Adrenochrome: Pigment obtained by the oxidation of epinephrine.Hydroxytestosterones: 17 beta-Hydroxy-4-androsten-3-ones. Testosterone derivatives formed by the substitution of one or more hydroxyl groups in any position.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Mass Media: Instruments or technological means of communication that reach large numbers of people with a common message: press, radio, television, etc.Newspapers: Publications printed and distributed daily, weekly, or at some other regular and usually short interval, containing news, articles of opinion (as editorials and letters), features, advertising, and announcements of current interest. (Webster's 3d ed)Xenobiotics: Chemical substances that are foreign to the biological system. They include naturally occurring compounds, drugs, environmental agents, carcinogens, insecticides, etc.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Drugs, Generic: Drugs whose drug name is not protected by a trademark. They may be manufactured by several companies.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Drug Prescriptions: Directions written for the obtaining and use of DRUGS.Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Tablets, Enteric-Coated: Tablets coated with material that delays release of the medication until after they leave the stomach. (Dorland, 28th ed)Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Bacterial Capsules: An envelope of loose gel surrounding a bacterial cell which is associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Some capsules have a well-defined border, whereas others form a slime layer that trails off into the medium. Most capsules consist of relatively simple polysaccharides but there are some bacteria whose capsules are made of polypeptides.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Medical Missions, Official: Travel by a group of physicians for the purpose of making a special study or undertaking a special project of short-term duration.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Music: Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.Electric Organ: In about 250 species of electric fishes, modified muscle fibers forming disklike multinucleate plates arranged in stacks like batteries in series and embedded in a gelatinous matrix. A large torpedo ray may have half a million plates. Muscles in different parts of the body may be modified, i.e., the trunk and tail in the electric eel, the hyobranchial apparatus in the electric ray, and extrinsic eye muscles in the stargazers. Powerful electric organs emit pulses in brief bursts several times a second. They serve to stun prey and ward off predators. A large torpedo ray can produce of shock of more than 200 volts, capable of stunning a human. (Storer et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p672)Sister Chromatid Exchange: An exchange of segments between the sister chromatids of a chromosome, either between the sister chromatids of a meiotic tetrad or between the sister chromatids of a duplicated somatic chromosome. Its frequency is increased by ultraviolet and ionizing radiation and other mutagenic agents and is particularly high in BLOOM SYNDROME.Singing: Modulation of human voice to produce sounds augmented by musical tonality and rhythm.Music Therapy: The use of music as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of neurological, mental, or behavioral disorders.Urogenital System: All the organs involved in reproduction and the formation and release of URINE. It includes the kidneys, ureters, BLADDER; URETHRA, and the organs of reproduction - ovaries, UTERUS; FALLOPIAN TUBES; VAGINA; and CLITORIS in women and the testes; SEMINAL VESICLES; PROSTATE; seminal ducts; and PENIS in men.Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.Electromagnetic Fields: Fields representing the joint interplay of electric and magnetic forces.Designer Drugs: Drugs designed and synthesized, often for illegal street use, by modification of existing drug structures (e.g., amphetamines). Of special interest are MPTP (a reverse ester of meperidine), MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine), and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). Many drugs act on the aminergic system, the physiologically active biogenic amines.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.FinlandCognitive Science: The study of the precise nature of different mental tasks and the operations of the brain that enable them to be performed, engaging branches of psychology, computer science, philosophy, and linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Animal Fins: Membranous appendage of fish and other aquatic organisms used for locomotion or balance.Cellulosomes: Extracellular structures found in a variety of microorganisms. They contain CELLULASES and play an important role in the digestion of CELLULOSE.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Vitamin K: A lipid cofactor that is required for normal blood clotting. Several forms of vitamin K have been identified: VITAMIN K 1 (phytomenadione) derived from plants, VITAMIN K 2 (menaquinone) from bacteria, and synthetic naphthoquinone provitamins, VITAMIN K 3 (menadione). Vitamin K 3 provitamins, after being alkylated in vivo, exhibit the antifibrinolytic activity of vitamin K. Green leafy vegetables, liver, cheese, butter, and egg yolk are good sources of vitamin K.Vitamin K 1: A family of phylloquinones that contains a ring of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone and an isoprenoid side chain. Members of this group of vitamin K 1 have only one double bond on the proximal isoprene unit. Rich sources of vitamin K 1 include green plants, algae, and photosynthetic bacteria. Vitamin K1 has antihemorrhagic and prothrombogenic activity.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Vitamin K Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN K in the diet, characterized by an increased tendency to hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGIC DISORDERS). Such bleeding episodes may be particularly severe in newborn infants. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1182)Vitamin K 2: A group of substances similar to VITAMIN K 1 which contains a ring of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinione and an isoprenoid side chain of varying number of isoprene units. In vitamin K 2, each isoprene unit contains a double bond. They are produced by bacteria including the normal intestinal flora.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Vitamin K Deficiency Bleeding: Hemorrhage caused by vitamin K deficiency.Vitamins: Organic substances that are required in small amounts for maintenance and growth, but which cannot be manufactured by the human body.Vitamin A: Retinol and derivatives of retinol that play an essential role in metabolic functioning of the retina, the growth of and differentiation of epithelial tissue, the growth of bone, reproduction, and the immune response. Dietary vitamin A is derived from a variety of CAROTENOIDS found in plants. It is enriched in the liver, egg yolks, and the fat component of dairy products.Vitamin K 3: A synthetic naphthoquinone without the isoprenoid side chain and biological activity, but can be converted to active vitamin K2, menaquinone, after alkylation in vivo.Ciliophora: A phylum of EUKARYOTES characterized by the presence of cilia at some time during the life cycle. It comprises three classes: KINETOFRAGMINOPHOREA; OLIGOHYMENOPHOREA; and POLYMENOPHOREA.Adoption: Voluntary acceptance of a child of other parents to be as one's own child, usually with legal confirmation.Word Association Tests: Lists of words to which individuals are asked to respond ascertaining the conceptual meaning held by the individual.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Adoptive Transfer: Form of passive immunization where previously sensitized immunologic agents (cells or serum) are transferred to non-immune recipients. When transfer of cells is used as a therapy for the treatment of neoplasms, it is called adoptive immunotherapy (IMMUNOTHERAPY, ADOPTIVE).Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel: Electrophoresis in which a polyacrylamide gel is used as the diffusion medium.Immunotherapy, Adoptive: Form of adoptive transfer where cells with antitumor activity are transferred to the tumor-bearing host in order to mediate tumor regression. The lymphoid cells commonly used are lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL). This is usually considered a form of passive immunotherapy. (From DeVita, et al., Cancer, 1993, pp.305-7, 314)Word Processing: Text editing and storage functions using computer software.Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Meditation: A state of consciousness in which the individual eliminates environmental stimuli from awareness so that the mind can focus on a single thing, producing a state of relaxation and relief from stress. A wide variety of techniques are used to clear the mind of stressful outside interferences. It includes meditation therapy. (Mosby's Medical, Nursing, and Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)Unconscious (Psychology): Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.Jehovah's Witnesses: Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.Generalization (Psychology): The phenomenon of an organism's responding to all situations similar to one in which it has been conditioned.Seeds: The encapsulated embryos of flowering plants. They are used as is or for animal feed because of the high content of concentrated nutrients like starches, proteins, and fats. Rapeseed, cottonseed, and sunflower seed are also produced for the oils (fats) they yield.Unconsciousness: Loss of the ability to maintain awareness of self and environment combined with markedly reduced responsiveness to environmental stimuli. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp344-5)Reality Testing: The individual's objective evaluation of the external world and the ability to differentiate adequately between it and the internal world; considered to be a primary ego function.Generalization, Stimulus: The tendency to react to stimuli that are different from, but somewhat similar to, the stimulus used as a conditioned stimulus.Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Mindfulness: A psychological state of awareness, the practices that promote this awareness, a mode of processing information and a character trait. As a therapy mindfulness is defined as a moment-to-moment awareness of one's experience without judgment and as a state and not a trait.Pharmacology: The study of the origin, nature, properties, and actions of drugs and their effects on living organisms.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Theory of Mind: The ability to attribute mental states (e.g., beliefs, desires, feelings, intentions, thoughts, etc.) to self and to others, allowing an individual to understand and infer behavior on the basis of the mental states. Difference or deficit in theory of mind is associated with ASPERGER SYNDROME; AUTISTIC DISORDER; and SCHIZOPHRENIA, etc.Chemistry, Analytic: The branch of chemistry dealing with detection (qualitative) and determination (quantitative) of substances. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Imitative Behavior: The mimicking of the behavior of one individual by another.Contraceptives, Oral, Combined: Fixed drug combinations administered orally for contraceptive purposes.Game Theory: Theoretical construct used in applied mathematics to analyze certain situations in which there is an interplay between parties that may have similar, opposed, or mixed interests. In a typical game, decision-making "players," who each have their own goals, try to gain advantage over the other parties by anticipating each other's decisions; the game is finally resolved as a consequence of the players' decisions.Substance P: An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.Mass Vaccination: Administration of a vaccine to large populations in order to elicit IMMUNITY.
(1/19) Inactivation of catecholamines by superoxide gives new insights on the pathogenesis of septic shock.

A major feature of septic shock is the development of a vascular crisis characterized by nonresponsiveness to sympathetic vasoconstrictor agents and the subsequent irreversible fall in blood pressure. In addition, sepsis, like other inflammatory conditions, results in a large increase in the production of free radicals, including superoxide anions (O(2)) within the body. Here we show that O(2) reacts with catecholamines deactivating them in vitro. Moreover, this deactivation would appear to account for the hyporeactivity to exogenous catecholamines observed in sepsis, because administration of a superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic to a rat model of septic shock to remove excess O(2) restored the vasopressor responses to norepinephrine. This treatment with the SOD mimetic also reversed the hypotension in these animals; suggesting that deactivation of endogenous norepinephrine by O(2) contributes significantly to this aspect of the vascular crisis. Indeed, the plasma concentrations of both norepinephrine and epinephrine in septic rats treated with the SOD mimetic were significantly higher than in untreated rats. Interestingly, the plasma concentrations for norepinephrine and epinephrine were inversely related to the plasma concentrations of adrenochromes, the product of the autoxidation of catecholamines initiated by O(2). We propose, therefore, that the use of a SOD mimetic represents a new paradigm for the treatment of septic shock. By removing O(2), exogenous and endogenous catecholamines are protected from autoxidation. As a result, both hyporeactivity and hypotension are reversed, generation of potentially toxic adrenochromes is reduced, and survival rate is improved.  (+info)

(2/19) Spectroscopic detection of adrenaline-quinone formation in micelles.

Spectral changes, from 200 nm to 600 nm, of the oxidation of adrenaline to adrenochrome induced by periodate in electrically charged and neutral micelles at pH 3.77 were studied. The observed variations of the peak position, intensity and shape of the fluorescence spectra indicated that depending on the charge of the micelle adrenaline ion is partially embedded into the micellar core. Fluorescence lifetime measurements using Omnilyzer allowed to calculate partition coefficients of 0.36, 0.05 and 0.01 in sodium dodecyl sulphate, tetradodecyltrimethylammonium bromide and Triton X-100, respectively. Kinetics of adrenaline decay during oxidation were followed by its fluorescence what overcame spectral interference in the absorption spectra of adrenaline from the formed intermediates. Scanning absorption spectroscopy, with 100 ms resolution, allowed the recording of spectral changes during the transformation. With this method, the formation of adrenaline-quinone with absorption maxima at 388 nm and 274 nm was detected. The calculated rate constants of the observed kinetics during oxidation were significantly lowered in both charged micelles compared to buffer solution and in Triton X-100 neutral micelles. The observed phenomena are discussed in terms of the electrostatic forces mechanism and in the frame of the Raper-Mason scheme of adrenaline transformation.  (+info)

(3/19) The fallacy of using adrenochrome reaction for measurement of reactive oxygen species formed during cytochrome p450-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics.

The adrenochrome reaction (oxidation of epinephrine to adrenochrome) has been widely employed as a standard assay for reactive oxygen species, produced under a variety of conditions, including those produced during cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidation of substrates such as cyclosporine. However, it has been reported that epinephrine and adrenochrome can be metabolized by hepatic microsomes and that adrenochrome can also be metabolized by NADPH-CYP reductase. Thus, in the present report, we provide evidence that measurement of adrenochrome cannot be used as an index of reactive oxygen species generated during CYP-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics because adrenochrome and its precursor, epinephrine, interact with the CYP enzyme system as substrates and inhibitors. Our results indicated that adrenochrome was moderately stable in phosphate buffer but degraded rapidly (over 50% consumed in less than 2 min) by (cloned and expressed) CYP3A4 and CYP reductase in the presence of NADPH. Furthermore, both epinephrine and adrenochrome were found to be inhibitors of CYP3A4-mediated oxidation of testosterone. Together, these results lead to the conclusion that the use of adrenochrome reaction for measurement of reactive oxygen species formed during CYP3A4-mediated metabolism of xenobiotics is inappropriate.  (+info)

(4/19) Quinone reductase 2 is a catechol quinone reductase.

 (+info)

(5/19) Generation of the superoxide radical during autoxidation of oxymyoglobin.

Autoxidation of bovine oxymyoglobin to metmyoglobin induces co-oxidation of epinephrine to adrenochrome. This co-oxidation is markedly inhibited by superoxide dismutase [EC 1.15.1.1]. Electron transfer from oxymyoglobin to ferricytochrome c is partially inhibited by superoxide dismutase. These results indicate that autoxidation of oxymyoglobin results in generation of superoxide radicals. Autoxidation of oxymyoglobin is accelerated by superoxide dismutase and partially inhibited by catalase [EC 1.11.1.6].  (+info)

(6/19) Rapid methods for high-throughput detection of sulfoxides.

 (+info)

(7/19) Effect of furosemide and furosemide-carbazochrome combination on exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in Standardbred racehorses.

The objective was to quantify the effect of furosemide and carbazochrome on exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) in Standardbred horses using red blood cell count and hemoglobin concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Six healthy Standardbred horses with prior evidence of EIPH performed a standardized treadmill test 4 h after administration of placebo, furosemide, or furosemide-carbazochrome combination. Red blood cell (RBC) counts and hemoglobin concentrations were determined on the BAL fluid. The RBC count in BAL ranges were (2903-26,025 cells/microL), (45-24,060 cells/microL), and (905-3045 cells/microL) for placebo, furosemide, and furosemide-carbazochrome, respectively. Hemoglobin concentration ranges were (0.03-0.59 mg/mL), (0.01-0.55 mg/mL), and (0.007-0.16 mg/mL) for placebo, furosemide, and furosemide-carbazochrome groups, respectively. No significant differences were detected among treatments. However, there was great variability among horses, suggesting that a larger sample size or better selection of horses was needed.  (+info)

(8/19) Free radical signalling underlies inhibition of CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels by nitrous oxide in the pain pathway.

 (+info)

*  Appetite for Adrenochrome
... is the debut album by the Sacramento, California punk rock band the Groovie Ghoulies, released in ... Appetite for Adrenochrome was remastered and reissued by Lookout! Records in September 1996. This version was re-released by ... A cover of Kiss' 1976 top-ten hit "Beth" appears as an unlisted track at the end of Appetite for Adrenochrome. The Groovie ...
*  XP8
"XP8 presents Adrenochrome". Indiegogo.com. 2013-05-09. Retrieved 2013-05-09. "Interview: XP8". intravenous.co.uk. 2015-02-05. ... In 2013, XP8 released the crowd-funded concept album Adrenochrome, which they described as their best effort to date, without ... Adrenochrome (2013, 2393 Records) RE_Productions (2004, Black Flames Records) Synthphony REMIXed! Vol.4 (2005, Synthphony ...
*  Abram Hoffer
Subsequent research suggested that Hoffer's adrenochrome theory had merit as people with schizophrenia have defects in the ... Hoffer called his theory the "adrenochrome hypothesis". In 1967, Hoffer resigned some of his academic and administrative ... He hypothesised that schizophrenics may lack the ability to remove the hallucinogenic catecholamine metabolite adrenochrome ... ISBN 1-59120-226-4. Hoffer, A (1990). "The Adrenochrome Hypothesis and Psychiatry". Retrieved 2011-07-25. "ACS : Orthomolecular ...
*  Derek Richter
Green DE, Richter D (1937) Adrenaline and adrenochrome. Biochem J 31:596-616 • Richter D (1937) Adrenaline and amine oxidase. ...
*  Liquid Sky (band)
Their first release was the EP Adrenochrome in 2001. In 2002, Emily was replaced by Fiona Creaby and the band subsequently ... Adrenochrome (2001) (Emily Garrard - Vocals) "Liquid Sky". Room 13. "Liquid Sky Biography". Liquid Sky. ...
*  In situ
Examples of the former include the Corey-Chaykovsky reagent and adrenochrome. In biomedical engineering, protein nanogels made ...
*  Floorshow EP
"Floorshow" (Eldritch/Adams/Marx) - 3:20 "Lights" (Eldritch) - 5:30 "Teachers/Adrenochrome" (Cohen/Eldritch) - 7:35 Andrew ... ", "Lights" and "Adrenochrome" were later rerecorded and released on singles. The Leonard Cohen cover, "Teachers", remained ...
*  Bisulfite
... salts are common additives to the drug epinephrine in order to prevent its oxidation to adrenochrome and resulting ...
*  Ether addiction
... along with his invention of adrenochrome's psychedelic effects later in the book. Dr. Wilbur Larch, in John Irving's novel The ...
*  Epinephrine (medication)
The use of epinephrine based eye-drops, commonly used to treat glaucoma, may also lead to buildup of adrenochrome pigments in ...
*  Isolationism (album)
Adrenochrome)" Final: "Hide" Lull: "Thoughts" Thomas Köner: "Kanon (Part One: Brohuk)". ...
*  List of MeSH codes (D03)
... adrenochrome MeSH D03.438.473.050 --- alcian blue MeSH D03.438.473.133 --- captan MeSH D03.438.473.155 --- carbolines MeSH ...
*  Renalase
... the native renalase used in these experiments did not catalyze the conversion of the catecholamine epinephrine to adrenochrome ...
*  Carbazochrome
... , the semicarbazone of adrenochrome, that interacts with α-adrenoreceptors on surface of platelets, which are ...
Erowid Adrenochrome Vault  Erowid Adrenochrome Vault
Information about Adrenochrome including basics, effects, dosage, history, legal status, photos, research, media coverage, and ... Adrenochrome is an oxidation product of adrenaline (ephinephrine, norepinephrine). It has achieved mythical status as a ...
more infohttps://www.erowid.org/chemicals/adrenochrome/adrenochrome.shtml
ADRENOCHROME MONOSEMICARBAZONE PDF  ADRENOCHROME MONOSEMICARBAZONE PDF
Adrenochrome Monosemicarbazone is a haemostatic with a rapid onset of action . It contains a water soluble form of adrenochrome ... Adrenochrome Monosemicarbazone is a haemostatic with a rapid onset of action . It contains a water soluble form of adrenochrome ... Adrenochrome is a pigment which can be obtained by oxidation of adrenalin Adrenochrome Monosemicarbazone, also known as ... Picture 1 - Adrenochrome. Subscribe to our Free Newsletters!. Adrenochrome monosemicarbazone / Carbazochrome - Indications, ...
more infohttps://norman-nekro.eu/adrenochrome-monosemicarbazone-25/
Appetite for Adrenochrome - Wikipedia  Appetite for Adrenochrome - Wikipedia
Appetite for Adrenochrome is the debut album by the Sacramento, California punk rock band the Groovie Ghoulies, released in ... Appetite for Adrenochrome was remastered and reissued by Lookout! Records in September 1996. This version was re-released by ... A cover of Kiss' 1976 top-ten hit "Beth" appears as an unlisted track at the end of Appetite for Adrenochrome. The Groovie ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appetite_for_Adrenochrome
adrenochrome - oi  adrenochrome - oi
We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.Find out more ...
more infohttp://oxfordindex.oup.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095352375
The Adrenochrome Hypothesis and Psychiatry - A. Hoffer, M.D. Ph.D. and H. Osmond, M.D.  The Adrenochrome Hypothesis and Psychiatry - A. Hoffer, M.D. Ph.D. and H. Osmond, M.D.
Adrenochrome i.e. schizophrenia arose in an individual when too much adrenochrome was formed, that adrenochrome then interfered ... Why the Adrenochrome Hypothesis has Been Neglected The adrenochrome hypothesis has so far withstood the assault of critics and ... We used the adrenochrome hypothesis to lead us to vitamins, but we might have come upon it serendipitously. The adrenochrome ... It was used by many surgeons and known as stable adrenochrome. It was not adreno-chrome. Dr. Rinkel later published a cor- ...
more infohttp://www.orthomolecular.org/library/jom/1999/articles/1999-v14n01-p049.shtml
Adrenochrome Properties, Effects, Uses, Monosemicarbazone | Chemistry Learner  Adrenochrome Properties, Effects, Uses, Monosemicarbazone | Chemistry Learner
Adrenochrome Uses. Adrenochrome Monosemicarbazone, also known as Carbazochrome is a derivative of Adrenochrome. It is believed ... Psychoactive Effects of Adrenochrome. According to megavitamin researchers Dr Abram Hoffer and Humphry Osmond, Adrenochrome is ... Adrenochrome Properties. Here are some of the basic properties of this substance:. Molecular Mass: The molar mass of this ... Is Adrenochrome Legal?. There have been considerable amounts of controversy over whether it can be categorized as a ...
more infohttp://www.chemistrylearner.com/adrenochrome.html
Co-creating Our New Earth : Adrenochrome in blood leads to Schizophrenia, Heart disease, Parkinsons  Co-creating Our New Earth : Adrenochrome in blood leads to Schizophrenia, Heart disease, Parkinson's
Adrenochrome blood drinking leads to: Schizophrenia. Hallucination. Heart disease. Alzheimers Disease.. The adrenochrome ... Adrenochrome can be transferred across the blood-brain barrier.. The adrenochrome hypothesis of schizophrenia has been reviewed ... It is likely the major source is from the heart which is the largest organ in the body which can make adrenochrome and its ... Adrenochrome, a substance taken from a live beating heart of a horrified person is highly addictive, very psychoactive and ...
more infohttp://co-creatingournewearth.blogspot.com/2015/08/adrenochrome-in-blood-leads-to.html
Drug Information  Drug Information
Adrenochrome monosemicarbazone / Carbazochrome Adrenochrome monosemicarbazone is used for the treatment of hematuria (blood in ...
more infohttps://www.medindia.net/doctors/drug_information/home.asp
Ind-Swift Limited Product Information | Medindia  Ind-Swift Limited Product Information | Medindia
Adrenochrome monosemicarbazone / Carbazochrome Adrenochrome monosemicarbazole is used for the treatment of hematuria (blood in ... Adrenochrome monosemicarbazole stops bleeding by reducing capillary fragility, oozing from raw surfaces and bleeding from ...
more infohttp://www.medindia.net/drugs/manufacturers/ind-swift-limited.htm
Acetylsulfamethoxazole- CAS Number 21312-10-7  Acetylsulfamethoxazole- CAS Number 21312-10-7
Adrenochrome semicarbazone. 100 mg. DRE-C10045850. Add to basket Agaric acid. 250 mg. DRE-C10047700. Add to basket ...
more infohttps://www.lgcstandards.com/GB/en/Acetylsulfamethoxazole/p/DRE-C10024050
Amoxicillin trihydrate- CAS Number 61336-70-7  Amoxicillin trihydrate- CAS Number 61336-70-7
Adrenochrome semicarbazone. 100 mg. DRE-C10045850. Add to basket Agaric acid. 250 mg. DRE-C10047700. Add to basket ...
more infohttps://www.lgcstandards.com/CN/en/Amoxicillin-trihydrate/p/DRE-C10242500
XP8 - Wikipedia  XP8 - Wikipedia
"XP8 presents Adrenochrome". Indiegogo.com. 2013-05-09. Retrieved 2013-05-09. "Interview: XP8". intravenous.co.uk. 2015-02-05. ... In 2013, XP8 released the crowd-funded concept album Adrenochrome, which they described as their best effort to date, without ... Adrenochrome (2013, 2393 Records) RE_Productions (2004, Black Flames Records) Synthphony REMIXed! Vol.4 (2005, Synthphony ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XP8
7 things that Are Killing You!, page 3  7 things that Are Killing You!, page 3
adrenochrome posted on Jun, 8 2009 @ 06:59 AM link reply to post by TheComte ...
more infohttp://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread470821/pg3
Professor Maurice Hallett - People - Cardiff University  Professor Maurice Hallett - People - Cardiff University
No DOI! The adrenochrome pathway. A potential catabolic route for adrenaline metabolism in inflammatory disease. Advances in ... No DOI! The adrenochrome pathway. A potential catabolic route for adrenaline metabolism in inflammatory disease. Advances in ...
more infohttps://www.cardiff.ac.uk/people/view/126369-hallett-maurice
WFMU:
Mike L.:
Playlist
from September 10, 2007  WFMU: Mike L.: Playlist from September 10, 2007
Appetite for Adrenochrome 1:36:29 ) Joan Jett Doin' Alright with the Boys Bad Reputation 1:38:28 ) ...
more infohttp://wfmu.org/playlists/shows/24528
FEAR & LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS  FEAR & LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS
Adrenochrome. DUKE stares wonderingly at the bottle. DUKE Adrenochrome... GONZO (into PHONE) Hi, Lucy? Yeah, it's me. I got ... or so of pure adrenochrome -- or maybe just a fresh adrenaline gland to chew on. DUKE (V/O) I could already feel the stuff ...
more infohttps://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/fearandloathing.html
Body Electric Lyrics Sisters Of Mercy  Body Electric Lyrics Sisters Of Mercy
Adrenochrome. 4. Alice. 5. Amphetamine Logic. 6. Black Planet. 7. Body Electric. ...
more infohttp://www.songlyrics.com/sisters-of-mercy/body-electric-lyrics/
FEAR & LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS  FEAR & LOATHING IN LAS VEGAS
Adrenochrome. DUKE stares wonderingly at the bottle. DUKE Adrenochrome... GONZO (into PHONE) Hi, Lucy? Yeah, it's me. I got ... or so of pure adrenochrome -- or maybe just a fresh adrenaline gland to chew on. DUKE (V/O) I could already feel the stuff ...
more infohttp://www.awesomefilm.com/script/fearandloathing.html
  • Adrenochrome, a substance taken from a live beating heart of a horrified person is highly addictive, very psychoactive and stimulating to those who chose to drink it. (blogspot.com)
  • As a result, under the direction of Dr. R. Heacock (1959, 1965), an enormous body of data was gathered and published detailing the chemistry of adrenochrome, its synthesis, metabolism, conversion to other products and its reactions with substances like ascorbic acid. (orthomolecular.org)
  • Floorshow" (Eldritch/Adams/Marx) - 3:20 "Lights" (Eldritch) - 5:30 "Teachers/Adrenochrome" (Cohen/Eldritch) - 7:35 Andrew Eldritch - vocals Gary Marx - guitars Craig Adams - bass guitar Doktor Avalanche (drum machine) - drums Andrew Eldritch (1982): "We made a tape once and took it down to Rough Trade. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adrenochrome can be transferred across the blood-brain barrier. (blogspot.com)
  • Adrenochrome monosemicarbazole is used for the treatment of hematuria (blood in the urine), retinal hemorrhage (bleeds in the retina of the eye), epistaxis (bleeding from the nose), secondary bleeding from wounds, uterine bleeding and preoperatively to reduce bleeding . (medindia.net)
  • It is likely the major source is from the heart which is the largest organ in the body which can make adrenochrome and its derivatives - Increased adrenochrome formation in the synapse would play havoc with the transmission of signals by binding with receptor cites on the neuron. (blogspot.com)
  • In 2013, XP8 released the crowd-funded concept album Adrenochrome, which they described as their best effort to date, without any record label support. (wikipedia.org)
  • That re-view is still pertinent for the whole area of adrenochrome investigation went into hi-bernation for a number of reasons, espe-cially in psychiatry. (orthomolecular.org)