Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Sebaceous Gland NeoplasmsAnal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the anal gland.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Perianal GlandsSublingual Gland Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the sublingual glands.Adenoma, Pleomorphic: A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Carcinoma, Mucoepidermoid: A tumor of both low- and high-grade malignancy. The low-grade grow slowly, appear in any age group, and are readily cured by excision. The high-grade behave aggressively, widely infiltrate the salivary gland and produce lymph node and distant metastases. Mucoepidermoid carcinomas account for about 21% of the malignant tumors of the parotid gland and 10% of the sublingual gland. They are the most common malignant tumor of the parotid. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p575; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1240)Palatal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PALATE, including those of the hard palate, soft palate and UVULA.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)ROC Curve: A graphic means for assessing the ability of a screening test to discriminate between healthy and diseased persons; may also be used in other studies, e.g., distinguishing stimuli responses as to a faint stimuli or nonstimuli.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.Cushing Syndrome: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excess levels of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) or other GLUCOCORTICOIDS from endogenous or exogenous sources. It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. Endogenous Cushing syndrome or spontaneous hypercortisolism is divided into two groups, those due to an excess of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN and those that are ACTH-independent.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Adrenal Glands: A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Adrenal Gland Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Adrenal Cortex: The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It is derived from MESODERM and comprised of three zones (outer ZONA GLOMERULOSA, middle ZONA FASCICULATA, and inner ZONA RETICULARIS) with each producing various steroids preferentially, such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and ANDROSTENEDIONE. Adrenal cortex function is regulated by pituitary ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN.Adrenal Medulla: The inner portion of the adrenal gland. Derived from ECTODERM, adrenal medulla consists mainly of CHROMAFFIN CELLS that produces and stores a number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS, mainly adrenaline (EPINEPHRINE) and NOREPINEPHRINE. The activity of the adrenal medulla is regulated by the SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM.Medulla Oblongata: The lower portion of the BRAIN STEM. It is inferior to the PONS and anterior to the CEREBELLUM. Medulla oblongata serves as a relay station between the brain and the spinal cord, and contains centers for regulating respiratory, vasomotor, cardiac, and reflex activities.Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral: A group of malignant lymphomas thought to derive from peripheral T-lymphocytes in lymph nodes and other nonlymphoid sites. They include a broad spectrum of lymphocyte morphology, but in all instances express T-cell markers admixed with epithelioid histiocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. Although markedly similar to large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma (LYMPHOMA, LARGE-CELL, IMMUNOBLASTIC), this group's unique features warrant separate treatment.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Kidney Medulla: The internal portion of the kidney, consisting of striated conical masses, the renal pyramids, whose bases are adjacent to the cortex and whose apices form prominent papillae projecting into the lumen of the minor calyces.Nurse Anesthetists: Professional nurses who have completed postgraduate training in the administration of anesthetics and who function under the responsibility of the operating surgeon.Pneumoperitoneum: A condition with trapped gas or air in the PERITONEAL CAVITY, usually secondary to perforation of the internal organs such as the LUNG and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, or to recent surgery. Pneumoperitoneum may be purposely introduced to aid radiological examination.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Ephedrine: A phenethylamine found in EPHEDRA SINICA. PSEUDOEPHEDRINE is an isomer. It is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist that may also enhance release of norepinephrine. It has been used for asthma, heart failure, rhinitis, and urinary incontinence, and for its central nervous system stimulatory effects in the treatment of narcolepsy and depression. It has become less extensively used with the advent of more selective agonists.Pneumoperitoneum, Artificial: Deliberate introduction of air into the peritoneal cavity.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)X-Ray Diffraction: The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Catecholamines: A general class of ortho-dihydroxyphenylalkylamines derived from tyrosine.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Adrenocortical Adenoma: A benign neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. It is characterized by a well-defined nodular lesion, usually less than 2.5 cm. Most adrenocortical adenomas are nonfunctional. The functional ones are yellow and contain LIPIDS. Depending on the cell type or cortical zone involved, they may produce ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Hyperaldosteronism: A condition caused by the overproduction of ALDOSTERONE. It is characterized by sodium retention and potassium excretion with resultant HYPERTENSION and HYPOKALEMIA.Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Urography: Radiography of any part of the urinary tract.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Methoxyflurane: An inhalation anesthetic. Currently, methoxyflurane is rarely used for surgical, obstetric, or dental anesthesia. If so employed, it should be administered with NITROUS OXIDE to achieve a relatively light level of anesthesia, and a neuromuscular blocking agent given concurrently to obtain the desired degree of muscular relaxation. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p180)Battered Child Syndrome: A clinical condition resulting from repeated physical and psychological injuries inflicted on a child by the parents or caregivers.Phenoxybenzamine: An alpha-adrenergic antagonist with long duration of action. It has been used to treat hypertension and as a peripheral vasodilator.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.OregonBibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.

Ganglioneuromas and renal anomalies are induced by activated RET(MEN2B) in transgenic mice. (1/1819)

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by the development of medullary thyroid carcinoma, pheochromocytomas, musculoskeletal anomalies and mucosal ganglioneuromas. MEN2B is caused by a specific mutation (Met918-->Thr) in the RET receptor tyrosine kinase. Different mutations of RET lead to other conditions including MEN2A, familial medullary thyroid carcinoma and intestinal aganglionosis (Hirschsprung disease). Transgenic mice were created using the dopamine beta-hydroxylase promoter to direct expression of RET(MEN2B) in the developing sympathetic and enteric nervous systems and the adrenal medulla. DbetaH-RET(MEN2B) transgenic mice developed benign neuroglial tumors, histologically identical to human ganglioneuromas, in their sympathetic nervous systems and adrenal glands. The enteric nervous system was not affected. The neoplasms in DbetaH-RET(MEN2B) mice were similar to benign neuroglial tumors induced in transgenic mice by activated Ras expression under control of the same promoter. Levels of phosphorylated MAP kinase were not increased in the RET(MEN2B)-induced neurolglial proliferations, suggesting that alternative pathways may play a role in the pathogenesis of these lesions. Transgenic mice with the highest levels of DbetaH-RET(MEN2B) expression, unexpectedly developed renal malformations analogous to those reported with loss of function mutations in the Ret gene.  (+info)

The elevated serum alkaline phosphatase--the chase that led to two endocrinopathies and one possible unifying diagnosis. (2/1819)

A 39-year-old Chinese man with hypertension being evaluated for elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) levels was found to have an incidental right adrenal mass. The radiological features were characteristic of a large adrenal myelolipoma. This mass was resected and the diagnosis confirmed pathologically. His blood pressure normalised after removal of the myelolipoma, suggesting that the frequently observed association between myelolipomas and hypertension may not be entirely coincidental. Persistent elevation of the SAP levels and the discovery of hypercalcaemia after surgery led to further investigations which confirmed primary hyperparathyroidism due to a parathyroid adenoma. The patient's serum biochemistry normalised after removal of the adenoma. The association of adrenal myelolipoma with primary hyperparathyroidism has been reported in the literature only once previously. Although unconfirmed by genetic studies this association may possibly represent an unusual variation of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome.  (+info)

A possible contributory role of BK virus infection in neuroblastoma development. (3/1819)

The tumor suppressor protein p53 is aberrantly localized to the cytoplasm of neuroblastoma cells, compromising the suppressor function of this protein. Such tumors are experimentally induced in transgenic mice expressing the large tumor (T) antigen of polyomaviruses. The oncogenic mechanisms of T antigen include complex formation with, and inactivation of, the tumor suppressor protein p53. Samples from 18 human neuroblastomas and five normal human adrenal glands were examined. BK virus DNA was detected in all neuroblastomas and none of five normal adrenal glands by PCR. Using DNA in situ hybridization, polyomaviral DNA was found in the tumor cells of 17 of 18 neuroblastomas, but in none of five adrenal medullas. Expression of the large T antigen was detected in the tumor cells of 16 of 18 neuroblastomas, but in none of the five adrenal medullas. By double immunostaining BK virus T antigen and p53 was colocalized to the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. Immunoprecipitation revealed binding between the two proteins. The presence and expression of BK virus in neuroblastomas, but not in normal adrenal medulla, and colocalization and binding to p53, suggest that this virus may play a contributory role in the development of this neoplasm.  (+info)

Neuroblastoma metastatic to the liver in infants. (4/1819)

Four infants are described who presented with rapid enlargement of the liver. This was found to be due to neuroblastoma which had metastasized to the liver; the condition was associated with high levels of urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA). In 3 infants the primary tumour was in the adrenal gland and in one it was not identified. One infant died after laparotomy and 2 infants survive disease free with normal VMA levels, one after adrenalectomy and hepatic irradiation and one after a short course of chemotherapy. The fourth patient responded initially to hepatic irradiation and chemotherapy, but relapsed 2 years later with recurrent disease; at the same time the VMA level which had been normal, again rose. The importance of screening for an abnormal VMA level in any infant with a rapidly enlarging liver in order to obtain an early diagnosis is stressed. Careful follow-up, with serial VMA estimations, is essential to detect recurrent disease. The prognosis for some infants with this distribution of neuroblastoma which has metastasized to the liver, but not to the bones or oribt, is good.  (+info)

Rat sarcoma model supports both "soil seed" and "mechanical" theories of metastatic spread. (5/1819)

Following injection into the portal venous or vena caval systems, tumour cells are held up almost exclusively in the liver or lung respectively, and subsequent outgrowth of tumour only occurs in these organs. Following systemic arterial injection, cells are distributed, and subsequently grow, in a variety of organs. However, the adrenal gland supports tumour growth from much fewer cells than the lung, and this is partly due to the fact the rate of tumour cell loss in the initial 48 h is very high in the latter compared to the former organ.  (+info)

Combined liver-spleen-kidney scintigraphy and subsequent subtraction of the kidney scintiphotograph in the evaluation of displaced kidney. (6/1819)

The displacement of kidney was studied by using the combined liver-spleen-kidney scintigraphy and the subsequent subtraction of the kidney scintiphotograph to leave the liver-spleen scintiphotograph alone. A suprarenal mass was shown as cold spot between the liver and right kidney on the combined study. When the liver scintiphotograph and kidney scintiphotograph were over-lapped and the differential diagnosis was difficult, the subsequent subtraction of the kidney scintiphotograph was useful in the diagnosis of the enlarged liver.  (+info)

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A with the identical somatic mutation in medullary thyroid carcinoma and pheochromocytoma without germline mutation at the corresponding site in the RET proto-oncogene. (7/1819)

A germline mutation either in exon 10 or 11 of the RET proto-oncogene is found in the majority of patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A). A 41-year-old female patient was referred for further evaluation of incidentally discovered right adrenal tumor. She had bilateral adrenal pheochromocytomas and medullary thyroid carcinomas detected by endocrinological and radiological examination, and diagnosed as MEN 2A. Molecular genetic testing of the RET exons 10 and 11 exhibited the identical somatic missense mutation at codon 634 in both tumors but did not confirm germline mutations in the corresponding sites. Possible mechanisms for tumorigenesis in this patient are discussed.  (+info)

Mercury intoxication presenting with hypertension and tachycardia. (8/1819)

An 11 year old girl presented with hypertension and tachycardia. Excess urinary catecholamine excretion suggested phaeochromocytoma but imaging studies failed to demonstrate a tumour. Other symptoms included insomnia and weight loss, and she was found to have a raised concentration of mercury in blood and urine. Mercury intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypertension with tachycardia even in patients presenting without the skin lesions typical of mercury intoxication and without a history of exposure.  (+info)

*Adrenal tumor

An adrenal tumor or adrenal mass is any benign or malignant neoplasms of the adrenal gland, several of which are notable for ... "Adrenal Cortical Neoplasms: Perspectives in Pediatric Patients" in "Adrenal Glands: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Evidence" ... The adrenal medulla is located anatomically at the center of each adrenal gland, and is composed of neuroendocrine (chromaffin ... Pheochromocytoma is a neoplasm composed of cells similar to the chromaffin cells of the mature adrenal medulla. ...

*Endocrine gland neoplasm

An endocrine gland neoplasm is a neoplasm affecting one or more glands of the endocrine system. Examples include: Adrenal tumor ...

*List of MeSH codes (C04)

... peritoneal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078 --- adrenal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078.265 --- adrenal cortex neoplasms ... sebaceous gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.805.776 --- sweat gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.839.500 --- muscle neoplasms MeSH C04.588 ... anal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.445 --- duodenal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.501 --- ileal neoplasms MeSH ... lip neoplasms MeSH C04.588.443.591.692 --- palatal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.443.591.824 --- salivary gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588 ...

*Neoplasm

... adrenal gland, pancreas). Encapsulated hematomas, encapsulated necrotic tissue (from an insect bite, foreign body, or other ... ICD-10 classifies neoplasms into four main groups: benign neoplasms, in situ neoplasms, malignant neoplasms, and neoplasms of ... The term 'neoplasm' is a synonym of "tumor". 'Neoplasia' denotes the process of the formation of neoplasms/tumors, the process ... p. Neoplasm. ISBN 0781733901. "II Neoplasms". World Health Organization. Retrieved 19 June 2014. Abrams, Gerald. "Neoplasia I ...

*ICD-10 Chapter II: Neoplasms

Malignant neoplasm of thyroid gland (C74) Malignant neoplasm of adrenal gland (C74.0) Cortex of adrenal gland (C74.1) Medulla ... Benign neoplasm of thyroid gland (D35) Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified endocrine glands (D35.0) Adrenal gland (D35.1) ... Neoplasm of uncertain or unknown behaviour of endocrine glands (D44.0) Thyroid gland (D44.1) Adrenal gland (D44.2) Parathyroid ... Parotid gland (D11.7) Other major salivary glands Sublingual gland Submandibular gland (D11.9) Major salivary gland, ...

*Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins

Cancer (including neoplasms in the mammalian lung, oral/nasal cavities, thyroid and adrenal glands, and liver, squamous cell ...

*Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2b

Cancer of the adrenal glands (pheochromocytoma) occurs in 50% of cases. A variety of eponyms have been proposed for MEN 2B, ... Benign tumors (neoplasms) develop in the mouth, eyes, and submucosa of almost all organs in the first decade of life. Medullary ... Pheochromocytoma - a hormone secreting tumor of the adrenal glands - is also present in 50% of cases. Affected individuals are ... multiple endocrine neoplasm 2B or not 2B?" J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1998 Jan;83(1) 17-20. PMID 9435410 R. L. Miller; N. J. ...

*List of diseases (A)

... familial Adrenal cancer Adrenal disorder Adrenal gland hyperfunction Adrenal gland hypofunction Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital ... X-linked Adrenal hypoplasia Adrenal incidentaloma Adrenal insufficiency Adrenal macropolyadenomatosis Adrenal medulla neoplasm ... Adrenal hyperplasia Adrenal hypertension Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, ... Adenocarcinoid tumor Adenocarcinoma of lung Adenocarcinoma of esophagus Adenoid cystic carcinoma Adenoma of the adrenal gland ...

*Laboratory rat

The most common are adenomas of the pituitary and adenomas/adenocarcinomas of the adrenal cortex in both sexes, mammary gland ... Comparison of Neoplasms in Six Sources of Rats Jared M. Diamond (January 2006). Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail Or ... adrenal glands, and hearts are smaller. Scientists have bred many strains or "lines" of rats specifically for experimentation. ... There were even significant variations in the incidences of adrenal medulla tumors among rats from the same source raised in ...

*Chromatin remodeling

Mutations in this gene were first recognized in human cancer cell lines derived from adrenal gland and lung. In cancer, ... several more subunits of the human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex have been found mutated in a wide range of neoplasms. ...

*Adrenal medulla

It is located at the center of the gland, being surrounded by the adrenal cortex. It is the innermost part of the adrenal gland ... As a cluster of neuron cell bodies, the adrenal medulla is considered a ganglion of the sympathetic nervous system. Neoplasms ... The adrenal medulla (Latin: medulla glandulae suprarenalis) is part of the adrenal gland. ... Blood Supply to the Suprarenal Glands" Anatomy Atlases - Microscopic Anatomy, plate 15.292 - "Adrenal Gland". ...

*Zona reticularis

Coppola, Christopher P.; Merrell, Ronald C. (2001). "Neoplasms of the Adrenal and Endocrine Pancreas in the Elderly". In ... "Adrenal Gland". ... ACTH partially regulates adrenal androgen secretion, also CRH. ... Pediatric Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison Disease) at eMedicine Ibáñez L, Potau N, Marcos MV, de Zegher F (September 1999). " ... The zona reticularis is the innermost layer of the adrenal cortex, lying deep to the zona fasciculata and superficial to the ...

*MEN1

The MEN1 phenotype is inherited via an autosomal-dominant pattern and is associated with neoplasms of the pituitary gland, the ... In rare cases, adrenal cortex tumours are also seen. Most germline or somatic mutations in the MEN1 gene predict truncation or ... The MEN-1 syndrome often exhibits tumors of parathyroid glands, anterior pituitary, endocrine pancreas, and endocrine duodenum ... and ependymomas are observed neoplasms. In a study of 12 sporadic carcinoid tumors of the lung, five cases involved ...

*Saliva testing

These glands, along with additional minor salivary glands, secrete a rich mixture of biological chemicals, electrolytes, ... The following conditions are among those that can be detected through saliva testing (list not comprehensive): adrenal ... benign and metastatic neoplasms (such as breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and oral cancer), infectious conditions (such as HIV ... Nitrate extracted from blood by the salivary gland, accumulates in saliva, which is then reduced to nitric oxide to have a ...

*Adrenocortical hormone

In either case, treatment may rely on removal of the tumor or of the adrenal glands. Without the adrenal glands, the human body ... Low, G., & Sahi, K. (2012). Clinical and imaging overview of functional adrenal neoplasms. International Journal of Urology, 19 ... or it can also be caused by a tumor in the pituitary gland or adrenal gland. ... Shier, D., Butler, J., Lewis, R. "Adrenal Glands." Hole's Human Anatomy & Physiology. 12th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010. 504 ...

*Eosinophilia

IgG4-related disease Parasitic infections Addison's disease and stress-induced suppression of adrenal gland function Some forms ... Of solid tumor neoplasms, ovarian cancer is most likely to provoke eosinophilia, though any other cancer can cause the ... Reiter A, Gotlib J (2017). "Myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia". Blood. 129 (6): 704-714. doi:10.1182/blood-2016-10-695973. ...

*Incidental medical findings

Pituitary adenomas are tumors that occur in the pituitary gland, and account for about 15% of intracranial neoplasms. They ... often of the adrenal gland, which is detected when diagnostic imaging is used for the analysis of unrelated symptoms. With the ...

*Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor

Ong, ES Neoplasms of the Endocrine Pancreas Workup - Imaging Studies National Cancer Institute. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine ... McKenna, L. R.; Edil, B. H. (2014). "Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors". Gland surgery. 3 (4): 258-275. doi:10.3978/j. ... Pancreatic, neuroendocrine GI, and adrenal cancers. Cancer Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach 13th edition 2010. ISBN 978 ... Only 1 or 2% of clinically significant pancreas neoplasms are PanNETs. PanNETs are sometimes abbreviated as PETs or PNETs: such ...

*Craniopharyngioma

... is a type of brain tumor derived from pituitary gland embryonic tissue, that occurs most commonly in children ... Craniopharyngioma is a rare, usually suprasellar neoplasm, which may be cystic, that develops from nests of epithelium derived ... Excessive thirst Excessive urination Adrenal insufficiency. This occurs because of a reduction in ACTH production, a reduction ... The tumor, being in the pituitary gland, can cause secondary health problems. The immune system, thyroid levels, growth hormone ...

*List of cutaneous conditions

Acral dry gangrene Acromegaly Addison's disease Adrenal adenoma Adrenal carcinoma Adrenal hyperplasia Alopecia-nail dystrophy- ... In the embryo, the epidermis, hair, and glands form from the ectoderm, which is chemically influenced by the underlying ... neoplasms, and cysts are skin lesions that develop from the epidermal layer of the skin. Aberrant basal cell carcinoma ... Within the latter type, the hairs occur in structures called pilosebaceous units, each with hair follicle, sebaceous gland, and ...

*Pseudocyst

... s may form in a number of places, including the pancreas, abdomen, adrenal gland, and eye. Pseudocysts are often ... The CT scan's weakness is its lack of differentiation between pseudocysts and cystic neoplasm. Also, the intravenous contrast ... Types of adrenal cysts include parasitic cysts, epithelial cysts, endothelial cysts, and pseudocysts. 56% of all adrenal cysts ... The cause of adrenal pseudocysts is unknown. A few theories exist, but it is believed that repeated episodes of trauma, ...

*Neuroendocrine tumor

Pituitary gland: Neuroendocrine tumor of the anterior pituitary Thyroid gland: Neuroendocrine thyroid tumors, particularly ... G1 and G2 neuroendocrine neoplasms are called neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) - formerly called carcinoid tumours. G3 neoplasms ... Pancreatic, neuroendocrine GI, and adrenal cancers. Cancer Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach 13th edition 2010; ISBN 978 ... Although there are many kinds of NETs, they are treated as a group of tissue because the cells of these neoplasms share common ...

*Pheochromocytoma

... is a neuroendocrine tumor of the medulla of the adrenal glands (originating in the chromaffin cells), or extra-adrenal ... The other component neoplasms of that syndrome include parathyroid adenomas, and medullary thyroid cancer. Mutations in the ... Extra-adrenal paragangliomas (often described as extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas) are closely related, though less common, ... causing it to reduce the activity of the sympathetic nerves controlling the adrenal medulla. A healthy adrenal medulla will ...

*Abdominal pain

... benign or malignant neoplasms Large bowel obstruction caused by colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, volvulus, fecal ... adrenal insufficiency, lead poisoning, black widow spider bite, narcotic withdrawal Blood vessels aortic dissection, abdominal ... food allergies Glands Bile system Inflammatory: cholecystitis, cholangitis Obstruction: cholelithiasis, tumours Liver ...

*Endolymphatic sac tumor

... adrenal glands, epididymis, broad ligament, along with the endolymphatic sac. The vast majority of patients with an ... Aug 1993). "Papillary neoplasms (Heffner's tumors) of the endolymphatic sac". Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 102 (8 pt 1): 648-51. ... An endolymphatic sac tumor is a very uncommon papillary epithelial neoplasm arising within the endolymphatic sac or ...

*Prostate cancer

Androgens include testosterone, which is made in the testes; dehydroepiandrosterone, made in the adrenal glands; and ... "Male Genitals - Prostate Neoplasms". Pathology study images. University of Virginia School of Medicine. Archived from the ... In prostate cancer, the cells of these prostate glands mutate into cancer cells. The prostate glands require male hormones, ... "The case of scirrhous of the prostate gland with corresponding affliction of the lymphatic glands in the lumbar region and in ...
Adrenal incidentalomas are quite common. About 4 % of the population have adrenal tumors that they are unknown of. Some percentage of this patients produce a little to much cortisol, but not enough to give overt Cushings syndrome. It is shown that slightly elevated cortisol production will give higher blood pressure, higher blood sugar and maybe higher BMI. For another hormone produced in the adrenal glands , aldosterone, we know that even if you have an adrenal tumor on one adrenal, you could have bilateral overproduction of the hormone.In that situations it is no need of an operation of the adrenal with the tumor. When the overproduction is unilateral it is of great value to the patient to operate the adrenal gland, and the symptoms from the hormone excess will disappear. For aldosterone Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) has been used for several years to try to determine if the hormone overproduction is one-sided or to sided. We are in this study using the same principle for cortisol ...
As popular as abdominal imaging examination has become, adrenal incidentaloma has now become a common finding in clinical practice. Although most cases are benign and nonfunctioning, the presence of an adrenal incidentaloma are still critically concerning for patients and physicians alike because of the risk of transition to malignancy or hormonal hyperfunction. In most reports, malignant and functional lesions represented a small part of adrenal incidentalomas, but some medical centres demonstrated that adrenal adenocarcinoma and pheochromocytoma accounted for 12 % (47/380) and 11 % (42/380), respectively [5]. During a long-term follow-up, the 2-year and 5-year risk of tumour growth and hormonal alteration for adrenal incidentalomas was 29 % and 47 %, respectively [9]. In this study, malignance and pheochromocytoma represented 27.6 % of all patients with pathologic results. Of patients under surveillance, more than 80 % (123/138) had to receive an operation. Meanwhile, several reports recently ...
Case Reports in Endocrinology is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes case reports related to the endocrine system and its associated diseases.
Zeynep G zde zkan, C neyt T rkmen, Yasemin anl , Mustafa Nuri Yenerel, I k Adalet. Unusual presentation of adrenal lymphoma observed with PET-CT. Turk J Hematol. 2011; 28(4): 337- ...
Axial CT image revealing a left adrenal mass measuring 2.8cm in diameter. Areas of decreased density equivalent to the attenuation of adipose tissue within a w
Incidentalomas are increasingly common findings on radiologic studies, causing worry for physicians and patients. Physicians should consider the risk of discovering incidentalomas when contemplating imaging. Patients may assume that incidentalomas are cancer, and may not be aware of the radiation risks associated with repeat imaging. Once incidentalomas are detected, appropriate management is dependent on an informed patients wishes and the clinical situation. Guidelines are provided for the initial management of eight incidentalomas (pituitary, thyroid, pulmonary, hepatic, pancreatic, adrenal, renal, and ovarian). Patients presenting with pituitary incidentalomas should undergo pituitary-specific magnetic resonance imaging if the lesion is 1 cm or larger, or if it abuts the optic chiasm. Thyroid incidentalomas are ubiquitous, but nodules larger than 1 to 2 cm are of greater concern. Worrisome pulmonary incidentalomas are those larger than 8 mm or those with irregular borders, eccentric calcifications,
During the past decade, ultrasound has become a routine diagnostic tool for the evaluation of soft tissue structures in the abdominal cavity. One consequence of abdominal ultrasound is the unexpected finding of a seemingly incidental adrenal mass. There are many factors that determine how aggressive the diagnostic and therapeutic approach should be toward an adrenal mass, including the severity of concurrent problems, the original reason for performing abdominal ultrasound, the age of the dog or cat, the likelihood that the mass is hormonally active, the likelihood that the mass is a malignant or benign tumor, the size and invasiveness of the mass, and the owners desires and willingness to pursue the problem. The first consideration is to be certain an adrenal mass exists. Abdominal ultrasound should always be repeated to confirm the mass is a repeatable finding. An adrenal mass is suspected when the maximum width of the adrenal gland exceeds 1.5 cm, there is loss of the typical kidney bean ...
Excess secretion of any of the adrenal cortical or medullary hormones contributes to a number of well-known clinical syndromes.. They may result from benign or malignant adrenal tumours, adrenal hyperplasia or, least frequently, from extra-adrenal disease. Differentiation among these possibilities is often impossible on clinical or biochemical grounds alone. Location of the site(s) of excess hormone production in the past depended on relatively insensitive or invasive radiological methods. The non-invasive evaluation began with X-ray computed tomography but the functional significance of anatomical abnormalities cannot be determined from CT scan. Incorporation of specific radiopharmaceuticals into the abnormal tissues allows scintigraphic localization of functional abnormalities with a high degree of efficacy. The combination of adrenal scintigraphy and kompjuterizovanom tomografijom CT or magnetskom rezonancijom MRI should in most cases obviatc the need for more invasive procedures. Phaeochromocytoma
Learn about benign adrenal tumors and adrenal cancer treatment, such as an adrenalectomy, by endocrine surgeons at Brigham and Womens Hospital.
UCL Discovery is UCLs open access repository, showcasing and providing access to UCL research outputs from all UCL disciplines.
The Endocrine Society recently issued a Clinical Practice Guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of two types of rare adrenal tumors: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.
Case Reports in Endocrinology is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that publishes case reports related to the endocrine system and its associated diseases.
An adrenal mass, also called an adrenal tumor, is a growth that appears on the adrenal gland, according to the Department of Surgery at the University of Southern California. The human body has two...
adrenal cancer: the adrenal glans its just small gland located on each of your kidneys the most common tumer of the adrenal gland is actually a benign tumor calles an adrenal adenoma,these tumor never cause a patient to have any symptoms and do not need to treat,adrenal adenoma actually come from cancer cells that have…
The NCI-H510A cell line was derived by D. Carney, A.F. Gazdar and associates in 1982 from an adrenal metastasis in an adult male patient.
Objective:To determine the frequency of subclinical hormone secretion in incidentally discovered adrenal masses.Design:We reviewed the radiologic reports of 177
Build: Wed Jun 21 18:33:50 EDT 2017 (commit: 4a3b2dc). National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), 6701 Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda MD 20892-4874 • 301-435-0888. ...
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies. ...
If negative on all of the above, consider further imaging e.g. CT attenuation, chemical shift MRI, scintigraphy, or PET to assess for ...
Abstract Previous studies have indicated that an autostimulatory transforming growth factor was required for the optimal growth of SW-13 adrenal carcinoma cells in soft agar. The p..
Home gardeners often dream of an orchard in the back yard; how nice to walk outside and pick a few apples or cherries of your own. But USDA Zone 6 gardeners may mistakenly think the hot, humid summers arent suitable for fruit tree growing. Dont cheat yourself out of an orchard--many varieties grow well in ...
Anna GOLDENBERG, DO, Marc Neff, MD, Roy L Sandau, DO, Linda Szczurek, DO, Jennifer Rager, DO. University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Osteopathic Medicine(Kennedy University Health System)- Department of Surgery. The exponential increase in computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has lead to a significant rise in the detection of asymptomatic adrenal masses. The prevalence of adrenal "incidentalomas" is approximately 4%-10%. We present a case of a 55 year old male with a large 7 by 7 cm right adrenal mass that was followed by serial CT scans and multiple non-diagnostic CT guided core biopsies. Due to the large size of the mass and unknown pathology, the patient underwent successful transabdominal laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The patients post-operative course was uneventful and he was discharged home on post-operative day number three. Pathology results from the adrenal mass revealed an unusual finding; a large adrenal lipoma. Adrenal lipomas are rare, ...
1. The major issue to resolve with the various imaging techniques is the differentiation of benign adrenal adenomas from adrenal cortical carcinoma, since biochemical tests can distinguish an adrenal adenoma from a pheochromocytoma. As Dr. Copeland has noted, approximately half of the adrenal masses in patients with known cancer represent metastasis (1). It is in that group of patients that fine-needle aspiration of the adrenal mass is most useful in excluding metastatic disease if the findings on imaging are equivocal. In the study Dr. Copeland cites to advocate the routine use of delayed enhanced CT (2), 39 of the 40 malignant adrenal incidentalomas were metastatic lesions, while the remaining lesion was a malignant pheochromocytoma. None were adrenal cortical carcinomas. Until we have sufficient data that this procedure regularly distinguishes between primary adrenal adenomas and carcinomas, "additional research is needed ...
Background: Adrenal pheochromocytoma is potentially lethal if undetected and is associated with long-term morbidity. Methods: Records of patients (11 men, 18 women) with confirmed pheochromocytoma were studied with respect to clinicopathological features and outcome. Results: Pheochromocytoma was diagnosed in 4 of 8,486 (0.05%) autopsies and accounted for 3 of the 4 immediate causes of death. Operative mortality occurred in 1 patient with undiagnosed tumor. Hypertensive-related complications occurred in 6 patients before diagnosis. Malignancy was documented in 7 patients with distant metastases (n = 4) or locally invasive tumors (n = 3). During a median follow-up of 4 years, 23 patients are alive and free of disease (79%). Four of the 6 patients (67%) who died had distant metastases compared with 2 of 23 patients (9%) without distant metastases (P = 0.04). Persistent hypertension and diabetes requiring treatment were present in 8 (35%) and 4 (17%) of 23 patients respectively. Conclusions: Fatal ...
A 32-year-old woman, primigravida, who was 12 weeks pregnant, initially consulted a practitioner with awareness of right abdominal discomfort. She was pointed out bilateral adrenal tumor by abdominal ultrasonography. She was diagnosed with pheochromocytoma by blood examination and consulted our hospital. There were no signs of preeclampsia. Her other past history were unremarkable. A physical examination showed a temperature of 35.7°C and a respiratory rate of 16 breaths/min. Her blood pressure was 129/90 mmHg and pulse rate was 86 beats/min. Her heart and breath sounds were normal. The size of her uterus was consistent with 12 weeks of gestation and fetal heart rate was 148 beats/min. There were no palpable masses in the thyroid, no uterine contractions, and no edema was detected. Major laboratory findings included a hematocrit of 38.8% and white blood cell count of 8,100/mm3, with 72.0% neutrophils and the platelet count was 391,000/mm3. The blood sugar level in the fasting was 87mg/dl. ...
The authors report a case of the safe performance of radiofrequency (RF) ablations and biopsies in a patient with metastatic pheochromocytoma. The patient had previously undergone RF ablation at another institution for a tumor in her liver; that procedure was complicated by a hypertensive crisis and cardiac arrest. Our experience emphasizes that, despite a prior life-threatening complication, careful pre-, intra-, and postprocedural care to avoid a hypertensive crisis allowed safe RF ablations and biopsies in a patient with pheochromocytoma.
Choosing effective therapy for patients with malignant pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma (PPGL) is problematic and none of the options are curative. Although combination chemotherapy with cyclophospha
Adrenal myelolipoma is a benign tumor of the adrenal gland. It mainly consists of mature adipose tissue and intermixed myeloid tissue. Adrenal myelolipoma are the second most common cause of adrenal incidentillomas and make up almost 10% of it. Rarely, myelolipomas are encountered outside the adrenal glands and are termed as extra adrenal myelolipomoas. ...
von Hippel-Lindau (vHL) disease is an inherited, autosomal dominant syndrome manifested by a variety of benign and malignant tumors. More than 300 germline VHL mutations have been identified that are
Adrenal lesions can be functional or non functional. Non-functional adrenal tumors frequently present as an incidental finding on CT or MR imaging. The indication for their removal lies in the size of adrenal mass; whether large (,5cm) at diagnosis, or enlarging on serial examination. The small size of the adrenal gland, the benign nature of most adrenal tumors and the difficulty of gaining access to the organ by open surgical means make the laparoscopic approach particularly suitable for adrenalectomy. Ever since, Gagner reported first Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy in 1992, it has become a new gold standard for removing benign adrenal gland and has replaced open surgical procedures. Many reports have confirmed the advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy over open adrenalectomy. Laparoscopy offers a shorter hospital stay, decrease in postoperative pain, early return to activity and improved cosmesis. We have done laparoscopic adrenalectomy in 32 cases; age range varies from 8 - 60 years. Average ...
In the adrenal tumor cell system ganglioside Gm1 inhibited cholera enterotoxin (CT)-induced steroidogenesis if it was preincubated with the toxin or added to adrenal cells 10 min before CT. In the preincubation studies a molar ratio of Gm1 to toxin of 3:1 was necessary for half-maximal inhibition of steroidogenesis. On the other hand, horse serum anticholeragenoid neutralized the steroidogenic response to cell-bound CT by 50% if it was added to adrenal monolayer cultures 15 min after the toxin. Specific antiserum was able to neutralized 20% of the toxin-induced activity even if it was added to adrenal cultures 2 h after CT. Phase contrast microscopy demonstrated that partial neutralization of the biochemical effect of CT by horse serum anticholeragenoid was accompanied by partial prevention of toxin-induced rounding of adrenal cells. Further studies showed that pretreatment of cultured adrenal cells with a maximal dose of CT increased cyclic adenosine 3-5-monophosphate formation in response to ...
This 72 y/o male was referred for MRI to evaluate an adrenal mass. Selected coronal and in & out of phase axial images shown above demonstrate a predominantly fat containing, thinly encapsulated right adrenal mass consistent with an adrenal myelolipoma ...
Doctor answers on Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, and More: Dr. Gupta on causes of adrenal cancer: At this time, there are no known direct causes for prostate cancer. Three factors are known. As men age, the risk for prostate cancer increases. Race also plays a role in risk (aa | whites | asians). Men with a primary relative(father, brother) are at the most increased risk for developing the disease. At 40, a rectal exam and psa blood test are the best way to start screening. for topic: Causes Of Adrenal Cancer
Dr. Rao responded: Prognosis. Majority of pheochromocytomas are benign only about 10 % are malignant, one third ( 30 % ) out side adrenal gland tumors are malignant. With 50 % 5 yr survival, also show elivated levels of |a href="/topics/chromogranin-a" track_data="{
Treatment of Adrenal Incidentaloma:Management of an incidentally found adrenal mass in a patient without a known primary malignancy will depend upon the size of the mass, its characteristics on the CT or MRI scan, and whether hormonal tests indicate that the tumor is producing excessive adrenal hormones.The two options for treating adrenal incidentaloma are:Monitoring its appearance with a series of CT or MRI scans, orRemoving the adrenal mass with minimally invasive surgery, usually laparoscopically. It typically involves removal of the mass and the adrenal gland (adrenalectomy). In select cases, removal of only the tumor may be recommended (partial adrenalectomy). This surgery may be done through a single small incision in the abdomen (Single Site laparoscopic surgery) or through 3-4 small keyhole incisions. Robotic surgery may also be recommended by your surgeon. If the lesion is large and/or looks suspicious on the CT or MR imaging, the mass is secreting excessive adrenal hormones. Surgery recovery
We had a great Ambulatory Report today with the help of our own Christian Ngo and Endocrinologist Dr. Abramowitz, teaching us how to workup/manage adrenal incidentalomas: Basics: All patients: cortisol (1mg dex suppression test: am cortisol |1.8 rules out and |5 rules in). 24 hour urine cortisol is only used in patients where suspicion for…
Introduction: Karel Pacak and Graeme Eisenhofer. Part I: Pheochromocytoma: A Kaleidoscope of Presentations and a Minefield for Differential Diagnosis: 1. Diagnostic Challenges and Vagaries of Pheochromocytoma: William M. Manger.. 2. Clinical Characteristics of Incidentally-Discovered Pheochromocytoma Based on Experience in 50 Proven Cases: Emmanuel L. Bravo.. 3. Clinical Experience with 1080 Adrenal Incidentalomas Observed at a Single Endocrinological Center: A Place for Chromaffin Tumors: Anna Kasperlik-Zaluska.. 4. Characteristics of pheochromocytoma in a 4- to 20-year-old population: Marta Barontini.. 5. Pheochromocytoma During Pregnancy: A Literature Survey: Henri Timmers.. 6. Lack of Symptomatology in Patients with Histological Evidence of Pheochromocytoma: A Diagnostic Challenge: Debbie L. Cohen.. Part II: Genetics: Increasing Importance for Clinical Decision-Making:.. 7. Predictors and Prevalence of Paraganglioma Syndrome Associated with Mutations of the SDHC Gene: Hartmut Neumann.. 8. ...
Phaeochromocytoma are a rare clinical entity in children. Contrary to traditional teaching which suggested that 10% of phaeochromocytomas are familial, advances in molecular genetics have revealed an identifiable germ line mutation in up to 59% (27/48) of apparently sporadic phaeochromocytomas presenting at 18 years or younger and in 70% of those presenting before 10 years of age. The inherited predisposition may be attributable to a germ line mutation in the Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene; the genes encoding for the subunits B and D of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB and SDHD); the RET proto-oncogene predisposing to Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2 (MEN2) or the Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) gene.1 Of these, the Von Hipplel Lindau gene is the most commonly mutated gene in children presenting with a phaeochromocytoma. Referral to Clinical Genetics is recommended for genetic counselling prior to gene testing and investigation of the wider family. This review provides guidance on the aetiology, ...
The majority of people with adrenal adenomas will have no symptoms and the growths will only be discovered during a MRI or CT completed for other reasons. These non-functioning adrenal adenomas do not require follow up treatment.. Functional adrenal adenomas will increase hormones made in the adrenal gland.. ...
Malignant pheochromocytomas are divided into categories based on the extent of the tumour. Localized refers to apparently benign tumours that are confined to the adrenal gland. Regional refers to tumours that have extended into nearby tissues, lymph nodes or organs. Metastatic refers to tumours that
Malignant pheochromocytomas are divided into categories based on the extent of the tumour. Localized refers to apparently benign tumours that are confined to the adrenal gland. Regional refers to tumours that have extended into nearby tissues, lymph nodes or organs. Metastatic refers to tumours that
Adrenal Cancer is cancer that begins in the small glands that sit above each of the kidneys, which are located inside the upper part of the abdomen. These glands are important to the bodys endocrine, or hormonal, system. Each adrenal gland has two main parts that function separately: Adrenal cortex: The cortex is the
Catecholamine-secreting tumors that arise from chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla and the sympathetic ganglia are referred to as pheochromocytomas and catecholamine-secreting paragangliomas (extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas), respectively. Becaus
This Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy consultation is part of a series of consultations with surgical specialists at the University of California, San Diego.
The adrenal glands are endocrine glands located directly on top of the kidneys. Their main function is to secrete vital hormones and steroids during times of stress, as well as govern many different bodily functions. The hormones that the adrenal glands secrete are primarily derived from amino acids or lipids. The right adrenal gland is pyramid-shaped, while the left adrenal gland is shaped like a crescent moon. They have an irregular surface configuration, are enclosed in a capsule made of connective tissue, and have a liberal blood supply from the superior, middle, and inferior suprarenal arteries.. The outer portion of each gland is called the adrenal cortex, and it has three zones of cells. Each zone can be identified under a microscope based on different structural features; additionally, the zones can be distinguished solely based on their different functions. The outermost layer is called the zona glomerulosa, and it primarily produces mineralcorticoids to regulate blood pressure. When ...
... , a rare cancer, is a disease in which cancer (malignant) cells are found in special cells in the body called chromaffin cells. Most pheochromocytomas start inside the adrenal gland (the adrenal medulla) where most chromaffin cells are located. There are two adrenal glands, one above each kidney in the back of the upper abdomen. Cells in the adrenal glands make important hormones that help the body work properly. Usually pheochromocytoma affects only one adrenal gland. Pheochromocytoma may also start in other parts of the body, such as the area around the heart or bladder ...
Cancer: Adrenal cancer | Chemotherapy. Treatment in Essen, Germany ✈ Find the best medical programs at BookingHealth - ✔Compare the prices ✔Online booking.
As with all cancer treatments, adrenal cancer surgery may produce side effects. Learn how the medical experts and therapists at CTCA work to minimize them.
Earlier this month, Towson University celebrated the life of the schools late president, Maravene Loeschke by holding a huge memorial service at SECU Arena. Loeschke passed away in June from complications related to adrenal cancer, a disease that is rare and difficult to diagnose.
Cortisol is a separate steroid hormone produced within the adrenal cortex. If a tumor produces excess cortisol, Cushings syndrome (also known as hypercortisolism) can develop. This syndrome is seen not only with adrenal tumors, but can also be the result of excessive levels of adrenal cortical stimulating hormone (also known as ACTH, a hormone that is responsible for stimulating the adrenal glands to produce cortisol) produced by the pituitary gland or another tumor in the body. Cushings syndrome may also develop in patients who are taking steroids as medication for other disorders. The symptoms of Cushings syndrome can vary greatly from patient to patient and involve a number of different parts of the body. Symptoms include weight gain and water retention resulting in a round face and collection of fat on the back of the shoulders and neck (so-called "buffalo hump"). Red streaks can appear on the skin known as striae. Excessive hair growth (called hirsutism) can also be seen. Excessive ...
Cortisol is a separate steroid hormone produced within the adrenal cortex. If a tumor produces excess cortisol, Cushings syndrome (also known as hypercortisolism) can develop. This syndrome is seen not only with adrenal tumors, but can also be the result of excessive levels of adrenal cortical stimulating hormone (also known as ACTH, a hormone that is responsible for stimulating the adrenal glands to produce cortisol) produced by the pituitary gland or another tumor in the body. Cushings syndrome may also develop in patients who are taking steroids as medication for other disorders. The symptoms of Cushings syndrome can vary greatly from patient to patient and involve a number of different parts of the body. Symptoms include weight gain and water retention resulting in a round face and collection of fat on the back of the shoulders and neck (so-called "buffalo hump"). Red or purple stretch marks, known as striae can appear on the skin. Excessive hair growth (called hirsutism) can also be ...
Diseases of the adrenal gland are relatively rare. The most common reason that a patient may need to have the adrenal gland removed is excess hormone production by a tumour located within the adrenal. Most of these tumours are small and not cancers. They are known as benign growths that can usually be removed with laparoscopic techniques. Removal of the adrenal gland may also be required for certain tumours even if they arent producing excess hormones, such as very large tumours or if there is a suspicion that the tumour could be a cancer, or sometimes referred to as malignant. Fortunately, malignant adrenal tumours are rare. An adrenal mass or tumour is sometimes found by chance when a patient gets an X-ray study to evaluate another problem.. ...
Strong positive staining (+++) of the malignant pheochromocytoma (top left),++ of the paraganglioma (top right),+ of the benign pheochromocytoma (bottom left),
An horseshoe adrenal gland is very rare anomaly. It is also sometimes called a butterfly adrenal gland, fused adrenal gland or midline adrenal gland. It is the solitary adrenal gland that is present in the midline with the fused portion either p...
h4. What are the adrenal glands? The adrenal glands are the part of the body responsible for releasing three different classes of hormones. These hormones control many important functions in the body, such as: * Maintaining metabolic processes, such as managing blood sugar levels and regulating inflammation * Regulating the balance of salt and water * Controlling the fight or flight response to stress * Maintaining pregnancy * Initiating and controlling sexual maturation during childhood and puberty The adrenal glands are also an important source of sex steroids, such as estrogen and testosterone. h4. What are adrenal gland disorders? Adrenal gland ...
A 54-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with a presumed allergic reaction to a single dose of amoxicillin given for a suspected upper respiratory tract infection. She complained of chest tightness although there was no wheeze or stridor. On examination, she was pyrexial, tachycardic, hypertensive and had a diffuse mottled rash on her lower limbs. Her initial investigations showed raised inflammatory markers. She was treated in the intensive care for a presumed anaphylactic reaction with an underlying sepsis. Further investigations including CT head and CSF examination were unremarkable; however, a CT abdomen showed a 10 cm heterogeneous right adrenal mass. Based on review by the endocrine team, a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma crisis was made, which was subsequently confirmed on 24-h urinary metanephrine measurement. An emergency adrenalectomy was considered although she was deemed unfit for surgery. Despite intensive medical management, her conditioned deteriorated and she died secondary to ...
Teaching Files with CT Medical Imaging and case studies on Anatomical Regions including Adrenal, Colon, Cardiac, Stomach, Pediatric, Spleen, Vascular, Kidney, Small Bowel, Liver, Chest | CTisus
Happy Anniversary - well, technically Im two days late This is going to be a bit of a big update, even for me, Ive been holding back a bit it seems It was a year ago that I learned I had pheochromocytoma again. It was just after that I learned it was malignant pheochromocytoma cancer.…
Teaching Files with CT Medical Imaging and case studies on Anatomical Regions including Adrenal, Colon, Cardiac, Stomach, Pediatric, Spleen, Vascular, Kidney, Small Bowel, Liver, Chest | CTisus
Adrenal glands are ductless glands that belong to the endocrine system of the body (related to kidneys). They are triangular in shape and are found on top of the kidneys. They are 1-2 inches in length and weigh less than one ounce. They control more than 35 hormones in our body-these glands are very powerful. They are the anti-stress glands that help the body fight stress and regulate salt balance, water and blood pressure. Proper functioning is very important for the energy, resilience and endurance of the body. Keep reading to learn more about adrenal gland problems in women.. ,img class="alignright size-full wp-image-4329″ style="float: right; margin-left: 5px;" title="Symptoms Of Adrenal Gland Problems In Women" src="http://womenalt.ygoy.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/How-to-Avoid-Insecurities-in-a-Relationship_.jpg" alt="Symptoms Of Adrenal Gland Problems In Women" width="300″ height="205″ /,. Adrenal Gland Problems in Women. There are many problems women experience caused by a ...
|p||p||bold|The aim of the study|/bold| was to present our experience in the treatment of pheochromocytoma, which can have untypical manifestations or their complete lack. Surgery still is the main treatment. Since introducing minimally invasive method the operative choice between open and videoscopic still remains.|/p||p|The proper diagnosis, preparation and surgical treatment allow to avoid serious cardiovascular complications. In the treatment, pre-or intraoperative hypertensive crisis and hypotension appearing after removing the tumor are the important issues. Based on our study from 29.10.1997 to 31.01.2009 authors are showing methods and principles of preparation and the intra- and post-operative complications associated with performed operation.|/p||p|Additionally the problem of pheochromocytomas, clinically asymptomatic, so-called silent pheochromocytoma is discussed. Evaluated material consisted of 125 patients with pheochromocytoma. 32 (25,6%) were operated by open, classical
When undetected, pheochromocytoma can maim or kill. Therefore, infrequent as the disease may be, accurate, safe, and feasible screening to find these tumors remains an important goal for the primary care physician, the clinical researcher, and the subspecialist alike. This crucial need is addressed by Lenders and colleagues in this issue [1]. Excess catecholamines released into the circulation by a pheochromocytoma cause the clinical manifestations of the disease. Increased plasma concentrations of norepinephrines or epinephrines or both are found in most but not all patients with these neoplasms. However, high plasma concentrations of catecholamines may be found in other disorders, and the limited sensitivity and specificity of measurement of plasma catecholamines for diagnosis of pheochromocytoma has been well established [2, 3 ...
Find the best hypertension in pheochromocytoma doctors in Kolkata. Get guidance from medical experts to select hypertension in pheochromocytoma specialist in Kolkata from trusted hospitals - credihealth.com
The left adrenal vein is also a guide to the left renal artery which often lies dorsal to the vein and one potential complication of left adrenalectomy is the inadvertent ligation of the apical renal arterial branch to the upper pole which lies in close contact to the inferior border of an adrenal tumor ...
Macro: Adrenal gland 75 x 50 x 45 mm and 90 g with thin yellow cortex and central dark red/brown to gelatinous lesion, up to 70 mm. Macroscopic: The findings are classical with central congested, red to brown lesion and thin residual rim of yellow adrenal cortex.. Microscopic: The histology nicely demonstrates the component tissues including:. ...
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Im trying to grow PC12 cells (from rat adrenal pheochromocytoma) on glass slides. I used another labs protocol using poly-D lysine, washed and then added collagen. This protocol has worked for this cell line before but I cant seem to repeat it (regardless of how careful and closely I follow the protocol). I need the cells to stick for at least 10 days before I can continue with my experiment. I tried different incubation times and concentration of both poly-D lysine and collagen but i still have the same issues. Help ...
Lets talk about adrenals! I know a lot of people who are suffering from adrenal issues, usually referred to as adrenal fatigue or adrenal burnout. When you have adrenal fatigue, you always feel tired and run down, no matter how much rest you get. Frustrating right?. So, where are these adrenal glands and what do they do? Your adrenal glands are about 3 inches wide, pyramid-shaped, and sit right above your kidneys. These glands produce hormones that help us deal with stress. The center of the adrenal gland is called the medulla. It produces the hormone adrenaline which results in epinephrine and norepinephrine. The outer part of the gland, known as the cortex, makes the hormones aldosterone, DHEAs, cortisol, and trace amounts of the hormones testosterone and estrogen. These are busy little glands!. Theyre also very important glands. They help you respond to stress, play a part in how strong your immune system is, regulate your body temperature, and help keep your blood sugar levels stable. If ...
Wardelmann, E. (2008) Sarcomas and Bone Tumors in Adulthood, in Hereditary Tumors: From Genes to Clinical Consequences (eds H. Allgayer, H. Rehder and S. Fulda), Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Germany. doi: 10.1002/9783527627523.ch27 ...
Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal glands. Symptoms include headache, sweating, palpitations, elevated blood pressure, anxiety, nausea, tremors and more. Learn more about the symptoms, causes, treatments, and diagnosis (including tests) of pheochromocytoma.
Adrenalectomy is indicated for adrenal tumors larger than 5 cm, or for adrenal tumors with hormonal activity. Adrenal tumors |3 cm in size without hormonal activity require watchful waiting (with imaging controls)..., from the online textbook of urology by D. Manski
The adrenal glands are located above the kidneys. The hormones produced by the adrenal glands affect nearly every organ in the body. The inner layer of the adrenal gland releases substances (hormones) such as adrenaline that:Help control blood pressure.Help the body react to stress by increasing heart rate, opening the airways, and shifting blood flow to the large muscles.The outer layer of the ..
Teaching Files with CT Medical Imaging and case studies on Anatomical Regions including Adrenal, Colon, Cardiac, Stomach, Pediatric, Spleen, Vascular, Kidney, Small Bowel, Liver, Chest | CTisus
Teaching Files with CT Medical Imaging and case studies on Anatomical Regions including Adrenal, Colon, Cardiac, Stomach, Pediatric, Spleen, Vascular, Kidney, Small Bowel, Liver, Chest | CTisus
View details of top hypertension in pheochromocytoma hospitals in Navi Mumbai. Get guidance from medical experts to select best hypertension in pheochromocytoma hospital in Navi Mumbai
Cancer patients now have a silver lining as a new international study has found a new treatment for one of the most rare and aggressive forms of cancer.
Incidentaloma is a made-up word that refers to a benign tumor discovered incidentally, usually by some imaging exam such as CT or MRI. Dangers and treatments vary.
Incidentaloma is a made-up word that refers to a benign tumor discovered incidentally, usually by some imaging exam such as CT or MRI. Dangers and treatments vary.
Incidentaloma is a made-up word that refers to a benign tumor discovered incidentally, usually by some imaging exam such as CT or MRI. Dangers and treatments vary.
Only a few percent of pediatric adrenal lesions are benign. Adrenal tumors include those of neural and cortical origin. Although most neuroblastomas present as abdominal masses, pheochromocytomas and cortical tumors usually present with endocrine dysfunction. Although imaging may not be able to differentiate benign lesions from malignant tumors, or whether they arise in the adrenal…
Computed tomography scan (also called a CT or CAT scan). A diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general X-rays. ...
Computed tomography scan (also called a CT or CAT scan). A diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general X-rays. ...
Pheochromocytoma (PCC) is a rare kind of tumor that forms in the middle of the adrenal glands. The tumors cause your adrenal glands to make too many hormones.
Dec. 5 - If adrenal masses are found incidentally during a CT scan, andthe masses look benign, they do not require additional imagingfollow-up, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
Certain adrenal gland disorders are characterized by an inability of the adrenal glands to produce cortisol (also known as hydrocortisone hormone) and aldosterone, often due to certain missing enzymes (proteins that speed up or cause chemical reactions). The result is enlarged adrenal glands due to overstimulation from the hypothalamus which detects the low levels of hormones. The hypothalamus, in turn, stimulates the pituitary gland to stimulate the adrenal glands. Overstimulation of the adrenal glands can lead to overproduction of androgens, which can lead to masculinization.. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 314.454.5437 or 800.678.5437 or email us.. ...
pheochromocytoma definition: A usually benign cyst of the adrenal medulla or perhaps the sympathetic neurological system when the affected cells secrete increased levels of epinephrine or norepinephrine.;…
Treatment for pheochromocytoma usually includes removing the tumor. Before removing the tumor, however, your doctor may prescribe medications to control high blood pressure. In children, there may be multiple tumors. An extensive evaluation to locate them will be required before surgery.. Continuous medical follow-up may be required to monitor the development of future tumors.. Family members may also want to consider testing to rule out the presence of the tumors, as genetics does appear to play a role in some cases.. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 314.454.5437 or 800.678.5437 or email us. ...
Learn more about Pheochromocytoma at Cartersville Medical Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Learn more about Pheochromocytoma at Grand Strand Medical Center DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
Global Markets Directs latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline guide Pheochromocytoma - Pipeline Review, H2 2016, provides an overview
Wet-lab validated real-time PCR primer assays for your biological pathway of interest. Select your gene target of interest using an interactive pathway map, and select your plate.
There is a world of difference between the opinions of conventional physicians and integrative physicians when it comes to the subject of our adrenal glands. In medical school I received excellent instruction on the anatomy and physiology (A&P) and healthy functioning of the adrenal glands. In case you skipped that lecture, they are small glands that sit atop our kidneys and are divided into two hormone-producing regions.
Immediately download the Adrenal gland summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays, quotes, character descriptions, lesson plans, and more - everything you need for studying or teaching Adrenal gland.
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Your adrenal glands are two tiny pyramid-shaped pieces of tissue situated right above each kidney. Their job is to produce and release, when appropriate, certain ...
The purpose of this study is to determine whether iobenguane I 131 is safe and effective in patients with malignant pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma.
Phaeochromocytomas are rare neuroendocrine tumours that produce catecholamines and numerous secretory proteins and peptides, including neuropeptide Y (NPY), a vasoactive peptide with influences on blood pressure. The production of catecholamines and NPY by phaeochromocytomas is highly variable. This study examined influences of hereditary factors and differences in catecholamine production on tumour expression of NPY, as assessed by quantitative PCR, enzyme immunoassay and immunohistochemistry. Phaeochromocytomas included hereditary adrenaline-producing tumours (adrenergic phenotype) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2), predominantly noradrenaline-producing tumours (noradrenergic phenotype) in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome, and other adrenergic and noradrenergic tumours where there was no clear hereditary syndrome. NPY levels in phaeochromocytomas from VHL patients were lower (P,0.0001) than in those from MEN 2 patients for both mRNA (84-fold difference) and the peptide (99-fold ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay for Plasma Free Metanephrines in the Biochemical Diagnosis of Phaeochromocytoma in Adults is not ideal. AU - Mullins, F. AU - Fitzgerald, R. AU - OShea, P. AU - Tormey, William. PY - 2011/10. Y1 - 2011/10. U2 - 10.1515/CCLM.2011.742. DO - 10.1515/CCLM.2011.742. M3 - Article. VL - 50. SP - 105. EP - 110. JO - Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. T2 - Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. JF - Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. SN - 1434-6621. IS - 1. ER - ...
Recent studies have shown that somatic mutations in the KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D genes are associated with the pathogenesis of aldosterone-producing adenoma. Clinical profile and biochemical characteristics of the mutations in Chinese patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma remain unclear. In this study, we performed DNA sequencing in 168 Chinese patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma and found 129 somatic mutations in KCNJ5, 4 in ATP1A1, 1 in ATP2B3, and 1 in CACNA1D. KCNJ5 mutations were more prevalent in female patients and were associated with larger adenomas, higher aldosterone excretion, and lower minimal serum K+ concentration. More interestingly, we identified a novel somatic KCNJ5 mutation (c.445-446insGAA, p.T148-T149insR) that could enhance CYP11B2 mRNA upregulation and aldosterone release. This mutation could also cause membrane depolarization and intercellular Ca2+ increase. In conclusion, somatic KCNJ5 mutations are conspicuously more popular than mutations of ...
The adrenal glands in children can be affected by a variety of benign lesions. The diagnosis of adrenal lesions can be challenging, but assessment of morphologic changes in correlation with the clinical presentation can lead to an accurate diagnosis. These lesions can be classified by their cause: congenital (eg, discoid adrenal gland, horseshoe adrenal gland, and epithelial cysts), vascular and/or traumatic (eg, adrenal hemorrhage), infectious (eg, granulomatous diseases), enzyme deficiency disorders (eg, congenital adrenal hyperplasia [CAH] and Wolman disease), benign neoplasms (eg, pheochromocytomas, ganglioneuromas, adrenal adenomas, and myelolipomas), and adrenal mass mimics (eg, extralobar sequestration and extramedullary hematopoiesis ...
Hyperaldosteronism, also aldosteronism, is a medical condition wherein too much aldosterone is produced by the adrenal glands, which can lead to lowered levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia) and increased hydrogen ion excretion (alkalosis). This cause of mineralocorticoid excess is primary hyperaldosteronism reflecting excess production of aldosterone by adrenal zona glomerulosa. Bilateral micronodular hyperplasia is more common than unilateral adrenal adenoma. Play media It can be asymptomatic, but these symptoms may be present: Fatigue Headache High blood pressure Hypokalemia Hypernatraemia Hypomagnesemia Intermittent or temporary paralysis Muscle spasms Muscle weakness Numbness Polyuria Polydipsia Tingling Metabolic alkalosis The causes of primary hyperaldosteronism are adrenal hyperplasia and adrenal adenoma (Conns syndrome). These cause hyperplasia of aldosterone-producing cells of the adrenal cortex resulting in primary hyperaldosteronism. The causes of secondary ...
von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Sagittal vertebral angiogram of the same patient as in the previous 3 images shows a hypervascular intramural nodule (open arrow) that demonstrates a prolonged and intense enhancement with a surrounding avascular area, representing the cyst surrounding the mural nodule (solid arrows). Note the stretching of vessels around the cyst. The final diagnosis was a cerebellar hemangioblastoma associated with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (same patient as in Images 1-3).VHL is characterized by a predisposition to bilateral and multicentric retinal angiomas, central nervous system (CNS) hemangioblastomas; renal cell carcinomas; pheochromocytoma s; islet cell tumors of the pancreas; endolymphatic sac tumors[1] ; and renal, pancreatic, and epididymal cysts.[2, 3] CNS hemangioblastoma (Lindau tumor) is the most commonly recognized manifestation of VHL and occurs in 40% of patients.[4] ...
Looking for online definition of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 in the Medical Dictionary? multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 explanation free. What is multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2? Meaning of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 medical term. What does multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 mean?

Search of: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - List Results - ClinicalTrials.govSearch of: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | 'Adrenal Gland Neoplasms' - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov

Study of Adrenal Gland Tumors. *Adrenal Gland Neoplasm. Observational. *Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child ... Combined FDG-PET and 123I-Iodometomidate Imaging for Adrenal Neoplasia. *Adrenal Gland Neoplasms ... Towards an Easy-to-use Adrenal Cancer/Tumor Identity Card. *Adrenal Gland Neoplasms ... An Image-guided SBRT for Adrenal Gland Metastasis in Oligometastatic Patients. *Adrenal Gland Metastases ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?recr=Open&cond=%22Adrenal+Gland+Neoplasms%22&show_down=Y

Adrenal gland neoplasms Pathway Map - PrimePCR | Life Science | Bio-RadAdrenal gland neoplasms Pathway Map - PrimePCR | Life Science | Bio-Rad

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms R96 Predesigned 96-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Adrenal Gland Neoplasms R384 Predesigned 384-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Adrenal gland neoplasms M96 Predesigned 96-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ... Adrenal gland neoplasms M384 Predesigned 384-well panel for use with SYBR® Green ...
more infohttp://www.bio-rad.com/en-us/prime-pcr-assays/pathway/adrenal-gland-neoplasms

2018 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code D35.0: Benign neoplasm of adrenal gland2018 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code D35.0: Benign neoplasm of adrenal gland

A non-metastasizing neoplasm arising from the adrenal gland.. *A non-metastasizing neoplasm arising from the adrenal gland. ( ... Benign neoplasm of adrenal gland. 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code *D35.0 should not be used for reimbursement ... Benign neoplasm of other and unspecified endocrine glands. 2016 2017 2018 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Type 1 Excludes*benign ... Tumor - see also Neoplasm, unspecified behavior, by site* adrenal* cortical (benign) D35.0- ...
more infohttps://www.icd10data.com/ICD10CM/Codes/C00-D49/D10-D36/D35-/D35.0

Laurence Katznelson, MD | Stanford Medicine ProfilesLaurence Katznelson, MD | Stanford Medicine Profiles

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms. *Adrenal Cortex Diseases. *Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma. *Growth Hormone Deficiency ... The adrenal glands appeared normal on computed tomographic scanning. Bilateral surgical adrenalectomy revealed PPNAD. ... Adrenal function was assessed by using the high-dose cosyntropin stimulation test.A total of 48 patients were assessed, with a ... Adrenal reserve was assessed with a 1 mcg cosyntropin stimulation test and growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was diagnosed by ...
more infohttps://med.stanford.edu/profiles/laurence-katznelson

A Phase II Study of Pertuzumab and Erlotinib for Metastatic or Unresectable Neuroendocrine Tumors - Full Text View -...A Phase II Study of Pertuzumab and Erlotinib for Metastatic or Unresectable Neuroendocrine Tumors - Full Text View -...

Endocrine Gland Neoplasms. Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms. Neuroectodermal Tumors, Primitive, Peripheral ... Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial. Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue ... Neoplasms, Multiple Primary. Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary. Genetic Diseases, Inborn. Adrenal Gland Diseases. ... Pancreatic Neoplasms. Digestive System Neoplasms. Neoplasms by Site. Digestive System Diseases. Pancreatic Diseases. Endocrine ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00947167?term=pertuzumab&rank=54

ICD-10 Code: D35.01  - Benign neoplasm of right adrenal glandICD-10 Code: D35.01 - Benign neoplasm of right adrenal gland

The ICD-10 Code D35.01 is the code used for Benign neoplasm of right adrenal gland .An alternative description for this code is ...
more infohttp://medpricemonkey.com/icd10_code?icd10_code=D35.01

ICD-10 Code: D35.02  - Benign neoplasm of left adrenal glandICD-10 Code: D35.02 - Benign neoplasm of left adrenal gland

The ICD-10 Code D35.02 is the code used for Benign neoplasm of left adrenal gland .An alternative description for this code is ...
more infohttp://medpricemonkey.com/icd10_code?icd10_code=D35.02

Endoscopic, extraperitoneal adrenalectomyEndoscopic, extraperitoneal adrenalectomy

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / surgery*. Adrenalectomy / instrumentation*. Aged. Female. Humans. Laparoscopes*. Male. Middle Aged. ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Endoscopic-extraperitoneal-adrenalectomy/7851150.html

Hyperandrogenic states in pregnancy.Hyperandrogenic states in pregnancy.

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / metabolism. Adrenal Glands / metabolism, ultrasonography. Adrenocortical Adenoma / metabolism, ... Ovarian Neoplasms / metabolism, ultrasonography. Ovary / metabolism, ultrasonography. Placenta / enzymology. Pregnancy. ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Hyperandrogenic-states-in-pregnancy/21114372.html

Adrenal Gland Cancer | Neuroblastoma | Pheochromocytoma | MedlinePlusAdrenal Gland Cancer | Neuroblastoma | Pheochromocytoma | MedlinePlus

Most adrenal gland tumors are benign. Types of tumors include Neuroblastoma and Pheochromocytoma. ... ClinicalTrials.gov: Adrenal Gland Neoplasms (National Institutes of Health) Journal Articles References and abstracts from ... Most adrenal gland tumors are benign. They usually do not cause symptoms and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland ... Your adrenal, or suprarenal, glands are located on the top of each kidney. These glands produce hormones that you cant live ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/adrenalglandcancer.html

Clinical Trial FinderClinical Trial Finder

Conditions: Adrenal Gland Neoplasm; Hypertension; Bone Diseases, Metabolic; Cardiovascular Disease; Hyperinsulinemia. ... Conditions: Carcinoma, Hepatocellular; Liver Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial. Interventions: Procedure: Hepatic ... Condition: Neoplasms. Interventions: Drug: Bevacizumab; Drug: BAY 43-9006. Sponsor: National Cancer Institute (NCI). Completed ... Adrenal Suppression and Absorption Study of Halobetasol Propionate Foam in Subjects 12-17 With Plaque Psoriasis Condition: ...
more infohttps://www.cardiosmart.org/Heart-Conditions/High-Blood-Pressure/The-Research/Clinical-Trial-Finder

C74.10 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF MEDULLA OF UNSPECIFIED ADRENAL GLANDC74.10 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF MEDULLA OF UNSPECIFIED ADRENAL GLAND

This code is grouped under diagnosis codes for neoplasms. ... ICD-10 C74.10 is malignant neoplasm of medulla of unspecified ... Neoplasms (C00-D48) *Malignant neoplasms of thyroid and other endocrine glands (C73-C75) *Malignant neoplasm of adrenal gland ( ... C74.10 MALIGNANT NEOPLASM OF MEDULLA OF UNSPECIFIED ADRENAL GLAND Home > ICD-10 List > Neoplasms > Malignant neoplasms of ... Malignant neoplasm of unspecified part of right adrenal gland. 12. C74.92. Malignant neoplasm of unspecified part of left ...
more infohttps://healthprovidersdata.com/hipaa/codes/ICD10-C74.10

Transcriptional regulation of the neuropeptide Y gene by nerve growth factor: antagonism by glucocorticoids and potentiation by...Transcriptional regulation of the neuropeptide Y gene by nerve growth factor: antagonism by glucocorticoids and potentiation by...

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms (metabolism, pathology) *Animals. *Colforsin (pharmacology) *Cyclic AMP (metabolism) *Glucocorticoids ( ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/pubmed2160601.do

HKU Scholars Hub: Venous sampling: its role in localization of endocrine tumours.HKU Scholars Hub: Venous sampling: its role in localization of endocrine tumours.

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - Diagnosis. en_US. dc.subject.mesh. Adrenal Glands - Blood Supply. en_US. ... Adrenal venous sampling serves to lateralize functioning tumour, and to differentiate it from hyperplasia. Inferior petrosal ... Adrenal venous sampling serves to lateralize functioning tumour, and to differentiate it from hyperplasia. Inferior petrosal ...
more infohttp://hub.hku.hk/handle/10722/162014

Labord coelioscopique des pheochromocytomes est-il acceptable? Reflexions a propos dune etude prospective de 6 cas personnels...L'abord coelioscopique des pheochromocytomes est-il acceptable? Reflexions a propos d'une etude prospective de 6 cas personnels...

en] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms/pathology/surgery ; Adult ; Aged ; Anesthesia, General/methods ; Catecholamines/blood ; Female ; ... en] Today, laparoscopy is for us the technique of choice for approaching presumed benign adrenal tumors. With regards to ...
more infohttp://orbi.ulg.ac.be/handle/2268/94440

ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D44.11 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of right adrenal glandICD-10 Diagnosis Code D44.11 Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of right adrenal gland

Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of right adrenal gland Long Description: Neoplasm of uncertain behavior of right adrenal gland ... Adrenal Gland Disorders The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you cant ... With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough hormones. In Cushings syndrome, theres too much ... A problem in another gland, such as the pituitary, which helps to regulate the adrenal gland ...
more infohttps://icdlist.com/icd-10/d4411

angioma of retina 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engineangioma of retina 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / genetics. Carcinoma, Renal Cell / diagnosis. Carcinoma, Renal ... Pancreatic Neoplasms / diagnosis. von Hippel-Lindau Disease / diagnosis. *[MeSH-minor] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Adult ... MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Hemangioma / diagnosis. Pheochromocytoma / diagnosis. Retinal Neoplasms / ... Optic Nerve Neoplasms / complications. Optic Nerve Neoplasms / diagnosis. Retinal Neoplasms / complications. Retinal Neoplasms ...
more infohttp://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=angioma+of+retina+2005:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b0

benign phaeochromocytoma drug 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search enginebenign phaeochromocytoma drug 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine

MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / pathology. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Cardiovascular Diseases / mortality. Life ... MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / therapy. Paraganglioma / diagnosis. Paraganglioma / ... MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / drug therapy. Pheochromocytoma / drug therapy. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / therapeutic ... MeSH-major] Adrenal Gland Neoplasms / diagnosis. Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions. Metoclopramide / adverse ...
more infohttp://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=benign+phaeochromocytoma+drug+2000:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b1

Nephrology and Urology - Clinical Research and Development | ClinipaceNephrology and Urology - Clinical Research and Development | Clinipace

Adrenal gland neoplasms. *Scleroderma. *Renal artery obstruction. Discover the areas of strength our nephrology and urology ...
more infohttps://www.clinipace.com/therapeutic-areas/nephrology-urology/

Elaine R Morgan - Research Output
     - Northwestern ScholarsElaine R Morgan - Research Output - Northwestern Scholars

Powered by Pure, Scopus & Elsevier Fingerprint Engine™ © 2019 Elsevier B.V. We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content. By continuing you agree to the use of cookies. ...
more infohttps://www.scholars.northwestern.edu/en/persons/elaine-r-morgan/publications/?type=%2Fdk%2Fatira%2Fpure%2Fresearchoutput%2Fresearchoutputtypes%2Fcontributiontojournal%2Fletter

Elaine R Morgan - Research Output
     - Northwestern ScholarsElaine R Morgan - Research Output - Northwestern Scholars

Secondary malignant neoplasms after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue for high-risk neuroblastoma. Martin ... High risk of subsequent neoplasms continues with extended follow-up of childhood Hodgkins disease: Report from the Late ...
more infohttps://www.scholars.northwestern.edu/en/persons/elaine-r-morgan/publications/

Pediatric pheochromocytoma. A 36-year review by S. H. Ein, John Pullerits et al."Pediatric pheochromocytoma. A 36-year review" by S. H. Ein, John Pullerits et al.

One girl was left with no adrenal tissue. The only complication was in a boy with a large, partly-resected malignant right ... adrenal tumor who had a subphrenic abscess drained and was left with a temporary bile fistula, cirrhosis, and chronic pain. All ... Sixteen tumors were adrenal and 4 were extra-adrenal (1 intrathoracic and 1 extradural). All except 2 tumors were completely ... Adolescent; *Adrenal Gland Neoplasms; Anesthesia, General; Angiography; Blood Pressure; Catecholamines; Child; Female; Follow- ...
more infohttps://escholarship.umassmed.edu/anesthesiology_pubs/81/

SelfDecode | Genome AnalysisSelfDecode | Genome Analysis

Adrenal Gland Neoplasms CTNNB1,GNAS,RB1,TP53. Brain Injuries EPO,FOS,SOD2,VEGFA. ... Mammary Neoplasms, Animal ANXA4,BRCA1,GATA3,ID4,RB1,SOX9,STAT3,STAT5A. Uterine Cervical Neoplasms CTNNB1,HES1,NOTCH1,NOTCH2, ... Urinary Bladder Neoplasms ARID1A,EOMES,NCOR1,RB1,RHOA,SOD2,TP53,TRP53. Lung Adenocarcinoma AHR,FOXO3,HMGB2,JUNB,KLF5,SOD2,SOX2, ... Prostatic Neoplasms AHR,ANXA4,AR,ATF3,BRCA1,CREG1,CTNNB1,EZH2,FOXA1,FOXA3,FOXP4,MED12,RXRA,SOD2,STAT3,TP53,VDR,VEGFA,ZMYM3. ...
more infohttps://www.selfdecode.com/molecular-function/GO:0006357/
  • The only complication was in a boy with a large, partly-resected malignant right adrenal tumor who had a subphrenic abscess drained and was left with a temporary bile fistula, cirrhosis, and chronic pain. (umassmed.edu)
  • The adrenal medulla is located anatomically at the center of each adrenal gland, and is composed of neuroendocrine (chromaffin) cells which produce and release epinephrine (adrenaline) into the bloodstream in response to activation of the sympathetic nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • These glands produce hormones that you can't live without, including sex hormones and cortisol, which helps you respond to stress and has many other functions. (medlineplus.gov)
  • An additional code from Chapter 4 may be used, to identify functional activity associated with any neoplasm. (icd10data.com)
  • The Table of Neoplasms should be used to identify the correct topography code. (icd10data.com)
  • A primary malignant neoplasm that overlaps two or more contiguous (next to each other) sites should be classified to the subcategory/code .8 ('overlapping lesion'), unless the combination is specifically indexed elsewhere. (icd10data.com)