Connective Tissue: Tissue that supports and binds other tissues. It consists of CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS embedded in a large amount of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX.Vasa Vasorum: Nutrient blood vessels which supply the walls of large arteries or veins.Tunica Media: The middle layer of blood vessel walls, composed principally of thin, cylindrical, smooth muscle cells and elastic tissue. It accounts for the bulk of the wall of most arteries. The smooth muscle cells are arranged in circular layers around the vessel, and the thickness of the coat varies with the size of the vessel.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Elastic Tissue: Connective tissue comprised chiefly of elastic fibers. Elastic fibers have two components: ELASTIN and MICROFIBRILS.Muscle, Smooth, Vascular: The nonstriated involuntary muscle tissue of blood vessels.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Adventitia: The outermost covering of organs, blood vessels, and other such structures in the body.Temporal Arteries: Arteries arising from the external carotid or the maxillary artery and distributing to the temporal region.Aorta, Thoracic: The portion of the descending aorta proceeding from the arch of the aorta and extending to the DIAPHRAGM, eventually connecting to the ABDOMINAL AORTA.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Aorta, Abdominal: The aorta from the DIAPHRAGM to the bifurcation into the right and left common iliac arteries.Carotid Artery Injuries: Damages to the CAROTID ARTERIES caused either by blunt force or penetrating trauma, such as CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; THORACIC INJURIES; and NECK INJURIES. Damaged carotid arteries can lead to CAROTID ARTERY THROMBOSIS; CAROTID-CAVERNOUS SINUS FISTULA; pseudoaneurysm formation; and INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY DISSECTION. (From Am J Forensic Med Pathol 1997, 18:251; J Trauma 1994, 37:473)Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Blood Vessels: Any of the tubular vessels conveying the blood (arteries, arterioles, capillaries, venules, and veins).Cautery: The application of a caustic substance, a hot instrument, an electric current, or other agent to control bleeding while removing or destroying tissue.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Neointima: The new and thickened layer of scar tissue that forms on a PROSTHESIS, or as a result of vessel injury especially following ANGIOPLASTY or stent placement.Arteries: The vessels carrying blood away from the heart.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Connective Tissue Cells: A group of cells that includes FIBROBLASTS, cartilage cells, ADIPOCYTES, smooth muscle cells, and bone cells.Batroxobin: A proteolytic enzyme obtained from the venom of fer-de-lance (Bothrops atrox). It is used as a plasma clotting agent for fibrinogen and for the detection of fibrinogen degradation products. The presence of heparin does not interfere with the clotting test. Hemocoagulase is a mixture containing batroxobin and factor X activator. EC 3.4.21.-.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Arteriosclerosis: Thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES of all sizes. There are many forms classified by the types of lesions and arteries involved, such as ATHEROSCLEROSIS with fatty lesions in the ARTERIAL INTIMA of medium and large muscular arteries.Arteritis: INFLAMMATION of any ARTERIES.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Giant Cell Arteritis: A systemic autoimmune disorder that typically affects medium and large ARTERIES, usually leading to occlusive granulomatous vasculitis with transmural infiltrate containing multinucleated GIANT CELLS. The TEMPORAL ARTERY is commonly involved. This disorder appears primarily in people over the age of 50. Symptoms include FEVER; FATIGUE; HEADACHE; visual impairment; pain in the jaw and tongue; and aggravation of pain by cold temperatures. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed)Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Basilar Artery: The artery formed by the union of the right and left vertebral arteries; it runs from the lower to the upper border of the pons, where it bifurcates into the two posterior cerebral arteries.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.ElastinAortitis: Inflammation of the wall of the AORTA.Atherosclerosis: A thickening and loss of elasticity of the walls of ARTERIES that occurs with formation of ATHEROSCLEROTIC PLAQUES within the ARTERIAL INTIMA.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Vasoconstrictor Agents: Drugs used to cause constriction of the blood vessels.NADPH Dehydrogenase: A flavoprotein that reversibly oxidizes NADPH to NADP and a reduced acceptor. EC 1.6.99.1.Myocytes, Smooth Muscle: Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Cerebral Arteries: The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Vasculitis: Inflammation of any one of the blood vessels, including the ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of the ABDOMINAL AORTA which gives rise to the visceral, the parietal, and the terminal (iliac) branches below the aortic hiatus at the diaphragm.Vasodilation: The physiological widening of BLOOD VESSELS by relaxing the underlying VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.NADPH Oxidase: A flavoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the univalent reduction of OXYGEN using NADPH as an electron donor to create SUPEROXIDE ANION. The enzyme is dependent on a variety of CYTOCHROMES. Defects in the production of superoxide ions by enzymes such as NADPH oxidase result in GRANULOMATOUS DISEASE, CHRONIC.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Nitroblue Tetrazolium: Colorless to yellow dye that is reducible to blue or black formazan crystals by certain cells; formerly used to distinguish between nonbacterial and bacterial diseases, the latter causing neutrophils to reduce the dye; used to confirm diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Gene Transfer Techniques: The introduction of functional (usually cloned) GENES into cells. A variety of techniques and naturally occurring processes are used for the gene transfer such as cell hybridization, LIPOSOMES or microcell-mediated gene transfer, ELECTROPORATION, chromosome-mediated gene transfer, TRANSFECTION, and GENETIC TRANSDUCTION. Gene transfer may result in genetically transformed cells and individual organisms.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Saphenous Vein: The vein which drains the foot and leg.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)AcridinesCell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Adenoviridae: A family of non-enveloped viruses infecting mammals (MASTADENOVIRUS) and birds (AVIADENOVIRUS) or both (ATADENOVIRUS). Infections may be asymptomatic or result in a variety of diseases.Models, Cardiovascular: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the cardiovascular system, processes, or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers and other electronic equipment.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Histological Techniques: Methods of preparing tissue for examination and study of the origin, structure, function, or pathology.Carotid Artery Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the CAROTID ARTERIES, including the common, internal, and external carotid arteries. ATHEROSCLEROSIS and TRAUMA are relatively frequent causes of carotid artery pathology.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Apolipoproteins E: A class of protein components which can be found in several lipoproteins including HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and CHYLOMICRONS. Synthesized in most organs, Apo E is important in the global transport of lipids and cholesterol throughout the body. Apo E is also a ligand for LDL receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) that mediates the binding, internalization, and catabolism of lipoprotein particles in cells. There are several allelic isoforms (such as E2, E3, and E4). Deficiency or defects in Apo E are causes of HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE III.beta-Galactosidase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.Sus scrofa: A species of SWINE, in the family Suidae, comprising a number of subspecies including the domestic pig Sus scrofa domestica.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Rupture, Spontaneous: Tear or break of an organ, vessel or other soft part of the body, occurring in the absence of external force.Desmin: An intermediate filament protein found predominantly in smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle cells. Localized at the Z line. MW 50,000 to 55,000 is species dependent.Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen: Nuclear antigen with a role in DNA synthesis, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. PCNA is required for the coordinated synthesis of both leading and lagging strands at the replication fork during DNA replication. PCNA expression correlates with the proliferation activity of several malignant and non-malignant cell types.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Stem Cell Niche: A particular zone of tissue composed of a specialized microenvironment where stem cells are retained in a undifferentiated, self-renewable state.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Aortic Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the AORTA.Isometric Contraction: Muscular contractions characterized by increase in tension without change in length.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Vascular Diseases: Pathological processes involving any of the BLOOD VESSELS in the cardiac or peripheral circulation. They include diseases of ARTERIES; VEINS; and rest of the vasculature system in the body.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Mice, Inbred C57BLRats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Coronary Vasospasm: Spasm of the large- or medium-sized coronary arteries.Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III: A CALCIUM-dependent, constitutively-expressed form of nitric oxide synthase found primarily in ENDOTHELIAL CELLS.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Matrix Metalloproteinase 2: A secreted endopeptidase homologous with INTERSTITIAL COLLAGENASE, but which possesses an additional fibronectin-like domain.Aneurysm, Dissecting: Aneurysm caused by a tear in the TUNICA INTIMA of a blood vessel leading to interstitial HEMORRHAGE, and splitting (dissecting) of the vessel wall, often involving the AORTA. Dissection between the intima and media causes luminal occlusion. Dissection at the media, or between the media and the outer adventitia causes aneurismal dilation.Nitric Oxide Synthase: An NADPH-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-ARGININE and OXYGEN to produce CITRULLINE and NITRIC OXIDE.Autopsy: Postmortem examination of the body.Metalloendopeptidases: ENDOPEPTIDASES which use a metal such as ZINC in the catalytic mechanism.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Rats, Inbred WKY: A strain of Rattus norvegicus used as a normotensive control for the spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR).Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Receptor, Endothelin B: A subtype of endothelin receptor found predominantly in the KIDNEY. It may play a role in reducing systemic ENDOTHELIN levels.Neovascularization, Physiologic: The development of new BLOOD VESSELS during the restoration of BLOOD CIRCULATION during the healing process.Superoxides: Highly reactive compounds produced when oxygen is reduced by a single electron. In biological systems, they may be generated during the normal catalytic function of a number of enzymes and during the oxidation of hemoglobin to METHEMOGLOBIN. In living organisms, SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE protects the cell from the deleterious effects of superoxides.Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Receptor, Endothelin A: A subtype of endothelin receptor found predominantly in the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE. It has a high affinity for ENDOTHELIN-1 and ENDOTHELIN-2.Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Collagenases: Enzymes that catalyze the degradation of collagen by acting on the peptide bonds.Mesenteric Arteries: Arteries which arise from the abdominal aorta and distribute to most of the intestines.Luminescent Measurements: Techniques used for determining the values of photometric parameters of light resulting from LUMINESCENCE.Mast Cells: Granulated cells that are found in almost all tissues, most abundantly in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Like the BASOPHILS, mast cells contain large amounts of HISTAMINE and HEPARIN. Unlike basophils, mast cells normally remain in the tissues and do not circulate in the blood. Mast cells, derived from the bone marrow stem cells, are regulated by the STEM CELL FACTOR.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Matrix Metalloproteinase 9: An endopeptidase that is structurally similar to MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 2. It degrades GELATIN types I and V; COLLAGEN TYPE IV; and COLLAGEN TYPE V.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Vasodilator Agents: Drugs used to cause dilation of the blood vessels.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Carotid Stenosis: Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)Tissue Engineering: Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Hypertension: Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.Acetylcholine: A neurotransmitter found at neuromuscular junctions, autonomic ganglia, parasympathetic effector junctions, a subset of sympathetic effector junctions, and at many sites in the central nervous system.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Genetic Therapy: Techniques and strategies which include the use of coding sequences and other conventional or radical means to transform or modify cells for the purpose of treating or reversing disease conditions.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Transforming Growth Factor beta: A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
(1/30) Gene profile for differentiation of vascular adventitial myofibroblasts.

Our previous study demonstrated that TGF-beta1 could induce the differentiation of vascular adventitial fibroblasts (AFs) to myofibroblasts (MFs). The aim of this study was to identify the genes which might be responsible for the cell phenotypic change using genechips. Cultured rat AFs were treated with TGF-beta1 (10 ng/ml) for 0 min, 5 min, 15 min, 2 h, 12 h and 24 h, respectively. Then the cells were gathered to prepare total RNA. We examined TGF-beta1-induced gene expression profiling using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays and analyzed data by GCOS1.2 software. Moreover, expressional similarity was measured by hierarchical clustering. Some of genechip results were confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Microarray analysis identified 2121 genes with a 2-fold change or above after TGF-beta1 stimulation. 1318 genes showed a greater than 2-fold increase and 761 genes were reduced 2 folds or more at mRNA levels, whereas a small portion of the total regulated genes (42 genes) displayed dynamically up- and down-regulated pattern. Genes were further segregated for early (peak at 5 min, 15 min and/or 2 h), late (peak at 12 h and/or 24 h), and sustained (2-fold change or above at five time points) temporal response groups according to the time of their peak expression level. Among 1318 up-regulated genes, 333 genes (25.3%) responded rapidly to TGF-beta1 and 159 genes (12.1%) responded in a sustained manner. Most genes (826, 62.6%) were regulated at 12 h or later. For the 761 down-regulated genes, numbers of early and late responsive genes were 335 (44%) and 267 (36.1%), respectively. There were also 159 genes, 19.9% of total down-regulated genes, decreased at five time points treated by TGF-beta1. The results suggested that the gene expressions of secreted phosphoprotein 1 (APP1) and Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase 2 (ROCK2) had the same trends as alpha-smooth muscle-actin, a marker of MF differentiation. In addition, the gene expression of potassium voltage-gated channel, Shal-related family and member 2 (KCND2) was up-regulated. Furthermore, it was found that endothelin 1 (EDN1), some complement components, NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (NQO1) might be involved in MF differentiation. Using microarrary technique, we confirmed some genes that have been identified by other techniques were implicated in MF differentiation and observed new genes involved in this process. Our results suggest that gene expression profiling study is helpful in identifying genes and pathways potentially involved in cell differentiation.  (+info)

(2/30) Neovascularization of coronary tunica intima (DIT) is the cause of coronary atherosclerosis. Lipoproteins invade coronary intima via neovascularization from adventitial vasa vasorum, but not from the arterial lumen: a hypothesis.

 (+info)

(3/30) Hypoxia induces unique proliferative response in adventitial fibroblasts by activating PDGFbeta receptor-JNK1 signalling.

 (+info)

(4/30) Adventitial inversion with graft telescopic insertion for distal anastomosis in acute type a aortic dissection.

PURPOSE: One current method of anastomosis in aortic dissection type A is the adventitial inversion technique. To improve hemostasis at the anastomotic site, we have developed a novel technique for distal anastomosis involving adventitial inversion employing graft telescopic insertion. METHODS: The adventitia was inverted into the aortic lumen and the anastomosis with a Dacron tube-graft was made in a telescopic method, covering the inverted adventitia. RESULTS: Five patients have undergone emergency ascending aortic replacement for aortic dissection by one surgeon using this technique. There have been no reoperations for bleeding or false aneurysm. CONCLUSION: Complete coverage of the inverted adventitia eliminated the potential risk of thrombus formation. Graft telescopic insertion lead to complete hemostasis.  (+info)

(5/30) Ultrasound-guided percutaneous delivery of tissue-engineered endothelial cells to the adventitia of stented arteries controls the response to vascular injury in a porcine model.

 (+info)

(6/30) Fluid flow along venous adventitia in rabbits: is it a potential drainage system complementary to vascular circulations?

 (+info)

(7/30) Dynamic T cell-APC interactions sustain chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis.

 (+info)

(8/30) Single-walled carbon nanotubes promote rat vascular adventitial fibroblasts to transform into myofibroblasts by SM22-alpha expression.

 (+info)

*  Tunica intima
... the tunica adventitia). In dissection, the inner coat (tunica intima) can be separated from the middle (tunica media) by a ...
*  Adventitia
... it is covered by adventitia. The connective tissue of the gallbladder is covered by adventitia where the gallbladder bounds the ... Adventitia is the outermost connective tissue covering of an organ, vessel, or other structure. It is also called the tunica ... In the abdomen, whether an organ is covered in adventitia or serosa depends upon whether it is peritoneal or retroperitoneal: ... Lumen (anatomy) Editorial Review (June 14, 2012). "Definition of Adventitia". eMedicineHealth. WebMD. Retrieved 2015-03-24. ...
*  Bipalium adventitium
... is known to prey on earthworms. In order to catch its prey, it follows a chemical trail given off by the ... Bipalium adventitium is believed to have been introduced in the last century to the United States from Asia. It is believed ... Bipalium adventitium is a land planarian in the subfamily Bipaliinae. It has been accidentally introduced in the United States ... Most adult individuals of B. adventitium are 5-8 cm (2.0-3.1 in) in length. The head is expanded and fan-shaped, being easily ...
*  15-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid
Zhang, L; Li, Y; Chen, M; Su, X; Yi, D; Lu, P; Zhu, D (2014). "15-LO/15-HETE mediated vascular adventitia fibrosis via p38 MAPK ... rat PA adventitia fibroblasts; Baby hamster kidney cells; and diverse types of vascular endothelial cells. These growth- ...
*  Dowry
Two types of dowry were known-dos profectitia and dos adventitia. That dos is profectitia which was given by the father or ... All other dos is adventitia. Roman law also allowed for a species of dowry, called dos receptitia, which was given by some ...
*  Gastrointestinal tract
The GI tract can be divided into four concentric layers in the following order: Mucosa Submucosa Muscular layer Adventitia or ... In addition, the oral cavity has adventitia. Approximately 20,000 protein coding genes are expressed in human cells and 75% of ... Retroperitoneal parts are covered with adventitia. They blend into the surrounding tissue and are fixed in position. For ...
*  Human digestive system
Other more muscular parts are lined with adventitia. The digestive system is supplied by the celiac artery. The celiac artery ...
*  Aortic arch
... the tunica adventitia, composed of loose collagen fibers. Innervated by barometric nerve terminals, the aortic arch is ...
*  Surgical mesh
The vaginal wall has three layers: tunica mucosa, muscularis, adventitia. When prolapse occurs, smooth fibers of the muscularis ...
*  Nils Hylander
Plantae subspontaneae vel in tempore recentiore adventitiae. Första litteraturuppgift för Sveriges vildväxande kärlväxter jämte ...
*  Lymphatic vessel
As they proceed forward and in their course are joined by other capillaries, they grow larger and first take on an adventitia, ... Lymph vessels are lined by endothelial cells, and have a thin layer of smooth muscle, and adventitia that bind the lymph ... The outermost layer is the adventitia that consists of fibrous tissue. The general structure described here is seen only in ... The smallest vessels (lymphatic or lymph capillaries) lack both the muscular layer and the outer adventitia. ...
*  Bipalium
Specimens of Bipalium adventitium are characterized by a single dark dorsal stripe. They were first discovered in the US in ... B. adventitium reproduces sexually and creates egg capsules, which hatch around 3 weeks post-deposition. The egg capsules have ... Juveniles of this species, unlike B. adventitium, do not appear the same coloration as parents in their early days. Recently, ... Currently, there are four known invasive species of Bipalium in the United States: B. adventitium, B. kewense, B. ...
*  Blood vessel
The outer layer is Tunica adventitia and the thickest layer in veins. It is entirely made of connective tissue. It also ...
*  Renin-angiotensin system
"Presence of angiotensin converting enzyme in the adventitia of large blood vessels". J. Hypertens. 10 (7): 615-20. doi:10.1097/ ...
*  George Chaldakov
Aloe L (2000). "Atherosclerotic lesions: possible interactive involvement of intima, adventitia and associated adipose tissue ...
*  Diverticulum
False diverticula (also known as "pseudodiverticula") do not involve muscular layers or adventitia. False diverticula, in the ... including muscularis propria and adventitia, such as Meckel's diverticulum. ...
*  Atheroma
The healthy epicardial coronary artery consists of three layers, the intima, media, and adventitia. Atheroma and changes in the ...
*  Felted
... in describing the external coat or tunica adventitia of an artery, Gray says: "...consists mainly of fine and closely felted ...
*  Stem cell marker
May 2004). "Abundant progenitor cells in the adventitia contribute to atherosclerosis of vein grafts in ApoE-deficient mice". ...
*  Duodenum
Like other structures of the gastrointestinal tract, the duodenum has a mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa, and adventitia. ...
*  Aortic aneurysm
Most AAA are true aneurysms that involve all three layers (tunica intima, tunica media and tunica adventitia). The prevalence ...
*  Geoplanidae
Land planarians, showing a variety of forms and colors Bipalium adventitium close up under a rock, North California, USA. Obama ... "Tracking and predation on earthworms by the invasive terrestrial planarian Bipalium adventitium (Tricladida, Platyhelminthes ...
*  Baroreceptor
Arterial baroreceptor sensory endings are simple, splayed nerve endings that lie in the tunica adventitia of the artery. An ...
*  Vein
Microscopically, veins have a thick outer layer made of connective tissue, called the tunica externa or tunica adventitia. ...
*  New Zealand flatworm
Reproductive ecology and evolution in the invasive terrestrial planarian Bipalium adventitium across North America. ...
Tunica media vasorum synonyms, tunica media vasorum antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com  Tunica media vasorum synonyms, tunica media vasorum antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com
2 synonyms for tunica: adventitia, tunic. What are synonyms for tunica media vasorum? ... Related to tunica media vasorum: tunica adventitia, tunica intima, tunica externa, nervi vasorum #vtZoom,.vt-link{cursor: ... adventitia','type':2},{'name':'tunic','type':2},{'name':'tissue layer','type':4},{'name':'membrane','type':4},{'name':' ...
more infohttps://www.freethesaurus.com/tunica+media+vasorum
Adventitia | Define Adventitia at Dictionary.com  Adventitia | Define Adventitia at Dictionary.com
Adventitia definition, the external covering of an organ or other structure, derived from connective tissue, especially the ... adventitia. in Medicine. adventitia. [ăd′vĕn-tĭsh′ə]. n.. *The outermost membranous covering of an organ or structure, ... adventitia. Historical Examples. of adventitia. *. Up to the third decade there is only a strengthening of the media and ... The adventitia varies much in thickness, being better developed in the medium-sized than in the large arteries. ...
more infohttps://www.dictionary.com/browse/adventitia
Adventitia - wikidoc  Adventitia - wikidoc
adventitia at eMedicine Dictionary. *Organology at UC Davis Digestive/mammal/system1/system10 - "Mammal, whole system (LM, Low ... 4. Adventitia. 5. Striated muscle. 6. Striated and smooth. 7. Smooth muscle. 8. Lamina muscularis mucosae. 9. Esophageal glands ... Adventitia is the outermost connective tissue covering of any organ, vessel, or other structure. ... In the abdomen, whether an organ is covered in adventitia or serosa depends upon whether it is peritoneal or retroperitoneal: * ...
more infohttp://www.wikidoc.org/index.php/Adventitia
Membrana adventitia | definition of membrana adventitia by Medical dictionary  Membrana adventitia | definition of membrana adventitia by Medical dictionary
What is membrana adventitia? Meaning of membrana adventitia medical term. What does membrana adventitia mean? ... Looking for online definition of membrana adventitia in the Medical Dictionary? membrana adventitia explanation free. ... Synonym(s): tunica adventitia [TA], membrana adventitia (1) [L. adventicius, coming from abroad, foreign, fr. ad, to + venio, ... membrana adventitia. (1) Tunica externa (see there); tunica adventitia [NA6].. (2) Capsular decidua; decidua capsularis [[NE3 ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/membrana+adventitia
Adventitia - Wikipedia  Adventitia - Wikipedia
... it is covered by adventitia. The connective tissue of the gallbladder is covered by adventitia where the gallbladder bounds the ... Adventitia is the outermost connective tissue covering of an organ, vessel, or other structure. It is also called the tunica ... In the abdomen, whether an organ is covered in adventitia or serosa depends upon whether it is peritoneal or retroperitoneal: ... Lumen (anatomy) Editorial Review (June 14, 2012). "Definition of Adventitia". eMedicineHealth. WebMD. Retrieved 2015-03-24. ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventitia
Elastic elements in the media and adventitia of human intracranial extracerebral arteries. | Stroke  Elastic elements in the media and adventitia of human intracranial extracerebral arteries. | Stroke
Elastic elements in the media and adventitia of human intracranial extracerebral arteries.. F T Mérei, F Gallyas, Z Horváth ... We find that the media and adventitia of adult human cerebral arteries contain elastic fibers forming a dense, coherent network ... Elastic elements in the media and adventitia of human intracranial extracerebral arteries. ... Elastic elements in the media and adventitia of human intracranial extracerebral arteries. ...
more infohttp://stroke.ahajournals.org/content/11/4/329
Bipalium adventitium - Wikipedia  Bipalium adventitium - Wikipedia
Bipalium adventitium is known to prey on earthworms. In order to catch its prey, it follows a chemical trail given off by the ... Bipalium adventitium is believed to have been introduced in the last century to the United States from Asia. It is believed ... Bipalium adventitium is a land planarian in the subfamily Bipaliinae. It has been accidentally introduced in the United States ... Most adult individuals of B. adventitium are 5-8 cm (2.0-3.1 in) in length. The head is expanded and fan-shaped, being easily ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipalium_adventitium
Adventitia definition  Adventitia definition
... the external covering of an organ or other structure, derived from connective tissue, especially the ... Definithing > Dictionary > a > Adventitia. Adventitia. the external covering of an organ or other structure, derived from ... adventitia ad·ven·ti·tia (ād'věn-tĭsh'ə, -vən-). n.. The outermost membranous covering of an organ or structure, especially the ... Disclaimer: Adventitia definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in ...
more infohttps://definithing.com/define-dictionary/adventitia/
Trophic Effect of Norepinephrine on Arterial Intima-Media and Adventitia Is Augmented by Injury and Mediated by Different α1...  Trophic Effect of Norepinephrine on Arterial Intima-Media and Adventitia Is Augmented by Injury and Mediated by Different α1...
NE had no effect on expression of these proteins in day-4 injured adventitia. Adventitia for day-12 injured aorta was not ... and in adventitia by 12±3%, 49±5%, and 23±5% (Figure 3A). The increased sensitivity of IM and adventitia to NE remained evident ... In adventitia of uninjured aorta, there was a trend toward similar but smaller effects on protein synthesis and content (Figure ... In adventitia of day-12 aorta, DNA returned to uninjured levels but protein remained reduced (Figure 2A), suggesting that ...
more infohttp://circres.ahajournals.org/content/89/9/815
Emerging measurements of atherosclerosis: extra-media thickness, epicardial adipose tissue, and periarterial adipose tissue...  Emerging measurements of atherosclerosis: extra-media thickness, epicardial adipose tissue, and periarterial adipose tissue...
... and periarterial adipose tissue intima media adventitia index in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Justyna ... and periarterial adipose tissue intima media adventitia index in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. ... and periarterial adipose tissue intima media adventitia index in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. ... and periarterial adipose tissue intima media adventitia index in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery". ...
more infohttps://www.termedia.pl/Emerging-measurements-of-atherosclerosis-extra-media-thickness-epicardial-adipose-tissue-and-periarterial-adipose-tissue-intima-media-adventitia-index-in-morbidly-obese-patients-undergoing-bariatric-s,42,36462,0,1.html
Adventitia/Suture Scissors  Adventitia/Suture Scissors
Accurate Surgical Instruments offer the highest quality surgical instruments used in Gynecology Surgery and Gynecology procedures.
more infohttp://accuratesurgical.com/products/gynecology/product/4450-adventitia-suture-scissors
Adventitia/Suture Scissors  Adventitia/Suture Scissors
Adventitia Scissors, 15cm long Round Handle 8mm diameter, Straight Serrated Blade 9mm ...
more infohttp://accuratesurgical.com/products/gynecology/product/4437-adventitia-suture-scissors
Difference Between Adventitia and Serosa - DifferenceBetween.com  Difference Between Adventitia and Serosa - DifferenceBetween.com
Adventitia vs Serosa Serosa is different from adventitia because serosa is for lubrication where as adventitia is to bind ... What is Adventitia?. Adventitia is a connective tissue. It is the outermost connective tissue layer that surrounds any ... What is the difference between Adventitia and Serosa?. • Serosa secretes serous fluid where as adventitia does not secrete a ... Filed Under: Biology Tagged With: Adventitia, connective tissue, epicardium, pericardium, perimetrium, serosa, serous, serous ...
more infohttps://www.differencebetween.com/difference-between-adventitia-and-vs-serosa/
Adventitia of abdominal part of ureter | Anatomy  Adventitia of abdominal part of ureter | Anatomy
Adventitia of abdominal part of ureter. C0736511 View more…. Muscles and fasciae of abdomen by Henry Gray. Part 1 Audio book. ...
more infohttp://healthmatics.org/anatomy/adventitia-of-abdominal-part-of-ureter/
Angiotensin converting enzyme in the endothelium and smooth muscle cum adventitia of the normo- and hypertensive rat aorta |...  Angiotensin converting enzyme in the endothelium and smooth muscle cum adventitia of the normo- and hypertensive rat aorta |...
Sim, M.K. (1990). Angiotensin converting enzyme in the endothelium and smooth muscle cum adventitia of the normo- and ... Angiotensin converting enzyme in the endothelium and smooth muscle cum adventitia of the normo- and hypertensive rat aorta. ...
more infohttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/32171
Adventitia | Open Access articles | Open Access journals | Conference Proceedings | Editors | Authors | Reviewers | scientific...  Adventitia | Open Access articles | Open Access journals | Conference Proceedings | Editors | Authors | Reviewers | scientific...
Adventitia is the outermost connective tissue covering of an organ, vessel, or other structure.[1] It is also called the tunica ... In the abdomen, whether an organ is covered in adventitia or serosa depends upon whether it is peritoneal or retroperitoneal: * ... The connective tissue of the gallbladder is covered by adventitia where the gallbladder bounds the liver, but by serosa for the ... retroperitoneal organs are covered in adventitia (loose connective tissue) In the gastrointestinal tract, the muscularis ...
more infohttp://research.omicsgroup.org/index.php/Adventitia
CorpusUL: Tissue-Engineered Vascular Adventitia with Vasa Vasorum Improves Graft Integration and Vascularization Through...  CorpusUL: Tissue-Engineered Vascular Adventitia with Vasa Vasorum Improves Graft Integration and Vascularization Through...
The addition of a vasa vasorum to the tissue-engineered adventitia did not influence the burst pressure of these constructs. ... Tissue-Engineered Vascular Adventitia with Vasa Vasorum Improves Graft Integration and Vascularization Through Inosculation. ... Tissue-Engineered Vascular Adventitia with Vasa Vasorum Improves Graft Integration and Vascularization Through Inosculation ... Characterization of the mechanical properties of both control and vascularized adventitia demonstrated that the ultimate ...
more infohttps://corpus.ulaval.ca/jspui/handle/20.500.11794/16746
CN103157099B - Mixed enzyme digestive juice for fast digestion of vascular adventitia and preparation method thereof 
        -...  CN103157099B - Mixed enzyme digestive juice for fast digestion of vascular adventitia and preparation method thereof -...
... mixture for constructing the animal model and methods of making the outer membrane of vascular tissue damage without adventitia ... The present invention is a digestive enzyme mixture rapidly digestible adventitia, characterized in that: said mixture of ... 0010] 一种用于血管外膜快速消化的混合酶消化液的制备方法,其特征在于:所述的混合酶消化液包括消化液和中止液,其中消化液和中止液两者的摩尔体积比为1 :
more infohttps://patents.google.com/patent/CN103157099B/en
CorpusUL: Adventitia contribution in vascular tone : insights from adventitia-derived cells in a tissue-engineered human blood...  CorpusUL: Adventitia contribution in vascular tone : insights from adventitia-derived cells in a tissue-engineered human blood...
The adventitia contracted to endothelin-1, -2, whereas the media and the media+adventitia contracted to all three endothelins. ... Adventitia contribution in vascular tone : insights from adventitia-derived cells in a tissue-engineered human blood vessel. ... Adventitia contribution in vascular tone : insights from adventitia-derived cells in a tissue-engineered human blood vessel ... Endothelin-induced contraction of the adventitia was dependent on ETA receptors, whereas that of the media and the adventitia+ ...
more infohttps://corpus.ulaval.ca/jspui/handle/20.500.11794/16697
Features of atherosclerosis in the tunica adventitia of coronary and carotid arteries in a black kenyan population. | DR. BEDA...  Features of atherosclerosis in the tunica adventitia of coronary and carotid arteries in a black kenyan population. | DR. BEDA...
Tunica adventitia should therefore be prioritized in evaluation for atherosclerosis, in individuals at risk. This may enhance ... Features of atherosclerosis in the tunica adventitia of coronary and carotid arteries in a black kenyan population.. ... Ogeng'o J, Ongeti K, Obimbo M, Olabu B, Mwachaka P. "Features of atherosclerosis in the tunica adventitia of coronary and ... Features of atherosclerosis occur in the tunica adventitia of coronary and carotid arteries in over 10% of the black Kenyans ...
more infohttps://profiles.uonbi.ac.ke/bedaolabu/publications/features-atherosclerosis-tunica-adventitia-coronary-and-carotid-arteries-blac
  • Characterization of the mechanical properties of both control and vascularized adventitia demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength, modulus, and failure strain were in the same order of magnitude of a pig coronary artery. (ulaval.ca)
  • Disclaimer: Adventitia definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. (definithing.com)
  • In conclusion, this is the first direct demonstration that the adventitia has the capacity to contract and relax in response to vasoactive factors. (ulaval.ca)
  • We also demonstrated that the endothelin-converting enzyme, responsible for the formation of the active endothelin peptides, was present and functional in the adventitia. (ulaval.ca)
  • Increased cholesterol monohydrate area, internal elastic lamina area, positive remodeling, fibrous cap inflammation, adventitia breakdown, and inflammation were independent predictors of plaque disruption. (nih.gov)
  • The present study suggests that the adventitia of a blood vessel could play a greater role than expected in the modulation of blood vessel tone. (ulaval.ca)
  • Nonetheless, whether the adventitia can directly participate in the regulation of vasomotor tone of blood vessels still remains to be demonstrated. (ulaval.ca)
  • The lack of appropriate technical procedures to separate the adventitia tunica from the other components of a native blood vessel (stripping) has prevented direct investigations on the possible role of that layer in the regulation of vasomotor tone. (ulaval.ca)