Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Adolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Adolescent Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals 13-18 years.Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Schools: Educational institutions.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.United StatesPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Puberty: A period in the human life in which the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system takes place and reaches full maturity. The onset of synchronized endocrine events in puberty lead to the capacity for reproduction (FERTILITY), development of secondary SEX CHARACTERISTICS, and other changes seen in ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Adolescent, Institutionalized: An adolescent who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health: Longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood. (from http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth accessed 08/2012)Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.BrazilFather-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Coitus: The sexual union of a male and a female, a term used for human only.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Anorexia Nervosa: An eating disorder that is characterized by the lack or loss of APPETITE, known as ANOREXIA. Other features include excess fear of becoming OVERWEIGHT; BODY IMAGE disturbance; significant WEIGHT LOSS; refusal to maintain minimal normal weight; and AMENORRHEA. This disorder occurs most frequently in adolescent females. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Authoritarianism: The personality pattern or syndrome consisting of behavioral and attitudinal characteristics reflecting a preoccupation with the factors of power and authority in interpersonal relationships.Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Sexual Abstinence: Refraining from SEXUAL INTERCOURSE.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Homeless Youth: Runaway and homeless children and adolescents living on the streets of cities and having no fixed place of residence.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Contraception Behavior: Behavior patterns of those practicing CONTRACEPTION.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Social Control, Informal: Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.CaliforniaProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Tobacco Use Disorder: Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Pediatric Obesity: BODY MASS INDEX in children (ages 2-12) and in adolescents (ages 13-18) that is grossly above the recommended cut-off for a specific age and sex. For infants less than 2 years of age, obesity is determined based on standard weight-for-length percentile measures.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Informed Consent By Minors: Voluntary authorization by a person not of usual legal age for diagnostic or investigative procedures, or for medical and surgical treatment. (from English A, Shaw FE, McCauley MM, Fishbein DB Pediatrics 121:Suppl Jan 2008 pp S85-7).Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Child Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Personality Development: Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Psychosexual Development: The stages of development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to adulthood; i.e., oral, anal, genital, and latent periods.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Papillomavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Individuation: A process of differentiation having for its goal the development of the individual personality.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)
3.1.2 Adolescents. *3.1.3 Adults. *3.1.4 Medical staff. *3.1.5 USA Military recruits ... Y and W-135 vaccines is recommended for all young adolescents at 11-12 years of age and all unvaccinated older adolescents at ... Adults[edit]. Primary immunization with meningitis A, C, Y and W-135 vaccines is recommended for college students who plan to ... Adolescents[edit]. Primary immunization against meningococcal disease with meningitis A, C, ...
Currently, researchers have concluded that adults and adolescents are both competent decision-makers, not just adults. However ... In adolescents vs. adults[edit]. This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by ... Recent research[citation needed] has shown that there are differences in cognitive processes between adolescents and adults ... which they taught to adolescents, as summarized in the book Teaching Decision Making To Adolescents.[13] The process was based ...
Pedophilia is a psychological disorder in which an adult or older adolescent experiences a sexual preference for prepubescent ... Attraction to adults *Teleiophilia (from Greek téleios, "full grown") is a sexual preference for adults.[15] The term was ... Attraction to adolescents *Hebephilia and ephebophilia are sexual preferences for pubescent and post-pubescent youths, ... and pedophilia in adult male patients stratified by referral source". Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment. 19 (3 ...
"Neuroblastoma in adults and adolescents". Cancer. 79 (10): 2028-35. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1097-0142(19970515)79:10,2028::AID-CNCR26 ... The age range is broad, including older children and adults,[64] but only 10% of cases occur in people older than 5 years of ... of cases occur in children less than 5 years old and it is rare in adults.[2][3] Of cancer deaths in children, about 15% are ... "Chronic Health Conditions in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer". New England Journal of Medicine. 355 (15): 1572-82. doi: ...
Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile. *Sensory Profile School Companion. *Indicators of Developmental Risk Signals (INDIPCD-R)[37] ... Adults[edit]. There is a growing evidence base that points to and supports the notion that adults also show signs of sensory ... Adults who are sensory over-responsive have very high correlated anxiety and depression levels compared to adults who do not ... This correlation can be seen especially in adults who have low neurological thresholds (sensory sensitivity and sensory ...
"Books for adolescents". Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy. 46 (2): 178. October 2002. ISSN 1081-3004. ... the Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy review said that "the book is filled with jokes aimed at an adult audience rather ...
"Books for adolescents". Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy. Wiley-Blackwell. 42 (4): 332. December 1998. Retrieved April 14 ... Young, Black, and Determined has also been reviewed by Kirkus Reviews, The New York Times, and the Journal of Adolescent & ... Adult Literacy. It is a 1998 CCBC Choices book. Children's literature portal "Young, Black, and determined : a biography of ...
Stock, W (2010). "Adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia". Hematology. American Society of Hematology. ... Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) most often affects adults over the age of 55. It sometimes occurs in younger adults, but it ... of all leukemias are diagnosed in adults, with AML and CLL being most common in adults.[3] It occurs more commonly in the ... cancer diagnoses among adults are for leukemias, but because cancer is much more common among adults, more than 90% of all ...
However, it occasionally occurs in adolescents and adults. It was first characterized in 1920.[4] ...
Calkins, Kara; Sherin Devaskar (2011). "Fetal Origins of Adult Disease". Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care: 158-176. ... Adolescent Medicine. 166: 337. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.784. PMID 22213602. Ornoy A, Ratzon N, Greenbaum C, Wolf A, ...
"Reviews-Books for Adolescents." Journal of Adolescents & Adult Literacy. December 2004. p. 4 MultiCultural review. Volume 16, ... Blasingame currently edits the "Books for Adolescents" pages of the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy. In 2009 and 2010 ... Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 55: 619-628. doi: 10.1002/JAAL.00073 Breaking Point, The Test and Pretty Ugly were ... This study was published in the April 2012 edition of the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy and showed the Bluford ...
Zeldin, S. (2002). "Sense of community and positive adult beliefs toward adolescents and youth policy in urban neighborhoods ... Astroth, K. (1994) Beyond ephebiphobia: problem adults or problem youths? (fear of adolescents). Phi Delta Kappan. January 1, ... The fear of adolescents has been said to cause a disjunction between what is said about the value of young people and what is ... Viking Adult. Jobs, R.I. (2007) Riding the New Wave: Youth and the Rejuvenation of France After the Second World War. Stanford ...
Gavvala, JR; Schuele, SU (27 December 2016). "New-Onset Seizure in Adults and Adolescents: A Review". JAMA. 316 (24): 2657-2668 ... The Epilepsies: The diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care. National ... The Epilepsies: The diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care. National ... The Epilepsies: The diagnosis and management of the epilepsies in adults and children in primary and secondary care. National ...
Tantam D (January 2003). "The challenge of adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome". Child and Adolescent Psychiatric ... adolescents,[96] and adults.[97] None have been shown to reliably differentiate between AS and other ASDs.[11] ... "Suicidal behaviour in adolescents and young adults with ASD: findings from a systematic review" (PDF). Clinical Psychology ... "Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America. 12 (1): 23-45. doi:10.1016/S1056-4993(02)00049-4. PMID 12512397.. ...
Adults. O Cardiothoracic surgery. General surgery. T. S. Adults. O Child and adolescent psychiatry and psychotherapy. ... Child and adolescent psychiatry focuses on the care of children and adolescents with mental, emotional, and learning problems ... deals with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents (from newborn to age 16-21, depending on the country). ... Most sub-specialties of adult medicine have a pediatric equivalent such as pediatric cardiology, pediatric emergency medicine, ...
Adolescent and Adult Psychoeducational Profile (AAPEP). Pro-Ed; 1 September 1988. Eric Schopler; Gary B. Mesibov. Diagnosis and ... Autism in Adolescents and Adults. Springer; 28 February 1983 [cited 14 September 2012. ISBN 978-0-306-41057-4. Eric Schopler; ... Autism in Adolescents and Adults]. Springer; 28 February 1983. Eric Schopler; Gary B. Mesibov. (editors) Communication Problems ... Adolescent and Adult Psychoeducational Profile (AAPEP). Pro-Ed; 1 September 1988 [cited 14 September 2012]. ISBN 978-0-89079- ...
Autism in Adolescents and Adults. Springer; 28 February 1983. ISBN 978-0-306-41057-4. Eric Schopler; Gary B. Mesibov. (editors ... Adolescent and Adult Psychoeducational Profile (AAPEP). Pro-Ed; 1 September 1988. ISBN 978-0-89079-152-3. Eric Schopler; Gary B ... In addition six adults with autism and one with a non-specific communication disability were identified by a day service using ... Virues-Ortega J.; Julio F.; Pastor R. (2013). "The TEACCH program for children and adults with autism: A meta-analysis of ...
Adolescents, females and young adults are most sensitive to the neuropsychological effects of binge drinking. Adolescence, in ... The suicide risk in adolescents is more than 4 times higher among binge drinkers than non-binge drinking adolescents. Earlier ... psychological problems and in long-term heavy binge drinkers may cause irreversible brain damage in both adolescents and adults ... In adults, binge drinking is more common in people who have never been married and score a grade B or less in education. The ...
Autism in Adolescents and Adults. Springer; 28 February 1983. ISBN 978-0-306-41057-4. Eric Schopler; Gary B. Mesibov. (editors ... Adolescent and Adult Psychoeducational Profile (AAPEP). Pro-Ed; 1 September 1988. ISBN 978-0-89079-152-3. Eric Schopler; Gary B ... Adolescent and Adult Psychoeducational Profile (AAPEP): Volume IV (1988). Pro-ed, 1989. ISBN 089079152X. Linda R. Watson; ... research and service delivery for children and adults. The TEACCH program lead to many advances in knowledge of autism. ...
Adolescent amateurs. They often have a basic knowledge of computer systems and apply scripts and techniques that are available ... Adult amateurs. Most of them are motivated by the intellectual challenge. Professionals. They know much about computers. They ...
"Adolescent Youth". friendshospital.com. Retrieved 9 August 2012. Friends Hospital. "General Adult". Friendshospital.com. ... Adult Programs Dedicated Adult Units offering a rand of programming design for the varied needs of patients ages 18 to 65. ... Older Adult Program A dedicated treatment program specifically design for older adults. Private patient bedrooms with unit ... Patient Services: Adolescent Program A dedicated treatment program specifically design for young people 13-17 years of age. 24 ...
... (born 1937) is an author who has written books mainly for children and young adults. Mathis was born in ... Dybek, Caren (1 January 1974). "Black Literature for Adolescents". The English Journal. 63 (1): 64-67. doi:10.2307/813458. ... Mathis has written many books for children and young adults, and has received many accolades in her career. Her book Ray ... Gallo, Donald (ed.). Join In: Multiethnic Short Stories by Outstanding Writers for Young Adults. Random House Books. p. 200. ...
Adolescents and Adults". Asian EFL Journal. 6 (4). Archived from the original on December 8, 2006. Retrieved December 12, 2006. ... Adults learning a new language are unlikely to attain a convincing native accent since they are past the prime age of learning ... For example, adult second-language learners nearly always retain an immediately identifiable foreign accent, including some who ... It is commonly believed that children are better suited to learning a second language than are adults. However, general second- ...
113880, Groin hernia in adults and adolescents; [updated 2017 Nov 27, cited Nov 27, 2017]; [about 28 screens]. Available from ... 113880, Groin hernia in adults and adolescents; [updated 2017 Nov 27, cited Nov 27, 2017]; [about 28 screens]. Available from ... "Overview of treatment for inguinal and femoral hernia in adults". www.uptodate.com. Retrieved 2017-12-14.. ... "Danish Hernia Database recommendations for the management of inguinal and femoral hernia in adults". Danish Medical Bulletin. ...
"Fetal origins of adult disease". Current Problems in Pediatric & Adolescent Health Care. 41 (6): 158-76. doi:10.1016/j.cppeds. ... Associated adult diseases of the fetus due to IUGR include, but are not limited to, coronary artery disease (CAD), type 2 ... The fetal origins hypothesis states that fetal undernutrition is linked with coronary heart disease later in adult life due to ... Infants suffering from IUGR are prone to suffer from poor neuronal development and in increased risk for adult disease ...
Rosacea tends to occur more frequently in older adults.[20] Facial redness triggered by heat or the consumption of alcohol or ... Schnopp C, Mempel M (August 2011). "Acne vulgaris in children and adolescents". Minerva Pediatrica (Review). 63 (4): 293-304. ... Kamangar F, Shinkai K (October 2012). "Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach". International Journal of ... Prevost N, English JC (October 2013). "Isotretinoin: update on controversial issues". Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent ...
2 Compared with older adults, sexually-active adolescents aged 15-19 years and young adults aged 20-24 years are at higher risk ... Although this is a normal finding in adolescent and young adult females, these cells are more susceptible to infection. The ... Similar to gonorrhea, rates of reported cases of P&S syphilis have been consistently higher among adolescent and young adult ... Health-care claims data from adolescents and adults with employer-provided private health insurance in the United States were ...
Adolescents and Young Adults. Among adolescents and young adults, overall cancer incidence rates increased an average of 0.9% ... Among children, adolescents, and young adults, overall cancer incidence rates went up each year from 2012 to 2016. Read the ... Cancer Among Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults. Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer ... The most common cancer among adolescents and young adults was female breast cancer, which was highest among young black women. ...
Adolescent Adult Contact Tracing Counseling HIV Infections Humans Patient Education As Topic Referral And Consultation Risk ... The December 11, 2014, version of Recommendations for HIV Prevention with Adults and Adolescents with HIV in the United States ... The December 11, 2014, version of Recommendations for HIV Prevention with Adults and Adolescents with HIV in the United States ... The December 11, 2014, version of Recommendations for HIV Prevention with Adults and Adolescents with HIV in the United States ...
HIV Diagnoses, Adults and Adolescents. HIV Diagnoses, Adults and Adolescents. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email Print ...
... about acetaminophen and misuse of acetaminophen-containing over-the-counter medications by adolescents and young adults. ... in adults than we do in adolescents. The adolescent age group is what is new about this work," said study presenter Laura Shone ... Cite this: Adolescents, Young Adults Lack Knowledge of Acetaminophens Toxicity - Medscape - May 07, 2010. ... to play in conveying information in a way that is meaningful and relevant to adults and adolescents alike. ...
Teenagers who indulge in high culture activities such visiting museums and the opera improve their earnings and social standing in later life, according to research.
HIV Diagnoses, Adults and Adolescents, by…. HIV Diagnoses, Adults and Adolescents, by Race/Ethnicity. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn ...
Trajectory of development in adolescents and adults with autism.. Seltzer MM1, Shattuck P, Abbeduto L, Greenberg JS. ... Comparing children with adolescents and adults, modest degrees of symptom abatement and improvement in skills have been ... This article seeks to elucidate the trajectory of development in adolescents and adults with autism. Prospective, retrospective ... However, a small sub-group (about 15%) has more favorable adult outcomes. ...
A retrospective study of adolescents hospitalized for anor ... Anorexia nervosa in adults and adolescents: The refeeding ... Anorexia nervosa in adults and adolescents: Medical complications and their management. *Anorexia nervosa in adults and ... See Anorexia nervosa in adults and adolescents: Nutritional rehabilitation (nutritional support).). ●(See Anorexia nervosa ... Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Refeeding hypophosphatemia in hospitalized adolescents with anorexia nervosa: a ...
... 23.06.2015. Study shows structural and functional differences in the brain: ... "Its not that adolescents dont plan for the future at all. But when they make decisions, they focus much more on the here and ... Adolescents given the choice between a small reward right away and a bigger reward later tend to choose the immediate, smaller ... As a result, adolescents gradually learn to curb their impatience and to take a more forward-looking approach. "All the same, ...
38 NCCN Guidelines for Patients ® Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer, Version 1.2017 4 Navigating the treatment process How do I stay on track with my treatment plan? , Review How do I stay on track with my treatment plan? Research has shown that treatment can give AYAs with cancer a good chance of living for a very long time. But getting there means sticking with the treatment plan-a task that many AYAs find difficult. Many AYAs can stray from their treatment plan at one time or another-whether its not taking medicine as prescribed, not showing up for treatment, or taking recreational drugs that can harm treatment effects. Cancer treatment can be tough. But there are things you can do to make it easier to stick with your plan. Take all of your medicine as prescribed. That means taking it in the right amounts, at the right time. Skipping or delaying doses may change the drugs effects. If youre having trouble paying for your medicine, ask your treatment team for help. They may be able ...
102 NCCN Guidelines for Patients ® Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer, Version 1.2017 Glossary Acronyms Acronyms AYA adolescents and young adults CAM complementary and alternative medicine CBC complete blood count CPR cardiopulmonary resuscitation CT computed tomography CTZ chemoreceptor trigger zone DNA deoxyribonucleic acid DNAR do not attempt resuscitation DNI do not intubate GI gastrointestinal IV intravenous IVF in vitro fertilization MAB monoclonal antibodies MRI magnetic resonance imaging PET positron emission tomography THC tetrahydrocannabinol TNM tumor, node, and metastasis NCCN Abbreviations and Acronyms NCCN ® National Comprehensive Cancer Network ® NCCN Patient Guidelines NCCN Guidelines for Patients ® NCCN Guidelines ® NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology ® ...
The next meeting of the Adolescents and Adults with Autism Support Group, or A3SG, will be from 7-8 p.m. Tuesday, July 14, in ... The support group is for adolescents ages 16 and older and adults with autism and Aspergers and their families. Meetings are ... Next meeting of Adolescents and Adults with Autism Support Group. By Debra Burnett ...
Corrections to Adult and Adolescent ARV Treatment Guidelines Read the Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1- ... Corrections to Adult and Adolescent ARV Treatment Guidelines Read the Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1- ... The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents update also includes a table showing monthly average ... Whats New in the U.S. DHHS Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents ...
Information about cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs), including treatment, follow-up care, coping, and related ... What would you tell an adolescent or young adult with cancer?. Because cancer in young adults is rare, it is important to find ... Young adults who have a cancer that typically occurs in children and adolescents, such as brain tumors, leukemia, osteosarcoma ... Young adults are more likely than either younger children or older adults to be diagnosed with certain cancers, such as Hodgkin ...
Caring adults can do a lot to promote adolescent mental health, including clinical preventive services, crisis intervention, ... How Adults Can Support Adolescent Mental Health*Resources to Support Adolescent Mental Health ... Adolescent Development. *Healthy Relationshipshas sub items, Healthy Relationships*Bullying*Preventing Bullying Among ... Characteristics of Adolescents with Disabilities. *General Supports for Youth with Chronic Conditions & Disabilities and Their ...
The first cancer journal dedicated to the adolescent and young adult-aged oncology (AYAO) patient population. JAYAO is the only ... "Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (JAYAO) focuses on a group of patients who are often lost amongst much larger ... Director, Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Program. Cook Childrens Medical Center and University of. North Texas Health ... Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology. Editor-in-Chief: Leonard S. Sender, MD ...
The first cancer journal dedicated to the adolescent and young adult-aged oncology (AYAO) patient population. JAYAO is the only ... While adolescent and young adult (AYA) is most commonly used in JAYAO, teenage and young adult (TYA), young adult (YA), ... Psychological support for adolescents and young adults. In: Bleyer WA, Barr RD (Eds). Cancer in adolescents and young adults. ... Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology is published quarterly by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 140 Huguenot Street, New ...
Contributors and inhibitors of resilience among adolescents and young adults with cancer. Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult ... Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) who have cancer typically fare worse than either pediatric patients or adult patients ... We want to see these adolescents and young adults thrive during and after cancer treatment. Our research focuses on ... A pilot study of a novel resilience-promoting intervention for adolescents and young adults with serious illness. Journal of ...
... even as the skin cancers incidence continued to increase among older adults and the general population during the span, new ... adolescents and young adults declined markedly from 2006 to 2015 - ... adolescent (10-19), young adult (20-29), and adults in 10-year increments from 30 to 80+. ... However, for adolescents and young adults, incidence peaked around 2005 and then fell sharply through 2015: Among males, the ...
Transferring adolescent patients from pediatric to adult renal units can be difficult for all concerned. There has been little ... Transitioning adolescents from pediatric to adult dialysis units.. Watson AR1, Shooter M. ... Information about the adult unit should be obtained, and liaison visits by patient, family members, and possibly accompanying ... Transition should be a positive event, and each adolescent will require an individualized plan devised in discussion with team ...
Vaginal discharge refers to secretions from the vagina. The discharge may be:
A behavioural research project involving a patterns of care audit of treatment for cancers that are common among adolescents ... and young adults (AYAs). The qualitative studies will involve interviews with AYAs several years post diagnosis regarding their ... Patterns of care & experiences of care for adolescents & young adults (AYAs) with cancer Lead researcher. Associate Professor ... Children, teens and young adults. Understand more about when cancer is diagnosed in children, teen and young adults and how to ...
Obese Adolescents Likely to be Severely Obese Adults. By Deborah Mitchell G+ Nov 9 2010 - 5:02pm ... If you have an obese adolescent at home, he or she has an increased risk for becoming a severely obese adult, according to a ... Results of this study of obese adolescents and severely obese adults are important, say the authors, because "understanding ... Obese adolescents need help to prevent severe obesity. The latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ...
... among adolescents to 35.8% among college students.18,19 Although adolescents and young adults are in the age groups most likely ... of young-adult visits for non-injury-related indications and at 14.5% of adolescent visits and 27.0% of young-adult visits for ... We evaluated adolescents between 15 and 19 years of age and defined young adults as those between 20 and 29 years of age on the ... A controlled medication was prescribed at 23.4% of visits by adolescents and 36.9% of visits by young adults in which back pain ...
  • Incidence and prevalence estimates suggest that young people aged 15-24 years acquire half of all new STDs 1 and that one in four sexually-active adolescent females has an STD, such as chlamydia or human papillomavirus (HPV). (cdc.gov)
  • It is difficult to obtain firm numbers for prevalence of adults with pedophilic tendencies, but the highest estimates put it at around 3% - 5% of male adults and a fraction of that for female adults (APA, 2013). (bartleby.com)
  • Knee pain affects approximately 25% of adults, and its prevalence has increased almost 65% over the past 20 years, accounting for nearly 4 million primary care visits annually. (aafp.org)
  • However, a higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the adult population compared with the pediatric population could account for some of the difference in the PPVs observed in these two studies. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Please email your comments with the subject line "Comments on the Adult and Adolescent ARV Guidelines" to [email protected] by November 8, 2018. (nih.gov)
  • A study (1) to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, has highlighted the existence of barriers to the inclusion of 12 to 25-year-olds in both adult and paediatric early phase clinical trials, suggesting a need for more tailored approaches to give this patient population better access to therapeutic innovation. (eurekalert.org)
  • 5,6 In addition, in designing STD programs, consideration should be given to the needs of adolescent and young adult populations including extended clinic hours, optimizing privacy in waiting rooms, and urine based specimen collection. (cdc.gov)
  • May 7, 2010 (Vancouver, British Columbia) - A study of more than 250 teenagers and young adults by researchers at the University of Rochester, in New York, has found that more than 60% do not know what acetaminophen is, even though a third are users of acetaminophen-containing over-the-counter (OTC) pain-relieving products. (medscape.com)
  • Researchers at Stanford University, the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, and the University of California, Davis, have investigated why it is so difficult for adolescents to resist short-term temptations by studying the underlying brain mechanisms. (innovations-report.com)
  • In their study, the researchers found that adolescents' impatience is associated with a change in both brain structure and functioning. (innovations-report.com)
  • In future studies, the researchers want to find out to what extent the social environment influences adolescents' decisions. (innovations-report.com)
  • Researchers are working to learn more about the biology of cancers in young adults so that they can identity molecularly targeted therapies that may be effective in these cancers. (cancer.gov)
  • Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's have found an increased health risk in later life amongst adolescents who drink or use drugs before the age of 15. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • this enabled the researchers to identify those adolescents who were early users of illicit substances. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • In the modified intent-to-treat population, hSBA titers increased by a factor of at least 4 against the four primary test strains of meningococcal B in 56% to 85.3% of adolescents after two doses of MenB-FHbp and from 78.8% to 90.2% of adolescents after three doses, the researchers said. (healio.com)
  • Drawing on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the researchers of the study assessed data of 212,913 adolescents aged 12 to 17 from 2005 through 2017 and 398,967 adults aged 18 and older from 2008 through 2017. (ajmc.com)
  • The increase in adolescent major depressive episode began after 2011, concurrent with the increased ownership of smartphones and a concomitant increase in digital media time in this age group," explained the researchers. (ajmc.com)
  • The researchers found that 27.5 percent of respondents (corresponding to 32.8 million individuals) used prescription opioids in the previous year, including 21 percent of adolescents and 32.2 percent of young adults. (doctorslounge.com)
  • One in ten (9%) young adults aged 18-25 on their parents' health insurance and nearly one in five (18%) of all adolescents aged 15-17 reported that they would not seek sexual and reproductive health care services because of concerns that their parents might find out, according to a new analysis by Guttmacher researchers Liza Fuentes , Meghan Ingerick , Rachel Jones and Laura Lindberg . (guttmacher.org)
  • In earlier studies, researchers at Louisiana State University had found that estrogen - or more precisely, having ovaries - made adult rats exposed for the first time to THC, the primary ingredient in marijuana and hashish, less sensitive to THC's negative effects on tests of learning and memory. (scienceblog.com)
  • The researchers collected a sample of 2470 adolescents and young adults with ADHD, and identified 15,865 participants without ADHD. (ajmc.com)
  • The support group is for adolescents ages 16 and older and adults with autism and Asperger's and their families. (k-state.edu)
  • In analyzing data, the investigators calculated annual percentage of change for multiple demographics, including age: pediatric (ages 0-9), adolescent (10-19), young adult (20-29), and adults in 10-year increments from 30 to 80+. (news-medical.net)
  • The study population included 8,834 individuals ages 12 to 21 years who were enrolled in 1996 in the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. (emaxhealth.com)
  • 1 , - , 3 In the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 12.6% of adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years and 31.4% of young adults reported nonmedical use of prescription medications at some point in their lifetime. (aappublications.org)
  • DSN: CC37.HSPHANES.ADULT2 ABSTRACT General Information Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Mexican Americans Cuban Americans Puerto Ricans Tape Number 6521 ADOLESCENT AND ADULT HISTORY QUESTIONNAIRE Ages 12 Years - 74 Years Version 2 March 1987 This Public Use Data Tape has been edited very carefully. (cdc.gov)
  • The adolescent age group is what is new about this work," said study presenter Laura Shone, DrPH, MSW, associate professor of pediatrics and clinical nursing, Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, in an interview with Medscape Pediatrics . (medscape.com)
  • Dr. Shone and the other study authors suggest that providers of OTC drugs have "a critical role" to play in conveying information in a way that is meaningful and relevant to adults and adolescents alike. (medscape.com)
  • A retrospective study of adolescents hospitalized for anorexia nervosa (n = 69) found that moderately severe cases of the refeeding syndrome occurred in 6 percent, and mild cases in 22 percent [ 2 ]. (uptodate.com)
  • The results of the study show that it was difficult for the adolescents to wait for the larger payment. (innovations-report.com)
  • Although it's more difficult for adolescents to decide against short-term rewards, they are capable of doing so," says Wouter van den Bos, lead author of the study and researcher in the Center for Adaptive Rationality at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. (innovations-report.com)
  • Rosenberg AR , Yi-Frazier JP, Eaton L, Wharton C, Cochrane K, Pihoker C, Baker KS, McCauley E. Promoting resilience in stress management (PRISM) - A pilot study of a novel resilience-promoting intervention for adolescents and young adults with serious illness . (seattlechildrens.org)
  • If you have an obese adolescent at home, he or she has an increased risk for becoming a severely obese adult, according to a new study in the November 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association . (emaxhealth.com)
  • Results of this study of obese adolescents and severely obese adults are important, say the authors, because "understanding which individuals are at risk of severe obesity is essential for determining when interventions would need to be implemented to prevent obese individuals from progressing to severe obesity. (emaxhealth.com)
  • The present study aims to identify such oppositional COMT Val158Met effects in adolescents and adults in prefrontal brain networks at rest. (springer.com)
  • Resting state functional connectivity data were collected from cross-sectional and multicenter study sites involving 106 healthy young adults (mean age 24 ± 2.6 years), gender matched to 106 randomly chosen 14-year-olds. (springer.com)
  • Results of this study demonstrate that adolescent and adult resting state networks are dose-dependently and diametrically affected by COMT genotypes following a hypothetical model of dopamine function that follows an inverted U-shaped curve. (springer.com)
  • To study the behavioral effects of cocaine, Drs. Stephanie Collins and Sari Izenwasser administered either cocaine or a placebo to 12 adolescent rats and 16 adult rats daily for seven days. (eurekalert.org)
  • The results of the current study found that adolescents who were exposed to drugs and alcohol before the age of 15 were 2 to 3 times more likely to become dependent on substances, contract STDs, drop out of school and have criminal records. (kcl.ac.uk)
  • A multicenter phase II study using a dose intensified pediatric regimen in adults with untreated acute lymphoblastic leukaemia," Blood , vol. 108, p. 526a, 2006. (hindawi.com)
  • To remedy that, the study team sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of varenicline tartrate for smoking cessation in adolescents and young adults. (uspharmacist.com)
  • This retrospective study reports the clinical results of reconstruction of flexible, idiopathic, symptomatic flatfoot in adolescent and young adults indicated for surgery by persistent pain and functional limitations. (biomedsearch.com)
  • According to Stock, data were presented at ASH in 2000 that showed that young adults aged 16 to 20 years treated in an adult cooperative group study in the United States fared far worse than the same age group treated on pediatric studies. (cancernetwork.com)
  • To that end, this retrospective study examined brain morphology in a sample of adult daily marijuana users ( n = 29) versus nonusers ( n = 29) and a sample of adolescent daily users ( n = 50) versus nonusers ( n = 50). (jneurosci.org)
  • A new study from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, published on Wednesday , is now calling for better help for adolescents with chronic diseases like diabetes as they transition from pediatric to adult care. (montrealgazette.com)
  • Adolescents and young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at a greater risk of being involved in motor vehicle crashes, according to a study recently published in JAMA Pediatrics . (ajmc.com)
  • In this study, we examined whether adolescent attempts were asso- ciated with impairments related to suicidality, psychopathology, and psychosocial functioning in adulthood (objective 1) and whether these impairments were better accounted for by concurrent adolescent confounders (objective 2). (umontreal.ca)
  • The Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy is a peer-reviewed academic journal published six times per year by Wiley-Blackwell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Providers can help prepare adolescents to safely self-administer," Dr. Shone told Medscape Pediatrics . (medscape.com)
  • Application of pediatric guidelines for lipid levels for persons 17 to 21 years of age who have elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels would result in statin treatment for more than 400,000 additional young people than the adult guidelines, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents' update also includes a table showing monthly average wholesale prices for brand and generic HIV drugs, including combination therapies. (thebody.com)
  • The Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in HIV-1-Infected Adults and Adolescents have been updated! (nih.gov)
  • Of the 6,338 persons 17 to 21 years of age in the NHANES population included in this analysis, 2.5 percent would qualify for statin treatment under the pediatric guidelines compared with 0.4 percent under the adult guidelines. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Extrapolating to the U.S. population of 20.4 million people age 17 to 21 years, 483,500 individuals would be eligible for statin treatment under the pediatric guidelines compared with 78,200 under the adult guidelines, a difference of about 400,000. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Participants who met pediatric criteria had lower average LDL-C levels (167 vs 210 mg/dL) but higher proportions of other cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension , smoking, and obesity compared with those who met the adult guidelines. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • What's New in the U.S. HHS Opportunistic Infections Guidelines for HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents? (thebody.com)
  • The Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV Infected Adults and Adolescents document was published in an electronic format that could be easily updated as relevant changes in prevention and treatment recommendations occur. (thebody.com)
  • The Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV Infected Adults and Adolescents and the IDSA-AASLD Guideline have overlapping members. (thebody.com)
  • Health literacy in regard to OTC meds is truly lacking in the adolescent age group, because the medication managers prior to these years were the adults in the home. (medscape.com)
  • The overall increasing incidence rates seen over time was primarily driven by adults 40+ years, the authors wrote. (news-medical.net)
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents between10 and 19 years of age in Denmark," Danish Medical Bulletin , vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 76-79, 2006. (hindawi.com)
  • This chapter will review notable new developments in the care of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) within the last 3 years. (springer.com)
  • To evaluate the performance of the vaccine, Østergaard and colleagues randomly assigned 3,596 adolescents aged 10 to 18 years to receive MenB-FHbp or HAV vaccine and saline and 3,304 young adults aged 18 to 25 years to receive MenB-FHbp or saline at baseline, 2 months and 6 months. (healio.com)
  • The two-group randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind intention-to-treat clinical trial enrolled a volunteer sample of 157 treatment-seeking adolescent and young adult cigarette smokers-ranging in age from 14 to 21 years-at an outpatient clinical site in Charleston, South Carolina, from August 15, 2012, to October 20, 2017. (uspharmacist.com)
  • The FDA approved the drug, marketed as Chantix, in 2006 for use in adults aged 18 years or older. (uspharmacist.com)
  • In Europe, the legal minimum age to participate in adult clinical trials is almost universally 18 years. (eurekalert.org)
  • The root myth scientists believed for years was that the adolescent brain was essentially an adult one, only with fewer miles on it. (indiebound.org)
  • For many years, scientists believed that the adolescent brain was essentially an adult one. (amazon.com)
  • Interweaving clear summary and analysis of research data with anecdotes drawn from her years as a clinician, researcher, and public speaker, renowned neurologist Frances E. Jensen, MD, explores adolescent brain functioning and development in the context of learning and multitasking, stress and memory, sleep, addiction, and decision making. (amazon.com)
  • The Duke Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine Program provides high-quality medical care to adolescents and young adults 12-26 years of age by respecting each individual, supporting their physical and emotional growth, and empowering them through education and skill building to be thriving, independent adults. (dukehealth.org)
  • When he switched to adult care two years later, all of a sudden those contacts were lost. (montrealgazette.com)
  • All participants were adults, ranging in age from 17 to 70 years, and there were more men than women. (cochrane.org)
  • Dr. Chester Berschling, MD is a child & adolescent psychiatry doctor who practices in Chevy Chase, MD. He is 84 years old and has been practicing for 58 years. (healthgrades.com)
  • We identified 11 trials (with 3352 participants older than 12 years with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia), fully published in peer-reviewed journals, focused on treatment of pneumonia in adolescents and adults treated in the community in outpatient settings. (cochrane.org)
  • As kids reach adulthood, we have created a demand for specialized care, but with few people trained to meet the unique combination of needs of these young adults. (ucsd.edu)
  • Difference in outcome of adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) enrolled in pediatric (AIEOP) and adult (GIMEMA) protocols," Blood , vol. 104, p. 1954, 2004. (hindawi.com)
  • C. A. Schiffer, "Differences in outcome in adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a consequence of better regimens? (hindawi.com)
  • D. J. De Angelo, "The treatment of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia," Hematology/the Education Program of the American Society of Hematology , pp. 123-130, 2005. (hindawi.com)
  • Efficacy and toxicity of a paediatric protocol in teenagers and young adults with Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from UKALL 2003. (springer.com)
  • Final results of a single institution experience with a pediatric-based regimen, the augmented Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster, in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and comparison to the hyper-CVAD regimen. (springer.com)
  • SAN FRANCISCO-A large North American trial presented here has shown that adolescents and young adults have better event-free and overall survival when treated on an intensive pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) regimen than that historically seen when treated on an adult regimen. (cancernetwork.com)
  • The authors analyzed data from the 2013-2015 National Survey of Family Growth to gain a better understanding of the barriers adolescents and young adults face when attempting to access confidential sexual and reproductive health services. (guttmacher.org)
  • Healthcare providers are advised to screen adolescents in five areas to identify any mental health concerns: alcohol use, child maltreatment, depression, illicit drug use, and suicide risk. (hhs.gov)
  • And the holidays, typically a time associated with an increase in adult depression, does tend to spur an increase in crisis calls for his group as well, Wells said. (pjstar.com)
  • Emotionally stressful situations may impact the adolescent more than it would affect the adult: stress can have permanent effects on mental health and can to lead to higher risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. (indiebound.org)
  • He has published more than 60 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters - many of which examine nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior - and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology and the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology . (westernschools.com)
  • Teens are better learners than adults because their brain cells more readily "build" memories. (indiebound.org)
  • But this heightened adaptability can be hijacked by addiction, and the adolescent brain can become addicted more strongly and for a longer duration than the adult brain. (indiebound.org)
  • Dr. Jensen gathers what we've discovered about adolescent brain function, wiring, and capacity and explains the science in the contexts of everyday learning and multitasking, stress and memory, sleep, addiction, and decision-making. (indiebound.org)
  • delved into the emerging science of the adolescent brain [and] came out with provocative new insights for parents, educators, public policymakers and teens themselves. (indiebound.org)
  • A captivating chapter, 'The Digital Invasion of the Teenage Brain,' calls attention to computer craving and adolescent addiction to the Internet. (indiebound.org)
  • The Teenage Brain explains how these eye-opening findings not only dispel commonly held myths about teens but also yield practical suggestions for adults and teenagers negotiating the mysterious and magical world of adolescent biology. (amazon.com)
  • When these rats were again exposed to THC as adults, they performed more poorly on tests of learning and memory - diminished response time, increase in errors - than did similar rats that had not been exposed to THC when younger. (scienceblog.com)