Adrenalectomy: Excision of one or both adrenal glands. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Adrenal Glands: A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.Cushing Syndrome: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excess levels of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) or other GLUCOCORTICOIDS from endogenous or exogenous sources. It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. Endogenous Cushing syndrome or spontaneous hypercortisolism is divided into two groups, those due to an excess of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN and those that are ACTH-independent.Adrenocortical Adenoma: A benign neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. It is characterized by a well-defined nodular lesion, usually less than 2.5 cm. Most adrenocortical adenomas are nonfunctional. The functional ones are yellow and contain LIPIDS. Depending on the cell type or cortical zone involved, they may produce ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE.Corticosterone: An adrenocortical steroid that has modest but significant activities as a mineralocorticoid and a glucocorticoid. (From Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1437)Adrenal Gland Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Hyperaldosteronism: A condition caused by the overproduction of ALDOSTERONE. It is characterized by sodium retention and potassium excretion with resultant HYPERTENSION and HYPOKALEMIA.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Adrenocorticotropic Hormone: An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).Laparoscopy: A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.Nelson Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by HYPERPIGMENTATION, enlarging pituitary mass, visual defects secondary to compression of the OPTIC CHIASM, and elevated serum ACTH. It is caused by the expansion of an underlying ACTH-SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA that grows in the absence of feedback inhibition by adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS, usually after ADRENALECTOMY.Adrenocortical Hyperfunction: Excess production of ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE. Hyperadrenal syndromes include CUSHING SYNDROME; HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and VIRILISM.Aldosterone: A hormone secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX that regulates electrolyte and water balance by increasing the renal retention of sodium and the excretion of potassium.Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Dexamethasone: An anti-inflammatory 9-fluoro-glucocorticoid.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Hypophysectomy: Surgical removal or destruction of the hypophysis, or pituitary gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Metyrapone: An inhibitor of the enzyme STEROID 11-BETA-MONOOXYGENASE. It is used as a test of the feedback hypothalamic-pituitary mechanism in the diagnosis of CUSHING SYNDROME.Adrenal Cortex: The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It is derived from MESODERM and comprised of three zones (outer ZONA GLOMERULOSA, middle ZONA FASCICULATA, and inner ZONA RETICULARIS) with each producing various steroids preferentially, such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and ANDROSTENEDIONE. Adrenal cortex function is regulated by pituitary ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN.Retroperitoneal Space: An area occupying the most posterior aspect of the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. It is bounded laterally by the borders of the quadratus lumborum muscles and extends from the DIAPHRAGM to the brim of the true PELVIS, where it continues as the pelvic extraperitoneal space.Pituitary Irradiation: Radiation therapy used to treat the PITUITARY GLAND.Cortisone: A naturally occurring glucocorticoid. It has been used in replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency and as an anti-inflammatory agent. Cortisone itself is inactive. It is converted in the liver to the active metabolite HYDROCORTISONE. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p726)Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Myelolipoma: A rare benign tumor of the adrenal gland, several centimeters in diameter, composed in varying proportions of adipose tissue, lymphocytes, and primitive myeloid cells, probably a developmental abnormality. (Dorland, 27th ed)ACTH Syndrome, Ectopic: Symptom complex due to ACTH production by non-pituitary neoplasms.Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone: A peptide of about 41 amino acids that stimulates the release of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. CRH is synthesized by neurons in the PARAVENTRICULAR NUCLEUS of the HYPOTHALAMUS. After being released into the pituitary portal circulation, CRH stimulates the release of ACTH from the PITUITARY GLAND. CRH can also be synthesized in other tissues, such as PLACENTA; ADRENAL MEDULLA; and TESTIS.Aminoglutethimide: An aromatase inhibitor that is used in the treatment of advanced BREAST CANCER.Metanephrine: Product of epinephrine O-methylation. It is a commonly occurring, pharmacologically and physiologically inactive metabolite of epinephrine.Incidental Findings: Unanticipated information discovered in the course of testing or medical care. Used in discussions of information that may have social or psychological consequences, such as when it is learned that a child's biological father is someone other than the putative father, or that a person tested for one disease or disorder has, or is at risk for, something else.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Adrenal Cortex HormonesPituitary ACTH Hypersecretion: A disease of the PITUITARY GLAND characterized by the excess amount of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secreted. This leads to hypersecretion of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) by the ADRENAL GLANDS resulting in CUSHING SYNDROME.Normetanephrine: A methylated metabolite of norepinephrine that is excreted in the urine and found in certain tissues. It is a marker for tumors.Adrenal Insufficiency: Conditions in which the production of adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS falls below the requirement of the body. Adrenal insufficiency can be caused by defects in the ADRENAL GLANDS, the PITUITARY GLAND, or the HYPOTHALAMUS.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Adrenal Cortex Function Tests: Examinations that evaluate and monitor hormone production in the adrenal cortex.Desoxycorticosterone: A steroid metabolite that is the 11-deoxy derivative of CORTICOSTERONE and the 21-hydroxy derivative of PROGESTERONE.Hypokalemia: Abnormally low potassium concentration in the blood. It may result from potassium loss by renal secretion or by the gastrointestinal route, as by vomiting or diarrhea. It may be manifested clinically by neuromuscular disorders ranging from weakness to paralysis, by electrocardiographic abnormalities (depression of the T wave and elevation of the U wave), by renal disease, and by gastrointestinal disorders. (Dorland, 27th ed)Catecholamines: A general class of ortho-dihydroxyphenylalkylamines derived from tyrosine.Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital: A group of inherited disorders of the ADRENAL GLANDS, caused by enzyme defects in the synthesis of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) and/or ALDOSTERONE leading to accumulation of precursors for ANDROGENS. Depending on the hormone imbalance, congenital adrenal hyperplasia can be classified as salt-wasting, hypertensive, virilizing, or feminizing. Defects in STEROID 21-HYDROXYLASE; STEROID 11-BETA-HYDROXYLASE; STEROID 17-ALPHA-HYDROXYLASE; 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3-HYDROXYSTEROID DEHYDROGENASES); TESTOSTERONE 5-ALPHA-REDUCTASE; or steroidogenic acute regulatory protein; among others, underlie these disorders.Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus: Nucleus in the anterior part of the HYPOTHALAMUS.
(1/1561) Maternal adrenocortical hormones maintain the early development of pancreatic B cells in the fetal rat.

To investigate the effect of maternal adrenocortical hormones on the development of fetal pancreatic islet cells, pregnant rats were adrenalectomised on d 6 of gestation. On d 12-16 the growth patterns of fetal insulin-producing B cells, glucagon-producing A cells, and somatostatin-producing D cells were observed histometrically. Maternal adrenalectomy resulted in growth retardation of fetal B cells on d 12-15. Maternal corticosterone therapy prevented this retardation. Maternal adrenalectomy, however, did not affect the developmental patterns of A and D cells. By Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, glucocorticoid receptors were demonstrated to be present in the islet cells from d 12 to d 15. These results suggest that maternal adrenocortical hormones, glucocorticoids in particular, maintain the early development of fetal pancreatic B cells through their specific intracellular glucocorticoid receptor.  (+info)

(2/1561) Pharmacodynamic actions of (S)-2-[4,5-dihydro-5-propyl-2-(3H)-furylidene]-1,3-cyclopentanedione (oudenone).

The pharmacodynamic actions of (S)-2-[4,5-dihydro-5-propyl-2(3H)-furylidene]-1,3-cyclopentanedione (oudenone) were studied in both anesthetized animals and isolated organs. Oudenone (10--40 mg/kg i.v.) induced an initial rise in blood pressure followed by a prolonged hypotension in the anesthetized rats. In unanesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), oudenone (5--200 mg/kg p.o.) caused a dose-related decrease in the systolic blood pressure. The initial pressor effect was diminished by pretreatments with phentolamine, guanethidine, hexamethonium and was abolished in the pithed rats. In addition, intracisternal administrations of oudenone (100--600 mug/kg) showed a marked increase in blood pressure in the anesthetized rats, suggesting that the pressor effect may be due to centrally mediated actions. Oudenone, given intra-arterially into the femoral artery (400--800 mug/kg), caused a long-lasting vasodilation in anesthetized dogs. At a relatively high dose (40 mg/kg i.v.), oudenone antagonized all pressor responses to autonomic agents and central vagus nerve stimulation in anesthetized rats and dogs, however, oudenone showed no anti-cholinergic,-histaminergic, beta-adrenergic and adrenergic neuron blocking properties.  (+info)

(3/1561) Primary aldosteronism with aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in a pregnant woman.

A 30-year-old pregnant woman complained of muscle weakness at 29 weeks' gestation. She was hypertensive with severe hypokalemia. Lower plasma renin activity and higher aldosterone level than the normal values in pregnancy suggested primary aldosteronism. A cesarean delivery was performed at 31 weeks' gestation because of pulmonary congestion. The neonatal course was uncomplicated. The laparoscopic adrenalectomy for a 2.0-cm right adrenal adenoma resulted in normalizing of her blood pressure and serum potassium level. Although primary aldosteronism is rare, especially during pregnancy, it should be always considered as one of etiologies of hypertension in pregnancy.  (+info)

(4/1561) Activation of the adult mode of ovine growth hormone receptor gene expression by cortisol during late fetal development.

The developmental and tissue-specific regulation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) mRNA expression is complex and involves alternate leader exon usage. The transcript composition of hepatic GHR mRNA has therefore been determined in fetal sheep during late gestation and after experimental manipulation of fetal plasma cortisol levels by fetal adrenalectomy and exogenous cortisol infusion, using RNase protection assays and a riboprobe containing exons 1A, 2, and 3 of the ovine GHR gene. Expression of the adult liver-specific GHR mRNA transcript containing exon 1A was not detected earlier than 138 days of gestation (term 145 +/-2 days). Thereafter, expression of this leader exon increased and accounted for 25-30% of the total GHR mRNA in the fetal liver at term. Hepatic GHR mRNA derived from leader exons other than 1A was detectable at 97 days and increased in abundance toward term in parallel with the normal prepartum rise in fetal plasma cortisol. Abolition of this cortisol surge by fetal adrenalectomy prevented both the activation of exon 1A expression and the prepartum rise in GHR mRNA derived from the other leader exons in fetal ovine liver. Conversely, raising cortisol levels by exogenous infusion earlier in gestation prematurely activated exon 1A expression and enhanced the abundance of GHR mRNA transcripts derived from the other leader exons. Cortisol therefore appears to activate the adult mode of GHR gene expression in fetal ovine liver during late gestation. These observations have important implications for the maturation of the somatotrophic axis and for the onset of GH-dependent growth after birth.  (+info)

(5/1561) Glucocorticoid enhances interleukin-1-induced pressor response in freely moving rats through its effect on nitric oxide release.

We investigated whether changes in nitric oxide (NO) release might be responsible for the modulation by glucocorticoids of the pressor response to i.p. injection of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in freely moving rats. In such rats, IL-1beta (10 microgram/kg) induced a biphasic pressor response, with a rise in the plasma concentration of NOx (NO2(-) and NO3(-): metabolites of NO) during the second phase. Systemic pretreatment with an exogenous glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), enhanced the second phase of the pressor response and completely suppressed the increase in plasma NOx. Treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, a nonspecific NO synthase inhibitor), enhanced the pressor response while attenuating the increase in plasma NOx. After bilateral adrenalectomy, IL-1beta induced a smaller pressor response, but a larger increase in plasma NOx; dexamethasone reversed these changes. Our results suggest that endogenous NO moderates the pressor response to IL-1beta in freely moving rats, and that glucocorticoids enhance the IL-1beta-induced pressor response at least in part by reducing endogenous NO release.  (+info)

(6/1561) Endogenous glucocorticoids protect against cytokine-mediated lethality during viral infection.

Certain cytokines activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis for glucocorticoid release, and these hormones can protect against cytokine-mediated pathologies. However, endogenous activation of such a pathway has not been established during infections. A prominent glucocorticoid response peaks 36 h following murine CMV (MCMV) infection, coincident with circulating levels of the cytokines IL-12, IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6, and dependent on IL-6 for maximal release. These studies examined functions of the hormone induction. Mice rendered glucocorticoid deficient by adrenalectomy were more susceptible than intact mice to MCMV-induced lethality, and the increased sensitivity was reversed by hormone replacement. Lack of endogenous glucocorticoids resulted in increases in IL-12, IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-6 production, as well as in mRNA expression for a wider range of cytokines, also including IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta. Viral burdens did not increase, and actually decreased, in the livers of glucocorticoid-deficient mice. TNF, but not IFN-gamma, was required for increased lethality in the absence of endogenous hormone. These results conclusively demonstrate the importance of induced endogenous glucocorticoids in protection against life-threatening effects resulting from infection-elicited cytokine responses. Taken together with the dependence on induced IL-6, they document existence of an immune system-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis pathway for regulating endogenous responses to viral infections.  (+info)

(7/1561) Mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory actions of central corticotropin-releasing factor.

Immune activation of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) provides a negative feedback mechanism to modulate peripheral inflammatory responses. We investigated whether central CRF attenuates endothelial expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and leukocyte recruitment during endotoxemia in rats and determined its mechanisms of action. As measured by intravital microscopy, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced a dose-dependent increase in leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and emigration in mesenteric venules, which was associated with upregulation of endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Intracisternal injection of CRF abrogated both the increased expression of ICAM-1 and leukocyte recruitment. Intravenous injection of the specific CRF receptor antagonist astressin did not modify leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions induced by a high dose of LPS but enhanced leukocyte adhesion induced by a low dose. Blockade of endogenous glucocorticoids but not alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) receptors reversed the inhibitory action of CRF on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions during endotoxemia. In conclusion, cerebral CRF blunts endothelial upregulation of ICAM-1 and attenuates the recruitment of leukocytes during endotoxemia. The anti-inflammatory effects of CRF are mediated by adrenocortical activation and additional mechanisms independent of alpha-MSH.  (+info)

(8/1561) Fetal rat adrenal steroidogenesis and steroid transfer to adrenalectomized mother.

On the 22nd day of gestation in rats, fetuses of acutely adrenalectomized mothers were injected subcutaneously with 0.43 muCi 4-14C-progesterone in 0.05 ml saline. Ten and 20 min after injection to fetuses, samples were taken to determine the 14C-progesterone metabolites in the plasma and adrenal glands. After extraction of the samples taken, the metabolites were separated by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography and identified by autoradiography. 11-deoxycorticosterone, 18-hydroxy-11-deoxycorticosterone, corticosterone and 11beta-hydroxyprogesterone were identified in the plasma of injected fetuses, and, in far smaller amounts, in the plasma of their mothers. The plasma of noninjected fetuses also contained very small amounts of these corticoids. The fetal adrenal glands contained far smaller amounts of radioactive steroids than the fetal plasma did. The results obtained show that steroids of fetal origin can cross the placenta in and out, constituting evidence that the fetal adrenal glands are the only source of the plasma corticoids of their adrenalectomized mothers.  (+info)

*  Metyrapone
... adrenalectomy). It is not for long term definitive treatment/cure, only as an adjunct (surgery is the aim for cure in most ...
*  Adrenalectomy
link) surgerydoor.co.uk: Adrenalectomy Surgery Encyclopedia: Adrenalectomy. ... Adrenalectomy (sometimes written as ADX for the procedure or resulting state) is the surgical removal of one or both (bilateral ... Complications from an Adrenalectomy can include an insufficient cortisol production, post-operative bleeding, damage to nearby ... adrenalectomy) adrenal glands. It is usually advised for patients with tumors of the adrenal glands. The procedure can be ...
*  Lennox Broster
As part of this work, Broster devised a new method for adrenalectomy which he reported in a 1932 paper. At the time, operations ... Removal of the larger adrenal gland (an adrenalectomy) revealed the cause of its enlargement was not a tumour but hyperplasia. ... the results of unilateral adrenalectomy". British Journal of Surgery. 19 (76): 557-570. doi:10.1002/bjs.1800197606. King, Dave ...
*  Yawn
Anías-Calderón, José; Verdugo-Díaz, Leticia; Drucker-Colín, René (2004). "Adrenalectomy and dexamethasone replacement on ...
*  Surgical Outcomes Analysis and Research
"Trends in adrenalectomy: a recent national review". Surg Endosc. 24: 2518-2526. doi:10.1007/s00464-010-0996-z. Nath B, Li YF, ...
*  Cushing's syndrome
Nelson DH, Meakin JW, Thorn GW (1960). "ACTH-producing pituitary tumors following adrenalectomy for Cushing syndrome". Annals ...
*  Elizabeth M. Bright
The effect of adrenalectomy upon the total metabolism of the cat. The metabolic effect of adrenalectomy upon the urethanized ... Aub, Joseph C., Forman, Jonathan, & Bright, E. M. (1922). The effect of adrenalectomy upon the total metabolism of the cat. Am ... Aub, J. C., Bright, E. M., & Forman, J. (1922). The metabolic effect of adrenalectomy upon the urethanized cat. Am. J. Physiol ...
*  Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease
At the point where abdominal CT scanning and pituitary fossa MRI show no clear abnormalities, adrenalectomy may be performed. ... The most common treatment for PPNAD is bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy; the process by which both adrenal glands are ...
*  List of -ectomies
Adrenalectomy is the removal of one or both adrenal glands. Apicoectomy is the surgical removal of tooth's root tip. ...
*  Feline hyperaldosteronism
Unilateral adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice for unilateral PHA. Potential complications include hemorrhage and ...
*  Pinealectomy
Hypophysectomy Thyroidectomy Adrenalectomy List of surgeries by type. ...
*  Neuropeptide Y
Yukimura Y, Bray GA (1978). "Effects of adrenalectomy on body weight and the size and number of fat cells in the Zucker (fatty ... Obesity in rats was significantly reduced by adrenalectomy or hypophysectomy. The role of Neuropeptide Y has gained substantial ...
*  Pseudocyst
In addition, adrenalectomies are used to diagnose the lesion and sometimes relieve pain. Because pseudocysts are closely ... an adrenalectomy or laproscopy may be used. Zadik, Yehuda; Aktaş, Alper; Drucker, Scott; Nitzan, Dorrit W. (2012). "Aneurysmal ...
*  Nelson's syndrome
... is also referred to as post adrenalectomy syndrome and is a result of an adrenalectomy performed for ... After a bilateral adrenalectomy is performed cortisol levels are no longer normal. This increases CRH production because it is ... The onset of the disease can occur up to 24 years after a bilateral adrenalectomy has been performed, with an average of up to ... Earlier, Nelson's syndrome was observed in 20-40% of patients who had a bilateral adrenalectomy with a pituitary adenoma. ...
*  Intuitive Surgical
Fewer complications were seen in robotic-assisted colorectal, adrenalectomy and lysis of adhesion." In 2014, NIH reported that ...
*  Clifford Brewer
He was the first surgeon to perform an adrenalectomy to treat advanced malignancy. Brewer married Marjorie Hirst, who he met ...
*  Incidental imaging finding
Suspicious adrenal masses or those ≥4 cm are recommended for complete removal by adrenalectomy. Masses 1 cm (unless the TSH is ...
*  Michael Stifelman
Robot-assisted partial adrenalectomy for isolated adrenal metastasis. J Endourol. Apr;23(4):651-4, 2009 Godoy G, Ramanathan V, ...
*  Primary aldosteronism
In people with a single benign tumor (adenoma), surgical removal (adrenalectomy) may be curative. This is usually performed ...
*  Neurotrophic factors
Studies have shown that corticosterone treatment and adrenalectomy reduces or upregulated hippocampal BDNF expression. ...
*  Hsp70
"The Level and Phosphorylation of Hsp70 in the Rat Liver Cytosol After Adrenalectomy and Hyperthermia". Cell Biology ...
*  Leo Loeb
Galante M, McCorkle HJ: Clinical evaluation of bilateral adrenalectomy and oophorectomy for advanced mammary carcinoma. Am J ...
*  Cushing's disease
Bilateral adrenalectomy is another treatment which provides immediate reduction of cortisol level and control of ... is progression of Nelson's syndrome which is caused by enhance level of tumor growth and ACTH secretion post adrenalectomy in 8 ...
*  HSD2 neurons
However, even after adrenalectomy, HSD2 neurons become activated by sodium deprivation, proving that MR activation is not ... All of these conditions, with the exception of adrenalectomy, cause a large elevation of circulating aldosterone. ... and adrenalectomy-also activate HSD2 neurons, although none do so to as great an extent as simply removing sodium from the diet ...
*  Da Vinci Surgical System
... adrenalectomy, splenectomy and bowel resection; Internal mammary artery mobilization and cardiac tissue ablation; Mitral valve ...
Comparison Between Posterior Retroperitoneoscopic Adrenalectomy and Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy - Full Text View -...  Comparison Between Posterior Retroperitoneoscopic Adrenalectomy and Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy - Full Text View -...
Comparison Between Posterior Retroperitoneoscopic Adrenalectomy and Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy (PRA). The safety and scientific ... Since 1992, transabdominal LA(laparoscopic adrenalectomy) has been a standard method of adrenalectomy. This traditional method ... Randomized Controlled Trial Between PRA(Posterior Retroperitoneoscopic Adrenalectomy) and LA(Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy). ... The purpose of this study is to compare two surgical methods of adrenalectomy. One is called PRA(posterior retroperitoneal ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01676025?cond=%22Conn
How I Treat Pituitary Dependant Hyperadrenocorticism - WSAVA2008 - VIN  How I Treat Pituitary Dependant Hyperadrenocorticism - WSAVA2008 - VIN
Bilateral Adrenalectomy Although this procedure has been proposed as a possible treatment for some time, reported difficulties ... This 'chemical adrenalectomy' can be achieved using two different protocols, one aimed at achieving complete and permanent ... patient has resulted in the technique not achieving widespread acceptance as a feasible alternative to chemical adrenalectomy. ...
more infohttp://www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspx?id=3866690&pid=11268
Institute of Advanced Laparoscopic and Robotic Surgery  Institute of Advanced Laparoscopic and Robotic Surgery
Laparoscopic and Robotic Adrenalectomy (Removal of adrenal gland for pheochromocytoma). *Transurethral Resection of Prostate ( ...
more infohttps://www.laparoscopyhospital.com/SERV02.HTM
Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Treatment (PDQ )  Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Treatment (PDQ )
Both anterior transabdominal laparoscopic adrenalectomy as well as posterior retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy have been ... A minimally invasive adrenalectomy is the generally preferred approach if the following conditions can be met:. *Preoperative ... Bilateral total adrenalectomy commits all patients to lifelong steroid dependence, and up to 25% of patients will experience ... Lee JE, Curley SA, Gagel RF, et al.: Cortical-sparing adrenalectomy for patients with bilateral pheochromocytoma. Surgery 120 ( ...
more infohttps://www.meb.uni-bonn.de/cancer.gov/CDR0000681246.html
Vetoryl Rx, 60 mg x 30 ct  Vetoryl Rx, 60 mg x 30 ct
Adrenalectomy should be considered as an option for cases that are good surgical candidates.. The safe use of this drug has not ...
more infohttp://www.petsupplies4less.com/Vetoryl-Rx-60-mg-x-30-ct_p_6258.html
Primary aldosteronism  Primary aldosteronism
Unilateral primary aldosteronism (PA) is often treated with adrenalectomy, but hypertension resolution rates are variable. A ... Proportion of Patients With Hypertension Resolution Following Adrenalectomy for Primary Aldosteronism: A Systematic Review and ... unilateral adrenalectomy or lifelong medical therapy with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. ... ...
more infohttp://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5936
STRESS-INDUCED SENSITIZATION TO AMPHETAMINE AND MORPHINE PSYCHOMOTOR EFFECTS DEPEND ON STRESS-INDUCED CORTICOSTERONE SECRETION ...  STRESS-INDUCED SENSITIZATION TO AMPHETAMINE AND MORPHINE PSYCHOMOTOR EFFECTS DEPEND ON STRESS-INDUCED CORTICOSTERONE SECRETION ...
... animals in which stress-induced corticosterone secretion was blocked by adrenalectomy, but who received exogenous ... animals in which stress-induced corticosterone secretion was blocked by adrenalectomy, but who received exogenous ...
more infohttps://iris.uniroma1.it/handle/11573/45085
Adrenalectomy - Symptoms, Treatments and Resources for Adrenalectomy  Adrenalectomy - Symptoms, Treatments and Resources for Adrenalectomy
Treatments and Tools for Adrenalectomy. Find Adrenalectomy information, treatments for Adrenalectomy and Adrenalectomy symptoms ... Adrenalectomy - MedHelp's Adrenalectomy Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, ... I had a adrenalectomy 5 days ago. Now I am having symptoms of adrenal surge. Dr gave me Xa... ... my husband had a left adrenalectomy,2 days later we found him and he wouldn't wake up. his ... ...
more infohttps://medhelp.org/tags/show/18885/Adrenalectomy
Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy  | Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library  Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy | Johns Hopkins Medicine Health Library
Laparoscopic adrenalectomy provides patients with a safe and effective way to remove a diseased or cancerous adrenal gland. ... Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is performed under a general anesthetic. The typical length of the operation is 3-4 hours. The ... Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a minimally invasive technique, which provides patients with less discomfort and equivalent ... When compared to conventional open surgery, laparoscopic adrenalectomy has resulted in significantly less post-operative pain, ...
more infohttps://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/test_procedures/urology/_22,LaparoscopicAdrenalectomy
Adrenalectomy facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Adrenalectomy  Adrenalectomy facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Adrenalectomy
Make research projects and school reports about Adrenalectomy easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia ... Adrenalectomy. Definition. Adrenalectomy is the surgical removal of one or both of the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are ... Adrenalectomy. Definition. Adrenalectomy is the surgical removal of one or both adrenal glands. The adrenal glands are paired ... With laparoscopy, adrenalectomy can be accomplished through four very small incisions.. Purpose. Adrenalectomy is usually ...
more infohttp://encyclopedia.com/medicine/divisions-diagnostics-and-procedures/medicine/adrenalectomy
Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy (Precare) - What You Need to Know  Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy (Precare) - What You Need to Know
Care guide for Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy (Precare). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment options ... Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is surgery to remove all or part of your adrenal gland. It is usually done when a small tumor is ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/cg/laparoscopic-adrenalectomy-precare.html
Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy - SAGES Abstract Archives  Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy - SAGES Abstract Archives
Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy. Introduction: With the advances in technology, there has been a recent interest in ... The aim of this study was to develop techniques of robotic lateral and posterior adrenalectomy and compare results to ... A number of reports has demonstrated the safety of robotic lateral adrenalectomy with scant comparison data. Nevertheless, the ... Methods and Procedures: Within a year, 15 patients underwent robotic and 20 patients laparoscopic adrenalectomy in an endocrine ...
more infohttps://www.sages.org/meetings/annual-meeting/abstracts-archive/robotic-versus-laparoscopic-adrenalectomy/
Single Incision Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy - SAGES Abstract Archives  Single Incision Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy - SAGES Abstract Archives
Single Incision Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy. Nihat Yavuz, MD, Serkan Teksoz, MD, Sabri Erguney, MD, Mete Duren, MD, Tuna ... From November 2009 to September 2010 we performed single incision laparoscopic adrenalectomy in 9 patients,seven of them being ... With its advantages as unique incision and better cosmetic result, single incision laparoscopic adrenalectomy may be an ... this field is laparoscopy performed through a single incision.In this study we present our first experiences on adrenalectomies ...
more infohttps://www.sages.org/meetings/annual-meeting/abstracts-archive/single-incision-laparoscopic-adrenalectomy/
Adrenalectomy Can Help In Ameliorating Cushing Syndrome  Adrenalectomy Can Help In Ameliorating Cushing Syndrome
Adrenalectomy may Help Patients With Mild Cushing Syndrome. A new study has found that patients with a mild form of Cushing ... Adrenalectomy Can Help In Ameliorating Cushing Syndrome. by Medindia Content Team on December 12, 2007 at 4:06 PM Research News ... Auchus said, "but we found that adrenalectomy can dramatically help some patients." Dr. Auchus said there are many caveats to ... Auchus' research group analyzed the records of 24 patients who underwent adrenalectomy at UT Southwestern between 2003 and 2006 ...
more infohttp://www.medindia.net/news/Adrenalectomy-Can-Help-In-Ameliorating-Cushing-Syndrome-30569-1.htm
Adrenalectomy for Solitary Adrenal Gland Metastases  Adrenalectomy for Solitary Adrenal Gland Metastases
... indication for adrenalectomy, partial versus total adrenalectomy, suspected versus confirmed metastatic disease. ... More From BioPortfolio on "Adrenalectomy for Solitary Adrenal Gland Metastases". *Related Companies*Related Events*Related ... The aim of this study is to compare retrospectively in case and control study, performing adrenalectomy, open or laparoscopic, ... Median survival was 16 months for patients who underwent adrenalectomy compared to 5 months for patients with documented ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/64325/Adrenalectomy-for-Solitary-Adrenal-Gland-Metastases.html
Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy (Inpatient Care) - What You Need to Know  Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy (Inpatient Care) - What You Need to Know
Care guide for Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy (Inpatient Care). Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment ... Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is surgery to remove all or part of your adrenal gland. It is usually done when a small tumor is ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/cg/laparoscopic-adrenalectomy-inpatient-care.html
JenS discusses Bilateral Adrenalectomy (BLA) 02/28 by CushingsHelp | Health  JenS discusses Bilateral Adrenalectomy (BLA) 02/28 by CushingsHelp | Health
Jen had Pituitary surgery by Dr. Shahinian 4/28/04, removed ACTH secreting corticotroph hyperplasia and prolactinoma. She was diagnosed by Dr. Ted Friedman as cyclical pituitary Cushings. Her second Surgery 7/21/04 for infection resulted in neuralgia. She had a BLA in March 2006 as Corticol Hyperplasia returned and she now has possible Nelson's syndrome. Jen also has Thyroid Issues (Hashimoto's, multiple nodules and entire thyroid removed 2003) and she is Growth Hormone Deficient (3/2006)
more infohttp://www.blogtalkradio.com/cushingshelp/2008/02/29/jens-discusses-bilateral-adrenalectomy-bla
Adrenalectomy -- Open Surgery | Methodist Healthcare  Adrenalectomy -- Open Surgery | Methodist Healthcare
Learn more about Adrenalectomy -- Open Surgery at Methodist Healthcare DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ... Adrenalectomy is the removal of one or both adrenal glands. There is one adrenal gland on top of each kidney. The adrenal ... Trends in adrenalectomy rates, indications, and physician volume: A statewide analysis of 1,816 adreanlectomies. Surgery. 2007; ... The role of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for adrenal tumours of 6 cm or greater. Surg Endosc. 2008;22(3):617-621. ...
more infohttps://sahealth.com/hl/?/14760/Adrenalectom%C3%ADa
Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy Hypothetical Consultation At UC San Diego Health  Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy Hypothetical Consultation At UC San Diego Health
This Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy consultation is part of a series of consultations with surgical specialists at the University ... Home ▶ Medical Services ▶ Surgery ▶ What to Expect During Your Consultation ▶ Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy ... Doctor: The surgery is called a laparoscopic adrenalectomy. A laparoscopic, or minimally invasive, surgery involves specialized ... This hypothetical consultation about laparoscopic adrenalectomy for adrenal gland ademoma is presented for purposes of general ...
more infohttps://health.ucsd.edu/SPECIALTIES/SURGERY/CONSULTS/Pages/lapadrenal.aspx
Adrenalectomy -- Open Surgery | Grand Strand Health  Adrenalectomy -- Open Surgery | Grand Strand Health
Learn more about Adrenalectomy -- Open Surgery at Grand Strand Medical Center DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ... Adrenalectomy is the removal of one or both adrenal glands. There is one adrenal gland on top of each kidney. The adrenal ... Trends in adrenalectomy rates, indications, and physician volume: A statewide analysis of 1,816 adreanlectomies. Surgery. 2007; ... The role of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for adrenal tumours of 6 cm or greater. Surg Endosc. 2008;22(3):617-621. ...
more infohttp://grandstrandmed.com/hl/?/14760/Surgical-removal--adrenal-glands&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1
  • Additionally, medical treatment should be administered preoperatively to decrease the likelihood of complications that occur due to adrenalectomy in patients with severe CS. (hindawi.com)
  • In the proximal tubule, neither adrenalectomy nor steroid replacement altered Na−K-ATPase activity or the apparent number of catalytic sites. (springer.com)
  • Hendler ED, Torretti J, Kupor L, Epstein FH (1972) Effects of adrenalectomy and hormone replacement on Na−K-ATPase in renal tissue. (springer.com)
  • As described in the preceding paper, adrenalectomy triggers hippocampal granule cell degeneration that begins within days after adrenalectomy, continues for months, and is the only apparent cell death anywhere within the brain. (nih.gov)