Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein: A ligand that binds to but fails to activate the INTERLEUKIN 1 RECEPTOR. It plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of INFLAMMATION and FEVER. Several isoforms of the protein exist due to multiple ALTERNATIVE SPLICING of its mRNA.Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that inhibit or block the activity of NEUROKININ-1 RECEPTORS.Purinergic P1 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P1 RECEPTORS.Histamine H2 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate SEROTONIN 5-HT3 RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of SEROTONIN or SEROTONIN 5-HT3 RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate excitatory amino acid receptors, thereby blocking the actions of agonists.Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists: Agents that antagonize ANGIOTENSIN RECEPTORS. Many drugs in this class specifically target the ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR.Dopamine Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate DOPAMINE RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of dopamine or exogenous agonists. Many drugs used in the treatment of psychotic disorders (ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS) are dopamine antagonists, although their therapeutic effects may be due to long-term adjustments of the brain rather than to the acute effects of blocking dopamine receptors. Dopamine antagonists have been used for several other clinical purposes including as ANTIEMETICS, in the treatment of Tourette syndrome, and for hiccup. Dopamine receptor blockade is associated with NEUROLEPTIC MALIGNANT SYNDROME.Interleukin-1beta: An interleukin-1 subtype that is synthesized as an inactive membrane-bound pro-protein. Proteolytic processing of the precursor form by CASPASE 1 results in release of the active form of interleukin-1beta from the membrane.Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of SEROTONIN or SEROTONIN 5-HT2 RECEPTOR AGONISTS. Included under this heading are antagonists for one or more specific 5-HT2 receptor subtypes.Adenosine A2 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that selectively bind to and block the activation of ADENOSINE A2 RECEPTORS.Hormone Antagonists: Chemical substances which inhibit the function of the endocrine glands, the biosynthesis of their secreted hormones, or the action of hormones upon their specific sites.Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS.Purinergic P2 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P2 RECEPTORS.Narcotic Antagonists: Agents inhibiting the effect of narcotics on the central nervous system.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Histamine H1 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H1 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous histamine. Included here are the classical antihistaminics that antagonize or prevent the action of histamine mainly in immediate hypersensitivity. They act in the bronchi, capillaries, and some other smooth muscles, and are used to prevent or allay motion sickness, seasonal rhinitis, and allergic dermatitis and to induce somnolence. The effects of blocking central nervous system H1 receptors are not as well understood.Receptors, Endothelin: Cell surface proteins that bind ENDOTHELINS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells.Muscarinic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous ACETYLCHOLINE or exogenous agonists. Muscarinic antagonists have widespread effects including actions on the iris and ciliary muscle of the eye, the heart and blood vessels, secretions of the respiratory tract, GI system, and salivary glands, GI motility, urinary bladder tone, and the central nervous system.GABA-A Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate GABA-A RECEPTORS thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous GABA-A RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Sialoglycoproteins: Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.Serotonin Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate serotonin receptors, thereby blocking the actions of serotonin or SEROTONIN RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Histamine Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate histamine receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine or histamine agonists. Classical antihistaminics block the histamine H1 receptors only.GABA Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate GABA RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and GABA RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Leukotriene Antagonists: A class of drugs designed to prevent leukotriene synthesis or activity by blocking binding at the receptor level.Receptor, Endothelin A: A subtype of endothelin receptor found predominantly in the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE. It has a high affinity for ENDOTHELIN-1 and ENDOTHELIN-2.Receptors, Serotonin: Cell-surface proteins that bind SEROTONIN and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Several types of serotonin receptors have been recognized which differ in their pharmacology, molecular biology, and mode of action.Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate: A class of ionotropic glutamate receptors characterized by affinity for N-methyl-D-aspartate. NMDA receptors have an allosteric binding site for glycine which must be occupied for the channel to open efficiently and a site within the channel itself to which magnesium ions bind in a voltage-dependent manner. The positive voltage dependence of channel conductance and the high permeability of the conducting channel to calcium ions (as well as to monovalent cations) are important in excitotoxicity and neuronal plasticity.Serotonin 5-HT1 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate SEROTONIN 5-HT1 RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of SEROTONIN 5-HT1 RECEPTOR AGONISTS. Included under this heading are antagonists for one or more of the specific 5-HT1 receptor subtypes.Dizocilpine Maleate: A potent noncompetitive antagonist of the NMDA receptor (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) used mainly as a research tool. The drug has been considered for the wide variety of neurodegenerative conditions or disorders in which NMDA receptors may play an important role. Its use has been primarily limited to animal and tissue experiments because of its psychotropic effects.Receptors, Adrenergic, beta: One of two major pharmacologically defined classes of adrenergic receptors. The beta adrenergic receptors play an important role in regulating CARDIAC MUSCLE contraction, SMOOTH MUSCLE relaxation, and GLYCOGENOLYSIS.beta 2-Microglobulin: An 11-kDa protein associated with the outer membrane of many cells including lymphocytes. It is the small subunit of the MHC class I molecule. Association with beta 2-microglobulin is generally required for the transport of class I heavy chains from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. Beta 2-microglobulin is present in small amounts in serum, csf, and urine of normal people, and to a much greater degree in the urine and plasma of patients with tubular proteinemia, renal failure, or kidney transplants.Biphenyl CompoundsCells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Receptors, Interleukin-1: Cell surface receptors that are specific for INTERLEUKIN-1. Included under this heading are signaling receptors, non-signaling receptors and accessory proteins required for receptor signaling. Signaling from interleukin-1 receptors occurs via interaction with SIGNAL TRANSDUCING ADAPTOR PROTEINS such as MYELOID DIFFERENTIATION FACTOR 88.Nicotinic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to nicotinic cholinergic receptors (RECEPTORS, NICOTINIC) and block the actions of acetylcholine or cholinergic agonists. Nicotinic antagonists block synaptic transmission at autonomic ganglia, the skeletal neuromuscular junction, and at central nervous system nicotinic synapses.TetrazolesBenzazepines: Compounds with BENZENE fused to AZEPINES.Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-1 RECEPTORS.Interleukin-1: A soluble factor produced by MONOCYTES; MACROPHAGES, and other cells which activates T-lymphocytes and potentiates their response to mitogens or antigens. Interleukin-1 is a general term refers to either of the two distinct proteins, INTERLEUKIN-1ALPHA and INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. The biological effects of IL-1 include the ability to replace macrophage requirements for T-cell activation.Xanthines: Purine bases found in body tissues and fluids and in some plants.Pyridines: Compounds with a six membered aromatic ring containing NITROGEN. The saturated version is PIPERIDINES.Radioligand Assay: Quantitative determination of receptor (binding) proteins in body fluids or tissue using radioactively labeled binding reagents (e.g., antibodies, intracellular receptors, plasma binders).Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Serotonin Receptor Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that bind to and activate SEROTONIN RECEPTORS. Many serotonin receptor agonists are used as ANTIDEPRESSANTS; ANXIOLYTICS; and in the treatment of MIGRAINE DISORDERS.Peptides, Cyclic: Peptides whose amino and carboxy ends are linked together with a peptide bond forming a circular chain. Some of them are ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS. Some of them are biosynthesized non-ribosomally (PEPTIDE BIOSYNTHESIS, NON-RIBOSOMAL).Histamine H3 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate HISTAMINE H3 RECEPTORS. They have been used to correct SLEEP WAKE DISORDERS and MEMORY DISORDERS.Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC ALPHA-2 RECEPTORS.Indoles: Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number one carbon adjacent to the benzyl portion, in contrast to ISOINDOLES which have the nitrogen away from the six-membered ring.Sulfonamides: A group of compounds that contain the structure SO2NH2.Pyrazoles: Azoles of two nitrogens at the 1,2 positions, next to each other, in contrast with IMIDAZOLES in which they are at the 1,3 positions.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Losartan: An antagonist of ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR with antihypertensive activity due to the reduced pressor effect of ANGIOTENSIN II.GABA-B Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate GABA-B RECEPTORS thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous GABA-B RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Receptors, Bradykinin: Cell surface receptors that bind BRADYKININ and related KININS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The identified receptor types (B-1 and B-2, or BK-1 and BK-2) recognize endogenous KALLIDIN; t-kinins; and certain bradykinin fragments as well as bradykinin itself.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Substance P: An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.Endothelin-1: A 21-amino acid peptide produced in a variety of tissues including endothelial and vascular smooth-muscle cells, neurons and astrocytes in the central nervous system, and endometrial cells. It acts as a modulator of vasomotor tone, cell proliferation, and hormone production. (N Eng J Med 1995;333(6):356-63)Azepines: Seven membered heterocyclic rings containing a NITROGEN atom.Receptors, Neurokinin-1: A class of cell surface receptors for TACHYKININS with a preference for SUBSTANCE P. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors have been cloned and are members of the G protein coupled receptor superfamily. They are found on many cell types including central and peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, acinar cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells.Cimetidine: A histamine congener, it competitively inhibits HISTAMINE binding to HISTAMINE H2 RECEPTORS. Cimetidine has a range of pharmacological actions. It inhibits GASTRIC ACID secretion, as well as PEPSIN and GASTRIN output.Receptor, Endothelin B: A subtype of endothelin receptor found predominantly in the KIDNEY. It may play a role in reducing systemic ENDOTHELIN levels.Binding, Competitive: The interaction of two or more substrates or ligands with the same binding site. The displacement of one by the other is used in quantitative and selective affinity measurements.Adenosine A3 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that selectively bind to and block the activation of ADENOSINE A3 RECEPTORS.Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Integrin beta3: An integrin beta subunit of approximately 85-kDa in size which has been found in INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB-containing and INTEGRIN ALPHAV-containing heterodimers. Integrin beta3 occurs as three alternatively spliced isoforms, designated beta3A-C.Purinergic P2X Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P2X RECEPTORS. Included under this heading are antagonists for specific P2X receptor subtypes.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Devazepide: A derivative of benzodiazepine that acts on the cholecystokinin A (CCKA) receptor to antagonize CCK-8's (SINCALIDE) physiological and behavioral effects, such as pancreatic stimulation and inhibition of feeding.Receptors, Cholecystokinin: Cell surface proteins that bind cholecystokinin (CCK) with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Cholecystokinin receptors are activated by GASTRIN as well as by CCK-4; CCK-8; and CCK-33. Activation of these receptors evokes secretion of AMYLASE by pancreatic acinar cells, acid and PEPSIN by stomach mucosal cells, and contraction of the PYLORUS and GALLBLADDER. The role of the widespread CCK receptors in the central nervous system is not well understood.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.PyrrolidinesBehavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.QuinoxalinesReceptors, Vasopressin: Specific molecular sites or proteins on or in cells to which VASOPRESSINS bind or interact in order to modify the function of the cells. Two types of vasopressin receptor exist, the V1 receptor in the vascular smooth muscle and the V2 receptor in the kidneys. The V1 receptor can be subdivided into V1a and V1b (formerly V3) receptors.Ketanserin: A selective serotonin receptor antagonist with weak adrenergic receptor blocking properties. The drug is effective in lowering blood pressure in essential hypertension. It also inhibits platelet aggregation. It is well tolerated and is particularly effective in older patients.Serotonin 5-HT4 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate SEROTONIN 5-HT4 RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of SEROTONIN or SEROTONIN RECEPTOR AGONISTS.2-Amino-5-phosphonovalerate: The D-enantiomer is a potent and specific antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE). The L form is inactive at NMDA receptors but may affect the AP4 (2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate; APB) excitatory amino acid receptors.PiperazinesReceptor, Cannabinoid, CB1: A subclass of cannabinoid receptor found primarily on central and peripheral NEURONS where it may play a role modulating NEUROTRANSMITTER release.Benzimidazoles: Compounds with a BENZENE fused to IMIDAZOLES.Receptors, Thromboxane: Cell surface proteins that bind THROMBOXANES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Some thromboxane receptors act via the inositol phosphate and diacylglycerol second messenger systems.Receptors, Dopamine D2: A subfamily of G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS that bind the neurotransmitter DOPAMINE and modulate its effects. D2-class receptor genes contain INTRONS, and the receptors inhibit ADENYLYL CYCLASES.Naltrexone: Derivative of noroxymorphone that is the N-cyclopropylmethyl congener of NALOXONE. It is a narcotic antagonist that is effective orally, longer lasting and more potent than naloxone, and has been proposed for the treatment of heroin addiction. The FDA has approved naltrexone for the treatment of alcohol dependence.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Bradykinin: A nonapeptide messenger that is enzymatically produced from KALLIDIN in the blood where it is a potent but short-lived agent of arteriolar dilation and increased capillary permeability. Bradykinin is also released from MAST CELLS during asthma attacks, from gut walls as a gastrointestinal vasodilator, from damaged tissues as a pain signal, and may be a neurotransmitter.Adrenergic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. Adrenergic antagonists block the actions of the endogenous adrenergic transmitters EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE.Famotidine: A competitive histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Its main pharmacodynamic effect is the inhibition of gastric secretion.Injections, Intraventricular: Injections into the cerebral ventricles.Adenosine: A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.Receptors, Neurokinin-2: A class of cell surface receptors for tachykinins that prefers neurokinin A; (NKA, substance K, neurokinin alpha, neuromedin L), neuropeptide K; (NPK); or neuropeptide gamma over other tachykinins. Neurokinin-2 (NK-2) receptors have been cloned and are similar to other G-protein coupled receptors.Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate alpha-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of endogenous or exogenous adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic alpha-antagonists are used in the treatment of hypertension, vasospasm, peripheral vascular disease, shock, and pheochromocytoma.Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that inhibit or block the activity of CANNABINOID RECEPTORS.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Transforming Growth Factor beta: A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.Naloxone: A specific opiate antagonist that has no agonist activity. It is a competitive antagonist at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors.QuinuclidinesHistamine: An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.BenzodiazepinonesCell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Bicuculline: An isoquinoline alkaloid obtained from Dicentra cucullaria and other plants. It is a competitive antagonist for GABA-A receptors.Mice, Inbred C57BLAdrenergic beta-2 Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC BETA-2 RECEPTORS.Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTORS by MINERALOCORTICOIDS such as ALDOSTERONE.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Receptors, Histamine H3: A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H3 receptors were first recognized as inhibitory autoreceptors on histamine-containing nerve terminals and have since been shown to regulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.QuinolinesReceptors, Opioid: Cell membrane proteins that bind opioids and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The endogenous ligands for opioid receptors in mammals include three families of peptides, the enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. The receptor classes include mu, delta, and kappa receptors. Sigma receptors bind several psychoactive substances, including certain opioids, but their endogenous ligands are not known.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Receptors, Purinergic P1: A class of cell surface receptors that prefer ADENOSINE to other endogenous PURINES. Purinergic P1 receptors are widespread in the body including the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, and nervous systems. There are at least two pharmacologically distinguishable types (A1 and A2, or Ri and Ra).Receptor, Bradykinin B2: A constitutively expressed subtype of bradykinin receptor that may play a role in the acute phase of the inflammatory and pain response. It has high specificity for intact forms of BRADYKININ and KALLIDIN. The receptor is coupled to G-PROTEIN, GQ-G11 ALPHA FAMILY and G-PROTEIN, GI-GO ALPHA FAMILY signaling proteins.Pyrilamine: A histamine H1 antagonist. It has mild hypnotic properties and some local anesthetic action and is used for allergies (including skin eruptions) both parenterally and locally. It is a common ingredient of cold remedies.PhenylpropionatesEndothelins: 21-Amino-acid peptides produced by vascular endothelial cells and functioning as potent vasoconstrictors. The endothelin family consists of three members, ENDOTHELIN-1; ENDOTHELIN-2; and ENDOTHELIN-3. All three peptides contain 21 amino acids, but vary in amino acid composition. The three peptides produce vasoconstrictor and pressor responses in various parts of the body. However, the quantitative profiles of the pharmacological activities are considerably different among the three isopeptides.Imidazoles: Compounds containing 1,3-diazole, a five membered aromatic ring containing two nitrogen atoms separated by one of the carbons. Chemically reduced ones include IMIDAZOLINES and IMIDAZOLIDINES. Distinguish from 1,2-diazole (PYRAZOLES).Peptide Fragments: Partial proteins formed by partial hydrolysis of complete proteins or generated through PROTEIN ENGINEERING techniques.Capsaicin: An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.Synaptic Transmission: The communication from a NEURON to a target (neuron, muscle, or secretory cell) across a SYNAPSE. In chemical synaptic transmission, the presynaptic neuron releases a NEUROTRANSMITTER that diffuses across the synaptic cleft and binds to specific synaptic receptors, activating them. The activated receptors modulate specific ion channels and/or second-messenger systems in the postsynaptic cell. In electrical synaptic transmission, electrical signals are communicated as an ionic current flow across ELECTRICAL SYNAPSES.Glutamic Acid: A non-essential amino acid naturally occurring in the L-form. Glutamic acid is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone: Cell surface proteins that bind corticotropin-releasing hormone with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The corticotropin releasing-hormone receptors on anterior pituitary cells mediate the stimulation of corticotropin release by hypothalamic corticotropin releasing factor. The physiological consequence of activating corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors on central neurons is not well understood.N-Methylaspartate: An amino acid that, as the D-isomer, is the defining agonist for the NMDA receptor subtype of glutamate receptors (RECEPTORS, NMDA).Receptors, Dopamine D1: A subfamily of G-PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTORS that bind the neurotransmitter DOPAMINE and modulate its effects. D1-class receptor genes lack INTRONS, and the receptors stimulate ADENYLYL CYCLASES.Isoindoles: Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number two carbon, in contrast to INDOLES which have the nitrogen adjacent to the six-membered ring.Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Cell surface proteins that bind CALCITONIN GENE-RELATED PEPTIDE with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. CGRP receptors are present in both the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM and the periphery. They are formed via the heterodimerization of the CALCITONIN RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN and RECEPTOR ACTIVITY-MODIFYING PROTEIN 1.Propanolamines: AMINO ALCOHOLS containing the propanolamine (NH2CH2CHOHCH2) group and its derivatives.Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1: An angiotensin receptor subtype that is expressed at high levels in a variety of adult tissues including the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM, the KIDNEY, the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM and the NERVOUS SYSTEM. Activation of the type 1 angiotensin receptor causes VASOCONSTRICTION and sodium retention.Antihypertensive Agents: Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.Receptors, Tachykinin: Cell surface proteins that bind TACHYKININS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Three classes of tachykinin receptors have been characterized, the NK-1; NK-2; and NK-3; which prefer, respectively, SUBSTANCE P; NEUROKININ A; and NEUROKININ B.Purinergic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to and block the activation of PURINERGIC RECEPTORS.Receptors, Opioid, mu: A class of opioid receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Mu opioid receptors bind, in decreasing order of affinity, endorphins, dynorphins, met-enkephalin, and leu-enkephalin. They have also been shown to be molecular receptors for morphine.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Receptors, Angiotensin: Cell surface proteins that bind ANGIOTENSINS and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells.Receptor, Adenosine A2A: A subclass of adenosine A2 receptors found in LEUKOCYTES, the SPLEEN, the THYMUS and a variety of other tissues. It is generally considered to be a receptor for ADENOSINE that couples to the GS, STIMULATORY G-PROTEIN.Enzyme Inhibitors: Compounds or agents that combine with an enzyme in such a manner as to prevent the normal substrate-enzyme combination and the catalytic reaction.Dopamine: One of the catecholamine NEUROTRANSMITTERS in the brain. It is derived from TYROSINE and is the precursor to NOREPINEPHRINE and EPINEPHRINE. Dopamine is a major transmitter in the extrapyramidal system of the brain, and important in regulating movement. A family of receptors (RECEPTORS, DOPAMINE) mediate its action.Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled: The largest family of cell surface receptors involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They share a common structure and signal through HETEROTRIMERIC G-PROTEINS.Naphthalenes: Two-ring crystalline hydrocarbons isolated from coal tar. They are used as intermediates in chemical synthesis, as insect repellents, fungicides, lubricants, preservatives, and, formerly, as topical antiseptics.Ondansetron: A competitive serotonin type 3 receptor antagonist. It is effective in the treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs, including cisplatin, and has reported anxiolytic and neuroleptic properties.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: The most common inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.Memantine: AMANTADINE derivative that has some dopaminergic effects. It has been proposed as an antiparkinson agent.Proglumide: A drug that exerts an inhibitory effect on gastric secretion and reduces gastrointestinal motility. It is used clinically in the drug therapy of gastrointestinal ulcers.Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A: A serotonin receptor subtype found widely distributed in peripheral tissues where it mediates the contractile responses of variety of tissues that contain SMOOTH MUSCLE. Selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonists include KETANSERIN. The 5-HT2A subtype is also located in BASAL GANGLIA and CEREBRAL CORTEX of the BRAIN where it mediates the effects of HALLUCINOGENS such as LSD.Receptors, Opioid, kappa: A class of opioid receptors recognized by its pharmacological profile. Kappa opioid receptors bind dynorphins with a higher affinity than endorphins which are themselves preferred to enkephalins.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Calcium Channel Blockers: A class of drugs that act by selective inhibition of calcium influx through cellular membranes.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Dopamine Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate dopamine receptors.CHO Cells: CELL LINE derived from the ovary of the Chinese hamster, Cricetulus griseus (CRICETULUS). The species is a favorite for cytogenetic studies because of its small chromosome number. The cell line has provided model systems for the study of genetic alterations in cultured mammalian cells.Dioxanes: 1,4-Diethylene dioxides. Industrial solvents. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), dioxane itself may "reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen." (Merck Index, 11th ed)Receptors, Neurotransmitter: Cell surface receptors that bind signalling molecules released by neurons and convert these signals into intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Neurotransmitter is used here in its most general sense, including not only messengers that act to regulate ion channels, but also those which act on second messenger systems and those which may act at a distance from their release sites. Included are receptors for neuromodulators, neuroregulators, neuromediators, and neurohumors, whether or not located at synapses.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Muscle, Smooth: Unstriated and unstriped muscle, one of the muscles of the internal organs, blood vessels, hair follicles, etc. Contractile elements are elongated, usually spindle-shaped cells with centrally located nuclei. Smooth muscle fibers are bound together into sheets or bundles by reticular fibers and frequently elastic nets are also abundant. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Granisetron: A serotonin receptor (5HT-3 selective) antagonist that has been used as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy patients.Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2: A subclass of beta-adrenergic receptors (RECEPTORS, ADRENERGIC, BETA). The adrenergic beta-2 receptors are more sensitive to EPINEPHRINE than to NOREPINEPHRINE and have a high affinity for the agonist TERBUTALINE. They are widespread, with clinically important roles in SKELETAL MUSCLE; LIVER; and vascular, bronchial, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary SMOOTH MUSCLE.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3: A subclass of serotonin receptors that form cation channels and mediate signal transduction by depolarizing the cell membrane. The cation channels are formed from 5 receptor subunits. When stimulated the receptors allow the selective passage of SODIUM; POTASSIUM; and CALCIUM.Tachykinins: A family of biologically active peptides sharing a common conserved C-terminal sequence, -Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2, where X is either an aromatic or a branched aliphatic amino acid. Members of this family have been found in mammals, amphibians, and mollusks. Tachykinins have diverse pharmacological actions in the central nervous system and the cardiovascular, genitourinary, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems, as well as in glandular tissues. This diversity of activity is due to the existence of three or more subtypes of tachykinin receptors.Neurokinin A: A mammalian neuropeptide of 10 amino acids that belongs to the tachykinin family. It is similar in structure and action to SUBSTANCE P and NEUROKININ B with the ability to excite neurons, dilate blood vessels, and contract smooth muscles, such as those in the BRONCHI.Vasoconstriction: The physiological narrowing of BLOOD VESSELS by contraction of the VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE.Sulpiride: A dopamine D2-receptor antagonist. It has been used therapeutically as an antidepressant, antipsychotic, and as a digestive aid. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Microinjections: The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.Ritanserin: A selective and potent serotonin-2 antagonist that is effective in the treatment of a variety of syndromes related to anxiety and depression. The drug also improves the subjective quality of sleep and decreases portal pressure.Ranitidine: A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Morphine: The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Analgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2: An angiotensin receptor subtype that is expressed at high levels in fetal tissues. Many effects of the angiotensin type 2 receptor such as VASODILATION and sodium loss are the opposite of that of the ANGIOTENSIN TYPE 1 RECEPTOR.Receptors, Histamine H2: A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H2 receptors act via G-proteins to stimulate ADENYLYL CYCLASES. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are gastric acid secretion, smooth muscle relaxation, inotropic and chronotropic effects on heart muscle, and inhibition of lymphocyte function. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)Patch-Clamp Techniques: An electrophysiologic technique for studying cells, cell membranes, and occasionally isolated organelles. All patch-clamp methods rely on a very high-resistance seal between a micropipette and a membrane; the seal is usually attained by gentle suction. The four most common variants include on-cell patch, inside-out patch, outside-out patch, and whole-cell clamp. Patch-clamp methods are commonly used to voltage clamp, that is control the voltage across the membrane and measure current flow, but current-clamp methods, in which the current is controlled and the voltage is measured, are also used.Receptors, Neuropeptide Y: Cell surface proteins that bind neuropeptide Y with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells.Platelet Activating Factor: A phospholipid derivative formed by PLATELETS; BASOPHILS; NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and MACROPHAGES. It is a potent platelet aggregating agent and inducer of systemic anaphylactic symptoms, including HYPOTENSION; THROMBOCYTOPENIA; NEUTROPENIA; and BRONCHOCONSTRICTION.Receptors, GABA-A: Cell surface proteins which bind GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID and contain an integral membrane chloride channel. Each receptor is assembled as a pentamer from a pool of at least 19 different possible subunits. The receptors belong to a superfamily that share a common CYSTEINE loop.Receptor, Adenosine A1: A subtype of ADENOSINE RECEPTOR that is found expressed in a variety of tissues including the BRAIN and DORSAL HORN NEURONS. The receptor is generally considered to be coupled to the GI, INHIBITORY G-PROTEIN which causes down regulation of CYCLIC AMP.Haloperidol: A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279)MorpholinesCyclic AMP: An adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group which is esterified to both the 3'- and 5'-positions of the sugar moiety. It is a second messenger and a key intracellular regulator, functioning as a mediator of activity for a number of hormones, including epinephrine, glucagon, and ACTH.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Thromboxane A2: An unstable intermediate between the prostaglandin endoperoxides and thromboxane B2. The compound has a bicyclic oxaneoxetane structure. It is a potent inducer of platelet aggregation and causes vasoconstriction. It is the principal component of rabbit aorta contracting substance (RCS).TriazolesBornanes8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin: A serotonin 1A-receptor agonist that is used experimentally to test the effects of serotonin.Norepinephrine: Precursor of epinephrine that is secreted by the adrenal medulla and is a widespread central and autonomic neurotransmitter. Norepinephrine is the principal transmitter of most postganglionic sympathetic fibers and of the diffuse projection system in the brain arising from the locus ceruleus. It is also found in plants and is used pharmacologically as a sympathomimetic.Hippocampus: A curved elevation of GRAY MATTER extending the entire length of the floor of the TEMPORAL HORN of the LATERAL VENTRICLE (see also TEMPORAL LOBE). The hippocampus proper, subiculum, and DENTATE GYRUS constitute the hippocampal formation. Sometimes authors include the ENTORHINAL CORTEX in the hippocampal formation.Integrin alpha5beta1: An integrin found in FIBROBLASTS; PLATELETS; MONOCYTES, and LYMPHOCYTES. Integrin alpha5beta1 is the classical receptor for FIBRONECTIN, but it also functions as a receptor for LAMININ and several other EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.Histamine Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate histamine receptors. Although they have been suggested for a variety of clinical applications histamine agonists have so far been more widely used in research than therapeutically.Receptor, Bradykinin B1: A subtype of BRADYKININ RECEPTOR that is induced in response to INFLAMMATION. It may play a role in chronic inflammation and has a high specificity for KININS lacking the C-terminal ARGININE such as des-Arg(10)-kallidin and des-Arg(9)-bradykinin. The receptor is coupled to G-PROTEIN, GQ-G11 ALPHA FAMILY and G-PROTEIN, GI-GO ALPHA FAMILY signaling proteins.Prostaglandin Antagonists: Compounds that inhibit the action of prostaglandins.Adrenergic beta-Agonists: Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta-adrenergic receptors.6-Cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione: A potent excitatory amino acid antagonist with a preference for non-NMDA iontropic receptors. It is used primarily as a research tool.Prazosin: A selective adrenergic alpha-1 antagonist used in the treatment of HEART FAILURE; HYPERTENSION; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; RAYNAUD DISEASE; PROSTATIC HYPERTROPHY; and URINARY RETENTION.
(1/144) Functional and molecular biological evidence for a possible beta3-adrenoceptor in the human detrusor muscle.

The possible existence of a beta3-adrenergic receptor (beta3-AR) in the human detrusor muscle was investigated by in vitro functional studies and analysis of mRNA expression. Isoprenaline, noradrenaline and adrenaline each produced a concentration-dependent relaxation of the human detrusor. The rank order for their relaxing potencies was isoprenaline (pD2 6.37+/-0.07) > or = noradrenaline (pD2 6.07+/-0.12) > or = adrenaline (pD2 5.88< or =0.11). Neither dobutamine (beta1- and beta2-AR agonist) nor procaterol (beta2-AR agonist) produced any significant relaxation at concentrations up to 10(-5) M. BRL37344A, CL316243 and CGP-12177A (beta3-AR agonists), relaxed the preparations significantly at concentrations higher than 10(-6) M. The pD2 values for BRL37344A, CL316243 and CGP-12177A were 6.42+/-0.25, 5.53+/-0.09 and 5.74+/-0.14, respectively. CGP-20712A (10(-7) - 10(-5) M), a beta1-AR antagonist, did not affect the isoprenaline-induced relaxation. On the other hand, ICI-118,551, a beta2-AR antagonist, produced a rightward parallel shift of the concentration-relaxation curve for isoprenaline only at the highest concentration used (10(-5) > M) and its pKB value was 5.71+/-0.19. Moreover, SR58894A (10(-7) - 10(-5) M), a beta3-AR antagonist, caused a rightward shift of the concentration-relaxation curve for isoprenaline in a concentration-dependent manner. The pA2 value and slope obtained from Schild plots were 6.24+/-0.20 and 0.68+/-0.31. The beta1-, beta2- and beta3-AR mRNAs were all positively expressed in detrusor smooth muscle preparations in a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. In conclusion, the present results provide the first evidence for the existence of the beta3-AR subtype in the human detrusor. They also suggest that the relaxation induced by adrenergic stimulation of the human detrusor is mediated mainly through beta3-AR activation.  (+info)

(2/144) Inhibition of beta(2)-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor endocytosis after depletion of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate.

Recent evidence supporting a role for phosphoinositides in the endocytosis of phospholipase C-coupled receptors has prompted an investigation of whether there exists a similar requirement for the internalization of adenylyl cyclase-linked receptors. When 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, which possess both muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) that couple to phospholipase C and beta-adrenergic receptors (beta(2)-ARs) linked to adenylyl cyclase, were pretreated with wortmannin (WT) at a concentration known to inhibit phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase activity, the labeling of both phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) was reduced. Stimulation of phosphoinositide breakdown by activation of mAChRs in WT-pretreated cells led to a further depletion of PIP(2). As previously demonstrated for SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, inclusion of WT inhibited the endocytosis of mAChRs in 1321N1 cells by >85%. In contrast, the internalization of beta(2)-ARs was only partially ( approximately 30%) prevented. However, when the concentration of PIP(2) was further reduced by exposure of WT-pretreated 1321N1 cells to a muscarinic agonist, the endocytosis of beta(2)-ARs was substantially inhibited (>70%). Lower concentrations of WT (100 nM) that were sufficient to fully inhibit phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity had no effect on either phosphoinositide synthesis or receptor endocytosis. The results indicate that the agonist-induced endocytosis of an adenylyl cyclase-linked receptor such as the beta(2)-AR, like that of the phospholipase C-coupled mAChR, is dependent on the synthesis of phosphoinositides and, in particular, that of PIP(2).  (+info)

(3/144) G(i) protein-mediated functional compartmentalization of cardiac beta(2)-adrenergic signaling.

In contrast to beta(1)-adrenoreceptor (beta(1)-AR) signaling, beta(2)-AR stimulation in cardiomyocytes augments L-type Ca(2+) current in a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent manner but fails to phosphorylate phospholamban, indicating that the beta(2)-AR-induced cAMP/PKA signaling is highly localized. Here we show that inhibition of G(i) proteins with pertussis toxin (PTX) permits a full phospholamban phosphorylation and a de novo relaxant effect following beta(2)-AR stimulation, converting the localized beta(2)-AR signaling to a global signaling mode similar to that of beta(1)-AR. Thus, beta(2)-AR-mediated G(i) activation constricts the cAMP signaling to the sarcolemma. PTX treatment did not significantly affect the beta(2)-AR-stimulated PKA activation. Similar to G(i) inhibition, a protein phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A (3 x 10(-8) M), selectively enhanced the beta(2)-AR but not beta(1)-AR-mediated contractile response. Furthermore, PTX and calyculin A treatment had a non-additive potentiating effect on the beta(2)-AR-mediated positive inotropic response. These results suggest that the interaction of the beta(2)-AR-coupled G(i) and G(s) signaling affects the local balance of protein kinase and phosphatase activities. Thus, the additional coupling of beta(2)-AR to G(i) proteins is a key factor causing the compartmentalization of beta(2)-AR-induced cAMP signaling.  (+info)

(4/144) Isoeugenolol: a selective beta1-adrenergic antagonist with tracheal and vascular smooth muscle relaxant properties.

Isoeugenolol (1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mg/kg, i.v.) produced a dose-dependent bradycardia and a decrease in blood pressure in anesthetized Wistar rats. Isoeugenolol inhibited the tachycardia effects induced by (-)isoproterenol, but had no blocking effect on the arterial pressor responses induced by (-)phenylephrine. In isolated guinea pig tissues, isoeugenolol antagonized (-)isoproterenol-induced positive inotropic and chronotropic effects on the atria and tracheal relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner. The apparent pA2 values for isoeugenolol on right atria, left atria and trachea were 7.63+/-0.03, 7.89+/-0.12 and 6.12+/-0.05, respectively, indicating that isoeugenolol was a highly selective beta1-adrenoceptor blocker. On the other hand, isoeugenolol produced a mild direct cardiac depression at high concentration and was without intrinsic sympathomimetic activity (ISA). In isolated rat thoracic aorta, isoeugenolol relaxed more potently the contractions induced by (-)phenylephrine (10 microM) and 5-HT (10 microM) than those by high K+ (75 mM). In isolated guinea pig trachea, isoeugenolol attenuated the carbachol (1 microM)-con-tracted trachea more significantly than those contracted with high K+. Furthermore, the binding characteristics of isoeugenolol and various beta-adrenoceptor antagonists were evaluated in [3H]CGP-12177 binding to rat ventricle, lung and interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) membranes. The -log IC50 values of isoeugenolol for predominate beta1-, beta2- and beta3-adrenergic receptor sites were 5.82+/-0.09, 4.74+/-0.05 and 4.73+/-0.12, respectively. In conclusion, isoeugenolol was found to be a highly selective beta1-adrenoceptor antagonist with tracheal and vascular smooth muscle relaxant activities, but was devoid of alpha-adrenoceptor-blocking action.  (+info)

(5/144) Dobutamine as selective beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist in in vivo studies on human thermogenesis and lipid utilization.

The use of dobutamine as selective beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist in in vivo studies on human thermogenesis and lipid utilization was investigated in 20 men. At 2.5, 5, and 10 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1), dobutamine induced significant increases in energy expenditure, lipid oxidation, and lipolysis. The beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol (bolus: 42.5 microg/kg, infusion: 1.02 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) blocked all dobutamine-induced effects on thermogenesis and lipid utilization. All parameters remained at levels comparable to those during saline infusion. The dose of atenolol used did not inhibit beta(2)-adrenoceptor-specific changes in energy expenditure, lipid oxidation, and lipolysis during salbutamol infusion (85 ng x kg(-1) x min(-1)). This indicates that atenolol was specific for beta(1)-adrenoceptors and did not camouflage concomitant beta(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation during dobutamine infusion. Therefore, we conclude that dobutamine can be used as a selective beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist at dosages +info)

(6/144) Selective beta1-adrenoceptor blockade enhances the activity of the stimulatory G-protein in human atrial myocardium.

1. Chronic selective beta1-adrenoceptor (beta1AR) blocker treatment enhances the sensitivity of beta2-adrenoceptor (beta2AR) in human heart (Hall et al., 1990; 1991). To clarify the mechanism of the cross-sensitization between beta1AR and beta2AR, we determined whether the stimulatory G-protein (G(s)alpha) function is increased in atria from beta1AR-blocker treated patients compared with non-beta-blocked patients, and investigated whether this change is caused by an alteration of post-translational modification of Gsalpha protein. 2. G(s)alpha function was determined by reconstitution of human atrial G(s)alpha into S49 cyc- cell membranes. In the reconstitution system, GTPgammaS stimulated cyclic AMP generation in a dose-dependent manner. Upon 10(-4) M GTPgammaS stimulation, G(s)alpha activity in the beta1AR-blocker, atenolol, treated group (78.2+/-10. 3 pmol cyclic AMP mg(-1) min(-1) 10(-3)) was 65% higher than that in non-beta-blocked patients (47.3+/-6.3 pmol cyclic AMP mg(-1) min(-1) 10(-3), n=15, P=0.02). 3. Isoelectric point (pI) valu G(s)alpha were measured by two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-E) and the amount of each isoform quantified by image analysis of a Western blot of the gel using specific antibody. Multiple isoforms of G(s)alpha were detected by 2D-E with different pI values. There were no significant differences between the groups of patients in either pI values or the proportions of the acidic isoforms of G(s)alpha to the main basic form (n=12, P>0.05). 4. The results suggest that chronic beta1AR-blockade enhances Gsalpha function in human atrium, and this may account in part for the hypersensitivity of beta2AR and other Gs-coupled receptors during beta1AR-blockade. The increased G(s)alpha function is unlikely to be caused directly by blockade of protein kinase A phosphorylation of G(s)alpha protein.  (+info)

(7/144) Enhancement by epinephrine of benzylpenicillin transport in rat small intestine.

The perfusion of rat small intestinal lumen with epinephrine (0.1 mM) resulted in a significant increase in the amount of benzylpenicillin (BP) transported from the mucosal to the serosal side. In this study, the perfusion of the lumen with phenylephrine, clonidine, dobutamine, or salbutamol had no effect on BP transport. However, the combinations of phenylephrine and isoproterenol, clonidine and isoproterenol, and phenylephrine and salbutamol increased the BP transport to a similar extent as that observed with epinephrine alone. Tolazolin or propranolol inhibited the epinephrine-induced increase in BP transport. An increase in the intracellular concentration of cAMP in conjunction with specific activation of either alpha(1)- or alpha(2)-adrenoceptors induced an increase in BP transport similar to that observed in response to epinephrine alone. Staurosporine or N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide abolished the epinephrine-induced increase in BP transport. Peptides or either zwitterionic or anionic cephalosporins also blocked the effect of epinephrine on BP transport. The extent of BP uptake into brush border or basolateral membrane vesicles prepared from epinephrine-perfused intestinal loops was markedly greater than that into vesicles prepared from control loops. The perfusion of intestinal lumen with carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxy phenylhydrazone, amiloride, or ouabain inhibited epinephrine-induced BP transport. These results indicate that the interaction of epinephrine with both beta(2)-adrenoceptors and either alpha(1)- or alpha(2-)adrenoceptors markedly stimulates the BP transport, an effect likely mediated by the enhancement of the function in the brush border membrane of intestinal epithelial cells coupled with the generation of an H(+) gradient.  (+info)

(8/144) Negative inotropic effects of isoprenaline on isolated left atrial assays from aged transgenic mice with cardiac over-expression of human beta(2)-adrenoceptors.

The action of isoprenaline has been evaluated in an isolated, left atrial assay, from aged transgenic mice with cardiac-specific over-expression of the beta(2)-adrenoceptor. In the assay, isoprenaline produced a negative inotropic concentration-response curve that was not altered by incubation with CGP-20712A (1 microM), a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist. However, after incubation with ICI-118,551 (300 nM), a selective beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, isoprenaline produced a positive inotropic concentration-effect curve that was located to the left of the negative inotropic curve. This suggests that the negative inotropic effect was mediated by a homogenous population of negatively-coupled beta(2)-adrenoceptors. In the presence of CGP-20712A (300 nM), the positive curve was shifted to the right, suggesting that the positive inotropic effect was mediated, at least in part, by beta(1)-adrenoceptors. These results differ substantially from those previously obtained in young transgenic mice. An outline of an explanatory model, based on a concept of over-expressed receptors 'stealing' G-proteins, is suggested.  (+info)

*  Beta-2 adrenergic antagonist
... β2-adrenoceptor antagonist) is an adrenergic antagonist which blocks the beta-2 adrenergic receptors of cells, with either high ... ICI-118,551 Butaxamine Propranolol Betablocker Beta-2 adrenergic receptor Beta2-adrenergic agonist Bilski, AJ; Halliday, SE; ... an antagonist for β2 and for β1 or β3 adrenoceptors) like the non-selective betablocker Propranolol. ... Fitzgerald, JD; Wale, JL (1983). "The pharmacology of a beta 2-selective adrenoceptor antagonist (ICI 118,551)". J Cardiovasc ...
*  Beta-2 adrenergic receptor
... denotes selective antagonist to the receptor. Beta-2 adrenergic receptor has been shown to interact with: AKAP12, OPRD1, Grb2, ... "Insulin stimulates sequestration of beta-adrenergic receptors and enhanced association of beta-adrenergic receptors with Grb2 ... Other adrenergic receptors Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor Beta-1 adrenergic receptor Beta-3 adrenergic ... "Cloning and sequence analysis of the human brain beta-adrenergic receptor. Evolutionary relationship to rodent and avian beta- ...
*  Falintolol
... is a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Conti, P; Dallanoce, C; De Amici, M; De Micheli, C; Klotz, KN (1998). " ... "Synthesis of new delta 2-isoxazoline derivatives and their pharmacological characterization as beta-adrenergic receptor ... antagonists". Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry. 6 (4): 401-8. doi:10.1016/s0968-0896(97)10051-7. PMID 9597184. ...
*  Beta-3 adrenergic receptor
"Potent and selective human beta(3)-adrenergic receptor antagonists". The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics ... Beta-3 adrenergic receptor has been shown to interact with Src. Other adrenergic receptors Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor Alpha-2 ... The beta-3 adrenergic receptor (β3 adrenoreceptor), also known as ADRB3, is a beta-adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the ... adrenergic receptor Beta-1 adrenergic receptor Beta-2 adrenergic receptor Beta Blocker GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ...
*  Dopexamine
Effects of depexamine may be suppressed by concomitant use with ß2-adrenergic and dopamine receptor antagonists requires ... a novel agonist at peripheral dopamine receptors and beta 2-adrenoceptors". British Journal of Pharmacology. 85 (3): 599-608. ... It is not an α-adrenergic agonist, does not cause vasoconstriction, and is not a pressor agent. As of 2004 there was some ... Dopexamine stimulates beta-2 adrenergic receptors and peripheral dopamine receptor D1 and dopamine receptor D2. It also ...
*  Flestolol
... is a short-acting beta adrenergic receptor antagonist. Acylation of glycidol (2) with the acid chloride 1 produces ... 1. Novel .beta.-blockers with ultrashort duration of action". Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 27 (8): 1007. doi:10.1021/ ...
*  Three-finger toxin
... causes decreased heart rate and are thought to function as beta blockers, antagonists for the beta-1 and beta-2 adrenergic ... of Three-Finger Fold Toxins Creates Ligands with Original Pharmacological Profiles for Muscarinic and Adrenergic Receptors". ... a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Muscarinic toxins can be either receptor agonists or receptor antagonists, and in some ... Novel Antagonists of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors from Snake Venom". ACS Chemical Biology. 10 (12): 2805-2815. doi:10.1021 ...
*  Beta-3 adrenergic antagonist
... is an adrenergic antagonist which blocks the Beta-3 adrenergic receptors of cells, with either high specificity (an antagonist ... "Potent and selective human beta(3)-adrenergic receptor antagonists". The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics ... SR 59230A Carvedilol Betablocker Beta-3 adrenergic receptor Candelore MR, Deng L, Tota L, Guan XM, Amend A, Liu Y, Newbold R, ... A Beta-3 adrenergic antagonist (β3-adrenoceptor antagonist) ... an antagonist for β3 and for β1 or β2 adrenoceptors) like the ...
*  Alpha-2A adrenergic receptor
... the sites for beta-adrenergic receptor kinase-mediated phosphorylation and desensitization of the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor ... The alpha-2A adrenergic receptor (α2A adrenoceptor), also known as ADRA2A, is an α2 adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the ... α2 adrenergic receptors include 3 highly homologous subtypes: α2A, α2B, and α2C. These receptors have a critical role in ... ADRA2A adrenergic, alpha-2A-, receptor". "α2A-adrenoceptor". IUPHAR Database of Receptors and Ion Channels. International Union ...
*  Adrenergic receptor
"Functional studies of the first selective beta 3-adrenergic receptor antagonist SR 59230A in rat brown adipocytes". Molecular ... Beta adrenergic receptor kinase Beta adrenergic receptor kinase-2 Cannon WB, Rosenbluth A (31 May 1933). "Studies On Conditions ... Basic Neurochemistry: α- and β-Adrenergic Receptors Brief overview of functions of the β3 receptor Theory of receptor ... ISBN 0-443-06911-5. Alpha receptors illustrated The Adrenergic Receptors "Adrenoceptors". IUPHAR Database of Receptors and Ion ...
*  Primary polydipsia
... an angiotensin II receptor antagonist Propranolol, a sympatholytic beta blocker Vasopressin receptor antagonists, such as ... and the effects of an adjunctive angiotensin-II receptor blocking drug (irbesartan)". The Australian and New Zealand Journal of ... 66 (2): 283-286. ISSN 1534-7796. PMID 15039516. (subscription required) Lee, H. S.; Kwon, K. Y.; Alphs, L. D.; Meltzer, H. Y. ( ... 157 (2): 569-593. doi:10.1111/j.1749-6632.1969.tb12908.x. ISSN 1749-6632. Siegler EL, Tamres D, Berlin JA, Allen-Taylor L, ...
*  Tiprenolol
... is a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist. Allen, JD; Shanks, RG (1974). "Effects of tiprenolol, practolol and ... 51 (2): 179-85. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.1974.tb09645.x. PMC 1776753 . PMID 4155971. ...
*  Tolamolol
... is a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist. Curtis-Prior, PB; Gadd, AL (1990). "Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists and human ... 42 (3): 220-2. doi:10.1111/j.2042-7158.1990.tb05395.x. PMID 1974626. ...
*  Glaucoma medication
... a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist Glaucoma Basic and clinical science course (2011-2012). Glaucoma. American Academy of ... Adrenergic antagonists (nonselective and selective Beta1-antagonists) Alpha 2 agonists Hyperosmotic agents Fotil is a ...
*  Vascular smooth muscle
The main endogenous agonist of these cell receptors is norepinephrine (NE). The adrenergic receptors exert opposite physiologic ... Antagonists of α 1 {\displaystyle \alpha _{1}} receptors (doxazosin, prazosin) cause vasodilation (i.e. decrease in vascular ... beta _{2}} receptors causes vasodilation and low blood pressure (i.e. the effect is opposite of the one resulting from ... Vascular smooth muscle is innervated primarily by the sympathetic nervous system through adrenergic receptors (adrenoceptors). ...
*  Beta-1 adrenergic receptor
Beta blockers) β1-selective antagonists include: Acebutolol (in hypertension, angina pectoris and arrhythmias) Atenolol (in ... The beta-1 adrenergic receptor (β1 adrenoreceptor), also known as ADRB1, is a beta-adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the ... "The cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor. Structural similarities of beta 1 and beta 2 receptor subtypes demonstrated by ... "beta 1-adrenergic receptor association with PSD-95. Inhibition of receptor internalization and facilitation of beta 1- ...
*  Sulfinalol
... is a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist. The methyl group on a sulfoxide is sufficiently acidic to substitute for ... "Studies on the mechanism of the acute antihypertensive and vasodilator actions of several beta-adrenoceptor antagonists". J. ... Bromination followed by condensation with 4-(4-methoxyphenyl)butan-2-amine (not PMA) gives the aminoketone 3. Successive ...
*  Prostaglandin DP1 receptor
Asapiprant (S-555739) and Laropiprant are selective receptor antagonists of DP1 whereas Vidupiprant is a receptor antagonist ... also known as β-Adrenergic receptor kinase 2 [BARK1]) and arrestin 2 (also known as Arrestin beta 1 [ARRB1]). These agents act ... Prostaglandin receptors Prostanoid receptors Prostaglandin DP2 receptor Eicosanoid receptor GRCh38: Ensembl release 89: ... is primarily a receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). The receptor is a member of the Prostaglandin receptors belonging to the ...
*  Adrenergic antagonist
Alpha blocker Beta blocker Adrenergic Receptor Antagonist Sympathetic nervous system Propanolol Beta-blockers and the treatment ... An adrenergic antagonist is a drug that inhibits the function of adrenergic receptors. There are five adrenergic receptors, ... The first group of receptors are the beta (β) adrenergic receptors. There are β1, β2, and β3 receptors. The second group ... The α-adrenergic antagonists have different effects from the β-adrenergic antagonists. Adrenergic ligands are endogenous ...
*  ICI-118,551
"Human fat cell beta-adrenergic receptors: beta-agonist-dependent lipolytic responses and characterization of beta-adrenergic ... ICI-118,551 is a selective β2 adrenergic receptor (adrenoreceptor) antagonist. ICI binds to the β2 subtype with at least 100 ... Hillman KL, Doze VA, Porter JE (August 2005). "Functional characterization of the beta-adrenergic receptor subtypes expressed ... September 1989). "Molecular characterization of the human beta 3-adrenergic receptor". Science. 245 (4922): 1118-21. doi: ...
*  Phenoxybenzamine
As a non-selective alpha receptor antagonist, it will also affect both the postsynaptic alpha 1 and presynaptic alpha 2 ... Phenoxybenzamine forms a permanent covalent bond with adrenergic receptors. Based on known information about the structures of ... Clinically, non-selective alpha antagonists block alpha receptors (but do not differentiate between alpha-1 and alpha-2). They ... Phenoxybenzamine also has irreversible antagonist/weak partial agonist properties at the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor. Due to its ...
*  Tienoxolol
... is a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist. Mahé, N; Do, B; Nicolaï, B; Rietveld, IB; Barrio, M; Tamarit, JL; Céolin, ...
*  Toliprolol
... is a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist. Stephenson, KA; Wilson, AA; Meyer, JH; Houle, S; Vasdev, N (2008). "Facile ... Synthesis, radiolabeling, and ex vivo biodistribution of 18F-(2S and 2R)-1-(1-fluoropropan-2-ylamino)-3-(m-tolyloxy)propan-2-ol ...
*  Dobutamine
Since it does not act on dopamine receptors to induce the release of norepinephrine (another? α1 agonist), dobutamine is less ... Dobutamine is predominantly a β1-adrenergic agonist, with weak β2 activity, and α1 selective activity, although it is used ... isomer is a potent β1 agonist and α1 antagonist, while the (−) isomer is an α1 agonist. The administration of the racemate ... "Dobutamine increases alveolar liquid clearance in ventilated rats by beta-2 receptor stimulation". Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care ...
*  Beta blocker
Adverse effects associated with β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist activity (bronchospasm, peripheral vasoconstriction, ... β2 and β3 receptors. β1-adrenergic receptors are located mainly in the heart and in the kidneys. β2-adrenergic receptors are ... β3-adrenergic receptors are located in fat cells. Beta receptors are found on cells of the heart muscles, smooth muscles, ... Beta blockers, due to their antagonism at beta-1 adrenergic receptors, inhibit both the synthesis of new melatonin and its ...
*  Bronchoconstriction
Muscarinic antagonists (anti-cholinergics): Blocking the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in pulmonary smooth muscle tissue ... These medications include short-acting beta agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol which typically last 4-6 hours, and long-acting ... http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/rccm.201303-0437ST Rau, JL (Jul 2000). "Inhaled adrenergic bronchodilators: ... These smooth muscle cells have muscarinic M3 receptors on their membrane. The activation of these receptors by acetylcholine ...
Acute hemodynamic and neurohumoral effects of selective ETA receptor blockade in patients with congestive heart failure | JACC:...  Acute hemodynamic and neurohumoral effects of selective ETA receptor blockade in patients with congestive heart failure | JACC:...
... introduction of beta-adrenergic blocking agent therapy within three months before study enrollment, pregnancy or lactation, ... it remains controversial whether nonselective ETA/B receptor antagonists or selective ETA receptor antagonists should be used. ... a nonselective ETA/B receptor antagonist although the selective ETA receptor antagonist LU135252 was at least as ... Nonselective ETA/B receptor antagonists improve hemodynamics in patients with CHF. Since ETB receptors mediate the release of ...
more infohttp://www.onlinejacc.org/content/35/7/1745
Screening for potential beta 2-adrenergic receptor antagonists using CypHer5E and IN Cell Analyzer 1000 ( 		               ...  Screening for potential beta 2-adrenergic receptor antagonists using CypHer5E and IN Cell Analyzer 1000 ( ...
... used to obtain dose-response and rank-order potency data for both agonist and antagonist treatment of β2-adrenergic receptor ... For live-cell receptor internalization studies a,Screening,for,potential,beta,2-adrenergic,receptor,antagonists,using,CypHer5E, ... Introduction CypHer ™ 5 a pH sensitive dye has shown utility in β2-adrenergic receptor agonist screening (1). CypHer5 has been ... The data demonstrate that the β2-adrenergic receptor CypHer5E antagonist assay used in conjunction with IN Cell Analyzer 1000 ...
more infohttp://www.bio-medicine.org/biology-technology/Screening-for-potential-beta-2-adrenergic-receptor-antagonists-using-CypHer5E-and-IN-Cell-Analyzer-1000-1255-1/
Stachel-independent modulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 signaling by synthetic ligands directed to its extracellular region | PNAS  Stachel-independent modulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 signaling by synthetic ligands directed to its extracellular region | PNAS
1994) Negative antagonists promote an inactive conformation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor. Mol Pharmacol 45:390-394. ... 1982) Adrenergic receptors in the heart. Annu Rev Physiol 44:475-484. ... 2016) Dihydromunduletone is a small-molecule selective adhesion G protein-coupled receptor antagonist. Mol Pharmacol 90:214-224 ... 2011) Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex. Nature 477:549-555. ...
more infohttp://www.pnas.org/content/114/38/10095
Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network Trial - Montelukast or Azithromycin for Reduction of Inhaled...  Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network Trial - Montelukast or Azithromycin for Reduction of Inhaled...
Hormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists. Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists. Adrenergic beta-Agonists. ... or a leukotriene receptor antagonist (montelukast) will provide a steroid-sparing effect when compared to placebo as the dose ... Adrenergic Agents. Neurotransmitter Agents. Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action. Leukotriene Antagonists. Hormone ... will be enrolled as uncontrolled and observed closely for symptoms or low peak flows for 2 weeks. The rationale for enrolling ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00471809
A Comparison of the Control of Asthma Provided by Symbicort® Turbuhaler® Versus Symbicort® Turbuhaler® Plus Pulmicort®...  A Comparison of the Control of Asthma Provided by Symbicort® Turbuhaler® Versus Symbicort® Turbuhaler® Plus Pulmicort®...
Hormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists. Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists. Adrenergic beta-Agonists. ... Adrenergic Agonists. Adrenergic Agents. Neurotransmitter Agents. Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action. ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00244608?intr=Foradil+Combi+OR+symbicort+OR+%28Budesonide+AND+formeterol%29&rank=64
Current Computer - Aided Drug Design: Ingenta Connect Table Of Contents  Current Computer - Aided Drug Design: Ingenta Connect Table Of Contents
Analysis of Drug Design for a Selection of G Protein-Coupled Neuro- Receptors Using Neural Network Techniques pp. 202-211(10) ... Ligand and Structure Based Models for the Identification of Beta 2 Adrenergic Receptor Antagonists pp. 222-236(15) Authors: ... Interaction studies of Withania somnifera's key metabolite Withaferin A with different receptors associated with cardiovascular ...
more infohttps://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ben/cad/2015/00000011/00000003
Homology Modeling of Cannabinoid Receptors: Discovery of Cannabinoid Analogues for Therapeutic Use | SpringerLink  Homology Modeling of Cannabinoid Receptors: Discovery of Cannabinoid Analogues for Therapeutic Use | SpringerLink
Structure of a beta(1)-adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor.Google Scholar ... Adrenergic Receptor Inverse Agonists and Antagonist Revealed by X-ray Crystallography.Google Scholar ... The 2.6 Angstrom Crystal Structure of a Human A(2A) Adenosine Receptor Bound to an Antagonist. Science 322:1211-1217.PubMed ... These compounds primarily target the cannabinoid receptors 1 (CB1) and Cannabinoid receptors 2 (CB2). This chapter focuses on ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/protocol/10.1007%2F978-1-61779-465-0_35
Beta-2 adrenergic antagonist - Wikipedia  Beta-2 adrenergic antagonist - Wikipedia
... β2-adrenoceptor antagonist) is an adrenergic antagonist which blocks the beta-2 adrenergic receptors of cells, with either high ... ICI-118,551 Butaxamine Propranolol Betablocker Beta-2 adrenergic receptor Beta2-adrenergic agonist Bilski, AJ; Halliday, SE; ... an antagonist for β2 and for β1 or β3 adrenoceptors) like the non-selective betablocker Propranolol. ... Fitzgerald, JD; Wale, JL (1983). "The pharmacology of a beta 2-selective adrenoceptor antagonist (ICI 118,551)". J Cardiovasc ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta-2_adrenergic_antagonist
Cell lines expressing recombinant aequorin and a G-protein coupled receptor for functional screening (         INTRODUCTION    ...  Cell lines expressing recombinant aequorin and a G-protein coupled receptor for functional screening ( INTRODUCTION ...
... receptor,for,functional,screening,biological,advanced biology technology,biology laboratory technology,biology device ... INTRODUCTION ...Many G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) trigger upon binding of an a...One of the methods of choice (reviewed ... TSH-Receptor. This system can be used to detect either agonists or antagonists. Surmountable antagonists as well as non- ... Screening for potential beta 2-adrenergic receptor antagonists using CypHer5E and IN Cell Analyzer 1000. 11. The use of CypHer5 ...
more infohttp://www.bio-medicine.org/biology-technology/Cell-lines-expressing-recombinant-aequorin-and-a-G-protein-coupled-receptor-for-functional-screening-1376-1/
Er Dilaterol effektive til fedtforbrænding & Bygning magert muskelvæv?  Er Dilaterol effektive til fedtforbrænding & Bygning magert muskelvæv?
It is a beta-2 adrenergic receptor antagonist. Clenbuterol also works to relax the smooth muscles of the body such as those ... It only affects the beta-2 receptor. It mimics adrenaline in that has the ability to raise the core temperature of the person ... The breaks in the cycle allow the beta-2 receptors to clear out the substance and return to their normal state. Without the ...
more infohttps://steroidly.com/da/dilaterol/
beta-Adrenergic regulation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the central nervous system | Science  beta-Adrenergic regulation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the central nervous system | Science
... a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist. The beta-mediated regulation of alpha 2-receptor sensitivity at brain norepinephrine ... beta-Adrenergic regulation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the central nervous system ... Incubation of rat cerebral cortical slices with the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol causes an increase in alpha 2- ... adrenergic receptor binding in addition to a decrease in beta-adrenergic receptor binding. The effects are rapid and reversible ...
more infohttp://science.sciencemag.org/content/207/4431/645
Eugenodilol - AdisInsight  Eugenodilol - AdisInsight
Mechanism of Action Alpha 1 adrenergic receptor antagonists; Beta 1 adrenergic receptor antagonists; Beta 2 adrenergic receptor ... Calcium channel antagonists * Orphan Drug Status Orphan designation is assigned by a regulatory body to encourage companies to ...
more infohttp://adisinsight.springer.com/drugs/800013259?error=cookies_not_supported&code=f1a546c2-4fe3-454b-89a2-9fe2741c0f97
Aclidinium bromide/formoterol - AdisInsight  Aclidinium bromide/formoterol - AdisInsight
Cholinergic receptor antagonists; Muscarinic M3 receptor antagonists * Orphan Drug Status Orphan designation is assigned by a ... Mechanism of Action Beta 2 adrenergic receptor agonists; ...
more infohttp://adisinsight.springer.com/drugs/800026743
Beta-2 adrenergic receptor  Beta-2 adrenergic receptor
... is an beta adrenergic receptor, and also denotes the human gene encoding it.cite web , title = Entrez Gene: ADRB1 adrenergic, ... The beta 2 adrenergic receptor (β2 adrenoreceptor), also known as ADRB2, ... Antagonists. "(. Beta blocker. s)". *. butoxamine. *. *. propranolol. (. antihypertensive. ). *. denotes selective agonist. s ... Beta-3 adrenergic receptor - The beta 3 adrenergic receptor (β3 adrenoreceptor), also known as ADRB3, is an beta adrenergic ...
more infohttp://enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/2479280/Beta
Application # 2018/0071285. SYSTEMS PHARMACOLOGY FOR TREATING OCULAR DISORDERS - Patents.com  Application # 2018/0071285. SYSTEMS PHARMACOLOGY FOR TREATING OCULAR DISORDERS - Patents.com
... antagonists, Dopamine receptor D1 antagonists, Dopamine receptor D5 antagonists, .beta.1 adrenergic receptor antagonists, .beta ... antagonists, Dopamine receptor D1 antagonists, Dopamine receptor D5 antagonists, .beta.1 adrenergic receptor antagonists, .beta ... antagonists, Dopamine receptor D1 antagonists, Dopamine receptor D5 antagonists, .beta.1 adrenergic receptor antagonists, .beta ... antagonists, Dopamine receptor D1 antagonists, Dopamine receptor D5 antagonists, .beta.1 adrenergic receptor antagonists, .beta ...
more infohttp://patents.com/us-20180071285.html
Pilot Study Comparing Tiotropium (Spiriva) to Salmeterol (Serevent) Plus Fluticasone (Flixotide) in Chronic Obstructive...  Pilot Study Comparing Tiotropium (Spiriva) to Salmeterol (Serevent) Plus Fluticasone (Flixotide) in Chronic Obstructive...
Adrenergic beta-2 Receptor Agonists. Adrenergic beta-Agonists. Adrenergic Agonists. Adrenergic Agents. ... Cholinergic Antagonists. Cholinergic Agents. Neurotransmitter Agents. Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action. ... Recently published reports indicate that additional bronchodilator efficacy may be achieved when a long-acting beta agonist is ... At Visit 2, a pre-dose PFT will be performed prior to first administration of trial medication. Treatment with blinded study ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00239499?term=FLUTICASONE+AND+SALMETEROL&rank=91
Beta-2 adrenergic receptor - Wikipedia  Beta-2 adrenergic receptor - Wikipedia
... denotes selective antagonist to the receptor. Beta-2 adrenergic receptor has been shown to interact with: AKAP12, OPRD1, Grb2, ... "Insulin stimulates sequestration of beta-adrenergic receptors and enhanced association of beta-adrenergic receptors with Grb2 ... Other adrenergic receptors Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor Alpha-2 adrenergic receptor Beta-1 adrenergic receptor Beta-3 adrenergic ... "Cloning and sequence analysis of the human brain beta-adrenergic receptor. Evolutionary relationship to rodent and avian beta- ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta-2_adrenergic_receptor
ASMscience | The Interplay between th  ASMscience | The Interplay between th
2 ). The GI microbiota plays essential roles in human nutrition, physiology, development, immunity, and behavior, with ... The QseC sensor kinase: a bacterial adrenergic receptor. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103 : 10420- 10425.[PubMed] [CrossRef] ... Predicted 3D structure for the human beta 2 adrenergic receptor and its binding site for agonists and antagonists. Proc Natl ... The QseC sensor kinase: a bacterial adrenergic receptor. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103 : 10420- 10425.[PubMed] [CrossRef] ...
more infohttps://www.asmscience.org/content/book/10.1128/9781555818791.chap20
A Category Names List - Drug Information Portal - U.S. National Library of Medicine  A Category Names List - Drug Information Portal - U.S. National Library of Medicine
Adrenergic beta-1 Receptor Antagonists (10) • Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC BETA-1 RECEPTORS. MeSH ... Adrenergic beta-3 Receptor Antagonists (1). Adrenergic beta-Agonists (61) • Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta- ... adrenergic receptors. MeSH. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists (75) • Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors ... Adrenergic Antagonists (132) • Drugs that bind to but do not activate ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. Adrenergic antagonists block the ...
more infohttps://druginfo.nlm.nih.gov/drugportal/drug/categories
A Category Names List - Drug Information Portal - U.S. National Library of Medicine  A Category Names List - Drug Information Portal - U.S. National Library of Medicine
Adrenergic beta-1 Receptor Antagonists (10) • Drugs that bind to and block the activation of ADRENERGIC BETA-1 RECEPTORS. MeSH ... Adrenergic beta-3 Receptor Antagonists (1). Adrenergic beta-Agonists (61) • Drugs that selectively bind to and activate beta- ... adrenergic receptors. MeSH. Adrenergic beta-Antagonists (75) • Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors ... Adrenergic Antagonists (132) • Drugs that bind to but do not activate ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS. Adrenergic antagonists block the ...
more infohttps://druginfo.nlm.nih.gov/drugportal/jsp/drugportal/drugNamesAndCategories.jsp
  • A method of treating an ocular disorder in a subject includes administering to the subject subtherapeutic amounts of two or more agents that inhibit and/or blocks the activation of Gs- or Gq-protein coupled receptors or Gs- or Gq-signaling cascade in ocular cells of the subject, and/or activates Gi-protein coupled receptors, which is induced or triggered by light induced all-trans-retinal generation. (patents.com)
  • When inhaled, indacaterol reaches the receptors in the airways and activates them. (europa.eu)
  • Different polymorphic forms, point mutation s, and/or downregulation of this gene are associated with nocturnal asthma , obesity and type 2 diabetes . (enacademic.com)
  • title=Genetic variation of the beta(2)-adrenoceptor: its functional and clinical importance in bronchial asthma. (enacademic.com)
  • G protein-coupled receptors enable cells to sense extracellular signals and translate them into physiological responses. (pnas.org)
  • In addition to a transmembrane domain that transduces signals into the cytoplasm, adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) have large extracellular regions (ECRs) that interact with proteins in the extracellular space. (pnas.org)
  • Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) play critical roles in diverse biological processes, including neurodevelopment and cancer progression. (pnas.org)
  • Although ECRs regulate receptor function, it is not clear whether ECRs play a direct regulatory role in G-protein signaling or simply serve as a protective cap for the activating " Stachel " sequence. (pnas.org)
  • Here, we present a mechanistic analysis of ECR-mediated regulation of GPR56/ADGRG1, an aGPCR with two domains [pentraxin and laminin/neurexin/sex hormonebinding globulin-like (PLL) and G protein-coupled receptor autoproteolysis-inducing (GAIN)] in its ECR. (pnas.org)
  • The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily exhibits great diversity with regard to the length and complexity of the extracellular region (ECR). (pnas.org)
  • Members of the less well-studied adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (aGPCR) family are characterized by particularly diverse and large ECRs: hundreds to thousands of amino acid residues compose multiple protein domains ( 5 , 6 ). (pnas.org)
  • 2004. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor protein expression in the rat choroid plexus: a possible involvement of cannabinoids in the regulation of cerebrospinal fluid. (springer.com)
  • After selection with antibiotics, recombinant cells were subjected to a limit dilution, and clones expressing the G-protein coupled receptor and apoaequorin at a high level were selected. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This receptor-channel complex also contains a G protein - G s , which activate an adenylyl cyclase , cAMP-dependent kinase , and the counterbalancing phosphatase , PP2A . (enacademic.com)
  • In vitro autoradiography provides a useful means to examine different receptor populations in discrete tissue areas. (ahajournals.org)
  • 2. Seed cells at a density of 8000 cells/well in 100 µl of culture medium. (bio-medicine.org)
  • 2 S ,4 S )-2-methyl-2,3,3,4-tetrahydroxytetrahydrofuran (AI-2) (C) appears to have a surprisingly modest effect on virulence. (asmscience.org)
  • Knowing that anticholinergic and beta-adrenergic agents achieve their bronchodilating effects by different mechanisms, in particular the combination of these agents has proven to be beneficial in the management of COPD. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This study will enroll patients who present to Emergency Departments (EDs) and have an acute exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) at discharged in 2 Edmonton EDs. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Treatment with blinded study medication (tiotropium or fluticasone + salmeterol) will start in the morning of Visit 2 (Day 1). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • For live-cell receptor internalization studies, an enhanced version of this dye, CypHer5E, has been developed (3). (bio-medicine.org)
  • We have employed radioligand binding and cell purification techniques to determine the cellular origin of these receptors. (ahajournals.org)