Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Adrenal Cortex: The outer layer of the adrenal gland. It is derived from MESODERM and comprised of three zones (outer ZONA GLOMERULOSA, middle ZONA FASCICULATA, and inner ZONA RETICULARIS) with each producing various steroids preferentially, such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and ANDROSTENEDIONE. Adrenal cortex function is regulated by pituitary ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN.Adrenal Glands: A pair of glands located at the cranial pole of each of the two KIDNEYS. Each adrenal gland is composed of two distinct endocrine tissues with separate embryonic origins, the ADRENAL CORTEX producing STEROIDS and the ADRENAL MEDULLA producing NEUROTRANSMITTERS.Adrenal Medulla: The inner portion of the adrenal gland. Derived from ECTODERM, adrenal medulla consists mainly of CHROMAFFIN CELLS that produces and stores a number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS, mainly adrenaline (EPINEPHRINE) and NOREPINEPHRINE. The activity of the adrenal medulla is regulated by the SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM.Zona Reticularis: The inner zone of the adrenal cortex. This zone produces the enzymes that convert PREGNENOLONE, a 21-carbon steroid, to 19-carbon steroids (DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and ANDROSTENEDIONE) via 17-ALPHA-HYDROXYPREGNENOLONE.Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Adrenal Gland Diseases: Pathological processes of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Adrenocorticotropic Hormone: An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).Zona Fasciculata: The wide middle zone of the adrenal cortex. This zone produces a series of enzymes that convert PREGNENOLONE to cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) via 17-ALPHA-HYDROXYPROGESTERONE.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Visual Cortex: Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.Zona Glomerulosa: The narrow subcapsular outer zone of the adrenal cortex. This zone produces a series of enzymes that convert PREGNENOLONE to ALDOSTERONE. The final steps involve three successive oxidations by CYTOCHROME P-450 CYP11B2.Adrenocortical Adenoma: A benign neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. It is characterized by a well-defined nodular lesion, usually less than 2.5 cm. Most adrenocortical adenomas are nonfunctional. The functional ones are yellow and contain LIPIDS. Depending on the cell type or cortical zone involved, they may produce ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE.Steroid 11-beta-Hydroxylase: A mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the 11-beta-hydroxylation of steroids in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-FERRIHEMOPROTEIN REDUCTASE. This enzyme, encoded by CYP11B1 gene, is important in the synthesis of CORTICOSTERONE and HYDROCORTISONE. Defects in CYP11B1 cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia (ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA, CONGENITAL).Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.Adrenal Cortex Function Tests: Examinations that evaluate and monitor hormone production in the adrenal cortex.Adrenal Cortex HormonesAdrenocortical Carcinoma: A malignant neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. Adrenocortical carcinomas are unencapsulated anaplastic (ANAPLASIA) masses sometimes exceeding 20 cm or 200 g. They are more likely to be functional than nonfunctional, and produce ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES that may result in hypercortisolism (CUSHING SYNDROME); HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and/or VIRILISM.Auditory Cortex: The region of the cerebral cortex that receives the auditory radiation from the MEDIAL GENICULATE BODY.Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital: A group of inherited disorders of the ADRENAL GLANDS, caused by enzyme defects in the synthesis of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) and/or ALDOSTERONE leading to accumulation of precursors for ANDROGENS. Depending on the hormone imbalance, congenital adrenal hyperplasia can be classified as salt-wasting, hypertensive, virilizing, or feminizing. Defects in STEROID 21-HYDROXYLASE; STEROID 11-BETA-HYDROXYLASE; STEROID 17-ALPHA-HYDROXYLASE; 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3-HYDROXYSTEROID DEHYDROGENASES); TESTOSTERONE 5-ALPHA-REDUCTASE; or steroidogenic acute regulatory protein; among others, underlie these disorders.Somatosensory Cortex: Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving sensations such as movement, pain, pressure, position, temperature, touch, and vibration. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.Cosyntropin: A synthetic peptide that is identical to the 24-amino acid segment at the N-terminal of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE. ACTH (1-24), a segment similar in all species, contains the biological activity that stimulates production of CORTICOSTEROIDS in the ADRENAL CORTEX.Aldosterone: A hormone secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX that regulates electrolyte and water balance by increasing the renal retention of sodium and the excretion of potassium.Adrenalectomy: Excision of one or both adrenal glands. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Hydrocortisone: The main glucocorticoid secreted by the ADRENAL CORTEX. Its synthetic counterpart is used, either as an injection or topically, in the treatment of inflammation, allergy, collagen diseases, asthma, adrenocortical deficiency, shock, and some neoplastic conditions.Adrenodoxin: An iron-sulfur protein which serves as an electron carrier in enzymatic steroid hydroxylation reactions in adrenal cortex mitochondria. The electron transport system which catalyzes this reaction consists of adrenodoxin reductase, NADP, adrenodoxin, and cytochrome P-450.Corticosterone: An adrenocortical steroid that has modest but significant activities as a mineralocorticoid and a glucocorticoid. (From Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1437)Aldosterone Synthase: A mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the 18-hydroxylation of steroids in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-specific flavoprotein. This enzyme, encoded by CYP11B2 gene, is important in the conversion of CORTICOSTERONE to 18-hydroxycorticosterone and the subsequent conversion to ALDOSTERONE.Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme: A mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the side-chain cleavage of C27 cholesterol to C21 pregnenolone in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-FERRIHEMOPROTEIN REDUCTASE. This enzyme, encoded by CYP11A1 gene, catalyzes the breakage between C20 and C22 which is the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of various gonadal and adrenal steroid hormones.Steroidogenic Factor 1: A transcription factor and member of the nuclear receptor family NR5 that is expressed throughout the adrenal and reproductive axes during development. It plays an important role in sexual differentiation, formation of primary steroidogenic tissues, and their functions in post-natal and adult life. It regulates the expression of key steroidogenic enzymes.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Steroid 21-Hydroxylase: An adrenal microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the 21-hydroxylation of steroids in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-FERRIHEMOPROTEIN REDUCTASE. This enzyme, encoded by CYP21 gene, converts progesterones to precursors of adrenal steroid hormones (CORTICOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE). Defects in CYP21 cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia (ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA, CONGENITAL).Cushing Syndrome: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excess levels of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) or other GLUCOCORTICOIDS from endogenous or exogenous sources. It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. Endogenous Cushing syndrome or spontaneous hypercortisolism is divided into two groups, those due to an excess of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN and those that are ACTH-independent.Adrenocortical Hyperfunction: Excess production of ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE. Hyperadrenal syndromes include CUSHING SYNDROME; HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and VIRILISM.Addison Disease: An adrenal disease characterized by the progressive destruction of the ADRENAL CORTEX, resulting in insufficient production of ALDOSTERONE and HYDROCORTISONE. Clinical symptoms include ANOREXIA; NAUSEA; WEIGHT LOSS; MUSCLE WEAKNESS; and HYPERPIGMENTATION of the SKIN due to increase in circulating levels of ACTH precursor hormone which stimulates MELANOCYTES.Steroid 17-alpha-Hydroxylase: A microsomal cytochrome P450 enzyme that catalyzes the 17-alpha-hydroxylation of progesterone or pregnenolone and subsequent cleavage of the residual two carbons at C17 in the presence of molecular oxygen and NADPH-FERRIHEMOPROTEIN REDUCTASE. This enzyme, encoded by CYP17 gene, generates precursors for glucocorticoid, androgen, and estrogen synthesis. Defects in CYP17 gene cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia (ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA, CONGENITAL) and abnormal sexual differentiation.Entorhinal Cortex: Cerebral cortex region on the medial aspect of the PARAHIPPOCAMPAL GYRUS, immediately caudal to the OLFACTORY CORTEX of the uncus. The entorhinal cortex is the origin of the major neural fiber system afferent to the HIPPOCAMPAL FORMATION, the so-called PERFORANT PATHWAY.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Adosterol: A sterol usually substituted with radioactive iodine. It is an adrenal cortex scanning agent with demonstrated high adrenal concentration and superior adrenal imaging.Pregnenolone: A 21-carbon steroid, derived from CHOLESTEROL and found in steroid hormone-producing tissues. Pregnenolone is the precursor to GONADAL STEROID HORMONES and the adrenal CORTICOSTEROIDS.Kidney Cortex: The outer zone of the KIDNEY, beneath the capsule, consisting of KIDNEY GLOMERULUS; KIDNEY TUBULES, DISTAL; and KIDNEY TUBULES, PROXIMAL.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase: An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation and reduction of FERREDOXIN or ADRENODOXIN in the presence of NADP. EC 1.18.1.2 was formerly listed as EC 1.6.7.1 and EC 1.6.99.4.17-Hydroxycorticosteroids: A group of hydroxycorticosteroids bearing a hydroxy group at the 17-position. Urinary excretion of these compounds is used as an index of adrenal function. They are used systemically in the free alcohol form, but with esterification of the hydroxy groups, topical effectiveness is increased.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Hyperaldosteronism: A condition caused by the overproduction of ALDOSTERONE. It is characterized by sodium retention and potassium excretion with resultant HYPERTENSION and HYPOKALEMIA.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Pituitary-Adrenal System: The interactions between the anterior pituitary and adrenal glands, in which corticotropin (ACTH) stimulates the adrenal cortex and adrenal cortical hormones suppress the production of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary.Steroids: A group of polycyclic compounds closely related biochemically to TERPENES. They include cholesterol, numerous hormones, precursors of certain vitamins, bile acids, alcohols (STEROLS), and certain natural drugs and poisons. Steroids have a common nucleus, a fused, reduced 17-carbon atom ring system, cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene. Most steroids also have two methyl groups and an aliphatic side-chain attached to the nucleus. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)3-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases: Catalyze the oxidation of 3-hydroxysteroids to 3-ketosteroids.Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Pheochromocytoma: A usually benign, well-encapsulated, lobular, vascular tumor of chromaffin tissue of the ADRENAL MEDULLA or sympathetic paraganglia. The cardinal symptom, reflecting the increased secretion of EPINEPHRINE and NOREPINEPHRINE, is HYPERTENSION, which may be persistent or intermittent. During severe attacks, there may be HEADACHE; SWEATING, palpitation, apprehension, TREMOR; PALLOR or FLUSHING of the face, NAUSEA and VOMITING, pain in the CHEST and ABDOMEN, and paresthesias of the extremities. The incidence of malignancy is as low as 5% but the pathologic distinction between benign and malignant pheochromocytomas is not clear. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1298)Chromaffin Cells: Cells that store epinephrine secretory vesicles. During times of stress, the nervous system signals the vesicles to secrete their hormonal content. Their name derives from their ability to stain a brownish color with chromic salts. Characteristically, they are located in the adrenal medulla and paraganglia (PARAGANGLIA, CHROMAFFIN) of the sympathetic nervous system.Dehydroepiandrosterone: A major C19 steroid produced by the ADRENAL CORTEX. It is also produced in small quantities in the TESTIS and the OVARY. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) can be converted to TESTOSTERONE; ANDROSTENEDIONE; ESTRADIOL; and ESTRONE. Most of DHEA is sulfated (DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE SULFATE) before secretion.Catecholamines: A general class of ortho-dihydroxyphenylalkylamines derived from tyrosine.Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 2: A melanocortin receptor subtype found primarily in the ADRENAL CORTEX. It shows specificity for ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Cerebellar Cortex: The superficial GRAY MATTER of the CEREBELLUM. It consists of two main layers, the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulosum.Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System: A collection of NEURONS, tracts of NERVE FIBERS, endocrine tissue, and blood vessels in the HYPOTHALAMUS and the PITUITARY GLAND. This hypothalamo-hypophyseal portal circulation provides the mechanism for hypothalamic neuroendocrine (HYPOTHALAMIC HORMONES) regulation of pituitary function and the release of various PITUITARY HORMONES into the systemic circulation to maintain HOMEOSTASIS.Hypophysectomy: Surgical removal or destruction of the hypophysis, or pituitary gland. (Dorland, 28th ed)Mitochondria: Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Adrenarche: A stage of development at which the ADRENAL GLANDS undergo maturation leading to the capability of producing increasing amounts of adrenal androgens, DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE and ANDROSTENEDIONE. Adrenarche usually begins at about 7 or 8 years of age before the signs of PUBERTY and continues throughout puberty.Aminoglutethimide: An aromatase inhibitor that is used in the treatment of advanced BREAST CANCER.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Progesterone Reductase: An enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of a 3 beta-hydroxy-delta(5)-steroid to 3-oxo-delta(4)-steroid in the presence of NAD. It converts pregnenolone to progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone to androstenedione. EC 1.1.1.145.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate: The circulating form of a major C19 steroid produced primarily by the ADRENAL CORTEX. DHEA sulfate serves as a precursor for TESTOSTERONE; ANDROSTENEDIONE; ESTRADIOL; and ESTRONE.Rats, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. This also includes animals with a long history of closed colony breeding.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Glucocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.Metyrapone: An inhibitor of the enzyme STEROID 11-BETA-MONOOXYGENASE. It is used as a test of the feedback hypothalamic-pituitary mechanism in the diagnosis of CUSHING SYNDROME.Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Steroid Hydroxylases: Cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases (MIXED FUNCTION OXYGENASES) that are important in steroid biosynthesis and metabolism.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Histocytochemistry: Study of intracellular distribution of chemicals, reaction sites, enzymes, etc., by means of staining reactions, radioactive isotope uptake, selective metal distribution in electron microscopy, or other methods.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Frontal Lobe: The part of the cerebral hemisphere anterior to the central sulcus, and anterior and superior to the lateral sulcus.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Organ Specificity: Characteristic restricted to a particular organ of the body, such as a cell type, metabolic response or expression of a particular protein or antigen.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Angiotensin II: An octapeptide that is a potent but labile vasoconstrictor. It is produced from angiotensin I after the removal of two amino acids at the C-terminal by ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZYME. The amino acid in position 5 varies in different species. To block VASOCONSTRICTION and HYPERTENSION effect of angiotensin II, patients are often treated with ACE INHIBITORS or with ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTOR BLOCKERS.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Tissue Distribution: Accumulation of a drug or chemical substance in various organs (including those not relevant to its pharmacologic or therapeutic action). This distribution depends on the blood flow or perfusion rate of the organ, the ability of the drug to penetrate organ membranes, tissue specificity, protein binding. The distribution is usually expressed as tissue to plasma ratios.Dexamethasone: An anti-inflammatory 9-fluoro-glucocorticoid.Kidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.Mineralocorticoids: A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS primarily associated with water and electrolyte balance. This is accomplished through the effect on ION TRANSPORT in renal tubules, resulting in retention of sodium and loss of potassium. Mineralocorticoid secretion is itself regulated by PLASMA VOLUME, serum potassium, and ANGIOTENSIN II.Chromaffin System: The cells of the body which stain with chromium salts. They occur along the sympathetic nerves, in the adrenal gland, and in various other organs.Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.In Situ Hybridization: A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Parietal Lobe: Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.Gyrus Cinguli: One of the convolutions on the medial surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES. It surrounds the rostral part of the brain and CORPUS CALLOSUM and forms part of the LIMBIC SYSTEM.Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Autoradiography: The making of a radiograph of an object or tissue by recording on a photographic plate the radiation emitted by radioactive material within the object. (Dorland, 27th ed)
(1/605) Primary aldosteronism with aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in a pregnant woman.

A 30-year-old pregnant woman complained of muscle weakness at 29 weeks' gestation. She was hypertensive with severe hypokalemia. Lower plasma renin activity and higher aldosterone level than the normal values in pregnancy suggested primary aldosteronism. A cesarean delivery was performed at 31 weeks' gestation because of pulmonary congestion. The neonatal course was uncomplicated. The laparoscopic adrenalectomy for a 2.0-cm right adrenal adenoma resulted in normalizing of her blood pressure and serum potassium level. Although primary aldosteronism is rare, especially during pregnancy, it should be always considered as one of etiologies of hypertension in pregnancy.  (+info)

(2/605) The expression of inhibin/activin subunits in the human adrenal cortex and its tumours.

Inhibins and activins are dimeric proteins of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily which have been shown to be expressed in the adrenal cortex. Recent studies have suggested a role for these peptides in the pathogenesis and/or function of adrenal tumours. To investigate further their physiological and pathological roles, we have documented immunoreactivity for inhibin alpha, betaA and betaB subunits in normal adult and fetal human adrenals, in hyperplastic adrenals and in adrenal tumours. In the normal and hyperplastic adult gland, diffuse immunopositivity was demonstrated for beta subunits, suggesting that activins (beta beta dimers) can be expressed in all zones. Inhibin alpha was limited to the zona reticularis and the innermost zona fasciculata in the normal gland, extending centripetally into the zona fasciculata in hyperplasia, supporting a role for ACTH in the regulation of expression, and suggesting that expression of inhibins (alpha beta dimers) is restricted. Immunopositivity for all three subunits was seen in both fetal and definitive zones of the fetal cortex, indicating that both inhibins and activins could be expressed in both. Immunopositivity for all three subunits was seen in most adrenocortical tumours. Loss of immunopositivity for inhibin alpha in a subgroup of carcinomas might indicate a role in tumour progression. The greater intensity of staining for inhibin alpha in tumours associated with Cushing's syndrome again suggests a link with cortisol production.  (+info)

(3/605) Androgen secreting adrenocortical tumours.

BACKGROUND: Androgen secreting adrenocortical tumours are rare in children and the determination of their malignant potential can be difficult. OBJECTIVES: To assess the presentation, histology, and clinical behaviour of these tumours. SETTING: Two tertiary referral centres. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of children diagnosed with an androgen secreting adrenocortical tumour between 1976 and 1996. PATIENTS: Twenty three girls and seven boys aged 0-14 years. RESULTS: Pubic hair was observed in all children, clitoromegaly or growth of the phallus in 23 children, acceleration of linear growth in 22 children, and advanced bone age (> 1.5 years) in 18 children. Hypersecretion of androgens was detected by assessment of serum androgen concentrations alone in four patients and by 24 hour urine steroid excretion profiles in 22 patients. All 16 tumours measuring < 5 cm in diameter were benign. Of the tumours measuring 5-9 cm, three were malignant and seven were benign, whereas all four tumours > 10 cm were malignant. Histological slides were available for reassessment in 25 children. Although mitoses and necrosis were more characteristic of tumours with malignant behaviour, no exclusive histological features of malignancy were seen. CONCLUSION: Histological criteria for malignancy are not reliable, whereas tumour size is important in assessing malignant potential.  (+info)

(4/605) Adrenocortical oncocytoma.

The histopathology and ultrastructural features of an adrenocortical oncocytoma are reported. The tumour was discovered incidentally during investigation for hypertension in a 72 year old female. Oncocytic tumours of the adrenal cortex are rare, with only 20 examples described in English language reports. Most have been non-functioning and benign, like the present example. Molecular studies may help assess the significance of oncocytic change in the pathogenesis and behaviour of oncocytic neoplasms.  (+info)

(5/605) Cloning of a novel kinase (SIK) of the SNF1/AMPK family from high salt diet-treated rat adrenal.

PCR-coupled cDNA subtraction hybridization was adapted to identify the genes expressed in the adrenocortical tissues from high salt diet-treated rat. A novel cDNA clone, termed salt-inducible kinase (SIK), encoding a polypeptide (776 amino acids) with significant similarity to protein serine/ threonine kinases in the SNF1/AMPK family was isolated. An in vitro kinase assay demonstrated that SIK protein had autophosphorylation activity. Northern blot revealed that SIK mRNA levels were markedly augmented by ACTH treatment both in rat adrenal glands and in Y1 cells. SIK may play an important role in the regulation of adrenocortical functions in response to high plasma salt and ACTH stimulation.  (+info)

(6/605) Autocrine role of IGF-II in proliferation of human adrenocortical carcinoma NCI H295R cell line.

In adrenocortical tumors, the malignant phenotype is associated with rearrangements (paternal isodisomy) at the 11p15 locus and IGF-II gene overexpression, strongly suggesting that the IGF system is a major determinant of adrenocortical tumor progression. The aim of this study was to validate an in vitro model for investigating the involvement of the IGF system in adrenocortical tumorigenesis. We analyzed the production of IGF mRNA and proteins, IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) and IGF receptors by the NCI H295R cell line, which is derived from a human adult adrenocortical carcinoma. H295R cells were shown to proliferate for a long period (26 days) in the absence of serum or any added growth factor. Northern blot analyses showed high IGF-II mRNA contents in H295R cells. The cells secreted large amounts of IGF-II protein (14 ng/10(6) cells per 48 h) although no IGF-I protein was detected. Western ligand blot analyses of conditioned media detected the presence of large amounts of a 34 kDa protein, which was identified as IGFBP-2 by immunoblotting. The presence of high-affinity binding sites for IGF-I and IGF-II on H295R cells was shown by binding experiments using radiolabeled IGFs and confirmed by reverse transcription PCR analyses showing type 1 and type 2 IGF receptors. Proliferation of H295R cells was inhibited by anti-IGF-II antibody (45%) and by anti-type 1 IGF receptor antibody (53%) indicating that IGF-II is an autocrine growth factor for these cells and that its effects are, at least in part, mediated by the type 1 IGF receptor. These findings confirm the involvement of the IGF system in adrenocortical tumors and suggest that the H295R cell line is a suitable in vitro model for studying the molecular mechanisms of adrenocortical tumor proliferation.  (+info)

(7/605) Evidence for a potential role for HDL as an important source of cholesterol in human adrenocortical tumors via the CLA-1 pathway.

CLA-1, a human homologue of rodent scavenger receptor class B1 (SR-B1), has been identified as a receptor for high density lipoprotein (HDL) and is highly expressed in the adrenal gland. Several studies have indicated that HDL might be a source of cholesterol for steroidogenesis in the adrenal gland. In this study, we show that ACTH and its second messenger cAMP stimulated CLA-1 protein expression in a human adrenocortical cell line. We also determined whether CLA-1 plays an important role in steroidogenesis by investigating CLA-1 expression levels in various adrenal tumors including the adenomas of Cushing's and Conn's syndrome. Western blot analysis showed that CLA-1 expression was much higher in the tumors of Cushing's syndrome than in non-tumor lesions of Conn's syndrome and pheochromocytoma. We were able to detect a strong CLA-1 signal in tumors of Conn's syndrome, too. On the other hand, much less CLA-1 expression was detected in Cushing's adenoma adjacent adrenal glands. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that CLA-1 was expressed in the outer region of the adrenal cortex mainly in plasma membranes of the cortical cells but not in the medulla. These findings demonstrated for the first time that ACTH increased CLA-1 protein in cultured human adrenocortical cells, and that cortisol- and aldosterone-secreting adenomas had high CLA-1 proteins in their cell surfaces.  (+info)

(8/605) A patient with preclinical Cushing's syndrome and excessive DHEA-S secretion having unilateral adrenal carcinoma and contralateral adenoma.

We report a case of preclinical Cushing's syndrome in a 54-year-old male associated with bilateral adrenocortical tumours. Physical findings and general laboratory data were unremarkable except for mild hypertension (158/90 mmHg) and impaired glucose tolerance. Endocrinological evaluation revealed the presence of autonomous cortisol secretion including unsuppressible serum cortisol by 8 mg dexamethasone test (11 microg/dl), high serum DHEA-S (3580 ng/ml, normal: 400-3500) and increased urinary 17-KS excretion (31.0-35.8 mg/day, normal: 5.8-21.3). CT scan demonstrated the presence of tumours in both adrenals and bilateral adrenalectomy was subsequently performed. Histological examination of the resected specimens revealed an adrenocortical carcinoma on the right side and an adenoma on the left side with noticeable cortical atrophy in non-neoplastic adrenals. Immunohistochemical study of steroidogenic enzymes demonstrated that all the steroidogenic enzymes involved in cortisol biosynthesis were expressed in both right and left adrenal tumours. Enzymatic activities of 21, 17alpha, 18, 11beta-hydroxylases were detected in both right and left adrenals except for the absence of 11beta-hydroxylase activity in the left adrenal adenoma. Results of in vitro tissue steroidogenesis examined in short-term tissue culture of the specimens revealed no significant differences between carcinoma and adenoma in cortisol production, but the production of adrenal androgens in carcinoma was significantly higher than that in adenoma, which may indicate the importance of evaluating adrenal androgen levels in patients with adrenocortical neoplasms.  (+info)

*  List of MeSH codes (C19)
File "2006 MeSH Trees".) MeSH C19.053.098.265 --- adrenal cortex neoplasms MeSH C19.053.098.265.500 --- adrenocortical adenoma ... adrenal cortex neoplasms MeSH C19.053.347.500.500 --- adrenocortical adenoma MeSH C19.053.347.500.750 --- adrenocortical ... adrenal cortex neoplasms MeSH C19.344.078.265.500 --- adrenocortical adenoma MeSH C19.344.078.265.750 --- adrenocortical ... ovarian neoplasms MeSH C19.391.630.705.265 --- brenner tumor MeSH C19.391.630.705.331 --- carcinoma, endometrioid MeSH C19.391. ...
*  Adrenal tumor
An adrenal tumor or adrenal mass is any benign or malignant neoplasms of the adrenal gland, several of which are notable for ... The adrenal cortex is composed of three distinct layers of endocrine cells which produce critical steroid hormones. These ... "Adrenal Cortical Neoplasms: Perspectives in Pediatric Patients" in "Adrenal Glands: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Evidence" ... Pheochromocytoma is a neoplasm composed of cells similar to the chromaffin cells of the mature adrenal medulla. ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C04)
... peritoneal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078 --- adrenal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.322.078.265 --- adrenal cortex neoplasms ... nose neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.656 --- orbital neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.828 --- skull base neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... anal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.445 --- duodenal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.501 --- ileal neoplasms MeSH ... femoral neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721 --- skull neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.450 --- jaw neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721. ...
*  Laboratory rat
The most common are adenomas of the pituitary and adenomas/adenocarcinomas of the adrenal cortex in both sexes, mammary gland ... Comparison of Neoplasms in Six Sources of Rats Jared M. Diamond (January 2006). Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail Or ... There were even significant variations in the incidences of adrenal medulla tumors among rats from the same source raised in ... The Lewis rat suffers from several spontaneous pathologies: first, they can suffer from high incidences of neoplasms, with the ...
*  MEN1
In rare cases, adrenal cortex tumours are also seen. Most germline or somatic mutations in the MEN1 gene predict truncation or ... The MEN1 phenotype is inherited via an autosomal-dominant pattern and is associated with neoplasms of the pituitary gland, the ... and ependymomas are observed neoplasms. In a study of 12 sporadic carcinoid tumors of the lung, five cases involved ...
*  ICD-10 Chapter II: Neoplasms
Malignant neoplasm of thyroid gland (C74) Malignant neoplasm of adrenal gland (C74.0) Cortex of adrenal gland (C74.1) Medulla ... Neoplasms. (C00) Malignant neoplasm of lip (C01) Malignant neoplasm of base of tongue (C02) Malignant neoplasm of other and ... Malignant neoplasm of breast (C51) Malignant neoplasm of vulva (C52) Malignant neoplasm of vagina (C53) Malignant neoplasm of ... Malignant neoplasm of penis (C61) Malignant neoplasm of prostate (C62) Malignant neoplasm of testis (C63) Malignant neoplasm of ...
*  Adrenal medulla
It is located at the center of the gland, being surrounded by the adrenal cortex. It is the innermost part of the adrenal gland ... As a cluster of neuron cell bodies, the adrenal medulla is considered a ganglion of the sympathetic nervous system. Neoplasms ... Recent research indicates that the adrenal medulla is under the control of the sensory and motor cortex rather than centres ... The adrenal medulla (Latin: medulla glandulae suprarenalis) is part of the adrenal gland. ...
*  Zona reticularis
The zona reticularis is the innermost layer of the adrenal cortex, lying deep to the zona fasciculata and superficial to the ... Coppola, Christopher P.; Merrell, Ronald C. (2001). "Neoplasms of the Adrenal and Endocrine Pancreas in the Elderly". In ... These precursors are not further converted in the adrenal cortex if the cells lack 17Beta Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Instead ... Pediatric Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison Disease) at eMedicine Ibáñez L, Potau N, Marcos MV, de Zegher F (September 1999). " ...
*  Adrenocortical hormone
... the adrenocortical hormones are hormones produced by the adrenal cortex, the outer region of the adrenal gland. These ... Low, G., & Sahi, K. (2012). Clinical and imaging overview of functional adrenal neoplasms. International Journal of Urology, 19 ... The glucocorticoid family of hormones is synthesized in the middle layer of the adrenal cortex known as the zona fasciculata. ... Androgens, or sex hormones, are synthesized in the innermost layer of the adrenal cortex known as the zona reticularis. These ...
*  Li-Fraumeni syndrome
... brain or adrenal cortex) regardless of age at diagnosis and/or a first or second degree relative with any cancer diagnosed ... link) Li F.P.; Fraumeni J.F. (October 1969). "Soft-tissue sarcomas, breast cancer, and other neoplasms. A familial syndrome?". ... This syndrome is also known as the sarcoma, breast, leukaemia and adrenal gland (SBLA) syndrome. The syndrome is linked to ... The classical LFS malignancies - sarcoma, cancers of the breast, brain and adrenal glands - comprise about 80% of all cancers ...
*  Adrenocortical carcinoma
... (ACC, adrenal cortical carcinoma, adrenal cortical cancer, adrenal cortex cancer, etc.) is an ... Finally, c-myc gene expression is relatively high in neoplasms, and it is often linked to poor prognosis. Bilateral ... There are several relatively rare variants of adrenal cortical carcinoma: Oncocytic adrenal cortical carcinoma Myxoid adrenal ... ACC, generally, carries a poor prognosis and is unlike most tumours of the adrenal cortex, which are benign (adenomas) and only ...
*  Renal cell carcinoma
Vigorous criticism of Grawitz was provided by Oskar Stoerk in 1908, who considered the adrenal origin of renal tumours to be ... Judd, E. Starr (1929). "Carcinoma of the Renal Cortex with Factors Bearing on Prognosis". Archives of Internal Medicine. 44 (5 ... which is an assessment based on the microscopic morphology of a neoplasm with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining). This ... When RCC metastasises, it most commonly spreads to the lymph nodes, lungs, liver, adrenal glands, brain or bones. Immunotherapy ...
Rare Cancer News & Clinical Trials » PubMed - Adrenocortical Carcinoma  Rare Cancer News & Clinical Trials » PubMed - Adrenocortical Carcinoma
A total of 48 adrenal cortex samples (39 tumoral and 9 normal adrenal glands) were studied. TERT promoter mutations were ... Adrenal cortical neoplasms in liver parenchyma can be present in 3 forms, including direct invasion or adhesion to liver ... By definition, adrenal incidentaloma is an asymptomatic adrenal mass detected on imaging not performed for suspected adrenal ... The term "adrenal incidentaloma" is a radiological term. Adrenal incidentalomas are adrenal tumors discovered in an imaging ...
more infohttp://news.rare-cancer.org/PubMed_-_Adrenocortical_Carcinoma/
Cushings & Cancer: July 2009  Cushing's & Cancer: July 2009
Each adrenal gland is composed of 2 distinct parts: the adrenal cortex and the adrenal medulla. The cortex is divided into 3 ... The postural test is most helpful in distinguishing between nodular hyperplasia and adrenal neoplasm. This test is based on the ... Adrenal Cortex. The adrenal cortex secretes 3 types of hormones: (1) mineralocorticoids (the most important of which is ... Labels: ACTH, Addison's, adrenal, Adrenal Crisis, adrenal incidentaloma, adrenal insufficiency, adrenalectomy, endocrine, ...
more infohttp://cushingshelp.blogspot.com/2009/07/
Does Serum-DXM Increase Diagnostic Accuracy of the Overnight DXM Suppression Test in the Work-up of Cushing's Syndrome? -...  Does Serum-DXM Increase Diagnostic Accuracy of the Overnight DXM Suppression Test in the Work-up of Cushing's Syndrome? -...
Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms. Endocrine Gland Neoplasms. Neoplasms by Site. Neoplasms. Adrenal Cortex Diseases. Dexamethasone ... Adrenal Gland Neoplasms. Syndrome. Alcoholism. Cushing Syndrome. Adrenocortical Adenoma. Disease. Pathologic Processes. Alcohol ... Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Adenoma of the Adrenal Gland Cushing's Syndrome Hyperadrenalism ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01504555?recr=Open&cond=%22Adrenal+Gland+Neoplasms%22&rank=13
Dr. Paul Gray Jr, MD - Reviews - Fort Worth, TX  Dr. Paul Gray Jr, MD - Reviews - Fort Worth, TX
Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms. *Adrenal Incidentaloma. *Adrenal Surgery. *Anal Disorders. *Aneurysm. *Anorectal Abscess ...
more infohttps://www.healthgrades.com/physician/dr-paul-gray-ydjf9
Search of: Adrenocortical carcinoma - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov  Search of: 'Adrenocortical carcinoma' - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov
Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms. *Drug: XR9576 (Tariquidar). Interventional. Phase 2. *National Cancer Institute (NCI) ... Structured Evaluation of adRENal Tumors Discovered Incidentally - Prospectively Investigating the Testing Yield. *Adrenal ... Wue-Adrenal-Tumors-92/2002. September 2002. December 2022. December 2024. April 30, 2008. November 1, 2016. *University of ... Natural History Study of Infants With Adrenal Masses Found on Prenatal and/or Neonatal Imaging. *Adrenocortical Carcinoma ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?cond=%22Adrenocortical+carcinoma%22
Deep voice and Face and neck swelling - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Deep voice and Face and neck swelling - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
2. Adrenal Cancer. 3. Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms. 4. Adrenal adenoma, familial. 5. Adrenal gland hyperfunction. 6. Adrenal ... 7. Adrenal incidentaloma. 8. Adrenocortical carcinoma. 9. Anaphylaxis. 10. Bright's Disease. More causes » , Show All Causes , ...
more infohttps://wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/deep-voice/face-and-neck-swelling.htm
Brian M. Shuch, MD > Yale Cancer Center | Yale School of...  Brian M. Shuch, MD > Yale Cancer Center | Yale School of...
Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms; Genetics; Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary; Urinary Tract; Urologic Neoplasms Public Health Interests ...
more infohttps://www.yalecancercenter.org/research/programs/therapeutics/people/brian_shuch-2.profile
Lysodren  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe  Lysodren - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe
Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms. *Cushing Syndrome. How long have you been taking it?. Choose one ... Lysodren treats cancer of the adrenal gland that can not be treated with surgery. It slows the growth or reduces the size of ... Lysodren is a prescription medication used to treat cancer of the adrenal gland that can not be treated with surgery. Lysodren ... Lysodren is a prescription medication used to treat cancer of the adrenal gland that can not be treated with surgery. ...
more infohttps://www.medicineshoppe.com/lysodren
The Effects of Case Management in a Medicaid Managed Care Plan - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  The Effects of Case Management in a Medicaid Managed Care Plan - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Neoplasms Heart Diseases Adrenal Cortex Diseases Behavioral: Case management Not Applicable Detailed Description:. This study ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00385879
Endocrine Neoplasms | SpringerLink  Endocrine Neoplasms | SpringerLink
... been a time of intense excitement and have brought major advances in the understanding and treatment of endocrine neoplasms. ... Neoplasms of the adrenal cortex Clinical and basic aspects Ana C. Latronico, George P. Chrousos ... Incidentally discovered adrenal masses Richard T. Kloos, Melvyn Korobkin, Norman W. Thompson, Isaac R. Francis, Brahm Shapiro, ... the increasingly recognized problem of incidentally discovered adrenal or pituitary masses. ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-1-4615-6355-6
Macrolides for KCNJ5 - Mutated Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma (MAPA)  Macrolides for KCNJ5 - Mutated Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma (MAPA)
A malignant neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. Adrenocortical carcinomas are unencapsulated anaplastic (ANAPLASIA) masses ... The compound is an adrenal cortex scanning agent used in the assessment of patients suspected of having Cushing's syndrome, ... Excess production of ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES such as ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ... and produce ADRENAL CORTEX HORMONES that may result in hypercortisolism (CUSHING SYNDROME); HYPERALDOSTERONISM; and/or VIRILISM ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/198682/Macrolides-for-KCNJ5-Mutated-Aldosterone-Producing-Adenoma-MAPA.html
OPUS Würzburg | Urine Steroid Metabolomics as a Biomarker Tool for Detecting Malignancy in Adrenal Tumors  OPUS Würzburg | Urine Steroid Metabolomics as a Biomarker Tool for Detecting Malignancy in Adrenal Tumors
... and examined its diagnostic value for the detection of adrenal malignancy. Design: Quantification of 32 distinct adrenal ... Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rare but accounts for 2-11% of incidentally discovered adrenal masses. Differentiating ACC ... and specific biomarker tool for discriminating benign from malignant adrenal tumors, with obvious promise for the diagnostic ... from adrenocortical adenoma (ACA) represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with adrenal incidentalomas, with tumor size, ...
more infohttps://opus.bibliothek.uni-wuerzburg.de/frontdoor/index/index/searchtype/authorsearch/author/%22Stiekema%2C+Han%22/docId/15468/start/0/rows/10
Back symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com  Back symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com
Adrenal Cancer ... excessive fat on top of back*Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms ... excessive fat on top of back*Adrenal gland ... Adrenal incidentaloma ... excessive fat on top of back*Adrenocortical carcinoma ... excessive fat on top of back*Agenesis of ... Nerve sheath neoplasm ... back pain*Neural tube defect, folate-sensitive ... spina bifida*Neural tube defects X-linked ... ... Adrenal adenoma, familial ... excessive fat on top of back* ...
more infohttp://www.rightdiagnosis.com/sym/back_symptoms.htm
Mitotane
      - Lysodren
     Summary Report | CureHunter  Mitotane - Lysodren Summary Report | CureHunter
A derivative of the insecticide DICHLORODIPHENYLDICHLOROETHANE that specifically inhibits cells of the adrenal cortex and their ... Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms (Adrenocortical Cancer) 05/15/1993 - "These findings do not support the conclusion that adjuvant ... A derivative of the insecticide DICHLORODIPHENYLDICHLOROETHANE that specifically inhibits cells of the adrenal cortex and their ... Neoplasms (Cancer) 02/01/2013 - "Mitotane, an adrenolytic agent, is the mainstay of treatment after surgical removal of the ...
more infohttp://www.curehunter.com/public/keywordSummaryD008939-Mitotane-Lysodren.do
Find Research Outputs
             - Johns Hopkins University  Find Research Outputs - Johns Hopkins University
Neoplasms Treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with cortisone: comparison of intramuscular and oral dosage.. WILKINS, L ... Le diagnostic des tumeurs virilisantes du cortex surrénalien: effet de la cortisone sur les stéroïdes urinaires et utilisation ... Treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with cortisone.. WILKINS, L., LEWIS, R. A., KLEIN, R., GARDNER, L. I., CRIGLER, J. ... The treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with cortisone.. LEWIS, R. A., KLEIN, R., GARDNER, L. I., CRIGLER, J. F. & ...
more infohttps://jhu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/?format=&page=6003
Kidney symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com  Kidney symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com
Adrenal adenoma, familial ... kidney stones*Adrenal Cancer ... kidney stones*Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms ... kidney stones*Adrenal ... Adrenal incidentaloma ... kidney stones*Adrenocortical carcinoma ... kidney stones*Adult-onset Renal Failure ... nephritis* ... Female sex reversal with dysgenesis of kidneys, adrenals and lungs ... abnormal kidney development*Fentanyl toxicity ... renal ...
more infohttp://www.rightdiagnosis.com/sym/kidney_symptoms.htm
Adrenal cortical carcinoma | definition of adrenal cortical carcinoma by Medical dictionary  Adrenal cortical carcinoma | definition of adrenal cortical carcinoma by Medical dictionary
What is adrenal cortical carcinoma? Meaning of adrenal cortical carcinoma medical term. What does adrenal cortical carcinoma ... Looking for online definition of adrenal cortical carcinoma in the Medical Dictionary? adrenal cortical carcinoma explanation ... adrenal cortical carcinoma. a malignant neoplasm of the adrenal cortex that may cause adrenal virilism or Cushing's syndrome. ... adrenal cortical carcinoma. a·dre·nal cor·ti·cal car·ci·no·ma. a carcinoma arising in the adrenal cortex that may cause ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Adrenal+cortical+carcinoma
Obesity and Skin problems - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Obesity and Skin problems - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
1. Adrenal Cancer. 2. Adrenal Cortex Diseases. 3. Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms. 4. Adrenal adenoma, familial. 5. Adrenal gland ... 6. Adrenal incidentaloma. 7. Adrenocortical carcinoma. 8. Albright like syndrome. 9. Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. 10. ...
more infohttps://symptoms.rightdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/obesity/skin-problems.htm
Cold sweat and Poor healing - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Cold sweat and Poor healing - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
7. Adrenal Cancer. 8. Adrenal Cortex Diseases. 9. Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms. 10. Adrenal adenoma, familial. More causes » , Show ...
more infohttps://symptoms.rightdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/cold-sweats/poor-healing.htm
  • Objective: Here we developed a novel steroid metabolomic approach, mass spectrometry-based steroid profiling followed by machine learning analysis, and examined its diagnostic value for the detection of adrenal malignancy. (uni-wuerzburg.de)
  • Hamartomes 0 questions A focal malformation resembling a neoplasm, composed of an overgrowth of mature cells and tissues that normally occur in the affected area. (lookformedical.com)
  • Ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic neoplasm of the mandible and maxilla, with multiple histologic variants, and high recurrence rates if improperly treated. (stanford.edu)
  • Tumeurs 12 questions Neoplasms composed of squamous cells of the epithelium. (lookformedical.com)
  • Tumeurs Embryonnaires Et Germinales 0 questions Neoplasms composed of primordial GERM CELLS of embryonic GONADS or of elements of the germ layers of the EMBRYO. (lookformedical.com)