenderness in the cheeks and jaw. It can also cause fever, headache, muscle aches, and fatigue. Mumps can lead to serious complications such as deafness, meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord), and inflammation of the testicles or ovaries.

Rubella, also known as German measles, is a viral infection that typically causes a mild fever, rash, and swollen lymph nodes. However, if a pregnant woman becomes infected with rubella, it can cause serious birth defects such as hearing impairment, heart defects, and developmental delays in the fetus.

The MMR vaccine is an important tool in preventing these diseases and protecting public health.

Rimantadine is an antiviral medication that belongs to the class of adamantanes. It is primarily used for preventing and treating influenza A virus infections. Rimantadine works by blocking the viral neuraminidase enzyme, which prevents the virus from spreading within the body.

The medical definition of Rimantadine is:

Rimantadine hydrochloride is a synthetic antiviral agent, chemically designated as 1-[(1R,2S)-2-ethyl-3-adamantanemethyl]-1H-imidazole monohydrochloride. It is a white crystalline powder, freely soluble in water, and soluble in alcohol and chloroform.

Rimantadine is available as an oral medication and is typically prescribed to be taken twice daily. It is most effective when started within 48 hours of the onset of flu symptoms. Common side effects of Rimantadine include gastrointestinal disturbances, nervousness, dizziness, and skin rashes.

It's important to note that Rimantadine is not effective against influenza B virus infections, and its use may be limited due to the emergence of resistant strains of the influenza A virus. Additionally, it should only be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional, as with any medication.

Hepatitis A vaccines are inactivated or live attenuated viral vaccines that are administered to prevent infection and illness caused by the hepatitis A virus. The vaccine contains antigens that stimulate an immune response in the body, leading to the production of antibodies that protect against future infection with the virus.

The inactivated hepatitis A vaccine is made from viruses that have been chemically treated to destroy their ability to cause disease while preserving their ability to stimulate an immune response. This type of vaccine is typically given in two doses, six months apart, and provides long-term protection against the virus.

The live attenuated hepatitis A vaccine contains a weakened form of the virus that is unable to cause illness but can still stimulate an immune response. This type of vaccine is given as a single dose and provides protection against the virus for at least 20 years.

Hepatitis A vaccines are recommended for people who are at increased risk of infection, including travelers to areas where hepatitis A is common, men who have sex with men, people who use injection drugs, and people with chronic liver disease or clotting factor disorders. The vaccine is also recommended for children in certain states and communities where hepatitis A is endemic.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Professional Staff Committees" is not a medical term or concept. Instead, it likely refers to committees made up of professional staff members in a hospital, healthcare organization, or other professional setting. These committees typically consist of department heads, managers, and other experienced professionals who collaborate on various aspects of organizational operations, such as policy-making, quality improvement, patient care standards, and staff development. They serve as platforms for discussion, decision-making, and problem-solving to ensure the smooth functioning and continuous improvement of the organization's services.

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a highly contagious viral infection that attacks the respiratory system of humans. It is caused by influenza viruses A, B, or C and is characterized by the sudden onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, sore throat, cough, runny nose, and fatigue. Influenza can lead to complications such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and ear infections, and can be particularly dangerous for young children, older adults, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems or chronic medical conditions. The virus is spread through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks, and can also survive on surfaces for a period of time. Influenza viruses are constantly changing, which makes it necessary to get vaccinated annually to protect against the most recent and prevalent strains.

An Ethics Committee in a clinical setting, also known as an Institutional Review Board (IRB), is a group that reviews and monitors biomedical and behavioral research involving humans to ensure that it is conducted ethically. The committee's role is to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects by ensuring that the risks of participation in research are minimized and that the potential benefits of the research are maximized.

The committee reviews the proposed research protocol, informed consent documents, and other study-related materials to ensure that they meet ethical standards and comply with federal regulations. The committee also monitors the conduct of the research to ensure that it is being carried out in accordance with the approved protocol and that any adverse events are reported and addressed promptly.

The members of an Ethics Committee typically include physicians, nurses, scientists, ethicists, and community members, and they may also seek input from other experts as needed. The committee operates independently of the researcher and has the authority to approve, require modifications to, or disapprove the research.

Meningococcal vaccines are vaccines that protect against Neisseria meningitidis, a type of bacteria that can cause serious infections such as meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord) and septicemia (bloodstream infection). There are several types of meningococcal vaccines available, including conjugate vaccines and polysaccharide vaccines. These vaccines work by stimulating the immune system to produce antibodies that can protect against the different serogroups of N. meningitidis, including A, B, C, Y, and W-135. The specific type of vaccine used and the number of doses required may depend on a person's age, health status, and other factors. Meningococcal vaccines are recommended for certain high-risk populations, such as infants, young children, adolescents, and people with certain medical conditions, as well as for travelers to areas where meningococcal disease is common.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a federal government agency responsible for protecting public health by ensuring the safety, efficacy, and security of human and veterinary drugs, biological products, medical devices, our country's food supply, cosmetics, and products that emit radiation. The FDA also provides guidance on the proper use of these products, and enforces laws and regulations related to them. It is part of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Consumer advocacy in a medical context refers to the process of representing and supporting the rights and interests of patients and healthcare consumers. Consumer advocates work to ensure that individuals receive safe, effective, and affordable healthcare services, and that they are empowered to make informed decisions about their own care. This may involve promoting transparency and accountability in the healthcare system, advocating for policies that protect patient rights, and providing education and support to help consumers navigate the complex world of healthcare. Consumer advocacy can take many forms, including individual case advocacy, class action lawsuits, policy reform efforts, and public awareness campaigns.

Inactivated vaccines, also known as killed or non-live vaccines, are created by using a version of the virus or bacteria that has been grown in a laboratory and then killed or inactivated with chemicals, heat, or radiation. This process renders the organism unable to cause disease, but still capable of stimulating an immune response when introduced into the body.

Inactivated vaccines are generally considered safer than live attenuated vaccines since they cannot revert back to a virulent form and cause illness. However, they may require multiple doses or booster shots to maintain immunity because the immune response generated by inactivated vaccines is not as robust as that produced by live vaccines. Examples of inactivated vaccines include those for hepatitis A, rabies, and influenza (inactivated flu vaccine).

Influenza B virus is one of the primary types of influenza viruses that cause seasonal flu in humans. It's an enveloped, negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virus belonging to the family Orthomyxoviridae.

Influenza B viruses are typically found only in humans and circulate widely during the annual flu season. They mutate at a slower rate than Influenza A viruses, which means that immunity developed against one strain tends to provide protection against similar strains in subsequent seasons. However, they can still cause significant illness, especially among young children, older adults, and people with certain chronic medical conditions.

Influenza B viruses are divided into two lineages: Victoria and Yamagata. Vaccines are developed each year to target the most likely strains of Influenza A and B viruses that will circulate in the upcoming flu season.

The Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis (DTaP) vaccine is a combination immunization that protects against three bacterial diseases: diphtheria, tetanus (lockjaw), and pertussis (whooping cough).

Diphtheria is an upper respiratory infection that can lead to breathing difficulties, heart failure, paralysis, or even death. Tetanus is a bacterial infection that affects the nervous system and causes muscle stiffness and spasms, leading to "lockjaw." Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory infection characterized by severe coughing fits, which can make it difficult to breathe and may lead to pneumonia, seizures, or brain damage.

The DTaP vaccine contains inactivated toxins (toxoids) from the bacteria that cause these diseases. It is typically given as a series of five shots, with doses administered at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, 15-18 months, and 4-6 years of age. The vaccine helps the immune system develop protection against the diseases without causing the actual illness.

It is important to note that there are other combination vaccines available that protect against these same diseases, such as DT (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids) and Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis), which contain higher doses of the diphtheria and pertussis components. These vaccines are recommended for different age groups and may be used as booster shots to maintain immunity throughout adulthood.

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is the medical practice of using antiviral medications to prevent the development of a disease after an exposure to that disease. It is most commonly used in the context of preventing HIV infection, where it involves taking a combination of antiretroviral drugs for 28 days following potential exposure to the virus, such as through sexual assault or accidental needlestick injuries.

The goal of PEP is to reduce the risk of HIV infection by stopping the virus from replicating and establishing itself in the body. However, it is not 100% effective and should be used in conjunction with other preventative measures such as safe sex practices and proper use of personal protective equipment.

It's important to note that PEP must be started as soon as possible after exposure, ideally within 72 hours, but preferably within 24 hours, for it to be most effective. The decision to initiate PEP should be made in consultation with a medical professional and will depend on various factors such as the type of exposure, the risk of transmission, and the individual's medical history.

Tetanus is a serious bacterial infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. The bacteria are found in soil, dust and manure and can enter the body through wounds, cuts or abrasions, particularly if they're not cleaned properly. The bacterium produces a toxin that affects the nervous system, causing muscle stiffness and spasms, often beginning in the jaw and face (lockjaw) and then spreading to the rest of the body.

Tetanus can be prevented through vaccination, and it's important to get vaccinated if you haven't already or if your immunization status is not up-to-date. If tetanus is suspected, medical attention should be sought immediately, as it can be a life-threatening condition if left untreated. Treatment typically involves administering tetanus immune globulin (TIG) to neutralize the toxin and antibiotics to kill the bacteria, as well as supportive care such as wound cleaning and management, and in some cases, mechanical ventilation may be necessary to assist with breathing.

Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated (IPV) is a vaccine used to prevent poliomyelitis (polio), a highly infectious disease caused by the poliovirus. IPV contains inactivated (killed) polioviruses of all three poliovirus types. It works by stimulating an immune response in the body, but because the viruses are inactivated, they cannot cause polio. After vaccination, the immune system recognizes and responds to the inactivated viruses, producing antibodies that protect against future infection with wild, or naturally occurring, polioviruses. IPV is typically given as an injection in the leg or arm, and a series of doses are required for full protection. It is a safe and effective way to prevent polio and its complications.

Conjugate vaccines are a type of vaccine that combines a part of a bacterium with a protein or other substance to boost the body's immune response to the bacteria. The bacterial component is usually a polysaccharide, which is a long chain of sugars that makes up part of the bacterial cell wall.

By itself, a polysaccharide is not very immunogenic, meaning it does not stimulate a strong immune response. However, when it is conjugated or linked to a protein or other carrier molecule, it becomes much more immunogenic and can elicit a stronger and longer-lasting immune response.

Conjugate vaccines are particularly effective in protecting against bacterial infections that affect young children, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and pneumococcal disease. These vaccines have been instrumental in reducing the incidence of these diseases and their associated complications, such as meningitis and pneumonia.

Overall, conjugate vaccines work by mimicking a natural infection and stimulating the immune system to produce antibodies that can protect against future infections with the same bacterium. By combining a weakly immunogenic polysaccharide with a protein carrier, these vaccines can elicit a stronger and more effective immune response, providing long-lasting protection against bacterial infections.

Amantadine is an antiviral medication that is primarily used to prevent and treat certain types of influenza (flu). It works by stopping the virus from multiplying in your body. In addition to its antiviral properties, amantadine also has central nervous system (CNS) stimulant and dopaminergic effects, which make it useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and various movement disorders.

The medical definition of Amantadine is:

A synthetic symmetrical tricyclic amine used as an antiviral agent to treat and prevent influenza A infection and as an anti-parkinsonian drug to control extrapyramidal symptoms caused by neuroleptic agents. The antiviral effect may be due to interference with viral uncoating or replication. The anti-parkinsonian effect may be due to a combination of dopamine agonist and NMDA receptor antagonist properties. (Stedman's Medical Dictionary, 28th edition)

Please note that the use of Amantadine for various medical conditions should always be under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as they will consider potential benefits and risks and provide appropriate guidance.

Health Planning Councils are regional organizations that are responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating healthcare plans and services within a specific geographic area. The primary goal of these councils is to improve the overall health of the population they serve by identifying healthcare needs, setting priorities, and coordinating resources to address those needs.

Health Planning Councils typically consist of a diverse group of stakeholders, including healthcare providers, consumers, advocates, and other community members. They may be responsible for a variety of tasks, such as:

1. Conducting needs assessments to identify the health needs and priorities of the population they serve.
2. Developing strategic plans to address those needs and priorities.
3. Allocating resources to support the implementation of healthcare services and programs.
4. Monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of healthcare services and programs.
5. Advocating for policies and practices that promote health equity and improve access to care.

Health Planning Councils may operate at the state, regional, or local level, depending on the specific structure and organization of the healthcare system in which they are located. They play a critical role in ensuring that healthcare resources are used efficiently and effectively to improve the health outcomes of the populations they serve.

Animal Care Committees (ACCs), also known as Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) in the United States, are committees required by regulations to oversee the humane treatment and use of animals in research and teaching at institutions such as universities, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies.

The main responsibilities of ACCs include reviewing and approving animal use protocols, inspecting animal facilities and laboratories, ensuring compliance with relevant policies and regulations, and providing training and education to researchers and staff on the ethical treatment of animals. The members of ACCs typically include veterinarians, scientists, non-scientists, and community members who can provide a balanced perspective on the use of animals in research and teaching.

An ethical review is the process of evaluating and assessing a research study or project that involves human participants, medical interventions, or personal data, to ensure that it is conducted in accordance with ethical principles and standards. The purpose of an ethical review is to protect the rights and welfare of the participants and to minimize any potential harm or risks associated with the research.

The ethical review is typically conducted by an independent committee called an Institutional Review Board (IRB), Research Ethics Committee (REC), or Ethics Review Board (ERB). The committee reviews the study protocol, informed consent procedures, recruitment methods, data collection and management plans, and potential conflicts of interest.

The ethical review process is guided by several key principles, including respect for persons, beneficence, and justice. These principles require that researchers obtain informed consent from participants, avoid causing harm, minimize risks, maximize benefits, and ensure fairness in the selection and treatment of research participants.

Overall, an ethical review is a critical component of responsible conduct in research and helps to ensure that studies are conducted with integrity, transparency, and respect for the rights and welfare of human participants.

A Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) Committee is a group of healthcare professionals, typically including physicians, pharmacists, and other experts, responsible for the evaluation, recommendation, and monitoring of safe and effective medication use within a healthcare system or organization. They make decisions about the formulary, which is the list of medications that are covered and approved for use within that system. The committee also develops guidelines and policies for medication prescribing, administering, and monitoring to promote quality patient care, reduce medication errors, and control costs.

Whoopering Cough, also known as Pertussis, is a highly contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium Bordetella pertussis. It is characterized by severe coughing fits followed by a high-pitched "whoop" sound during inspiration. The disease can affect people of all ages, but it is most dangerous for babies and young children. Symptoms typically develop within 5 to 10 days after exposure and include runny nose, low-grade fever, and a mild cough. After a week or two, the cough becomes more severe and is often followed by vomiting and exhaustion. Complications can be serious, especially in infants, and may include pneumonia, seizures, brain damage, or death. Treatment usually involves antibiotics to kill the bacteria and reduce the severity of symptoms. Vaccination is available and recommended for the prevention of whooping cough.

Thimerosal is a mercury-containing organic compound that has been used as a preservative in various pharmaceutical products, including vaccines, to prevent contamination by bacteria. It is metabolized or degraded into ethylmercury and thiosalicylate. Ethylmercury is an organomercurial compound that is less toxic than methylmercury and is excreted from the body more quickly. Thimerosal has been used in vaccines since the 1930s, and its use has been thoroughly studied and reviewed by regulatory agencies and health organizations worldwide. No evidence has been found to link thimerosal-containing vaccines to any harmful effects, except for minor reactions at the injection site. However, due to unfounded concerns about its safety, thimerosal was removed from or reduced in most childhood vaccines in the United States and other countries as a precautionary measure, starting in the late 1990s. Despite the removal of thimerosal from most vaccines, autism rates have not decreased, which supports the conclusion that thimerosal does not cause autism.

Secondary immunization, also known as "anamnestic response" or "booster," refers to the enhanced immune response that occurs upon re-exposure to an antigen, having previously been immunized or infected with the same pathogen. This response is characterized by a more rapid and robust production of antibodies and memory cells compared to the primary immune response. The secondary immunization aims to maintain long-term immunity against infectious diseases and improve vaccine effectiveness. It usually involves administering additional doses of a vaccine or booster shots after the initial series of immunizations, which helps reinforce the immune system's ability to recognize and combat specific pathogens.

Chickenpox is a highly contagious viral infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It is characterized by an itchy, blister-like rash that typically covers the body and can also affect the mouth, eyes, and scalp. The rash progresses through various stages, from red bumps to fluid-filled blisters to scabs, before ultimately healing.

Chickenpox is usually a mild disease in children but can be more severe in adults, pregnant women, and individuals with weakened immune systems. Common symptoms include fever, fatigue, headache, and loss of appetite, which often precede the onset of the rash. The infection typically lasts about 1-2 weeks, and once a person has had chickenpox, they usually develop immunity to future infections.

A vaccine is available to prevent chickenpox, and it is routinely administered to children as part of their childhood vaccination schedule. In some cases, the vaccine may be recommended for adults who have not had chickenpox or been vaccinated previously.

'Guidelines' in the medical context are systematically developed statements or sets of recommendations designed to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available evidence, including scientific studies, expert opinions, and patient values. Guidelines may cover a wide range of topics, such as diagnosis, treatment, prevention, screening, and management of various diseases and conditions. They aim to standardize care, improve patient outcomes, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote efficient use of healthcare resources.

A conflict of interest (COI) is a situation in which a person or organization has dual loyalties or is in a position to exploit their professional or personal relationships for personal or institutional gain. In the medical field, COIs can arise when healthcare providers, researchers, or institutions have financial or other interests that may influence their judgment or actions in providing care, conducting research, or making recommendations.

Examples of conflicts of interest in medicine include:

* A physician who has a financial relationship with a pharmaceutical company and receives compensation for promoting the company's products to patients or colleagues.
* A researcher who owns stock in a company that is funding their study and may stand to benefit financially from positive results.
* An institution that accepts funding from industry partners for research or educational programs, which could potentially influence the outcomes of the research or bias the education provided.

COIs can compromise the integrity of medical research, patient care, and professional judgment. Therefore, it is essential to disclose and manage COIs transparently to maintain trust in the healthcare system and ensure that decisions are made in the best interests of patients and society as a whole.

Diphtheria is a serious bacterial infection caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae. It typically affects the respiratory system, including the nose, throat, and windpipe (trachea), causing a thick gray or white membrane to form over the lining of these areas. This can lead to breathing difficulties, heart complications, and neurological problems if left untreated.

The bacteria can also produce a powerful toxin that can cause damage to other organs in the body. Diphtheria is usually spread through respiratory droplets from an infected person's cough or sneeze, or by contact with contaminated objects or surfaces. The disease is preventable through vaccination.

Diphtheria toxoid is a modified form of the diphtheria toxin that has been made harmless but still stimulates an immune response. It is used in vaccines to provide immunity against diphtheria, a serious bacterial infection that can cause breathing difficulties, heart failure, and paralysis. The toxoid is typically combined with other components in a vaccine, such as tetanus toxoid and pertussis vaccine, to form a combination vaccine that protects against multiple diseases.

The diphtheria toxoid is made by treating the diphtheria toxin with formaldehyde, which modifies the toxin's structure and makes it nontoxic while still retaining its ability to stimulate an immune response. When the toxoid is introduced into the body through vaccination, the immune system recognizes it as a foreign substance and produces antibodies against it. These antibodies then provide protection against future infections with the diphtheria bacteria.

The diphtheria toxoid vaccine is usually given as part of a routine childhood immunization schedule, starting at 2 months of age. Booster shots are recommended throughout childhood and adolescence, and adults may also need booster shots if they have not received them previously or if their immune status has changed.

Product surveillance, postmarketing refers to the ongoing monitoring and evaluation of a pharmaceutical or medical device product after it has been approved and released on the market. This process is used to detect any safety issues, adverse effects, or product performance concerns that may not have been identified during clinical trials. The data collected from postmarketing surveillance helps regulatory agencies, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to make informed decisions about the continued use, modification, or withdrawal of a product from the market. Postmarketing surveillance is an essential component of post-market risk management and helps ensure the safety and efficacy of medical products throughout their lifecycle.

'Infection Control' is a set of practices, procedures, and protocols designed to prevent the spread of infectious agents in healthcare settings. It includes measures to minimize the risk of transmission of pathogens from both recognized and unrecognized sources, such as patients, healthcare workers, visitors, and the environment.

Infection control strategies may include:

* Hand hygiene (handwashing and use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers)
* Use of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as gloves, masks, gowns, and eye protection
* Respiratory etiquette, including covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
* Environmental cleaning and disinfection
* Isolation precautions for patients with known or suspected infectious diseases
* Immunization of healthcare workers
* Safe injection practices
* Surveillance and reporting of infections and outbreaks

The goal of infection control is to protect patients, healthcare workers, and visitors from acquiring and transmitting infections.

Meningococcal infections are caused by the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis, also known as meningococcus. These infections can take several forms, but the most common are meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord) and septicemia (bloodstream infection). Meningococcal infections are contagious and can spread through respiratory droplets or close contact with an infected person. They can be serious and potentially life-threatening, requiring prompt medical attention and treatment with antibiotics. Symptoms of meningococcal meningitis may include fever, headache, stiff neck, and sensitivity to light, while symptoms of septicemia may include fever, chills, rash, and severe muscle pain. Vaccination is available to prevent certain strains of meningococcal disease.

"Health personnel" is a broad term that refers to individuals who are involved in maintaining, promoting, and restoring the health of populations or individuals. This can include a wide range of professionals such as:

1. Healthcare providers: These are medical doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists, pharmacists, allied health professionals (like physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, dietitians, etc.), and other healthcare workers who provide direct patient care.

2. Public health professionals: These are individuals who work in public health agencies, non-governmental organizations, or academia to promote health, prevent diseases, and protect populations from health hazards. They include epidemiologists, biostatisticians, health educators, environmental health specialists, and health services researchers.

3. Health managers and administrators: These are professionals who oversee the operations, finances, and strategic planning of healthcare organizations, such as hospitals, clinics, or public health departments. They may include hospital CEOs, medical directors, practice managers, and healthcare consultants.

4. Health support staff: This group includes various personnel who provide essential services to healthcare organizations, such as medical records technicians, billing specialists, receptionists, and maintenance workers.

5. Health researchers and academics: These are professionals involved in conducting research, teaching, and disseminating knowledge related to health sciences, medicine, public health, or healthcare management in universities, research institutions, or think tanks.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines "health worker" as "a person who contributes to the promotion, protection, or improvement of health through prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, palliation, health promotion, and health education." This definition encompasses a wide range of professionals working in various capacities to improve health outcomes.

Hepatitis A is a viral infection that specifically targets the liver, causing inflammation and impaired function. This disease is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV), which spreads primarily through the fecal-oral route, often due to poor sanitation and hygiene. Individuals can become infected by consuming food or water contaminated with HAV or by coming into direct contact with an infected person's stool.

The symptoms of hepatitis A may include fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). However, in some cases, particularly in children under six years old, the infection may be asymptomatic.

While hepatitis A can be unpleasant and cause serious complications, it is rarely fatal and most people recover completely within a few months. Preventive measures include vaccination, practicing good hygiene, and avoiding potentially contaminated food and water.

Medical societies are professional organizations composed of physicians, surgeons, and other healthcare professionals who share a common purpose of promoting medical research, education, and patient care. These societies can focus on specific medical specialties, such as the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) for cancer specialists or the American College of Surgeons (ACS) for surgeons. They may also address broader issues related to healthcare policy, advocacy, and ethics. Medical societies often provide resources for continuing medical education, publish scientific journals, establish clinical practice guidelines, and offer networking opportunities for members.

Pneumococcal vaccines are immunizing agents that protect against infections caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, also known as pneumococcus. These vaccines help to prevent several types of diseases, including pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteremia (bloodstream infection).

There are two main types of pneumococcal vaccines available:

1. Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV): This vaccine is recommended for children under 2 years old, adults aged 65 and older, and people with certain medical conditions that increase their risk of pneumococcal infections. PCV protects against 13 or 20 serotypes (strains) of Streptococcus pneumoniae, depending on the formulation (PCV13 or PCV20).
2. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine (PPSV): This vaccine is recommended for adults aged 65 and older, children and adults with specific medical conditions, and smokers. PPSV protects against 23 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

These vaccines work by stimulating the immune system to produce antibodies that recognize and fight off the bacteria if an individual comes into contact with it in the future. Both types of pneumococcal vaccines have been proven to be safe and effective in preventing severe pneumococcal diseases.

Mumps is a viral infection that primarily affects the parotid salivary glands, causing them to swell and become painful. The medical definition of mumps is: "An acute infectious disease, caused by the mumps virus, characterized by painful enlargement of one or more of the salivary glands, especially the parotids."

The infection spreads easily through respiratory droplets or direct contact with an infected person's saliva. Symptoms typically appear 16-18 days after exposure and include fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, and swollen, tender salivary glands. Complications of mumps are rare but can be serious and include meningitis, encephalitis, deafness, and inflammation of the reproductive organs in males.

Prevention is through vaccination with the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, which is part of routine childhood immunization schedules in many countries.

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is not a medical term per se, but it is a government organization that oversees and provides funding for many public health initiatives, services, and institutions in the United States. Here's a brief definition:

The HHS is a cabinet-level department in the US federal government responsible for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services. It achieves this by promoting effective and efficient delivery of high-quality healthcare, conducting critical medical research through its agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and enforcing public health laws and regulations, including those related to food safety, through its agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Additionally, HHS oversees the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which provide healthcare coverage for millions of elderly, disabled, and low-income Americans.

Rubella vaccine is a preventive measure used to immunize individuals against rubella, also known as German measles. It contains inactivated or weakened forms of the rubella virus that stimulate an immune response when introduced into the body. The two types of rubella vaccines available are:

1. Live Attenuated Rubella Vaccine (RAV): This vaccine contains a weakened form of the rubella virus, which triggers an immune response without causing the disease. It is the most commonly used rubella vaccine and is often combined with measles and mumps vaccines to create the Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) or Measles-Mumps-Rubella-Varicella (MMRV) vaccines.

2. Inactivated Rubella Vaccine: This vaccine contains a killed rubella virus, which is less commonly used but can still provide immunity against the disease.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that children receive one dose of MMR vaccine at 12-15 months of age and another dose at 4-6 years of age. This schedule ensures optimal protection against rubella and other diseases included in the vaccines.

It is important to note that pregnant women should not receive the rubella vaccine, as it can potentially harm the developing fetus. Women who are planning to become pregnant should ensure they have had their rubella immunization before conceiving.

The Herpes Zoster vaccine, also known as the shingles vaccine, is a preventive measure against the reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in individuals who have previously had chickenpox. The vaccine contains a live but weakened form of VZV that boosts the immune system's ability to recognize and fight off the virus, thereby reducing the risk of developing shingles and its complications. It is typically administered as a single dose for people aged 50 and older, or as a two-dose series for those aged 19 and older who have weakened immune systems.

Pharmaceutical preservatives are substances that are added to medications, pharmaceutical products, or biological specimens to prevent degradation, contamination, or spoilage caused by microbial growth, chemical reactions, or environmental factors. These preservatives help extend the shelf life and ensure the stability, safety, and efficacy of the pharmaceutical formulation during storage and use.

Commonly used pharmaceutical preservatives include:

1. Antimicrobials: These are further classified into antifungals (e.g., benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, thimerosal), antibacterials (e.g., parabens, phenol, benzyl alcohol), and antivirals (e.g., phenolic compounds). They work by inhibiting the growth of microorganisms like bacteria, fungi, and viruses.
2. Antioxidants: These substances prevent or slow down oxidation reactions that can degrade pharmaceutical products. Examples include ascorbic acid (vitamin C), tocopherols (vitamin E), sulfites, and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT).
3. Chelating agents: These bind to metal ions that can catalyze degradation reactions in pharmaceutical products. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is an example of a chelating agent used in pharmaceuticals.

The choice of preservative depends on the type of formulation, route of administration, and desired shelf life. The concentration of the preservative should be optimized to maintain product stability while minimizing potential toxicity or adverse effects. It is essential to conduct thorough safety and compatibility studies before incorporating any preservative into a pharmaceutical formulation.

The Smallpox vaccine is not a live virus vaccine but is instead made from a vaccinia virus, which is a virus related to the variola virus (the virus that causes smallpox). The vaccinia virus used in the vaccine does not cause smallpox, but it does cause a milder illness with symptoms such as a fever and a rash of pustules or blisters at the site of inoculation.

The smallpox vaccine was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796 and is one of the oldest vaccines still in use today. It has been highly effective in preventing smallpox, which was once a major cause of death and disability worldwide. In fact, smallpox was declared eradicated by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1980, thanks in large part to the widespread use of the smallpox vaccine.

Despite the eradication of smallpox, the smallpox vaccine is still used today in certain circumstances. For example, it may be given to laboratory workers who handle the virus or to military personnel who may be at risk of exposure to the virus. The vaccine may also be used as an emergency measure in the event of a bioterrorism attack involving smallpox.

It is important to note that the smallpox vaccine is not without risks and can cause serious side effects, including a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis), encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle). As a result, it is only given to people who are at high risk of exposure to the virus and who have been determined to be good candidates for vaccination by a healthcare professional.

"Drug approval" is the process by which a regulatory agency, such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), grants formal authorization for a pharmaceutical company to market and sell a drug for a specific medical condition. The approval process is based on rigorous evaluation of clinical trial data to ensure that the drug is safe and effective for its intended use.

The FDA's approval process typically involves several stages, including preclinical testing in the lab and animal studies, followed by three phases of clinical trials in human subjects. The first phase tests the safety of the drug in a small group of healthy volunteers, while the second and third phases test the drug's efficacy and side effects in larger groups of patients with the medical condition for which the drug is intended.

If the results of these studies demonstrate that the drug is safe and effective, the pharmaceutical company can submit a New Drug Application (NDA) or Biologics License Application (BLA) to the FDA for review. The application includes data from the clinical trials, as well as information about the manufacturing process, labeling, and proposed use of the drug.

The FDA reviews the application and may seek input from independent experts before making a decision on whether to approve the drug. If approved, the drug can be marketed and sold to patients with the medical condition for which it was approved. The FDA continues to monitor the safety and efficacy of approved drugs after they reach the market to ensure that they remain safe and effective for their intended use.

Medical Laboratory Personnel are professionals who perform and interpret various laboratory tests to assist physicians in diagnosing, monitoring, and treating diseases and other medical conditions. They work in different areas of the clinical laboratory such as chemistry, hematology, immunology, microbiology, and transfusion medicine.

Their responsibilities may include collecting and processing specimens, operating and maintaining laboratory equipment, performing tests and procedures, analyzing results, conducting quality control, maintaining records, and reporting findings to healthcare providers. Medical Laboratory Personnel play a critical role in ensuring the accuracy and timeliness of diagnostic information, which is essential for providing effective medical care.

Medical Laboratory Personnel may hold various job titles, including Medical Laboratory Technologist (MLT), Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS), Clinical Laboratory Scientist (CLS), Medical Technologist (MT), Medical Laboratory Technician (MLT), and Clinical Laboratory Technician (CLT). The specific duties and educational requirements for these positions may vary depending on the laboratory setting, state regulations, and professional certification.

Health policy refers to a set of decisions, plans, and actions that are undertaken to achieve specific healthcare goals within a population. It is formulated by governmental and non-governmental organizations with the objective of providing guidance and direction for the management and delivery of healthcare services. Health policies address various aspects of healthcare, including access, financing, quality, and equity. They can be designed to promote health, prevent disease, and provide treatment and rehabilitation services to individuals who are sick or injured. Effective health policies require careful consideration of scientific evidence, ethical principles, and societal values to ensure that they meet the needs of the population while being fiscally responsible.

Practice guidelines, also known as clinical practice guidelines, are systematically developed statements that aim to assist healthcare professionals and patients in making informed decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence, consensus of expert opinion, and consideration of patient preferences. Practice guidelines can cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, management, prevention, and treatment options for various medical conditions. They are intended to improve the quality and consistency of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote evidence-based medicine. However, they should not replace clinical judgment or individualized patient care.

Exsanguination is a medical term that refers to the state of complete loss of blood from the circulatory system. It can be caused by severe bleeding due to trauma, surgery, or medical conditions such as ruptured aneurysms or hemorrhagic shock. Exsanguination can lead to hypovolemia, which is a critical decrease in blood volume that can result in organ failure and death if not promptly treated with fluid replacement and blood transfusions.

Hepatitis A Virus, Human (HAV): A single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the Picornaviridae family, specifically the Hepatovirus genus. It is the causative agent of Hepatitis A, a viral infection that primarily affects the liver. The virus is typically transmitted through the fecal-oral route, often via contaminated food or water, or close contact with an infected individual. Following incubation (15-50 days), symptoms may include jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, diarrhea, and fever. Most people recover completely within a few weeks; however, severe complications and death are possible, especially in individuals with preexisting liver disease. Prevention is primarily achieved through vaccination and practicing good hygiene.

Rotavirus vaccines are preventive measures used to protect against rotavirus infections, which are the leading cause of severe diarrhea and dehydration among infants and young children worldwide. These vaccines contain weakened or inactivated forms of the rotavirus, a pathogen that infects and causes symptoms by multiplying inside cells lining the small intestine.

The weakened or inactivated virus in the vaccine stimulates an immune response in the body, enabling it to recognize and fight off future rotavirus infections more effectively. The vaccines are usually administered orally, as a liquid droplet or on a sugar cube, to mimic natural infection through the gastrointestinal tract.

There are currently two licensed rotavirus vaccines available globally:

1. Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline): This vaccine contains an attenuated (weakened) strain of human rotavirus and is given in a two-dose series, typically at 2 and 4 months of age.
2. RotaTeq (Merck): This vaccine contains five reassortant viruses, combining human and animal strains to provide broader protection. It is administered in a three-dose series, usually at 2, 4, and 6 months of age.

Rotavirus vaccines have been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis and related hospitalizations among infants and young children. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the inclusion of rotavirus vaccination in national immunization programs, particularly in countries with high child mortality rates due to diarrheal diseases.

A measles vaccine is a biological preparation that induces immunity against the measles virus. It contains an attenuated (weakened) strain of the measles virus, which stimulates the immune system to produce antibodies that protect against future infection with the wild-type (disease-causing) virus. Measles vaccines are typically administered in combination with vaccines against mumps and rubella (German measles), forming the MMR vaccine.

The measles vaccine is highly effective, with one or two doses providing immunity in over 95% of people who receive it. It is usually given to children as part of routine childhood immunization programs, with the first dose administered at 12-15 months of age and the second dose at 4-6 years of age.

Measles vaccination has led to a dramatic reduction in the incidence of measles worldwide and is considered one of the greatest public health achievements of the past century. However, despite widespread availability of the vaccine, measles remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in some parts of the world, particularly in areas with low vaccination coverage or where access to healthcare is limited.

Mass vaccination is a coordinated effort to administer vaccine doses to a large portion of a population in a short amount of time. This strategy is often used during outbreaks of infectious diseases, such as influenza or measles, to quickly build up community immunity (herd immunity) and reduce the spread of the disease. Mass vaccination campaigns can also be implemented as part of public health initiatives to control or eliminate vaccine-preventable diseases in a population. These campaigns typically involve mobilizing healthcare workers, volunteers, and resources to reach and vaccinate as many people as possible, often through mobile clinics, community centers, and other accessible locations.

I apologize, but "Canada" is not a medical term or concept. It is a country located in North America, known for its vast wilderness, multicultural cities, and significant natural resources. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terms, I would be happy to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seasons" is not a term that has a medical definition. Seasons refer to the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn or fall, and winter) based on the position of the earth in its orbit around the sun. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

"Hepatitis B vaccines are vaccines that prevent infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. They work by introducing a small and harmless piece of the virus to your body, which triggers your immune system to produce antibodies to fight off the infection. These antibodies remain in your body and provide protection if you are exposed to the real hepatitis B virus in the future.

The hepatitis B vaccine is typically given as a series of three shots over a six-month period. It is recommended for all infants, children and adolescents who have not previously been vaccinated, as well as for adults who are at increased risk of infection, such as healthcare workers, people who inject drugs, and those with certain medical conditions.

It's important to note that hepatitis B vaccine does not provide protection against other types of viral hepatitis, such as hepatitis A or C."

Japanese Encephalitis (JE) vaccines are immunobiological preparations used for active immunization against Japanese Encephalitis, a viral infection transmitted through the bite of infected mosquitoes. The vaccines contain inactivated or live attenuated strains of the JE virus. They work by stimulating the immune system to produce antibodies and T-cells that provide protection against the virus. There are several types of JE vaccines available, including inactivated Vero cell-derived vaccine, live attenuated SA14-14-2 vaccine, and inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccine. These vaccines have been shown to be effective in preventing JE and are recommended for use in individuals traveling to or living in areas where the disease is endemic.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is not a medical condition or term, but rather a specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. Here's a brief description:

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that acts as the global authority on public health issues. Established in 1948, WHO's primary role is to coordinate and collaborate with its member states to promote health, prevent diseases, and ensure universal access to healthcare services. WHO is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, and has regional offices around the world. It plays a crucial role in setting global health standards, monitoring disease outbreaks, and providing guidance on various public health concerns, including infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases, mental health, environmental health, and maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health.

An immunocompromised host refers to an individual who has a weakened or impaired immune system, making them more susceptible to infections and decreased ability to fight off pathogens. This condition can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired (developed during one's lifetime).

Acquired immunocompromised states may result from various factors such as medical treatments (e.g., chemotherapy, radiation therapy, immunosuppressive drugs), infections (e.g., HIV/AIDS), chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes, malnutrition, liver disease), or aging.

Immunocompromised hosts are at a higher risk for developing severe and life-threatening infections due to their reduced immune response. Therefore, they require special consideration when it comes to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases.

Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) Reporting Systems are spontaneous reporting systems used for monitoring the safety of authorized medicines in clinical practice. These systems collect and manage reports of suspected adverse drug reactions from healthcare professionals, patients, and pharmaceutical companies. The primary objective of ADR reporting systems is to identify new risks or previously unrecognized risks associated with the use of a medication, monitor the frequency and severity of known adverse effects, and contribute to post-marketing surveillance and pharmacovigilance activities.

Healthcare professionals, including physicians, pharmacists, and nurses, are encouraged to voluntarily report any suspected adverse drug reactions they encounter during their practice. In some countries, patients can also directly report any suspected adverse reactions they experience after taking a medication. Pharmaceutical companies are obligated to submit reports of adverse events identified through their own pharmacovigilance activities or from post-marketing surveillance studies.

The data collected through ADR reporting systems are analyzed to identify signals, which are defined as new, changing, or unknown safety concerns related to a medicine or vaccine. Signals are further investigated and evaluated for causality and clinical significance. If a signal is confirmed, regulatory actions may be taken, such as updating the product label, issuing safety communications, or restricting the use of the medication.

Examples of ADR reporting systems include the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS), the European Medicines Agency's (EMA) EudraVigilance, and the World Health Organization's (WHO) Uppsala Monitoring Centre.

Attenuated vaccines consist of live microorganisms that have been weakened (attenuated) through various laboratory processes so they do not cause disease in the majority of recipients but still stimulate an immune response. The purpose of attenuation is to reduce the virulence or replication capacity of the pathogen while keeping it alive, allowing it to retain its antigenic properties and induce a strong and protective immune response.

Examples of attenuated vaccines include:

1. Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV): This vaccine uses live but weakened polioviruses to protect against all three strains of the disease-causing poliovirus. The weakened viruses replicate in the intestine and induce an immune response, which provides both humoral (antibody) and cell-mediated immunity.
2. Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine: This combination vaccine contains live attenuated measles, mumps, and rubella viruses. It is given to protect against these three diseases and prevent their spread in the population.
3. Varicella (chickenpox) vaccine: This vaccine uses a weakened form of the varicella-zoster virus, which causes chickenpox. By introducing this attenuated virus into the body, it stimulates an immune response that protects against future infection with the wild-type virus.
4. Yellow fever vaccine: This live attenuated vaccine is used to prevent yellow fever, a viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes in tropical and subtropical regions of Africa and South America. The vaccine contains a weakened form of the yellow fever virus that cannot cause the disease but still induces an immune response.
5. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine: This live attenuated vaccine is used to protect against tuberculosis (TB). It contains a weakened strain of Mycobacterium bovis, which does not cause TB in humans but stimulates an immune response that provides some protection against the disease.

Attenuated vaccines are generally effective at inducing long-lasting immunity and can provide robust protection against targeted diseases. However, they may pose a risk for individuals with weakened immune systems, as the attenuated viruses or bacteria could potentially cause illness in these individuals. Therefore, it is essential to consider an individual's health status before administering live attenuated vaccines.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "travel" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. In general, travel refers to the act of moving or journeying from one place to another, often over long distances. However, in a medical context, it might refer to the recommendation that individuals with certain medical conditions or those who are immunocompromised avoid traveling to areas where they may be at increased risk of exposure to infectious diseases. It's always best to check with a healthcare professional for advice related to specific medical situations and travel.

"Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype" is a specific subtype of the influenza A virus that causes respiratory illness and is known to circulate in humans and animals, including birds and pigs. The "H3N2" refers to the two proteins on the surface of the virus: hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N). In this subtype, the H protein is of the H3 variety and the N protein is of the N2 variety. This subtype has been responsible for several influenza epidemics and pandemics in humans, including the 1968 Hong Kong flu pandemic. It is one of the influenza viruses that are monitored closely by public health authorities due to its potential to cause significant illness and death, particularly in high-risk populations such as older adults, young children, and people with certain underlying medical conditions.

Adoption is a legal process in which the rights and responsibilities of being a parent are transferred from one person or couple to another. It permanently gives adoptive parents custody of the child and makes them legally responsible for the child's care and well-being. The birth parents' legal rights and responsibilities are typically terminated as part of the adoption process, although in some cases they may retain certain rights or have ongoing contact with the child. Adoption can involve infants, older children, or siblings, and can be arranged through private agencies, foster care systems, or international channels.

Tetanus toxoid is a purified and inactivated form of the tetanus toxin, which is derived from the bacterium Clostridium tetani. It is used as a vaccine to induce active immunity against tetanus, a potentially fatal disease caused by this toxin. The toxoid is produced through a series of chemical treatments that modify the toxic properties of the tetanus toxin while preserving its antigenic qualities. This allows the immune system to recognize and develop protective antibodies against the toxin without causing illness. Tetanus toxoid is often combined with diphtheria and/or pertussis toxoids in vaccines such as DTaP, Tdap, and Td.

Viral hepatitis vaccines are vaccines that prevent infection caused by various hepatitis viruses, including hepatitis A and B. These vaccines contain antigens that stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies that protect against infection with the corresponding virus. The vaccines are typically administered through injection and may require multiple doses for full protection.

The hepatitis A vaccine is made from inactivated hepatitis A virus, while the hepatitis B vaccine is made from recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen. Both vaccines have been shown to be highly effective in preventing infection and reducing the risk of complications associated with viral hepatitis, such as liver disease and liver cancer.

It's important to note that there are no vaccines available for other types of viral hepatitis, such as hepatitis C, D, or E. Prevention strategies for these types of viral hepatitis typically involve measures to reduce exposure to the virus, such as safe injection practices and avoiding high-risk behaviors like sharing needles or having unprotected sex with infected individuals.

Haemophilus vaccines are vaccines that are designed to protect against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), a bacterium that can cause serious infections such as meningitis, pneumonia, and epiglottitis. There are two main types of Hib vaccines:

1. Polysaccharide vaccine: This type of vaccine is made from the sugar coating (polysaccharide) of the bacterial cells. It is not effective in children under 2 years of age because their immune systems are not yet mature enough to respond effectively to this type of vaccine.
2. Conjugate vaccine: This type of vaccine combines the polysaccharide with a protein carrier, which helps to stimulate a stronger and more sustained immune response. It is effective in infants as young as 6 weeks old.

Hib vaccines are usually given as part of routine childhood immunizations starting at 2 months of age. They are administered through an injection into the muscle. The vaccine is safe and effective, with few side effects. Vaccination against Hib has led to a significant reduction in the incidence of Hib infections worldwide.

'Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype' is a specific subtype of the influenza A virus that causes flu in humans and animals. It contains certain proteins called hemagglutinin (H) and neuraminidase (N) on its surface, with this subtype specifically having H1 and N1 antigens. The H1N1 strain is well-known for causing the 2009 swine flu pandemic, which was a global outbreak of flu that resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. This subtype can also cause seasonal flu, although the severity and symptoms may vary. It is important to note that influenza viruses are constantly changing, and new strains or subtypes can emerge over time, requiring regular updates to vaccines to protect against them.

Immunization is defined medically as the process where an individual is made immune or resistant to an infectious disease, typically through the administration of a vaccine. The vaccine stimulates the body's own immune system to recognize and fight off the specific disease-causing organism, thereby preventing or reducing the severity of future infections with that organism.

Immunization can be achieved actively, where the person is given a vaccine to trigger an immune response, or passively, where antibodies are transferred to the person through immunoglobulin therapy. Immunizations are an important part of preventive healthcare and have been successful in controlling and eliminating many infectious diseases worldwide.

Population surveillance in a public health and medical context refers to the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of health-related data for a defined population over time. It aims to monitor the health status, identify emerging health threats or trends, and evaluate the impact of interventions within that population. This information is used to inform public health policy, prioritize healthcare resources, and guide disease prevention and control efforts. Population surveillance can involve various data sources, such as vital records, disease registries, surveys, and electronic health records.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

A Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committee (DTMC), also known as a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), is a group of independent experts that oversees the safety and efficacy data of a clinical trial. The committee's primary role is to protect the interests of the study participants and ensure the integrity of the trial by regularly reviewing accumulating data during the trial.

The DTMC typically includes clinicians, statisticians, and other experts who are not involved in the design or conduct of the trial. They review unblinded data from the trial to assess whether any safety concerns have arisen, such as unexpected adverse events, or whether there is evidence that the experimental intervention is significantly more effective or harmful than the control group.

Based on their review, the DTMC may recommend changes to the trial protocol, such as modifying the dose of the experimental intervention, adding or removing study sites, or stopping the trial early if there is clear evidence of benefit or harm. The committee's recommendations are typically confidential and only shared with the trial sponsor and regulatory authorities.

Overall, the role of a DTMC is to ensure that clinical trials are conducted ethically and responsibly, with the safety and well-being of study participants as the top priority.

Febrile seizures are a type of seizure that occurs in young children, typically between the ages of 6 months and 5 years, and is often associated with fever. A febrile seizure is defined as a convulsion or seizure that is brought on by a high fever, usually greater than 100.4°F (38°C), but can also occur in response to a rapid rise in body temperature. The seizures can vary in length and may involve shaking of the entire body, jerking of the arms and legs, or just twitching of one part of the body. They can be quite alarming to witness, but they are usually harmless and do not cause any long-term neurological problems.

Febrile seizures are most commonly caused by viral infections, such as a cold or flu, but they can also occur with bacterial infections, such as a urinary tract infection or ear infection. In some cases, the fever and seizure may be the first signs that a child is ill.

While febrile seizures are generally harmless, it is important to seek medical attention if your child has a seizure. This is because a small percentage of children who have febrile seizures may go on to develop epilepsy, a condition characterized by recurrent seizures. Additionally, some serious underlying conditions, such as meningitis or encephalitis, can cause fever and seizures, so it is important to rule out these possibilities with a thorough medical evaluation.

If your child has a febrile seizure, the best course of action is to remain calm and make sure they are in a safe place where they cannot injure themselves. Do not try to restrain them or put anything in their mouth. Instead, gently turn them onto their side to prevent choking and call for medical help. Most febrile seizures last only a few minutes and resolve on their own without any treatment. After the seizure, your child may be sleepy or confused, but they should return to their normal state within a short period of time.

Bioterrorism is the intentional use of microorganisms or toxins derived from living organisms to cause disease, death, or disruption in noncombatant populations. Biological agents can be spread through the air, water, or food and may take hours to days to cause illness, depending on the agent and route of exposure. Examples of biological agents that could be used as weapons include anthrax, smallpox, plague, botulism toxin, and viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola. Bioterrorism is a form of terrorism and is considered a public health emergency because it has the potential to cause widespread illness and death, as well as social disruption and economic loss.

The medical definition of bioterrorism focuses on the use of biological agents as weapons and the public health response to such attacks. It is important to note that the majority of incidents involving the intentional release of biological agents have been limited in scope and have not resulted in widespread illness or death. However, the potential for large-scale harm makes bioterrorism a significant concern for public health officials and emergency responders.

Preparation and response to bioterrorism involve a multidisciplinary approach that includes medical professionals, public health officials, law enforcement agencies, and government organizations at the local, state, and federal levels. Preparedness efforts include developing plans and procedures for responding to a bioterrorism event, training healthcare providers and first responders in the recognition and management of biological agents, and stockpiling vaccines, medications, and other resources that may be needed during a response.

In summary, bioterrorism is the intentional use of biological agents as weapons to cause illness, death, or disruption in noncombatant populations. It is considered a public health emergency due to its potential for widespread harm and requires a multidisciplinary approach to preparedness and response.

Bacterial vaccines are types of vaccines that are created using bacteria or parts of bacteria as the immunogen, which is the substance that triggers an immune response in the body. The purpose of a bacterial vaccine is to stimulate the immune system to develop protection against specific bacterial infections.

There are several types of bacterial vaccines, including:

1. Inactivated or killed whole-cell vaccines: These vaccines contain entire bacteria that have been killed or inactivated through various methods, such as heat or chemicals. The bacteria can no longer cause disease, but they still retain the ability to stimulate an immune response.
2. Subunit, protein, or polysaccharide vaccines: These vaccines use specific components of the bacterium, such as proteins or polysaccharides, that are known to trigger an immune response. By using only these components, the vaccine can avoid using the entire bacterium, which may reduce the risk of adverse reactions.
3. Live attenuated vaccines: These vaccines contain live bacteria that have been weakened or attenuated so that they cannot cause disease but still retain the ability to stimulate an immune response. This type of vaccine can provide long-lasting immunity, but it may not be suitable for people with weakened immune systems.

Bacterial vaccines are essential tools in preventing and controlling bacterial infections, reducing the burden of diseases such as tuberculosis, pneumococcal disease, meningococcal disease, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease. They work by exposing the immune system to a harmless form of the bacteria or its components, which triggers the production of antibodies and memory cells that can recognize and fight off future infections with that same bacterium.

It's important to note that while vaccines are generally safe and effective, they may cause mild side effects such as pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site, fever, or fatigue. Serious side effects are rare but can occur, so it's essential to consult with a healthcare provider before receiving any vaccine.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is not a medical term or concept. However, I can provide you with a general definition:

The EPA is an independent agency of the federal government of the United States, responsible for protecting public health and the environment by enforcing regulations based on federal laws. The agency conducts environmental assessment, education, research, and regulation of various voluntary and compulsory programs in the US to address issues related to toxic substances, air and water quality, solid waste management, radiation protection, and hazardous waste management.

A Pertussis vaccine is a type of immunization used to protect against pertussis, also known as whooping cough. It contains components that stimulate the immune system to produce antibodies against the bacteria that cause pertussis, Bordetella pertussis. There are two main types of pertussis vaccines: whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccines and acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines. wP vaccines contain killed whole cells of B. pertussis, while aP vaccines contain specific components of the bacteria, such as pertussis toxin and other antigens. Pertussis vaccines are often combined with diphtheria and tetanus to form combination vaccines, such as DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis) and TdaP (tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis). These vaccines are typically given to young children as part of their routine immunization schedule.

Rubella, also known as German measles, is a viral infection that primarily affects the skin and lymphatic system. It is caused by the rubella virus. The disease is typically mild with symptoms such as low-grade fever, sore throat, swollen glands (especially around the ears and back of the neck), and a rash that starts on the face and spreads to the rest of the body.

Rubella is preventable through vaccination, and it's part of the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine. It's crucial to get vaccinated against rubella because if a pregnant woman gets infected with the virus, it can cause serious birth defects in her unborn baby, including hearing impairment, eye abnormalities, heart problems, and developmental delays. This condition is called congenital rubella syndrome (CRS).

It's worth noting that rubella has been largely eliminated from many parts of the world due to widespread vaccination programs, but it still remains a public health concern in areas with low vaccination rates or where access to healthcare is limited.

Cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is a systematic process used to compare the costs and benefits of different options to determine which one provides the greatest net benefit. In a medical context, CBA can be used to evaluate the value of medical interventions, treatments, or policies by estimating and monetizing all the relevant costs and benefits associated with each option.

The costs included in a CBA may include direct costs such as the cost of the intervention or treatment itself, as well as indirect costs such as lost productivity or time away from work. Benefits may include improved health outcomes, reduced morbidity or mortality, and increased quality of life.

Once all the relevant costs and benefits have been identified and quantified, they are typically expressed in monetary terms to allow for a direct comparison. The option with the highest net benefit (i.e., the difference between total benefits and total costs) is considered the most cost-effective.

It's important to note that CBA has some limitations and can be subject to various biases and assumptions, so it should be used in conjunction with other evaluation methods to ensure a comprehensive understanding of the value of medical interventions or policies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "organizational policy" is not a medical term. It falls under the broader category of management or administrative terminology.

An organizational policy generally refers to a formal statement or set of guidelines that outline an organization's approved course of action or conduct regarding various matters. These policies guide decision-making and help ensure consistent action across the organization. They can cover a wide range of topics, including (but not limited to) employee behavior, data security, patient care standards, and operational procedures.

In a healthcare setting, organizational policies play a crucial role in maintaining quality of care, ensuring patient safety, and complying with relevant laws and regulations.

Immunocompetence is the condition of having a properly functioning immune system that can effectively respond to the presence of foreign substances, such as pathogens (like bacteria, viruses, and parasites) and other potentially harmful agents. It involves the ability of the immune system to recognize, attack, and eliminate these foreign substances while also maintaining tolerance to self-tissues and promoting tissue repair.

Immunocompetence is essential for overall health and wellbeing, as it helps protect the body from infections and diseases. Factors that can affect immunocompetence include age, genetics, stress, nutrition, sleep, and certain medical conditions or treatments (like chemotherapy or immunosuppressive drugs) that can weaken the immune system.

A disease outbreak is defined as the occurrence of cases of a disease in excess of what would normally be expected in a given time and place. It may affect a small and localized group or a large number of people spread over a wide area, even internationally. An outbreak may be caused by a new agent, a change in the agent's virulence or host susceptibility, or an increase in the size or density of the host population.

Outbreaks can have significant public health and economic impacts, and require prompt investigation and control measures to prevent further spread of the disease. The investigation typically involves identifying the source of the outbreak, determining the mode of transmission, and implementing measures to interrupt the chain of infection. This may include vaccination, isolation or quarantine, and education of the public about the risks and prevention strategies.

Examples of disease outbreaks include foodborne illnesses linked to contaminated food or water, respiratory infections spread through coughing and sneezing, and mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika virus and West Nile virus. Outbreaks can also occur in healthcare settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes, where vulnerable populations may be at increased risk of infection.

Rabies vaccines are medical products that contain antigens of the rabies virus, which stimulate an immune response in individuals who receive them. The purpose of rabies vaccines is to prevent the development of rabies, a viral disease that is almost always fatal once symptoms appear.

There are two primary types of rabies vaccines available:

1. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) vaccines: These vaccines are given to individuals who are at high risk of coming into contact with the rabies virus, such as veterinarians, animal handlers, and travelers visiting areas where rabies is common. The vaccine series typically consists of three doses given over a period of 28 days.
2. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) vaccines: These vaccines are administered to individuals who have already been exposed to the rabies virus, usually through a bite or scratch from an infected animal. The vaccine series typically consists of four doses given over a period of 14 days, along with a dose of rabies immune globulin (RIG) to provide immediate protection while the immune system responds to the vaccine.

Both types of rabies vaccines are highly effective at preventing the disease, but it is essential to receive them as soon as possible after exposure or before potential exposure, as the virus can be fatal if left untreated.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "information dissemination" is not a medical term per se, but rather a general term used in various fields, including healthcare and medicine. It refers to the process of spreading or distributing information to a specific audience or the public.

In the context of medicine and healthcare, information dissemination often relates to sharing clinical guidelines, research findings, public health messages, or patient education materials with healthcare professionals, patients, or the general public. This can occur through various channels, such as scientific conferences, peer-reviewed journals, newsletters, websites, social media platforms, and other communication methods.

The goal of information dissemination in medicine is to ensure that accurate, evidence-based, and up-to-date information reaches the intended audience, ultimately improving healthcare quality, patient outcomes, and decision-making processes.

Antiviral agents are a class of medications that are designed to treat infections caused by viruses. Unlike antibiotics, which target bacteria, antiviral agents interfere with the replication and infection mechanisms of viruses, either by inhibiting their ability to replicate or by modulating the host's immune response to the virus.

Antiviral agents are used to treat a variety of viral infections, including influenza, herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, hepatitis B and C, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections.

These medications can be administered orally, intravenously, or topically, depending on the type of viral infection being treated. Some antiviral agents are also used for prophylaxis, or prevention, of certain viral infections.

It is important to note that antiviral agents are not effective against all types of viruses and may have significant side effects. Therefore, it is essential to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any antiviral therapy.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

Insurance benefits refer to the coverage, payments or services that a health insurance company provides to its policyholders based on the terms of their insurance plan. These benefits can include things like:

* Payment for all or a portion of medical services, such as doctor visits, hospital stays, and prescription medications
* Coverage for specific treatments or procedures, such as cancer treatment or surgery
* Reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses, such as deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments
* Case management and care coordination services to help policyholders navigate the healthcare system and receive appropriate care.

The specific benefits provided will vary depending on the type of insurance plan and the level of coverage purchased by the policyholder. It is important for individuals to understand their insurance benefits and how they can access them in order to make informed decisions about their healthcare.

Herpes zoster, also known as shingles, is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. It's caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which also causes chickenpox. After you recover from chickenpox, the virus lies dormant in your nerve cells and can reactivate later in life as herpes zoster.

The hallmark symptom of herpes zoster is a unilateral, vesicular rash that occurs in a dermatomal distribution, which means it follows the path of a specific nerve. The rash usually affects one side of the body and can wrap around either the left or right side of your torso.

Before the rash appears, you may experience symptoms such as pain, tingling, or itching in the area where the rash will develop. Other possible symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and muscle weakness. The rash typically scabs over and heals within two to four weeks, but some people may continue to experience pain in the affected area for months or even years after the rash has healed. This is known as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN).

Herpes zoster is most common in older adults and people with weakened immune systems, although anyone who has had chickenpox can develop the condition. It's important to seek medical attention if you suspect you have herpes zoster, as early treatment with antiviral medications can help reduce the severity and duration of the rash and lower your risk of developing complications such as PHN.

Rabies is a viral zoonotic disease that is typically transmitted through the saliva of infected animals, usually by a bite or scratch. The virus infects the central nervous system, causing encephalopathy and ultimately leading to death in both humans and animals if not treated promptly and effectively.

The rabies virus belongs to the Rhabdoviridae family, with a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome. It is relatively fragile and cannot survive for long outside of its host, but it can be transmitted through contact with infected tissue or nerve cells.

Initial symptoms of rabies in humans may include fever, headache, and general weakness or discomfort. As the disease progresses, more specific symptoms appear, such as insomnia, anxiety, confusion, partial paralysis, excitation, hallucinations, agitation, hypersalivation (excessive saliva production), difficulty swallowing, and hydrophobia (fear of water).

Once clinical signs of rabies appear, the disease is almost always fatal. However, prompt post-exposure prophylaxis with rabies vaccine and immunoglobulin can prevent the onset of the disease if administered promptly after exposure. Preventive vaccination is also recommended for individuals at high risk of exposure to the virus, such as veterinarians, animal handlers, and travelers to areas where rabies is endemic.

In the context of healthcare, "safety" refers to the freedom from harm or injury that is intentionally designed into a process, system, or environment. It involves the prevention of adverse events or injuries, as well as the reduction of risk and the mitigation of harm when accidents do occur. Safety in healthcare aims to protect patients, healthcare workers, and other stakeholders from potential harm associated with medical care, treatments, or procedures. This is achieved through evidence-based practices, guidelines, protocols, training, and continuous quality improvement efforts.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Great Britain" is not a medical concept or condition. It is a geographical and political term referring to the largest island in the British Isles, on which the majority of England, Scotland, and Wales are located. It's also used to refer to the political union of these three countries, which is called the United Kingdom. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.

Papillomavirus vaccines are vaccines that have been developed to prevent infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV). HPV is a DNA virus that is capable of infecting the skin and mucous membranes. Certain types of HPV are known to cause cervical cancer, as well as other types of cancer such as anal, penile, vulvar, and oropharyngeal cancers. Other types of HPV can cause genital warts.

There are currently two papillomavirus vaccines that have been approved for use in the United States: Gardasil and Cervarix. Both vaccines protect against the two most common cancer-causing types of HPV (types 16 and 18), which together cause about 70% of cervical cancers. Gardasil also protects against the two most common types of HPV that cause genital warts (types 6 and 11).

Papillomavirus vaccines are given as a series of three shots over a period of six months. They are most effective when given to people before they become sexually active, as this reduces the risk of exposure to HPV. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all boys and girls get vaccinated against HPV at age 11 or 12, but the vaccine can be given to people as young as age 9 and as old as age 26.

It is important to note that papillomavirus vaccines do not protect against all types of HPV, and they do not treat existing HPV infections or cervical cancer. They are intended to prevent new HPV infections and the cancers and other diseases that can be caused by HPV.

Communicable disease control is a branch of public health that focuses on preventing and controlling the spread of infectious diseases within a population. The goal is to reduce the incidence and prevalence of communicable diseases through various strategies, such as:

1. Surveillance: Monitoring and tracking the occurrence of communicable diseases in a population to identify trends, outbreaks, and high-risk areas.
2. Prevention: Implementing measures to prevent the transmission of infectious agents, such as vaccination programs, education campaigns, and environmental interventions (e.g., water treatment, food safety).
3. Case management: Identifying, diagnosing, and treating cases of communicable diseases to reduce their duration and severity, as well as to prevent further spread.
4. Contact tracing: Identifying and monitoring individuals who have been in close contact with infected persons to detect and prevent secondary cases.
5. Outbreak response: Coordinating a rapid and effective response to disease outbreaks, including the implementation of control measures, communication with affected communities, and evaluation of interventions.
6. Collaboration: Working closely with healthcare providers, laboratories, policymakers, and other stakeholders to ensure a coordinated and comprehensive approach to communicable disease control.
7. Research: Conducting research to better understand the epidemiology, transmission dynamics, and prevention strategies for communicable diseases.

Effective communicable disease control requires a multidisciplinary approach that combines expertise in medicine, epidemiology, microbiology, public health, social sciences, and healthcare management.

Measles, also known as rubeola, is a highly infectious viral disease that primarily affects the respiratory system. It is caused by the measles virus, which belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and the genus Morbillivirus. The virus is transmitted through direct contact with infected individuals or through airborne droplets released during coughing and sneezing.

The classic symptoms of measles include:

1. Fever: A high fever (often greater than 104°F or 40°C) usually appears before the onset of the rash, lasting for about 4-7 days.
2. Cough: A persistent cough is common and may become severe.
3. Runny nose: A runny or blocked nose is often present during the early stages of the illness.
4. Red eyes (conjunctivitis): Inflammation of the conjunctiva, the mucous membrane that covers the inner surface of the eyelids and the white part of the eye, can cause redness and irritation.
5. Koplik's spots: These are small, irregular, bluish-white spots with a red base that appear on the inside lining of the cheeks, usually 1-2 days before the rash appears. They are considered pathognomonic for measles, meaning their presence confirms the diagnosis.
6. Rash: The characteristic measles rash typically starts on the face and behind the ears, then spreads downward to the neck, trunk, arms, and legs. It consists of flat red spots that may merge together, forming irregular patches. The rash usually lasts for 5-7 days before fading.

Complications from measles can be severe and include pneumonia, encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and ear infections. In rare cases, measles can lead to serious long-term complications or even death, particularly in young children, pregnant women, and individuals with weakened immune systems.

Vaccination is an effective way to prevent measles. The measles vaccine is typically administered as part of the Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) vaccine, which provides immunity against all three diseases.

Intravenous Immunoglobulins (IVIG) are a preparation of antibodies, specifically immunoglobulins, that are derived from the plasma of healthy donors. They are administered intravenously to provide passive immunity and help boost the immune system's response in individuals with weakened or compromised immune systems. IVIG can be used for various medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency disorders, secondary immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and some infectious diseases. The administration of IVIG can help prevent infections, reduce the severity and frequency of infections, and manage the symptoms of certain autoimmune disorders. It is important to note that while IVIG provides temporary immunity, it does not replace a person's own immune system.

Guideline adherence, in the context of medicine, refers to the extent to which healthcare professionals follow established clinical practice guidelines or recommendations in their daily practice. These guidelines are systematically developed statements designed to assist practitioners and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Adherence to evidence-based guidelines can help improve the quality of care, reduce unnecessary variations in practice, and promote optimal patient outcomes. Factors that may influence guideline adherence include clinician awareness, familiarity, agreement, self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the complexity of the recommendation.

Neisseria meningitidis is a Gram-negative, aerobic, bean-shaped diplococcus bacterium. It is one of the leading causes of bacterial meningitis and sepsis (known as meningococcal disease) worldwide. The bacteria can be found in the back of the nose and throat of approximately 10-25% of the general population, particularly in children, teenagers, and young adults, without causing any symptoms or illness. However, when the bacterium invades the bloodstream and spreads to the brain or spinal cord, it can lead to life-threatening infections such as meningitis (inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord) and septicemia (blood poisoning).

Neisseria meningitidis is classified into 12 serogroups based on the chemical structure of their capsular polysaccharides. The six major serogroups that cause most meningococcal disease worldwide are A, B, C, W, X, and Y. Vaccines are available to protect against some or all of these serogroups.

Meningococcal disease can progress rapidly, leading to severe symptoms such as high fever, headache, stiff neck, confusion, nausea, vomiting, and a rash consisting of purple or red spots. Immediate medical attention is required if someone experiences these symptoms, as meningococcal disease can cause permanent disabilities or death within hours if left untreated.

"Cost of Illness" is a medical-economic concept that refers to the total societal cost associated with a specific disease or health condition. It includes both direct and indirect costs. Direct costs are those that can be directly attributed to the illness, such as medical expenses for diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and medications. Indirect costs include productivity losses due to morbidity (reduced efficiency while working) and mortality (lost earnings due to death). Other indirect costs may encompass expenses related to caregiving or special education needs. The Cost of Illness is often used in health policy decision-making, resource allocation, and evaluating the economic impact of diseases on society.

Decision-making is the cognitive process of selecting a course of action from among multiple alternatives. In a medical context, decision-making refers to the process by which healthcare professionals and patients make choices about medical tests, treatments, or management options based on a thorough evaluation of available information, including the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances.

The decision-making process in medicine typically involves several steps:

1. Identifying the problem or issue that requires a decision.
2. Gathering relevant information about the patient's medical history, current condition, diagnostic test results, treatment options, and potential outcomes.
3. Considering the benefits, risks, and uncertainties associated with each option.
4. Evaluating the patient's preferences, values, and goals.
5. Selecting the most appropriate course of action based on a careful weighing of the available evidence and the patient's individual needs and circumstances.
6. Communicating the decision to the patient and ensuring that they understand the rationale behind it, as well as any potential risks or benefits.
7. Monitoring the outcomes of the decision and adjusting the course of action as needed based on ongoing evaluation and feedback.

Effective decision-making in medicine requires a thorough understanding of medical evidence, clinical expertise, and patient preferences. It also involves careful consideration of ethical principles, such as respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice. Ultimately, the goal of decision-making in healthcare is to promote the best possible outcomes for patients while minimizing harm and respecting their individual needs and values.

Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is a medical approach that combines the best available scientific evidence with clinical expertise and patient values to make informed decisions about diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases. It emphasizes the use of systematic research, including randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses, to guide clinical decision making. EBM aims to provide the most effective and efficient care while minimizing variations in practice, reducing errors, and improving patient outcomes.

Drug utilization refers to the use of medications by patients or healthcare professionals in a real-world setting. It involves analyzing and evaluating patterns of medication use, including prescribing practices, adherence to treatment guidelines, potential duplications or interactions, and outcomes associated with drug therapy. The goal of drug utilization is to optimize medication use, improve patient safety, and minimize costs while achieving the best possible health outcomes. It can be studied through various methods such as prescription claims data analysis, surveys, and clinical audits.

Pneumococcal infections are illnesses caused by the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, also known as pneumococcus. This bacterium can infect different parts of the body, including the lungs (pneumonia), blood (bacteremia or sepsis), and the covering of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis). Pneumococcal infections can also cause ear infections and sinus infections. The bacteria spread through close contact with an infected person, who may spread the bacteria by coughing or sneezing. People with weakened immune systems, children under 2 years of age, adults over 65, and those with certain medical conditions are at increased risk for developing pneumococcal infections.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea among children under 5 years of age. It is responsible for around 215,000 deaths among children in this age group each year.

Rotavirus infection causes inflammation of the stomach and intestines, resulting in symptoms such as vomiting, watery diarrhea, and fever. The virus is transmitted through the fecal-oral route, often through contaminated hands, food, or water. It can also be spread through respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Rotavirus infections are highly contagious and can spread rapidly in communities, particularly in settings where children are in close contact with each other, such as child care centers and schools. The infection is usually self-limiting and resolves within a few days, but severe cases can lead to dehydration and require hospitalization.

Prevention measures include good hygiene practices, such as handwashing with soap and water, safe disposal of feces, and rotavirus vaccination. The WHO recommends the inclusion of rotavirus vaccines in national immunization programs to reduce the burden of severe diarrhea caused by rotavirus infection.

In the context of medicine, risk is the probability or likelihood of an adverse health effect or the occurrence of a negative event related to treatment or exposure to certain hazards. It is usually expressed as a ratio or percentage and can be influenced by various factors such as age, gender, lifestyle, genetics, and environmental conditions. Risk assessment involves identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing risks to make informed decisions about prevention, mitigation, or treatment strategies.

An ethics consultation is a process in which healthcare professionals seek guidance and advice on ethical issues related to patient care from an expert panel or individual with specialized knowledge and training in medical ethics. The consultation may be requested by any member of the healthcare team, as well as patients and their families, when there are concerns about moral values, principles, and duties that arise during clinical decision-making.

The primary goal of an ethics consultation is to identify and analyze ethical dilemmas, clarify relevant ethical considerations, and provide recommendations for a course of action that respects the autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice for all parties involved. The process typically involves gathering information about the case, identifying key ethical issues, consulting with relevant stakeholders, and formulating a plan to address the concerns raised.

Ethics consultations can be helpful in situations where there is disagreement among healthcare providers or between patients and their caregivers regarding treatment options, goals of care, end-of-life decisions, informed consent, confidentiality, resource allocation, and other ethical challenges that arise in clinical practice. The recommendations provided by an ethics consultation are advisory in nature and do not replace the legal or professional responsibilities of healthcare providers.

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human participants and are designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new medical treatments, drugs, devices, or behavioral interventions. The purpose of clinical trials is to determine whether a new intervention is safe, effective, and beneficial for patients, as well as to compare it with currently available treatments. Clinical trials follow a series of phases, each with specific goals and criteria, before a new intervention can be approved by regulatory authorities for widespread use.

Clinical trials are conducted according to a protocol, which is a detailed plan that outlines the study's objectives, design, methodology, statistical analysis, and ethical considerations. The protocol is developed and reviewed by a team of medical experts, statisticians, and ethicists, and it must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB) before the trial can begin.

Participation in clinical trials is voluntary, and participants must provide informed consent before enrolling in the study. Informed consent involves providing potential participants with detailed information about the study's purpose, procedures, risks, benefits, and alternatives, as well as their rights as research subjects. Participants can withdraw from the study at any time without penalty or loss of benefits to which they are entitled.

Clinical trials are essential for advancing medical knowledge and improving patient care. They help researchers identify new treatments, diagnostic tools, and prevention strategies that can benefit patients and improve public health. However, clinical trials also pose potential risks to participants, including adverse effects from experimental interventions, time commitment, and inconvenience. Therefore, it is important for researchers to carefully design and conduct clinical trials to minimize risks and ensure that the benefits outweigh the risks.

Antibiotic prophylaxis refers to the use of antibiotics to prevent infection from occurring in the first place, rather than treating an existing infection. This practice is commonly used before certain medical procedures or surgeries that have a high risk of infection, such as joint replacements, heart valve surgery, or organ transplants. The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis is to reduce the risk of infection by introducing antibiotics into the body before bacteria have a chance to multiply and cause an infection.

The choice of antibiotic for prophylaxis depends on several factors, including the type of procedure being performed, the patient's medical history and allergies, and the most common types of bacteria that can cause infection in that particular situation. The antibiotic is typically given within one hour before the start of the procedure, and may be continued for up to 24 hours afterward, depending on the specific guidelines for that procedure.

It's important to note that antibiotic prophylaxis should only be used when it is truly necessary, as overuse of antibiotics can contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Therefore, the decision to use antibiotic prophylaxis should be made carefully and in consultation with a healthcare provider.

In the context of healthcare, an Information System (IS) is a set of components that work together to collect, process, store, and distribute health information. This can include hardware, software, data, people, and procedures that are used to create, process, and communicate information.

Healthcare IS support various functions within a healthcare organization, such as:

1. Clinical information systems: These systems support clinical workflows and decision-making by providing access to patient records, order entry, results reporting, and medication administration records.
2. Financial information systems: These systems manage financial transactions, including billing, claims processing, and revenue cycle management.
3. Administrative information systems: These systems support administrative functions, such as scheduling appointments, managing patient registration, and tracking patient flow.
4. Public health information systems: These systems collect, analyze, and disseminate public health data to support disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, and population health management.

Healthcare IS must comply with various regulations, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which governs the privacy and security of protected health information (PHI). Effective implementation and use of healthcare IS can improve patient care, reduce errors, and increase efficiency within healthcare organizations.

Public health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the art and science of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting human health through organized efforts of society." It focuses on improving the health and well-being of entire communities, populations, and societies, rather than individual patients. This is achieved through various strategies, including education, prevention, surveillance of diseases, and promotion of healthy behaviors and environments. Public health also addresses broader determinants of health, such as access to healthcare, housing, food, and income, which have a significant impact on the overall health of populations.

Sentinel surveillance is a type of public health surveillance that is used to monitor the occurrence and spread of specific diseases or health events in a defined population. It is called "sentinel" because it relies on a network of carefully selected healthcare providers, hospitals, or laboratories to report cases of the disease or event of interest.

The main goal of sentinel surveillance is to provide timely and accurate information about the incidence and trends of a particular health problem in order to inform public health action. This type of surveillance is often used when it is not feasible or practical to monitor an entire population, such as in the case of rare diseases or emerging infectious diseases.

Sentinel surveillance systems typically require well-defined criteria for case identification and reporting, as well as standardized data collection and analysis methods. They may also involve active monitoring and follow-up of cases to better understand the epidemiology of the disease or event. Overall, sentinel surveillance is an important tool for detecting and responding to public health threats in a timely and effective manner.

Human experimentation is a branch of medical research that involves conducting experiments on human subjects. According to the World Medical Association's Declaration of Helsinki, which sets ethical standards for medical research involving human subjects, human experimentation is defined as "systematic study designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge."

Human experimentation can take many forms, including clinical trials of new drugs or medical devices, observational studies, and interventional studies. In all cases, the principles of informed consent, risk minimization, and respect for the autonomy and dignity of the research subjects must be strictly adhered to.

Human experimentation has a controversial history, with many instances of unethical practices and abuse, such as the notorious Tuskegee syphilis study in which African American men were deliberately left untreated for syphilis without their informed consent. As a result, there are strict regulations and guidelines governing human experimentation to ensure that it is conducted ethically and with the utmost respect for the rights and welfare of research subjects.

Influenza A virus is defined as a negative-sense, single-stranded, segmented RNA virus belonging to the family Orthomyxoviridae. It is responsible for causing epidemic and pandemic influenza in humans and is also known to infect various animal species, such as birds, pigs, horses, and seals. The viral surface proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), are the primary targets for antiviral drugs and vaccines. There are 18 different HA subtypes and 11 known NA subtypes, which contribute to the diversity and antigenic drift of Influenza A viruses. The zoonotic nature of this virus allows for genetic reassortment between human and animal strains, leading to the emergence of novel variants with pandemic potential.

Anti-bacterial agents, also known as antibiotics, are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by bacteria. These agents work by either killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth and reproduction. There are several different classes of anti-bacterial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, among others. Each class of antibiotic has a specific mechanism of action and is used to treat certain types of bacterial infections. It's important to note that anti-bacterial agents are not effective against viral infections, such as the common cold or flu. Misuse and overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, which is a significant global health concern.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Infectious pregnancy complications refer to infections that occur during pregnancy and can affect the mother, fetus, or both. These infections can lead to serious consequences such as preterm labor, low birth weight, birth defects, stillbirth, or even death. Some common infectious agents that can cause pregnancy complications include:

1. Bacteria: Examples include group B streptococcus, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause sepsis, meningitis, or pneumonia in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.
2. Viruses: Examples include cytomegalovirus, rubella, varicella-zoster, and HIV, which can cause congenital anomalies, developmental delays, or transmission of the virus to the fetus.
3. Parasites: Examples include Toxoplasma gondii, which can cause severe neurological damage in the fetus if transmitted during pregnancy.
4. Fungi: Examples include Candida albicans, which can cause fungal infections in the mother and lead to preterm labor or stillbirth.

Preventive measures such as vaccination, good hygiene practices, and avoiding high-risk behaviors can help reduce the risk of infectious pregnancy complications. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of infections during pregnancy are also crucial to prevent adverse outcomes.

A randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a type of clinical study in which participants are randomly assigned to receive either the experimental intervention or the control condition, which may be a standard of care, placebo, or no treatment. The goal of an RCT is to minimize bias and ensure that the results are due to the intervention being tested rather than other factors. This design allows for a comparison between the two groups to determine if there is a significant difference in outcomes. RCTs are often considered the gold standard for evaluating the safety and efficacy of medical interventions, as they provide a high level of evidence for causal relationships between the intervention and health outcomes.

Cross infection, also known as cross-contamination, is the transmission of infectious agents or diseases between patients in a healthcare setting. This can occur through various means such as contaminated equipment, surfaces, hands of healthcare workers, or the air. It is an important concern in medical settings and measures are taken to prevent its occurrence, including proper hand hygiene, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), environmental cleaning and disinfection, and safe injection practices.

Research ethics refers to the principles and guidelines that govern the conduct of research involving human participants or animals. The overarching goal of research ethics is to ensure that research is conducted in a way that respects the autonomy, dignity, and well-being of all those involved. Research ethics are designed to prevent harm, promote fairness, and maintain trust between researchers and study participants.

Some key principles of research ethics include:

1. Respect for Persons: This means treating all individuals with respect and dignity, and recognizing their autonomy and right to make informed decisions about participating in research.
2. Beneficence: Researchers have a duty to maximize the benefits of research while minimizing potential harms.
3. Justice: Research should be conducted fairly, without discrimination or bias, and should benefit all those who are affected by it.
4. Confidentiality: Researchers must protect the privacy and confidentiality of study participants, including their personal information and data.
5. Informed Consent: Participants must give their voluntary and informed consent to participate in research, after being fully informed about the nature of the study, its risks and benefits, and their rights as a participant.

Research ethics are typically overseen by institutional review boards (IRBs) or research ethics committees (RECs), which review research proposals and monitor ongoing studies to ensure that they comply with ethical guidelines. Researchers who violate these guidelines may face sanctions, including loss of funding, suspension or revocation of their research privileges, or legal action.

A viral vaccine is a biological preparation that introduces your body to a specific virus in a way that helps your immune system build up protection against the virus without causing the illness. Viral vaccines can be made from weakened or inactivated forms of the virus, or parts of the virus such as proteins or sugars. Once introduced to the body, the immune system recognizes the virus as foreign and produces an immune response, including the production of antibodies. These antibodies remain in the body and provide immunity against future infection with that specific virus.

Viral vaccines are important tools for preventing infectious diseases caused by viruses, such as influenza, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A and B, rabies, rotavirus, chickenpox, shingles, and some types of cancer. Vaccination programs have led to the control or elimination of many infectious diseases that were once common.

It's important to note that viral vaccines are not effective against bacterial infections, and separate vaccines must be developed for each type of virus. Additionally, because viruses can mutate over time, it is necessary to update some viral vaccines periodically to ensure continued protection.

Data collection in the medical context refers to the systematic gathering of information relevant to a specific research question or clinical situation. This process involves identifying and recording data elements, such as demographic characteristics, medical history, physical examination findings, laboratory results, and imaging studies, from various sources including patient interviews, medical records, and diagnostic tests. The data collected is used to support clinical decision-making, inform research hypotheses, and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or interventions. It is essential that data collection is performed in a standardized and unbiased manner to ensure the validity and reliability of the results.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Schools" is not a medical term. It generally refers to educational institutions where children or adults receive instruction in various subjects. If you are asking about a medical condition that might be associated with the word "school," it's possible you could mean "psychological disorders that first present or become evident during the school-aged period (approximately 5-18 years of age)." These disorders can include, but are not limited to, ADHD, learning disabilities, anxiety disorders, and mood disorders. However, without more context, it's difficult for me to provide a more specific answer.

Medical ethics is a branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical care, research, and practice. It provides a framework for addressing questions related to patient autonomy, informed consent, confidentiality, distributive justice, beneficentia (doing good), and non-maleficence (not doing harm). Medical ethics also involves the application of ethical principles such as respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to specific medical cases and situations. It is a crucial component of medical education and practice, helping healthcare professionals make informed decisions that promote patient well-being while respecting their rights and dignity.

"Terminology as a topic" in the context of medical education and practice refers to the study and use of specialized language and terms within the field of medicine. This includes understanding the meaning, origins, and appropriate usage of medical terminology in order to effectively communicate among healthcare professionals and with patients. It may also involve studying the evolution and cultural significance of medical terminology. The importance of "terminology as a topic" lies in promoting clear and accurate communication, which is essential for providing safe and effective patient care.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Hepatitis B is a viral infection that attacks the liver and can cause both acute and chronic disease. The virus is transmitted through contact with infected blood, semen, and other bodily fluids. It can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby at birth.

Acute hepatitis B infection lasts for a few weeks to several months and often causes no symptoms. However, some people may experience mild to severe flu-like symptoms, yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), dark urine, and fatigue. Most adults with acute hepatitis B recover completely and develop lifelong immunity to the virus.

Chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to serious liver damage, including cirrhosis and liver cancer. People with chronic hepatitis B may experience long-term symptoms such as fatigue, joint pain, and depression. They are also at risk for developing liver failure and liver cancer.

Prevention measures include vaccination, safe sex practices, avoiding sharing needles or other drug injection equipment, and covering wounds and skin rashes. There is no specific treatment for acute hepatitis B, but chronic hepatitis B can be treated with antiviral medications to slow the progression of liver damage.

"Age factors" refer to the effects, changes, or differences that age can have on various aspects of health, disease, and medical care. These factors can encompass a wide range of issues, including:

1. Physiological changes: As people age, their bodies undergo numerous physical changes that can affect how they respond to medications, illnesses, and medical procedures. For example, older adults may be more sensitive to certain drugs or have weaker immune systems, making them more susceptible to infections.
2. Chronic conditions: Age is a significant risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and arthritis. As a result, age-related medical issues are common and can impact treatment decisions and outcomes.
3. Cognitive decline: Aging can also lead to cognitive changes, including memory loss and decreased decision-making abilities. These changes can affect a person's ability to understand and comply with medical instructions, leading to potential complications in their care.
4. Functional limitations: Older adults may experience physical limitations that impact their mobility, strength, and balance, increasing the risk of falls and other injuries. These limitations can also make it more challenging for them to perform daily activities, such as bathing, dressing, or cooking.
5. Social determinants: Age-related factors, such as social isolation, poverty, and lack of access to transportation, can impact a person's ability to obtain necessary medical care and affect their overall health outcomes.

Understanding age factors is critical for healthcare providers to deliver high-quality, patient-centered care that addresses the unique needs and challenges of older adults. By taking these factors into account, healthcare providers can develop personalized treatment plans that consider a person's age, physical condition, cognitive abilities, and social circumstances.

Bacterial infections are caused by the invasion and multiplication of bacteria in or on tissues of the body. These infections can range from mild, like a common cold, to severe, such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sepsis. The symptoms of a bacterial infection depend on the type of bacteria invading the body and the area of the body that is affected.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that can live in many different environments, including in the human body. While some bacteria are beneficial to humans and help with digestion or protect against harmful pathogens, others can cause illness and disease. When bacteria invade the body, they can release toxins and other harmful substances that damage tissues and trigger an immune response.

Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics, which work by killing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. However, it is important to note that misuse or overuse of antibiotics can lead to antibiotic resistance, making treatment more difficult. It is also essential to complete the full course of antibiotics as prescribed, even if symptoms improve, to ensure that all bacteria are eliminated and reduce the risk of recurrence or development of antibiotic resistance.

Animal experimentation, also known as animal testing, refers to the use of non-human animals in scientific research and testing to understand the effects of various substances, treatments, or procedures on living organisms. This practice is performed with the goal of advancing medical and veterinary knowledge, developing new medications, treatments, and surgical techniques, as well as studying basic biological processes and diseases.

In animal experimentation, researchers expose animals to specific conditions, treatments, or substances and then analyze their responses, behaviors, physiological changes, or other outcomes. The selection of animal species for these experiments depends on the research question and the similarities between the animal model and the human or target species under investigation. Commonly used animals include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, primates, and dogs.

Animal experimentation has been instrumental in numerous scientific breakthroughs and medical advancements throughout history. However, it remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns regarding the treatment and welfare of animals used in research. Many organizations advocate for the reduction, refinement, or replacement (3Rs) of animal testing, aiming to minimize animal suffering and find alternative methods whenever possible.

"BSNL formed new Telephone Advisory Committee". reachladakh.com. Retrieved 18 January 2016. "new advisory committee soon". ... Telephone / Telecom Advisory Committees (TAC) is a high level Indian government body made up of members of parliament and other ... "Telephone Advisory Committees (TACs)". dot.gov.in. Retrieved 23 December 2015. "Raghuram Rajan went ahead with TAC view on ... "Telephone Advisory Committee meeting presided over by Dr Ashok Tanwar Member of Parliament". firstpost.com. Archived from the ...
Photography Advisory Committee at AllMusic "Pitchfork: Album Reviews: Mirah: Advisory Committee". pitchfork.com. Retrieved 4 ... Advisory Committee is Mirah's second full-length album. It was released on K Records on March 19, 2002, and produced by both ... Advisory Committee was recorded over a one-year period, starting on September 17, 2000 and ending on July 4, 2001. It was ... Helens" - 4:08 "Recommendation" - 1:20 "Body Below" - 4:08 "The Sun" - 3:14 "Advisory Committee" - 2:57 "Special Death" - 2:32 ...
In June 2016 Piketty and Blanchflower left, and the remaining members of the Economic Advisory Committee announced they had ... The British Labour Party's Economic Advisory Committee was in 2015-16 a group of economists, described as experts on ... "Corbyn reveals big names in new Economic Advisory Committee". LabourList. 27 September 2015. Retrieved 11 March 2016. Giles, ... "What's happening at the first meeting of Labour's star-studded Economic Advisory Committee?". LabourList. 12 November 2015. ...
The Republic Advisory Committee was a committee established by the then Australian Prime Minister Paul Keating in April 1993 to ... The Republic Advisory Committee submitted two Volumes (Volume I - The Options and Volume II - the Appendices) to the Australian ... p. 9. Republican History - the Republic Advisory Committee (Articles lacking in-text citations from February 2013, All articles ... The committee's mandate was to "prepare an options paper describing 'the minimum constitutional changes necessary to achieve a ...
The Stamp Advisory Committee (SAC) is a committee to advise on the design of British postage stamps. The committee was ... The committee's recommendations are not binding on Royal Mail, nor does it select new subjects for stamp issues. The committee ... On 21 February 1968 a new Post Office appointed committee was set up and today the SAC advises the United Kingdom's Royal Mail ... The committee then review the possible design and advise Royal Mail which they think is the best. ...
35,000 were based on the recommendations of the committee. "Minutes of the Migration Advisory Committee meetings". National ... The Migration Advisory Committee is a non-departmental public body associated with the British Home Office. It was established ... "Migration Advisory Committee". gov.uk. Retrieved 2022-05-28. "Charge employers £1,000 for every non-EU migrant worker, say ... The Committee produced a report in 2016 in which they heavily criticised the Department of Health, Health Education England and ...
The Aquaculture Advisory Committee (AAC) was established by the Government of South Australia to support the development of the ... Members were appointed to the Aquaculture Advisory Committee for a period of three years, following a nomination process. As of ... Gail Gago (24 December 2012). "Aquaculture Advisory Committee" (PDF). www.premier.sa.gov.au. Archived from the original (PDF) ... The Committee typically mets four to five times a year and meetings were held at 25 Grenfell St, Adelaide. The Committee ...
"BSNL formed new Telephone Advisory Committee". reachladakh.com. Retrieved 18 January 2016. "new advisory committee soon". ... Telecom Advisory Committee (TAC) is a high level Indian government body made up of members of parliament and other members ... "Telecom Advisory Committees (TACs)". dot.gov.in. Retrieved 23 December 2015. "Raghuram Rajan went ahead with TAC view on ... "Telephone Advisory Committee meeting presided over by Dr Ashok Tanwar Member of Parliament". firstpost.com. Archived from the ...
Disablement Advisory Committees were established in the United Kingdom by the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act 1944. This was ... Harrison, Enid (March 1953). "Local Advisory Committees". Public Administration. 31: 65. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9299.1953.tb01762.x ... A National Advisory Council on the Employment of the Disabled was also established. Barnes, Colin (1991). Disabled people in ...
"CSAC (Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee) by Year". U.S. Postal Service (2011). Creating US Stamps. U.S. Postal Service. CSAC ... The U.S. Postal Service and the members of the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) use the following criteria to ... Established in 1957, the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) reviews all of the proposals and selects stamp subjects that ... The United States Postal Service's Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee (CSAC) evaluates potential subjects for U.S. postage ...
Dickey, Committee Secretary until 1942 then a Committee member E.C. Gregory, Committee Secretary from 1942 Muirhead Bone, ... The War Artists' Advisory Committee (WAAC), was a British government agency established within the Ministry of Information at ... "War Artists Advisory Committee". Imperial War Museum. Archived from the original on 28 September 2013. Retrieved 3 September ... When the committee was dissolved in December 1945 its collection consisted of 5,570 works of art produced by over four hundred ...
As a result, the Historical Advisory Committee was reduced in size and reorganized to be composed of only university-based ... The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Historical Advisory Committee was established in 1964. The NASA ... "Historical Advisory Committees: NASA and the National Archives," Pacific Historical Review, vol. 44, no. 3 (August 1975), pp. ... The committee was first made up of a wide variety of members, who initially sought to find support and prestige for the new ...
Various Special Advisory Committees (SAC) are formed (and disbanded) on an ad-hoc basis in Canadian government circles, ... "Special Advisory Committee on the Epidemic of Opioid Overdoses". Pan-Canadian Public Health Network (PHN). 2017-09-14. ... The committees join civil servants in various ministries at all FPT levels of government. The FPT structure was hatched in ... "Prime Minister creates committee on COVID-19". JUSTIN TRUDEAU, PRIME MINISTER OF CANADA. 4 March 2020. Retrieved 28 April 2020 ...
The Law Reform Advisory Committee was a body that reviewed the civil law in Northern Ireland, with a view to making ... As of August 2006, the Committee had 8 members: Mr Justice Declan Morgan (Chairman), Judge Desmond Marrinan (Vice Chairman), ...
The International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC) is an association of governments of cotton producing, consuming and trading ... The International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC) along with private sector cotton organizations initiated the International ...
The Building Regulations Advisory Committee (BRAC) is an advisory non-departmental public body of the government of the United ... The Building Regulations Advisory Committee is a statutory advisory body that the Secretary of State will consult on proposals ... It was officially replaced by the Building Advisory Committee (BAC) and the new Industry Competence Committee (ICC) and both ... As of July 2017, the committee had 19 members. The Building Control Performance Standards Advisory Group (BCPSAG) advises BRAC ...
Federal Register Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. Chapter 10) Federal Advisory Committee Act Federal Advisory Committee ... The Federal Advisory Committee Act defines advisory committee as "any committee, board, commission, council, conference, panel ... Federal Advisory Committee Act Committee Management Secretariat (15 June 2012). "The Federal Advisory Committee Act". Federal ... Committees composed of full-time officers or employees of the federal government do not count as advisory committees under FACA ...
The London Planning Advisory Committee (LPAC) was an ad hoc Londonwide joint committee responsible for strategic planning from ... The London Planning Advisory Committee was serviced by Havering London Borough Council. The joint planning committee for ... The Local Government Act 1985 required the London borough councils to set up a "joint planning committee for Greater London". ... "Advisory Board - centre for public scrutiny". Archived from the original on 11 December 2013. Retrieved 8 September 2012. " ...
The Malaria Policy Advisory Group (MPAG) - previously known as Malaria Policy Advisory Committee (MPAC) was established in 2011 ... "About Malaria Policy Advisory Group". World Health Organization. Retrieved 7 September 2021. "Malaria Policy Advisory Group". ...
The At-Large Advisory Committee (ALAC) is an advisory committee to ICANN, the organization that administers the Internet's ... Former Members of the At-Large Advisory Committee". "Hadia Elminiawi SOI - ALAC - Global Site". "ICANN , Archives , Committees ... Its structure was studied through the At-Large Advisory Committee Assistance Group, which made a proposal that was then ... At-Large Advisory Committee". ICANN At-Large Community website Official ALAC page at ICANN ALAC Assistance Group (Domain Name ...
... as interim chair of the Social Security Advisory Committee Paul Gray proposed as the next Social Security Advisory Committee ... The Social Security Advisory Committee (SSAC) is a statutory body that provides impartial advice to the UK government on social ... Social Security Advisory Committee website (Webarchive template wayback links, All articles with unsourced statements, Articles ... replacing the Advisory Committee on Rent Rebates and Rent Allowances (ACRRRA) from April 1983. Paul Gray (2011- ) Deep Sagar ( ...
... replacing the Citizens Commemorative Coin Advisory Committee (CCCAC). Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee Numismatics portal ... The Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (or CCAC) was established in 2003 to advise the United States Secretary of the Treasury ... and committees, 2003 in the United States, Articles with VIAF identifiers, Articles with LCCN identifiers, All stub articles, ...
The Naval Research Advisory Committee (NRAC) was a civilian advisory committee to the United States Navy from 1946 to 2019. Its ... Naval Research Advisory Committee". LII / Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 2020-07-15. "Naval Research Advisory Committee ... Disestablishment of the Secretary of the Navy Advisory Panel and Naval Research Advisory Sub-Committee" (PDF). Federation of ... Naval Research Advisory Committee (CS1 maint: others, All articles with dead external links, Articles with dead external links ...
The Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (ACA) was a UK agency founded on 30 April 1909, to undertake, promote, and ... He formed the Committee for the Scientific Survey of Air Defence. One of the committee's most important decisions was to speed ... ISBN 0-333-49320-6. "Report of the Advisory Committee for Aeronautics for the Year 1909 - 1910" (PDF). HMSO. 1910. Archived ... Model Research: The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, 1915-1958. 2 vols. Washington, DC: Scientific and Technical ...
... (1957 - 1973), history.aip.org The Papers of the President's Science Advisory Committee ... JASON (advisory group) Technology policy U.S. President's Science Advisory Committee Records, Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential ... The President's Science Advisory Committee (PSAC) was created on November 21, 1957, by President of the United States Dwight D ... PSAC was an upgrade and move to the White House of the Science Advisory Committee (SAC) established in 1951 by President Harry ...
The Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee (ODAC) receives requests for technical and clinical evaluation of new drugs by the U.S. ... fda.gov/AdvisoryCommittees/CommitteesMeetingMaterials/Drugs/OncologicDrugsAdvisoryCommittee/default.htm FDA Advisory Committees ... Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee, official webpage: https://www. ... Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The committee, consisting of members from academic and clinical oncology biostatistics, the ...
The National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC) is an Irish advisory body that advises the Chief Medical Officer and ... National Immunization Technical Advisory Group (the global concept) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (United States ... Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (United Kingdom) National Advisory Committee on Immunization (Canada) "College ... "Terms of Reference and Standard Operating Procedures RCPI National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC)" (PDF). 12 February ...
... at FDA.gov Roster of the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee ( ... about the Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee Occasional Smoker, 47, ... The Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee (TPSAC) is an advisory panel of the United States Food and Drug ... In February 2011, Lorillard and R.J. Reynolds filed a federal lawsuit to try to block the advisory committee action or force ...
The Defense Policy Board Advisory Committee, also referred to as the Defense Policy Board (DPBAC or DPB), is a federal advisory ... definition of DoD federal advisory committee Federal Register Current members (Articles lacking in-text citations from April ... review of all the Pentagon advisory boards, and fired all members of the Pentagon advisory boards who are appointed by the DoD ... The committee type is discretionary.[citation needed] Excerpt of Objectives and Scope of Activities from the charter: 1. The ...
"Bicycle Advisory Committee: Article XIV: Bicycle Advisory Committee". Archived from the original on 2007-08-13. Retrieved 2007- ... San Francisco Bicycle Advisory Committee v t e v t e (Government of San Francisco, Organizations based in San Francisco, ... The San Francisco Bicycle Advisory Committee consists of 11 San Francisco voting members appointed by the San Francisco Board ... The committee was established by Ordinance 365-90 on 1990-11-09. Committee projects include oversight and facilitation of the ...
Photography Advisory Committee at AllMusic "Pitchfork: Album Reviews: Mirah: Advisory Committee". pitchfork.com. Retrieved 4 ... Advisory Committee is Mirahs second full-length album. It was released on K Records on March 19, 2002, and produced by both ... Advisory Committee was recorded over a one-year period, starting on September 17, 2000 and ending on July 4, 2001. It was ... Helens" - 4:08 "Recommendation" - 1:20 "Body Below" - 4:08 "The Sun" - 3:14 "Advisory Committee" - 2:57 "Special Death" - 2:32 ...
The Act formalized a process for establishing, operating, overseeing, and terminating these advisory bodies. ... The Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 requires that advice provided to federal agencies by advisory committees must be ... The Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA) requires that advice provided to federal agencies by advisory committees must ... The National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) was established under the Occupational Safety and ...
Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee * Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee *2024 Meeting Materials, Oncologic Drugs Advisory ... Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee *2024 Meeting Materials, Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee. *2023 Meeting Materials, ... FDA Advisory Committee Information Line. 1-800-741-8138. (301-443-0572 in the Washington DC area). Please call the Information ... FDA Advisory Committee Information Line. 1-800-741-8138. (301) 443-0572 (local number). Please call the Information Line for up ...
Small Business Advisory Committee The Small Business Advisory Committee is appointed by the School Board as an advisory group ... Multilingual Advisory Committee Join the Multilingual Advisory Committee Meeting. Meeting Date/Time:. April 29, 2024, at 6:30 p ... Technology Advisory Committee The Technology Advisory Committee was formed by School Board Policy #5306.1 to provide input, ... Advisory Committee Chairs Planning Meeting. Join the Advisory Committee Chairs Planning Meeting ...
Go to Boards and committees All DNR-related boards, committees, and advisory groups ... The Lake Michigan Citizens Fishery Advisory Committee reviews and provides input and direction into the fishery goals, ... The committee chair is Denny Grinold and the DNR facilitator is Jay Wesley. ... For information on the committee, please contact Jay Wesley or call 616-490-5090. ...
... the Activities Directors Advisory Committee reviews all recommendations from the different activities advisory committees and, ... IHSA Advisory Committees communicate information about their area of interest to the Board of Directors and staff. Committees ... The size, scope and make-up of each ad hoc committee varies depending on the subject matter.. Athletic Advisory Committees play ... Advisory committees may not propose changes to the IHSA Constitution and By-laws; such proposals must be made by an official ...
Volunteer committee members are Queens alumni and donors who are appointed based on their estate, trust, tax, insurance, and ... Queens Universitys Gift Planning Advisory Committee is an operational committee of the Office of Advancement created to ... Queens Universitys Gift Planning Advisory Committee is an operational committee of the Office of Advancement created to ... Gift Planning Advisory Committee. J. Mark Skeggs, Com 98, Chair. Vice-President, Wealth Planning, Gluskin Sheff ...
List of members in the advisory committee, along with meeting agendas and minutes, meeting dates, and miscellaneous documents. ... CAN/TRIO Advisory Committee. More information coming soon. Contact Information. Vania Agama Ramirez. 805-922-6966 ext. 3489. ...
FDIC Advisory Committee on Community Banking FDIC Headquarters, 550 17th Street N.W., Washington, DC January 20, 2011 ...
Structural Advisory Committee Meeting 6/10/2021. * …. This page is located more than 3 levels deep within a topic. Some page ... This page, Structural Advisory Committee Meeting 6/10/2021, is offered by ...
Advisory group will provide input on clinical trial designs. ... The committee, according to the FDA, is designed to inject a ... Food and Drug Administration on Friday announced the establishment of its first-ever patient advisory committee on medical ... One of the primary missions of the committee will be to help figure out when and how patients should have input into the ... The FDA says the committee will help the government "meet its public health commitment to improve patient health and quality of ...
portland bicycle advisory committeeportland bureau of transportationPortland freight committeeportland pedestrian advisory ... Southwest update and dispatch from PBOT Bicycle Advisory Committee tour. The Portland Bicycle Advisory Committee (BAC) and ... Citys bike committee explores south Portlands riverfront bikeways. The Bicycle Advisory Committees monthly rides are some of ... PBOT advisory committee reform is underway, but participants have questions. Current and former committee members are ...
... the state legislature directed the State Forester to establish a Smoke Management Advisory Committee to provide advice and ... Advisory Committee seeks new member. ODF is seeking to fill the public committee member vacancy. Committee members are ... Smoke Management Advisory Committee public nomination form About. In 1989, the state legislature directed the State Forester to ... Committee members gather for public meetings in Salem twice a year to discuss and provide advice to the Smoke Management ...
The Northern Ireland Food Advisory Committee acts as an independent advisory body to the Food Standards Agency. It is chaired ... Welsh Food Advisory Committee The Welsh Food Advisory Committee acts as an independent advisory body to the Food Standards ... Northern Ireland Food Advisory Committee Penodol i Ogledd Iwerddon The Northern Ireland Food Advisory Committee acts as an ... independent advisory body to the Food Standards Agency. It is chaired by the Northern Ireland Board member. Its role is to ...
Advisory Committees News. Pennsylvania Advisory Committee Releases Report on Fair Housing Access & Zoning Practices ... New York Advisory Committee to the U. S. Commission on Civil Rights Final Call for Panelists (5/22/2023 Deadline to Submit) ... New York Advisory Committee Announces 2023 Public Briefings on Examining the New York Child Welfare System and its Impact on ... Iowa Advisory Committee Public Web Briefing on Access to Mental and Behavioral Healthcare for K-12 Students - Panel I ...
This committee considers applications for degree awarding powers (DAP) and/or university title (UT). It also oversees the ... Advisory Committee on Degree Awarding Powers (ACDAP). The Committee is concerned with applications for degree awarding powers ... Home About us How were run Committees Advisory Committee on Degree Awarding Powers ... two members appointed from the QAA Student Strategic Advisory Committee (SSAC) who are not also members of the QAA Board ...
Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - September 28-29, 2023. *Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - June ... Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - March 13, 2023. *Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - December 5, ... Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - September 16, 2022. *Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - July 7, ... Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - March 7, 2022. *Readout: Disability Advisory Committee Meeting - December 10, ...
The committee will typically meet on the third Thursday of each month. Please consult the meeting agenda for details. ... The Regional Waste Advisory Committee advises the Metro Council on the implementation of the 2030 Regional Waste Plan. ... Committee on Racial Equity. *Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation. +. Open this submenu. −. Close this submenu. * ... Metro advisory committees. +. Open this submenu. −. Close this submenu. *Committee on Disability Inclusion ...
All Advisory Committee meetings are public and all are welcome. Meetings have minutes published and are recorded. Recordings ... The Systems Analysis Advisory Committee will review the Councils computer models and provide advice on their further ... As is the case with all Council advisory committee meetings, attendance is open to the general public. ... Power Plan Fish and Wildlife Program Subbasin Plans Financial Reports Independent Scientific Advisory Board Independent ...
Community-Vaccine-Advisory-Committee-FAQ COVID-19 Community Vaccine Advisory Committee Questions and Answers ... A list of the Community Advisory Vaccine Committee members can be found on the Community Vaccine Advisory Committee page. These ... Boards and Advisory Committees. *. Forms. *. Jobs and Careers. *. Local Health Services/Offices. *. ... The Community Vaccine Advisory Committees work will be closely coordinated with both the work of the Scientific Safety Review ...
CNW/ - The Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) is seeking members for its newly established Seniors Expert Advisory Committee ( ... "The Seniors Expert Advisory Committee will give the OSC access to a multidisciplinary team of experts on issues related to ... is seeking members for its newly established Seniors Expert Advisory Committee (SEAC), which will advise staff on issues ... The committee will be chaired by Tyler Fleming, Director of the Investor Office, which leads the development of the OSC seniors ...
Subject: Chapel Hill Technology Advisory Committee Description: The Technology Committee was created to develop short and long ...
Memorandum of Understanding between the Argentine Republic and the Republic of Chile concerning Conservation Measures for the Ruddy-headed Goose (Chloephaga rubidiceps). ...
NSCCs Accessibility Advisory Committee aims to improve the educational experience for people with disabilities. ... NSCC Accessibility Advisory Committee. Our Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC) plays a pivotal role in helping NSCC become ... If you have questions about NSCCs Accessibility Advisory Committee, contact , Executive Director, Human Rights, Equity and ... Committee membership. With the goal of creating a barrier-free College, the AAC consists of eight volunteer members from across ...
The Committee will operate under the requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA). The purpose of FACA, which was ... The Committee is being formed by the Department of the Interior on behalf of the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) under ... Interior Deputy Secretary P. Lynn Scarlett announced today the formation of the National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC). ... The U.S. General Services Administration is responsible for implementing the Federal Advisory Committee Act. Additional ...
Committee Involvement The Business Advisory Committee was instrumental in the creation of a systemwide school-based staff ... Citizen Advisory Committees The following communication will be sent to all contacts Tuesday, March 5, 2024, at 5:00 p.m. via ... PROCEDURES CITIZEN ADVISORY. COMMITTEES COLLECTIVE BARGAINING INTERNAL AUDIT REPORT FRAUD, WASTE AND ABUSE ENGAGE FOR EDUCATION ... The Special Education Citizens Advisory Committee is accepting interested new members, but no application is needed. The Parent ...
Lithium Battery Air Safety Advisory Committee Bylaws ... Lithium Battery Air Safety Advisory Committee Bylaws Document. ...
  • These revised recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices update previous recommendations (MMWR 1990;39{RR-10}:1-5). (cdc.gov)
  • In the United States, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) convened a working group to evaluate similar questions to those considered by WHO. (cdc.gov)
  • Establishing bioethics committees. (who.int)
  • The World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) was established by the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010. (cdc.gov)
  • After Senate Bill No. 99 established the Active Transportation Program in 2013, Caltrans and the California Transportation Commission (CTC) built the California Active Transportation Program (ATP) Technical Advisory Committee (TAC). (ca.gov)
  • For details on the Patient Engagement Advisory Committee's charter and past meeting materials, see Advisory Committees - Patient Engagement Advisory Committee . (fda.gov)
  • This infographic provides an overview of the Disability Advisory Committee's findings and recommendations that informed its 2020 annual report. (canada.ca)
  • review the preparation of Regional Committee and Programme Subcommittee meetings and provide orientation for the implementation of the Regional Committee's resolutions. (who.int)
  • Cite this: FDA Advisory Committee Votes Against Approval for NASH Drug - Medscape - May 19, 2023. (medscape.com)
  • Five advisory committees provide advice and guidance to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) under the rules of FACA. (cdc.gov)
  • In light of the pace of technological change, the ICMA Board decided in 2019 to expand the remit of the Board Sub-Group on Technology, tap into the expertise of ICMA's broad membership, and provide guidance on ICMA's work through the creation of the FinTech Advisory Committee (FinAC). (icma-group.org)
  • The ATP TAC is an action-oriented committee that supports Caltrans' and the CTC's management and delivery of the ATP by providing balanced strategic technical guidance and assistance with complex program decisions that enable and maximize continuous improvement of the ATP. (ca.gov)
  • Committee members review information and comment on content and the comprehension of policies. (niagararegion.ca)
  • Washington, D.C. - The Market Risk Advisory Committee (MRAC) today released the agenda for a public meeting that will be held on September 28, 2022, at 9:30 a.m. (cftc.gov)
  • Members of the public may submit public comments in connection with the meeting, identified by "Market Risk Advisory Committee" by October 5, 2022 . (cftc.gov)
  • The National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) was established under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 to advise the Secretaries of Labor and Health and Human Services (HHS) on occupational safety and health programs and policies. (cdc.gov)
  • The Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health was established under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 to advise the Secretary of HHS, the Director of NIOSH, and the Director of the NIOSH Division on Compensation Analysis and Support on HHS and NIOSH activities. (cdc.gov)
  • TORONTO , June 1, 2016 /CNW/ - The Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) is seeking members for its newly established Seniors Expert Advisory Committee (SEAC), which will advise staff on issues impacting older investors and help the OSC develop tailored solutions. (newswire.ca)
  • advise the Regional Director on any other matters referred to the Committee. (who.int)
  • For specific meetings that need expertise beyond the core membership, the Committee can reach out to experts that participate on this and other advisory panels for the FDA and the National Institutes of Health. (fda.gov)
  • Minutes from the 1/13/11 and 1/27/11 EAC meetings were approved by the committee. (carleton.edu)
  • 1 The Regulations for Expert Advisory Panels and Committees provide that the Director-General shall submit to the Executive Board a report on meetings of expert committees containing observations on the implications of the expert committee reports and recommendations on the follow-up action to be taken. (who.int)
  • The outcomes and recommendations of this Expert Committee have broad inter- and intra-cluster relationships, links with regional offices, country offices and partnerships, as well as connections with other Expert Committees, whenever the subject of medicines arises. (who.int)
  • The Legislation Committee is an Internal Judicial Council Committee comprised of appellate court justices, superior court judges, court executives, and attorneys. (ca.gov)
  • Sydney Weydemeyer was appointed Secretary of the Committee and will serve through the end of spring term 2011. (carleton.edu)
  • Gabriel Callsen (ICMA) is acting as Secretary of the Committee. (icma-group.org)
  • For details on current committee members, see Roster of the Patient Engagement Advisory Committee . (fda.gov)
  • The Patient Engagement Advisory Committee (PEAC) is the first and only advisory committee whose members are all patients, caregivers, and representatives of patient organizations. (fda.gov)
  • The Committee is made up of a core of nine voting members plus one non-voting industry representative and one voting consumer representative. (fda.gov)
  • The Committee is made up of 12 members and 2 co-chairs and includes professionals from various fields, such as health professionals, lawyers, accountants, and tax professionals, as well as advocates of the disability community, representatives of indigenous communities, and persons with disabilities. (canada.ca)
  • The committee will consist of up to 15 members, including representation from the legal community, academia, industry, medical professionals and seniors' advocates. (newswire.ca)
  • The Legislation Committee reports directly to the Judicial Council and members are appointed by the Chief Justice for a one-year term. (ca.gov)
  • For agenda updates and more information about this advisory committee, including its members, visit MRAC . (cftc.gov)
  • The term of membership is two years, and up to four committee members can serve one consecutive term. (niagararegion.ca)
  • Committee members were most concerned with the increased risk for DILI in patients taking OCA. (medscape.com)
  • The committee members voted 15 to 1 to defer approval until clinical outcome data is submitted and reviewed. (medscape.com)
  • The Committee is designed to serve as an editorial body that defines priorities, orients members, identifies responsibilities and mobilizes resources. (bvsalud.org)
  • If you have questions about NSCC's Accessibility Advisory Committee, contact , Executive Director, Human Rights, Equity and Inclusion. (nscc.ca)
  • The recommendations provided by the committee will address considerations for the FDA and industry on these topics. (fda.gov)
  • The Client Experience Report provides a brief overview of important administrative processes changes to the disability tax credit (DTC) that have been implemented by the CRA, many of which were in response to recommendations made by the Committee. (canada.ca)
  • The Seniors Expert Advisory Committee will give the OSC access to a multidisciplinary team of experts on issues related to older investors, providing us with valuable input on our seniors strategy, an important initiative for the OSC," said Maureen Jensen , Chair and CEO of the OSC. (newswire.ca)
  • The mandate is the first step to secure accountability in the delegation between the Riksdag and the cabinet and it consists of the cabinets proposed standpoint for each council agenda point and the committee discussions. (lu.se)
  • World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund Joint Monitoring Programme on Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP) : report of the first meeting of the Advisory Group, Geneva, 23-25 April 2002. (who.int)
  • The mission of the Business Advisory Committee is to increase engagement and strengthen the partnership between the school system and Harford County's local business community. (hcps.org)
  • The County Executive and County Council established the MBE Advisory Committee to recommend specific MBE goals for various types of procurement of goods or services, and to monitor the county's MBE efforts on a quarterly basis. (alleghenycounty.us)
  • Alongside ICMA's commitment to green, social and sustainability markets, the ICMA FinTech Advisory Committee will work to ensure engagement and advice is applicable to and supportive of the move towards more sustainable financial markets. (icma-group.org)
  • Effective April 15, 2020, the Judicial Council amended California Rules of Court, rules 10.12, 10.16, and 10.34, by circulating order 20-01 , to change the name of the committee from the Policy Coordination and Liaison Committee to the Legislation Committee. (ca.gov)
  • For information about how to nominate yourself or another candidate to participate in the Committee, see Applying for Membership on FDA Advisory Committees . (fda.gov)
  • NIOSH welcomes any questions about the advisory committees and invites you to submit your name or to nominate a colleague for a future opening on the committee of interest. (cdc.gov)
  • Please submit expressions of interest to NIOSH Advisory Committees . (cdc.gov)
  • This Committee brings patients, caregivers, patient organizations, and experts together for a broader discussion of important patient-related issues. (fda.gov)
  • The development of the Belize VHL is assisted by a Committee formed by national institutions and organizations. (bvsalud.org)
  • Statements submitted in connection with the committee meeting will be made available to the public, including publication on cftc.gov. (cftc.gov)
  • Media workers planning to cover the protests should therefore consider the following safety information, and also read CPJ's regularly updated COVID-19 safety advisory . (cpj.org)
  • NEW The Disability Advisory Committee has released its fourth annual report. (canada.ca)
  • Report of the first meeting of the Advisory Group of WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. (who.int)
  • The Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (FACA) requires that advice provided to federal agencies by advisory committees must be objective and accessible to the public. (cdc.gov)
  • The Planning Advisory Committee, required under the Planning Act, provides advice to Regional Council and staff regarding the development of the new Regional Official Plan. (niagararegion.ca)
  • The Planning Advisory Committee was formed in the Spring of 2018 and consists of eight citizen representatives with professional expertise, reflecting the contents of the Regional Official Plan, to enable input from both a professional and citizen perspective. (niagararegion.ca)
  • Riksdags EU committee before negotiations in the EU council of ministers. (lu.se)
  • The Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations advises the Director-General in the area of medicines' quality assurance and provides regulatory tools for medical products. (who.int)
  • In 2017-partly to address the lack of progress in decreasing rabies in the world-a World Health Organization (WHO) expert committee endorsed a 2-dose rabies preexposure immunization schedule in place of the previous 3-dose schedule. (cdc.gov)
  • The committee meets approximately once per month in a virtual setting. (hcps.org)
  • The English Language Advisory Committee (ELAC) meets four times per school year. (ovsd.org)
  • The Committee meets under the Chairmanship of the Regional Director at least once a quarter. (who.int)
  • We are very grateful to the advisory committee who with their experience and knowledge helped make this conference a success. (eventscloud.com)
  • The committee was hoping to make preexposure immunization more affordable and convenient for local people, and more desirable and feasible for travelers. (cdc.gov)
  • The Committee will consider ways to advance access to devices that allow for care outside a hospital or clinical care setting, for example, in the home setting. (fda.gov)
  • This Committee actively contributes to bringing about access to quality essential medicines and health products for all. (who.int)
  • The committee will be chaired by Tyler Fleming , Director of the Investor Office, which leads the development of the OSC seniors strategy and its related initiatives. (newswire.ca)
  • The Committee will also discuss considerations for improving reach and comprehension of FDA's patient and caregiver communications, across diverse demographic groups. (fda.gov)
  • The Disability Advisory Committee advises the Minister of National Revenue and the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) on how the Agency can improve the way it administers and interprets tax measures for Canadians with disabilities. (canada.ca)
  • HCPS Limelight events are sponsored by a different Business Advisory Committee member each month, and the nominees are entered into a live drawing for a grand prize from that sponsor. (hcps.org)
  • The summary is updated after each Legislation Committee meeting. (ca.gov)