Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Psychology, Clinical: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological methods of recognizing and treating behavior disorders.Child Psychology: The study of normal and abnormal behavior of children.Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Psychology, Social: The branch of psychology concerned with the effects of group membership upon the behavior, attitudes, and beliefs of an individual.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Psychology, Comparative: The branch of psychology concerned with similarities or differences in the behavior of different animal species or of different races or peoples.Psychology, Educational: The branch of psychology concerned with psychological aspects of teaching and the formal learning process in school.Psychology, Experimental: The branch of psychology which seeks to learn more about the fundamental causes of behavior by studying various psychologic phenomena in controlled experimental situations.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Psychology, Medical: A branch of psychology in which there is collaboration between psychologists and physicians in the management of medical problems. It differs from clinical psychology, which is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of behavior disorders.Psychology, Industrial: The branch of applied psychology concerned with the application of psychologic principles and methods to industrial problems including selection and training of workers, working conditions, etc.Adolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Adolescent Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals 13-18 years.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Behavioral Medicine: The interdisciplinary field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical science, knowledge, and techniques relevant to health and illness and the application of this knowledge and these techniques to prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Behavioral Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.Economics, Behavioral: The combined discipline of psychology and economics that investigates what happens in markets in which some of the agents display human limitations and complications.Neurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Ecological and Environmental Phenomena: Ecological and environmental entities, characteristics, properties, relationships and processes.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Behavioral Research: Research that involves the application of the behavioral and social sciences to the study of the actions or reactions of persons or animals in response to external or internal stimuli. (from American Heritage Dictionary, 4th ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Gestalt Theory: A system which emphasizes that experience and behavior contain basic patterns and relationships which cannot be reduced to simpler components; that is, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Behaviorism: A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.United StatesLongitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Unconscious (Psychology): Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.Schools: Educational institutions.Psychophysiology: The study of the physiological basis of human and animal behavior.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)Cognitive Science: The study of the precise nature of different mental tasks and the operations of the brain that enable them to be performed, engaging branches of psychology, computer science, philosophy, and linguistics. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Self Psychology: Psychoanalytic theory focusing on interpretation of behavior in reference to self. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Terms, 1994) This elaboration of the psychoanalytic concepts of narcissism and the self, was developed by Heinz Kohut, and stresses the importance of the self-awareness of excessive needs for approval and self-gratification.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Displacement (Psychology): The process by which an emotional or behavioral response that is appropriate for one situation appears in another situation for which it is inappropriate.Child Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in children.Psychotherapy: A generic term for the treatment of mental illness or emotional disturbances primarily by verbal or nonverbal communication.Cognition: Intellectual or mental process whereby an organism obtains knowledge.Psychology, Military: The branch of applied psychology concerned with psychological aspects of selection, assignment, training, morale, etc., of Armed Forces personnel.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Character: In current usage, approximately equivalent to personality. The sum of the relatively fixed personality traits and habitual modes of response of an individual.Psychology, Applied: The science which utilizes psychologic principles to derive more effective means in dealing with practical problems.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Personal Construct Theory: A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)Codependency (Psychology): A relational pattern in which a person attempts to derive a sense of purpose through relationships with others.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Latency Period (Psychology): The period from about 5 to 7 years to adolescence when there is an apparent cessation of psychosexual development.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Ego: The conscious portion of the personality structure which serves to mediate between the demands of the primitive instinctual drives, (the id), of internalized parental and social prohibitions or the conscience, (the superego), and of reality.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Introversion (Psychology): A state in which attention is largely directed inward upon one's self.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Aspirations (Psychology): Strong desires to accomplish something. This usually pertains to greater values or high ideals.Neurobiology: The study of the structure, growth, activities, and functions of NEURONS and the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Criminal Psychology: The branch of psychology which investigates the psychology of crime with particular reference to the personality factors of the criminal.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Neuropsychology: A branch of psychology which investigates the correlation between experience or behavior and the basic neurophysiological processes. The term neuropsychology stresses the dominant role of the nervous system. It is a more narrowly defined field than physiological psychology or psychophysiology.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Race Relations: Cultural contacts between people of different races.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Ethics, Professional: The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Retention (Psychology): The persistence to perform a learned behavior (facts or experiences) after an interval has elapsed in which there has been no performance or practice of the behavior.Puberty: A period in the human life in which the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system takes place and reaches full maturity. The onset of synchronized endocrine events in puberty lead to the capacity for reproduction (FERTILITY), development of secondary SEX CHARACTERISTICS, and other changes seen in ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.Psychopathology: The study of significant causes and processes in the development of mental illness.Judgment: The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Happiness: Highly pleasant emotion characterized by outward manifestations of gratification; joy.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Thinking: Mental activity, not predominantly perceptual, by which one apprehends some aspect of an object or situation based on past learning and experience.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Resilience, Psychological: The human ability to adapt in the face of tragedy, trauma, adversity, hardship, and ongoing significant life stressors.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Regression (Psychology): A return to earlier, especially to infantile, patterns of thought or behavior, or stage of functioning, e.g., feelings of helplessness and dependency in a patient with a serious physical illness. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994).Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Cultural Evolution: The continuous developmental process of a culture from simple to complex forms and from homogeneous to heterogeneous qualities.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Morals: Standards of conduct that distinguish right from wrong.Societies, Scientific: Societies whose membership is limited to scientists.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Transference (Psychology): The unconscious transfer to others (including psychotherapists) of feelings and attitudes which were originally associated with important figures (parents, siblings, etc.) in one's early life.Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.Knowledge: The body of truths or facts accumulated in the course of time, the cumulated sum of information, its volume and nature, in any civilization, period, or country.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Education, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Personal Autonomy: Self-directing freedom and especially moral independence. An ethical principle holds that the autonomy of persons ought to be respected. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Social Sciences: Disciplines concerned with the interrelationships of individuals in a social environment including social organizations and institutions. Includes Sociology and Anthropology.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Adolescent, Institutionalized: An adolescent who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Psychoanalytic Theory: Conceptual system developed by Freud and his followers in which unconscious motivations are considered to shape normal and abnormal personality development and behavior.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders.National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health: Longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood. (from http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth accessed 08/2012)Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Imprinting (Psychology): A particular kind of learning characterized by occurrence in very early life, rapidity of acquisition, and relative insusceptibility to forgetting or extinction. Imprinted behavior includes most (or all) behavior commonly called instinctive, but imprinting is used purely descriptively.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.BrazilEvidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Father-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Habits: Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested.Coitus: The sexual union of a male and a female, a term used for human only.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)BooksVideo Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Individuality: Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.Sick Role: Set of expectations that exempt persons from responsibility for their illness and exempt them from usual responsibilities.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Countertransference (Psychology): Conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient which may interfere with treatment. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)
(1/746) Psychosocial factors related to adolescent smoking: a critical review of the literature.

OBJECTIVE: To extend the analysis of psychosocial risk factors for smoking presented in the United States surgeon general's 1994 report on smoking and health, and to propose a theoretical frame of reference for understanding the development of smoking. DATA SOURCES: General Science Index, Medline, PsycLIT, Sociofile, Sociological Abstracts, and Smoking and Health. Holdings of the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario Library as well as the authors' personal files. STUDY SELECTION: Reviewed literature focused on studies that examined the association of sociodemographic, environmental, behavioural, and personal variables with smoking. DATA SYNTHESIS: Adolescent smoking was associated with age, ethnicity, family structure, parental socioeconomic status, personal income, parental smoking, parental attitudes, sibling smoking, peer smoking, peer attitudes and norms, family environment, attachment to family and friends, school factors, risk behaviours, lifestyle, stress, depression/distress, self-esteem, attitudes, and health concerns. It is unclear whether adolescent smoking is related to other psychosocial variables. CONCLUSIONS: Attempts should be made to use common definitions of outcome and predictor variables. Analyses should include multivariate and bivariate models, with some attempt in the multivariate models to test specific hypotheses. Future research should be theory driven and consider the range of possible factors, such as social, personal, economic, environmental, biological, and physiological influences, that may influence smoking behaviour. The apparent inconsistencies in relationships between parental socioeconomic status and adolescent disposable income need to be resolved as does the underlying constructs for which socioeconomic status is a proxy.  (+info)

(2/746) The effects of a participative programme on Irish pupils' attitudes to HIV/AIDS.

The study is concerned with a general humanistic approach to health (lifeskills) education and its application to the specific issue of HIV/AIDS in the Republic of Ireland. A programme of five classroom sessions, structured to encourage active participation, was administered to an experimental group of 20 participants (10 male and 10 female). There was an equivalent control group. Attitudes towards 10 AIDS-related person concepts were measured before and after the programme using semantic differential rating scales. Highly significant differences were found between groups in post-programme attitudes to the concepts. There were no gender differences. It is concluded that this participative programme strongly influences AIDS-related attitudes, and, in particular, promotes compassion towards those with HIV/AIDS.  (+info)

(3/746) Adolescents' pregnancy intentions: relations to life situations and caretaking behaviors prenatally and 2 years postpartum.

PURPOSE: This study explores if and how adolescents' pregnancy intentions relate to life situations and health-related behaviors prenatally and up to 2 years postpartum. METHODS: Adolescent girls who reported that they had "wanted a baby" (n = 75) as their reason for pregnancy were compared with those who reported that the pregnancy "just happened" (n = 79) at four separate time periods: prenatally, at 6 and 24 months postpartum, and at 18 months postpartum for teens who became pregnant again subsequent to the study pregnancy. RESULTS: Those who stated that they wanted a baby were more likely to be Hispanic, married, and out of school before becoming pregnant. They were less likely to receive welfare as their primary means of support and to have run away from home in the past than teens who stated that their pregnancy just happened. Self-reported reason for pregnancy was unrelated to repeat pregnancy by 18 months postpartum, but those who had wanted the study baby were less likely to undergo elective termination of a subsequent pregnancy and less likely to become pregnant by a different partner. The groups diverged at 24 months postpartum when those who wanted a baby were more likely to be married to the father of the baby, be financially supported by him, receive child care assistance from him, and have attempted or succeeded at breastfeeding the study child. CONCLUSION: Self-reported reason for pregnancy reveals many important characteristics of pregnant adolescents both at the time of presentation and up to 2 years postpartum. Young women in this study who reported intentional pregnancy seem to fare better with regard to their financial status and their relationship with the father of the baby.  (+info)

(4/746) Alcohol-related problems among adolescent suicides in Finland.

We studied 106 adolescent suicides out of a total nationwide population of 1397 suicides. Forty-four (42%) of these 13-22-year-old victims were classified as having suffered either a DSM-III-R alcohol use disorder or diagnostically subthreshold alcohol misuse according to retrospective evaluation using the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST). These victims were found to differ from the other adolescent suicides in several characteristics: they were more likely to have comorbid categorical DSM-III-R disorders, antisocial behaviour, disturbed family backgrounds, precipitating life-events as stressors and severe psychosocial impairment. In addition, they also had a greater tendency to be alcohol-intoxicated at the time of the suicidal act, which tended to occur during weekends, suggesting that drinking in itself, and its weekly pattern, each contributed to the completion of their suicides.  (+info)

(5/746) Male youth street culture: understanding the context of health-related behaviours.

In the UK growing concerns have been expressed about young people, and particularly young men, who spend large amounts of their leisure time on the streets. Problems such as vandalism, under-age drinking and drug use have all been heavily reported in local and national media. This paper reports on ethnographic (primarily participant observation-based) research which sought to explore the motivations, meanings and behaviours of young people hanging around on the streets during the evening in a Scottish town. The aim is to move beyond previous research which has largely focused on the 'risk' factors associated with health-relevant behaviours, and to provide an understanding of the roles of alcohol, illicit drugs and tobacco within the young people's street culture. The paper therefore provides contextualized accounts of health-relevant behaviours. In conclusion it is argued that, to be effective, health promotion programmes need to locate lifestyle risk behaviours within broader life circumstances and that without a reduction in 'risk conditions' it is unlikely that youth street culture will disappear or that 'risk behaviours' will reduce.  (+info)

(6/746) Adolescents' knowledge and attitudes concerning HIV infection and HIV-infected persons: how a survey and focus group discussions are suited for researching adolescents' HIV/AIDS knowledge and attitudes.

The purpose of this article is to examine how two different corpora of material are suited for researching the sexuality of youth on the basis of material gathered via a structured questionnaire (N = 1183, response rate 87%) and via eight focus group discussions (FGDs), and to investigate the knowledge and opinions of adolescents at the age of 15 years about HIV infection and HIV-infected persons. Both boys and girls showed a good level of knowledge about HIV infection and AIDS. While their level of knowledge was good, their attitude was that the threat of an HIV infection was not a personal issue. Furthermore, negative attitudes to those having HIV/AIDS became more pronounced the more socially distant the infected person was to the respondent. The FGDs presented a more sceptical view of the attitudes of adolescents than the survey, while the knowledge about HIV infection and AIDS was the same regardless of the research method. In the FGDs, girls discussed the topics more extensively than boys, they used longer sentences, there was spontaneous discussion within the groups and the participants commented on each other's opinions. Boys were often content with short dichotomous responses and the interviewers had to qualify the responses with supplementary questions.  (+info)

(7/746) Young people's understanding of mental illness.

Research exploring young people's perspectives on mental health is at an early stage of development and few studies have focused in detail on mental distress or illness. This paper reports findings from a qualitative study which used case vignettes in group and individual interviews to explore the ways in which the young people who took part constructed their understanding of what constitutes mental illness. In essence, they did so by drawing on their own experiences to distinguish between behaviours with which they could identify in some way and those with which they could not. An overview of previous relevant research is provided in the Introduction, followed by a description of the methods and sampling strategies used. The main findings of the study are then presented in relation to the ways in which young people defined unusual behaviour, their understanding of the behaviours associated with different mental health problems and their attitudes to the people concerned. Finally, some ways in which health promotion might build on the findings are identified and discussed.  (+info)

(8/746) Exploring young people's difficulties in talking about contraception: how can we encourage more discussion between partners?

Interviews were conducted with 56 young men and women aged 16-19 within the Southampton Community Health NHS Trust to explore difficulties in talking about contraception. Concern about a partner's hostile or negative reaction to any discussion about contraception was central to explaining why some people found it so difficult to initiate such discussions. Admitting the intention to have intercourse, together with a perceived association between condom use and disease prevention, were the main concerns. There was some indication of gender differences in these findings. Furthermore, this negative reaction is perceived to be exacerbated according to the partner's reputation, the potential for harming one's own reputation and whether there is a desire for a longer-term relationship with this partner. The most important outcome of the interviews was that these concerns about a partner's negative reaction were largely unjustified, with the vast majority of participants showing only positive responses to scenarios of future partners initiating discussions with them about contraception. In addition to the need to improve communication skills, the data suggest that greater awareness about the positive reactions towards such discussions should be encouraged.  (+info)

*  Adolescent health
Drug and Alcohol services and Youth Drug courts General practitioners Justice Health Mental Health services Psychology School ... Australian Association for Adolescent Health Canadian Association for Adolescent Health The York Centre for Children, Youth, ... Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, WHO (2001) Global Consultation on Adolescent Friendly Health ... SpunOut.ie Irish National Youth Website Society for Research on Adolescents WHO Adolescent Health WHO Child and Adolescent ...
*  Doreen Granpeesheh
Granpeesheh obtained her psychology degree from the University of California at Los Angeles. Granpeesheh is the founder and ... A follow-up study in 1993 tracked these children as adolescents with 8 of the 9 best outcome children displaying "adaptive and ...
*  Dual process theory
Whether the focus be on social psychology or cognitive psychology, there are many examples of dual process theories produced ... "Neurobiological and memory models of risky decision making in adolescents versus young adults". Journal of Experimental ... In psychology, a dual process theory provides an account of how thought can arise in two different ways, or as a result of two ... In cognitive psychology, attention and working memory have also been conceptualized as relying on two distinct processes. ...
*  Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology
The Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed journal covering child and adolescent ... the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The editor-in-chief is Andres De Los Reyes (University of Maryland at ... "Psychology, Clinical". "Journals Ranked by Impact: Psychology, Developmental". 2015 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science ( ... It was established in 1971 as the Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, obtaining its current name in 2001. It is published by ...
*  Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Adolescent Psychology American Psychological Association Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology Divisions of the ... The Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (SCCAP) is an academic and professional society in the United States ... "A Brief History of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (SCCAP) from Section 1, APA Division 12, status ... These contributions include strong, long term impact of publication on the area of clinical child and adolescent psychology, ...
*  Richard M. Lerner
Lerner, Richard M. and Laurence Steinberg (eds.) Handbook of Adolescent Psychology. 3rd ed. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2009. Lerner, ... Lerner, Richard M. and Willis F. Overton (eds.). Handbook of Child Psychology and Developmental Science. 4 vols. Hoboken, NJ: ... Richard M. Lerner (born February 23, 1946, in Brooklyn, New York City) is professor of psychology at Tufts University, ... Child and Adolescent Development: An Advanced Course. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2008. ...
*  Relational aggression
Developmental Psychology, 22(4), 521-530. doi:10.1037/0012-1649.22.4.521 Brown, B. (2004) Adolescents' relationships with peers ... In R. Lerner and L. Steinberg (Eds.), Handbook of adolescent psychology. New York: Wiley. Hill, J. & Holmbeck, G. (1986) ... Merrill-Palmer Quarterly: Journal of Developmental Psychology, 45(2), 242-266. Horn, S.S.(2003). Adolescents' reasoning about ... and Suicidality in Adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 46(1), 40-49. doi:10.1097/01. ...
*  Crowds (adolescence)
Developmental Psychology, 31,'' 540-547. Kinney, D. (1993). From nerds to normals: The recovery of identity among adolescents ... In R. Lerner & L. Steinberg (Eds.), Handbook of adolescent psychology (3rd ed., Vol. 2, pp. 74-103). New York: Wiley. Eder, D ... In R. Lerner & L. Steinberg (Eds.), ''Handbook of adolescent psychology.'' New York: Wiley. Mory, M. (1994, February). ''When ... Horn, S. S. (2003). Adolescents' reasoning about exclusion from social groups. ''Developmental Psychology, 39'' 363-371. Brown ...
*  Personal fable
In Lerner, R. M., & Steinberg, L. (Eds.). (2009). Handbook of adolescent psychology. Volume 1: Individual bases of adolescent ... This helps adolescents to develop their own sense of self and their own way of perceive the world. It is normal for adolescents ... Aalsma, M. C., Lapsley, D. K., & Flannery, D. J. (2006). Personal fables, narcissism, and adolescent adjustment. Psychology in ... "Age, Gender, and Self-Esteem Differences in Adolescent Coping Styles". The Journal of Social Psychology. 140: 539-541. doi: ...
*  Q methodology
Adolescent Psychology. 31 (4): 525-539. doi:10.1207/S15374424JCCP3104_11. Borbinha, José; Oliveira, Bruno; Calisto, Francisco ... Q Methodology is a research method used in psychology and in social sciences to study people's "subjectivity"-that is, their ...
*  Working memory training
Adolescent Psychology. 39 (6): 825-836. doi:10.1080/15374416.2010.517162. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) Holmes, J., ... Applied Cognitive Psychology. 28: 403-408. doi:10.1002/acp.3011. Shipstead Z, Redick TS, Engle RW (2010). "Does working memory ... Psychology and Aging. 25: 767-778. doi:10.1037/a0020683. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) Klingberg, T., Forssberg, H ... Applied Cognitive Psychology. 24: 827-836. doi:10.1002/acp.1589. CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link) Borella, E., Carretti ...
*  Child PTSD Symptom Scale
Adolescent Psychology. 30 (3): 376-384. doi:10.1207/S15374424JCCP3003_9. ISSN 1537-4416. PMID 11501254. Ramos, S.M., & Boyle, G ... "Practice Parameters for Assessing Children and Adolescents with PTSD". Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent ... The Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) is a free checklist designed for children and adolescents to report traumatic events and ... CAPS-CA for assessing posttraumatic stress symptoms in children and adolescents". Journal of Anxiety Disorders. 28 (1): 51-56. ...
*  Richard Abidin
Adolescent Psychology. 24: 31. doi:10.1207/s15374424jccp2401_4. Routh, D (1994). Clinical Psychology Since 1917. NY: Plenum ... Abidin, Richard (1992). "The Determinants of Parenting Behavior". Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology. 21 (4): ... Adolescent Psychology. 21: 60. doi:10.1207/s15374424jccp2101_9. University of Virginia Curry School of Education InBalance, ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 31 (3): 384-92. doi:10.1207/S15374424JCCP3103_10. PMID 12149976. Abidin, ...
*  Juvenile delinquency
Woolard; Scott (2009). "The legal regulation of adolescence". In Lerner, R.; Steinberg, L. Handbook of Adolescent psychology. 2 ... The majority of adolescents who live in poverty are racial minorities. Also, minorities who offend, even as adolescents, are ... "Arab adolescents facing the future". pp. 232 in Brown et. al., (eds.) The World's Youth: Adolescence in Eight Regions of the ... Adolescents with criminal siblings are only more likely to be influenced by their siblings, and also become delinquen;if the ...
*  Body-focused repetitive behavior
Adolescent Psychology. 45: 1-14. doi:10.1080/15374416.2015.1055860. Torales J, Barrios I, Villalba J. "Alternative Therapies ... Clinical Psychology Review. 20 (3): 289-309. doi:10.1016/S0272-7358(98)00083-X. PMID 10779896. The TLC Foundation for Body- ...
*  Autism spectrum
The Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology has deemed two early childhood interventions as "well-established": ... Journal of Clinical and Child Adolescent Psychology. 2005;34(3):523-540. doi:10.1207/s15374424jccp3403_8. Corsello C, Hus V, ... Adolescent Psychology. 38 (3): 439-450. doi:10.1080/15374410902851739. ISSN 1537-4416. PMID 19437303. Smith, T; Iadarola, S ( ... 2015). "Evidence Base Update for Autism Spectrum Disorder". Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 44 (6): 897- ...
*  Impulsivity
Adolescent Psychology. 37 (1): 184-214. doi:10.1080/15374410701818681. Evans, SW; Owens, JS; Bunford, N (2014). "Evidence-based ... Corsini, Raymond Joseph (1999). The Dictionary of Psychology. Psychology Press. p. 476. ISBN 1-58391-028-X. Berlin, H. A.; ... "The Economic Impact of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents". Journal of Pediatric Psychology. ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 43 (4): 527-51. doi:10.1080/15374416.2013.850700. PMC 4025987 . PMID ...
*  Conduct disorder
... Symptoms and Treatment Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology Bullying tendency wired in brain ... Adolescent Psychology. 37: 215-237. doi:10.1080/15374410701820117. PMID 18444059. Hughes, T. (2010). Identifying, Assessing, ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 34: 477-505. doi:10.1207/s15374424jccp3403_6. Waschbusch D. A. (2002). "A ... Almost all adolescents who have a substance use disorder have conduct disorder-like traits, but after successful treatment of ...
*  Tina Malti
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 45(6), 707-836. Malti, T., Sette, S., & Dys, S. P. (2016). Social- ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 45(6), 827-836. doi:10.1080/15374416.2016.1239539 Dys, S. P., & Malti, T ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 45(6), 718-731. doi: 10.1080/15374416.2015.1121822 Malti, T. (2016). ... in clinical child psychology from the Academy of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Children and Adolescents in Switzerland and a ...
*  Nonsuicidal self-injury disorder
An Empirical Investigation in Adolescent Psychiatric Patients". Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology. 42 (4): 496- ... Studies have found that compared to adults and children, the prevalence of NSSI is highest among adolescents, with an ... The prevalence of NSSI among adolescents could be due to the heightened emotional reactivity and lability experienced by ... Clinical Psychology Review. 27 (1): 46-57. doi:10.1016/j.cpr.2005.12.005. Stanley, Barbara; Brodsky, Beth; Nelson, Joshua D.; ...
*  Substance abuse
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 43 (5): 695-720. doi:10.1080/15374416.2014.915550. PMID 24926870. " ... Suicide is also very common in adolescent alcohol abusers, with 1 in 4 suicides in adolescents being related to alcohol abuse. ... In children and adolescents, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and family therapy currently has the most research evidence for ... James W. Kalat Biological psychology 11th edition pg.78 Maglione, M; Maher, AR; Hu, J; Wang, Z; Shanman, R; Shekelle, PG; Roth ...
*  Intellectual disability
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 36: 418-429. doi:10.1080/15374410701448448. Kalachnik, JE.; Hanzel, TE.; ... University of Illinois Press, ISBN 978-0-252-06741-9 Cummings, Nicholas A.; Rogers H. Wright (2005). "Chapter 1, Psychology's ... "Australian Psychological Society : Psychologists and intellectual disability". Psychology.org.au. Retrieved 2010-06-29. Cooney ... Applied and Preventive Psychology. 1: 131-140. doi:10.1016/s0962-1849(05)80134-9. Campbell F.A.; Ramey C.T.; Pungello E.; ...
*  Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 43 (4): 527-51. doi:10.1080/15374416.2013.850700. PMC 4025987 . PMID ... Adolescents and adults tend to develop coping skills which make up for some or all of their impairments. The medical literature ... Adolescents and adults with ADHD are at increased risk of substance abuse. This is most commonly seen with alcohol or cannabis ... The criteria for an executive function deficit are met in 30-50% of children and adolescents with ADHD. One study found that 80 ...
*  Weinberg Screen Affective Scale (WSAS)
Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 9 April 2013. ... Furthermore, this measure may not be valid in measuring suicidal tendencies in adolescents. Weinberg, Warren A.; Harper, Caryn ... Adolescents, and Young Adults". Secondary Education and Beyond: providing opportunities for students with learning disabilities ... Adolescent Psychiatry. 46 (11): 1503-1526. doi:10.1097/chi.0b013e318145ae1c . PMID 18049300. "WSAS Scale" (PDF). Registry of ...
*  Parent management training
Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 43 (4): 527-51. doi:10.1080/15374416.2013.850700. PMC 4025987 . PMID ... The Journal of Adolescent Health: Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine. doi:10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.08 ... Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents (2nd ed.), 211-226. New York: Guilford Press. Pfiffner LJ, Haack LM ... Evidence-based psychotherapies for children and adolescents (2nd ed.), 159-78. New York: Guilford Press. Barkley RA (2013). ...
*  Emanuel Hammer
... a Diplomate in clinical psychology American Board of Professional Psychology and member at the National Association for ... An Exploratory Investigation of the Personalities of Gifted Adolescent Artists The house-tree-person (H-T-P) clinical research ... Hammer served as an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at the Graduate School of Arts and Science, New York University, ...
*  Eating disorder
... and binge eating in adolescent girls". Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 108 (2): 255-66. doi:10.1037/0021-843X.108.2.255. PMID ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. 44 (5): 707-21. doi:10.1080/15374416.2014.971458. PMID 25580937. ... Adolescent females in these overbearing families lack the ability to be independent from their families, yet realize the need ... 3.0.CO;2-#. Psychology Second Edition 2009, chap. 8 Eating Disorders by Schacter, Daniel L. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived ...
Here is the best resource for homework help with PSY 112 : Child and Adolescent Psychology at College Of Marin - Kentfield. Find PSY112 study guides, notes,
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Patients and/or caregivers may access this content for use in relation to their own personal healthcare or that of a family member only. Terms and conditions will apply. ...
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Discover entry requirements, content, fees and contact details for Psychology of Child and Adolescent Development at York St John University on prospects.ac.uk
Mount Pleasant Counselling Centre offers services through our qualified psychologists for any adolescent or young person in Perth, Western Australia.
Psychology 350: Adolescent Psychology examines the physical, cognitive, social, and moral development of adolescents in the contexts of family, peers, school, work, and the media. It discusses major theories, methods of studying adolescents, adolescent development, and contemporary adolescent issues and concerns (e.g., work, school, media, sexuality, and suicide).. This course should be useful to parents, teachers, students, and any individuals who deal with adolescents in their life and work.. ...
Research what it will take to earn an online Ph.D. in Child & Adolescent Development. Is a Ph.D. in Child & Adolescent Development online for you?
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This study aims to examine the relationship between mood and brain activity in adolescent girls in order to better understand the genetic and neural predictors of adolescent depression. The participants in this study will be healthy female adolescents aged 12-14 and their mothers. They will participate for a total of six months. Adolescent participants will have three study sessions at McLean Hospital, and during two of them, their mothers will also have assessments. Adolescent assessments will include interviews, questionnaires, computer tasks, and collection of a saliva sample for genetic analyses. Their second study visit will include an fMRI scan. Parent assessments will include an interview, questionnaires, and a computer task ...
Description: This OTAs report responds to the request of numerous Members of Congress to review the physical, emotional, and behavioral health status of contemporary American adolescents, including adolescents in groups who might be more likely to be in special need of health-related interventions: adolescents living in poverty, adolescents from racial and ethnic minority groups, Native American adolescents, and adolescents in rural areas. In addition, OTA was asked to: 1 ) identify risk and protective factors for adolescent health problems and integrate national data in order to understand the clustering of specific adolescent problems, 2) evaluate options in the organization of health services and technologies available to adolescents (including accessibility and financing), 3) assess options in the conduct of national health surveys to improve collection of adolescent health statistics, and 4) identify gaps in research on the health and behavior of adolescents. ...
Description: This OTAs report responds to the request of numerous Members of Congress to review the physical, emotional, and behavioral health status of contemporary American adolescents, including adolescents in groups who might be more likely to be in special need of health-related interventions: adolescents living in poverty, adolescents from racial and ethnic minority groups, Native American adolescents, and adolescents in rural areas. In addition, OTA was asked to: 1 ) identify risk and protective factors for adolescent health problems and integrate national data in order to understand the clustering of specific adolescent problems, 2) evaluate options in the organization of health services and technologies available to adolescents (including accessibility and financing), 3) assess options in the conduct of national health surveys to improve collection of adolescent health statistics, and 4) identify gaps in research on the health and behavior of adolescents. ...
More than 30,000 adolescents in the United States die annually from the effects of chronic illnesses. The anxiety from facing a terminal illness often hinders adolescents in making decisions about their own end-of-life (EOL) care. Although minors preferences are not legally binding, legislature, research, and professional guidelines all recommend that adolescent patients become involved in EOL decisions as part of routine intervention while they are stable. Family Centered Advance Care Planning (FCACP) is an intervention that facilitates EOL discussion among adolescents, their families, and their care providers. This pilot study will examine FCACPs effects on adaptive coping, psychological adjustment, quality of life, and plans and actions in HIV infected adolescents. The study will also provide feedback used for improving the FCACP Web site.. This study will include HIV or AIDS infected adolescents ranging in age from 14 to 21 who will jointly enroll with a selected surrogate older than 21. ...
AAPD Career Center: , Fullerton, California , Child/Adolescent Development - Tenure-Track at California State University, Fullerton
VALCANTI, Carolina Costa et al. Religious/spiritual coping in people with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis. Rev. esc. enferm. USP [online]. 2012, vol.46, n.4, pp.838-845. ISSN 0080-6234. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0080-62342012000400008.. The objective of the present study is to investigate the use of religious/spiritual coping mechanisms in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis, by means of interviews using a sociodemographic questionnaire and the religious/spiritual coping scale. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression. A total of 123 individuals were interviewed, 79.6% of whom presented a high score for religious/spiritual coping and none of whom presented low or irrelevant scores. The variables that affected the religious/spiritual coping behavior were: gender, age group, treatment time, family income, and religious practice. In conclusion, the participants used religious/spiritual coping mechanisms as a ...
Dr. Marion Underwood is one of the foremost researchers in the developmental origins and outcomes of social aggression and how adolescents digital communication relates to adjustment. Dr. Underwoods work has been published in numerous scientific journals and her research program has been supported by the National Institutes of Health since 1995. In 2003, she authored a book, Social Aggression among Girls and, in 2015, she was featured in a CNN special called "#Being13: Inside the Secret World of Teens." Since 2003, she and her research group have been conducting a longitudinal study of origins and outcomes of social aggression, and how adolescents use digital communication. Dr. Underwood received the 2001 Chancellors Council Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award, was granted a FIRST Award and a K02 Mid-Career Independent Scientist Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, and is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. She earned her bachelors degree from Wellesley ...
Resnick, M. D.; Bearman, P. S.; Blum, R. W.; Bauman, K. E.; Harris, K. M.; Jones, J.; Tabor, J.; Beuhring, T.; Sieving, R. E.; Shew, M.; Ireland, M.; Bearinger, L. H.; & Udry, J. R. (1997). Protecting adolescents from harm. Findings from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health. JAMA, 278(10), 823-832.
Pelham, W.E., Fabiano, G.A., Waxmonsky, J.G., Greiner, A.R., Gnagy, E.M., Pelham, W.E. III, Coxe, S., Verley, J., Bhatia, I., Hart, K., Karch, K., Konijendijk, E., Tresco, K., Nabum-Shani, I., & Murphy, S.A. (in press). Treatment sequencing for childhood ADHD: A multiple-randomization study of adaptive medication and behavioral interventions. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Page, T.F., Pelham III, W.E., Fabiano, G.A., Greiner, A.R., Gnagy, E.M., Hart, K., Coxe, S., Waxmonsky, J.G., & Pelham Jr., W.E. (in press). Comparative Cost Analysis of Sequential, Adaptive, Behavioral, Pharmacological, and Combined Treatments for Childhood ADHD. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Johnson, A. H., Miller, F. G., Chafouleas, S. M., Riley-Tillman, T. C., Fabiano, G. A., & Welsh, M. E. (in press). Evaluating the technical adequacy of DBR-SIS in tri-annual behavioral screening: A multisite investigation. Journal of School Psychology. Schatz, N.K., Fabiano, G.A., Cunningham, ...
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Intuitively it simply makes sense: exposure to sexual content in movies at an early age probably influences adolescents sexual behavior. And yet, even though a great deal of research has shown that adolescents who watch more risky behaviors in popular movies, like drinking or smoking, are more likely to drink and smoke themselves, surprisingly little research has examined whether movies influence adolescents sexual behaviors.
Adolescent use of marijuana, according to groups that are against any use of the plant, like the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids (who should be barking at BigPharma; buy hey, what do we know?!), is associated with adverse effects later in life. For them, the identification of factors underlying adolescent use is of significant public health importance. The relationship between US state laws that permit cannabis for medical purposes and adolescent marijuana use has been a hot topic of debate. The claim is that these laws convey a message about cannabis acceptability that increases its use in adolescents soon after passage. A recent study utilized 24 years worth of national data from the USA to examine the relationship between state medical cannabis laws and adolescent use of marijuana.. The studys authors use a multistage, random-sampling design with replacement, compiled from surveys conducted annually amongst national surveys of 8th, 10th, and 12th-grade students (modal ages 13-14, 15-16, and ...
Psychosocial Adjustment and the Meaning of Social Support for Visually Impaired Adolescents, Online, This article presents research derived from a nationwide study conducted at the University of Amsterdam into the psychosocial adjustment and the meaning of social support for Dutch adolescents with visual impairments. The findings indicate that social support, especially the support of peers, is important to adolescents with visual impairments. The differences between visually impaired and sighted adolescents proved to be small, but significant.
Investigators should understand the importance of caregiver permission-and ethically appropriate situations in which to waive caregiver permission-in the protection of adolescent research participants. Caregiver permission when adolescents are involved in a study may be waived by an IRB under two circumstances: 1) when requiring parental permission is not a reasonable requirement to protect adolescents; or 2) when the waiver would not adversely affect the rights and welfare of the adolescent, the study poses no more than a minimal risk to the adolescent, and the study could not be practically carried out without a waiver. In the federal regulations governing research, children are defined in 45 C.F.R. § 46.102(a) as, persons who have not attained the legal age for consent to treatments or procedures involved in the research, under the applicable law of the jurisdiction in which the research will be conducted (2).. This federal definition refers to laws, primarily state laws, related to minor ...
I am interested in the assessment, causes, and prevention of adolescent suicide and suicidal behavior. My work has focused on the risk factors and genetic epidemiology of adolescent suicide, and the translation of those findings into interventions to treat or prevent adolescent depression and suicidal behavior. Currently, we are testing a novel intervention supported by an app to reduce recurrent suicidal behavior after discharge from a psychiatric inpatient unit, developing adaptive screens for youth at suicidal risk in outpatient and emergency room facilities, and the development of novel ways to assess suicidal ideation and risk that bypass self-report. ...
Several, purely social changes associated with puberty further complicate adolescent lives and add to their propensity for moodiness.
This study examined the prevalence and correlates of smoking initiation among adolescents. We have used data from adolescents (n=5,392) ages 10-18 who participated in the 2003 Tobacco Survey, a representative sample of adolescents in Northwest Ohio. A selfreport of cigarette smoking was obtained using a questionnaire administered in classrooms. Data were analyzed using weighted chi-square and multiple logistic regressions in SAS that accounted for the survey design. The prevalence rates for adolescents that ever tried smoking were 7.4% in elementary (grades 4-5); 17.7% in middle (grades 6-8), and 41.4% in high (grades 9-12) schools, respectively. The highest prevalence rate was among Hispanics. Having a close friend that smoked and a smoker at home correlated significantly with both initiation of smoking and smoking at an earlier age. Smoking was correlated with low academic achievement among adolescents in all grades. Students who reported smoking by parents or siblings were significantly more likely
Little is known about stressful triggers and coping strategies of Nigerian adolescents and whether or not, and how, HIV infection modulates these sources of stress and coping. This study evaluated differences in stressors and coping strategies among Nigerian adolescents based on HIV status. We analysed the data of six hundred 10-19 year old adolescents recruited through a population-based survey from 12 States of Nigeria who self-reported their HIV status. Data on stressors and coping strategies were retrieved by self-report from participants, using a validated structured questionnaire. We compared results between adolescents with and without HIV with respect to identification of specific life events as stressors, and use of specific coping strategies to manage stress. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and sex. Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) had significantly increased odds of identifying having to visit the hospital regularly (AOR: 5.85; 95 % CI: 2.11-16.20; P = 0.001), and ...
The ability of adolescents to access safe and effective new products for HIV prevention and treatment is optimised by adolescent licensure at the same time these products are approved and marketed for adults. Many adolescent product development programmes for HIV prevention or treatment products may proceed simultaneously with adult phase III development programmes. Appropriately implemented, this strategy is not expected to delay licensure as information regarding product efficacy can often be extrapolated from adults to adolescents, and pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in adolescents are expected to be similar to those in adults. Finally, adolescents enrolled in therapeutic HIV prevention and treatment research can be considered adults, based on US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations and the appropriate application of state law. The FDA permits local jurisdictions to apply state and local HIV/sexually transmitted infection minor treatment laws so that adolescents who are ...
This study presents unique descriptions of how adolescents living in urban England view self-harm. Adolescents depicted self-harm as a complex behaviour involving a range of methods, functions and taboos. Those who self-harmed described it as a private, inwardly focused expression of distress, often with a reluctance to disclose and seek help. This was reinforced by the comments about self-harm as attention seeking from participants who had not self-harmed. Such views may contribute to fears about responses from others, particularly where social support may be variable or lacking. Self-harm being discovered by others was often viewed as a negative experience. Although most participants were unclear about what would constitute "help", some reflected on the benefits of help they had received following disclosure of self-harm. The ethnic diversity within this sample illustrated that self-harm was concern across a range of ethnic groups. Mixed reflections and experiences described in this study ...
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Adolescent Child Medical Pediatrics Psychiatry: 2 assigned downloads, like Increasing Awareness of Child and Adolescent Mental Health from ebook-reader
The teenage years are also called adolescence. During this time, the teenager will see the greatest amount of growth in height and weight. Adolescence is a time for growth spurts and puberty changes. An adolescent may grow several inches in several months followed by a period of very slow growth, then have another growth spurt. Changes with puberty may occur gradually or several signs may become visible at the same time.. There is a great amount of variation in the rate of changes that may occur. Some adolescents may experience these signs of maturity sooner or later than others. It is important to remember that these changes happen at different times for everyone. Being smaller or bigger than other boys is normal as each child experiences puberty at his own time.. ...
Study Purpose: The Adolescent Health and Academic Achievement (AHAA) study provides an opportunity to examine the effects of education on adolescent behavior, academic achievement, and cognitive and psychosocial development in the 1990s. Sample: Wave I, Stage 1 School sample: stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school, a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade, was also recruited from the community. Wave I, Stage 2: An in-home sample of 20,745 adolescents consisting of a core sample from each community plus selected special oversamples was interviewed in 1995. Eligibility for the oversamples was determined by the adolescents responses on the In-School Questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample. At Wave II, respondents who were in grades 7-11 at Wave I were re-interviewed. Wave III: The ...
Adolescent health has become a priority on the global agenda. Many low- and middle-income countries increasingly recognize that achieving the Sustainable Development Goals requires greater investments in adolescents health and development. National governments and partners see the importance of prioritizing adolescent health within their larger health programmes - including reproductive, maternal, neonatal, child and adolescent health - and want to know where and how to invest their resources and efforts.
June 2004-. "Violent behavior among adolescents is a significant problem worldwide, and a cross-national comparison of adolescent violent behaviors can provide information about the development and pattern of physical violence in young adolescents. Smith-Khuri and colleagues examined frequencies of adolescent violence-related behaviors in 5 countries and associations between violence-related behaviors and potential explanatory characteristics.". "A significant body of information currently exists describing violent behavior in the adolescent population of the United States, yet violent behavior in adolescents outside and in relation to the United States is not well characterized. Comparison of violence-related behaviors in US youths with those of their peers in other countries can provide a context for the US findings. Our analysis found that for 3 violence-related behaviors-fighting, weapon carrying, and injuries from fighting-adolescents from 5 European countries were remarkably similar in ...
Purpose : To investigate the comparability of health behavior data obtained from adolescents via notebook computer versus those obtained via written questionnaire. Methods : We interviewed adolescent patients ages 13-20 years receiving services at community adolescent health clinics. Participants anonymously completed either a computer-assisted...
Abstract Anxiety disorders are common in adolescents (ages 12 to 18) and contribute to a range of impairments. There has been speculation that adolescents with anxiety are at risk for being treatment nonresponders. In this review, the authors examine the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adolescents with anxiety. Outcomes from mixed child and adolescent samples and from adolescent-only samples indicate that approximately two-thirds of youths respond favorably to CBT. CBT produces moderate to large effects and shows superiority over control/comparison conditions. The literature does not support differential outcomes by age: adolescents do not consistently manifest poorer outcomes relative to children. Although extinction paradigms find prolonged fear extinction in adolescent samples, basic research does not fully align with the processes and goals of real-life exposure. Furthermore, CBT is flexible and allows for tailored application in adolescents, and it may be delivered in ...
Bierman, KL; Coie, JD; Dodge, KA; Foster, EM; Greenberg, MT; Lochman, JE; McMahon, RJ; Pinderhughes, EE; Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group,, The effects of the fast track program on serious problem outcomes at the end of elementary school., Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53, vol. 33 no. 4 (December, 2004), pp. 650-661, ISSN 1537-4416 (K.A. Dodge is a member of the Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group..) [15498733], [doi] [abs] [child development, problem behaviors ...
Bierman, KL; Coie, JD; Dodge, KA; Foster, EM; Greenberg, MT; Lochman, JE; McMahon, RJ; Pinderhughes, EE; Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group,, The effects of the fast track program on serious problem outcomes at the end of elementary school., Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology : the Official Journal for the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, American Psychological Association, Division 53, vol. 33 no. 4 (December, 2004), pp. 650-661, ISSN 1537-4416 (K.A. Dodge is a member of the Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group..) [15498733], [doi] [abs] [child development, problem behaviors ...
RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies representing 9 cohorts met the criteria. Four outcome categories were identified: behavior, cognition/school performance, brain structure/function, and physiologic responses. Eleven examined behavior; 7 found small but significant differences favoring nonexposed adolescents, with small effect sizes. Eight examined cognition/school performance; 6 reported significantly lower scores on language and memory tasks among adolescents with PCE, with varying effect sizes varied. Eight examined brain structure/function and reported morphologic differences with few functional differences. Three examined physiologic responses with discordant findings. Most studies controlled for other prenatal exposures, caregiving environment, and violence exposure; few examined mechanisms. ...
Comprehensive theoretical models of adolescent problem behavior propose risk and promotive factors at multiple levels of the social environment, including the family, peer, school, and neighborhood contexts.1-3 In addition, growing attention is focused on promoting positive youth development, encouraging health-promoting behavior, and investing in resources for youth.4-7 Thus, a holistic and comprehensive approach to optimizing adolescent development requires an understanding of factors related to both reducing problem behavior and increasing positive, competent youth behavior.. Research related to optimal youth development has begun to delineate critical dimensions of important social contexts.8-11 For example, some researchers propose 3 basic experiences (ie, connection, regulation, and autonomy) to define youths main associations with their environment that can be measured across multiple settings.8,12,13 Others have articulated similar concepts and expanded the number of dimensions to ...
Sexual Exploitation of Teenagers examines the sexual exploitation of maturing teenagers by adults. It explores why scientific facts concerning adolescent neurological and psychosocial development are incongruent with protective laws concerning juvenile consent to sexual activity. Adolescents may not have the wisdom-the emotional, intellectual, and experiential tools-to handle challenges, such as sexual harassment. The book recounts the stories of several teenagers who filed federal or state anti-discrimination cases. It analyzes these cases in light of evolving law and gendered social attitudes concerning sexually active women and youth. From case stories, readers can evaluate the factors, including adolescent development and judicial bias, which arguably play a role in exploitation cases. The book also highlights conflicting criminal and civil laws, detailing the legal and social mixed message received by adults and teenagers. It traces why personal injury law, sexual harassment law, and statutory rape
Background Young people in the UK have among the worst health in Europe with marked inequalities across the social scale. Substance use and violence are highly prevalent and damaging to young peoples long-term health. There are increasing calls for adolescent health interventions to address multiple rather than single risk behaviours because such behaviours cluster together and because such interventions are potentially more feasible and efficient. Positive youth development (PYD) is one such intervention to address inter-clustered risk behaviours among young people. The National Youth Agency defines such interventions as voluntary and informal educational activities aiming to bring about generalised youth development in terms of positive assets such as skills, relationships and confidence, rather than merely remedying problem behaviours. We systematically reviewed outcome evaluations testing the effectiveness of PYD interventions on preventing substance use and violence in young people. ...
There is inconsistency in the current literature regarding the association between dimensions of parenting processes and academic achievement for adolescents. Further, few studies have extended such an association into young adulthood. In this study, we examined the effect of three dimensions of parenting processes, including school-specific involvement, general parental support, and parental expectations, on academic achievement in adolescence and in young adulthood. Using a large, nationally representative, and longitudinal sample, we found that results from regression analyses suggested that all three dimensions of parenting processes had a significant effect on adolescents academic success. In particular, school-specific involvement had a stronger effect than general parental support and parental expectations. Further, parenting processes were indirectly associated with academic achievement later in young adulthood, partially through academic achievement in adolescence. Implications of the ...
This article presents a study investigating how adolescents from Sweden and the Gambia learned music while interacting with each other in a concert project conducted in the Gambia. The main aim is to explore in what ways adolescents acquire music and to analyse it in a context of cultural identity. A sociocultural and ethnomusicological approach was employed, drawing on field studies and interviews with the adolescents. The results demonstrate that the students musical and cultural backgrounds strongly influence the ways in which they learn and how they teach others. Their cultural backgrounds also affect their choice of tools for learning and teaching. The adolescents appear to be more inclined to change their ways of teaching others than to change the methods of their own musical learning. The results suggest that teachers ought not to always use the same methods in teaching their students as they experienced when learning themselves, and that teachers need an ability to identify the learning ...
The overall aims of this thesis were to develop and evaluate a screening instrument designed to detect gaming addiction symptoms in adolescents, to study associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms, to investigate the stability of problematic gaming, and to examine possible associations between gaming at baseline (W1) with problem gambling three years later (W2).. The study population consisted of adolescents from the Survey of Adolescent Life in Västmanland SALVe Cohort (adolescents in Västmanland born in 1997 and 1999, and their parents), in two waves (2012, n = 1887; 2015, n = 1576), and adolescents from child and adolescent psychiatric clinics in Västmanland (2014, n = 242).. The development of the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT) was based upon the research literature on gaming, gambling, and addiction. An expert panel estimated the content validity of the GAIT and found it to be excellent. Additional psychometric evaluations of the GAIT and the parent ...
We included 18 cross-sectional studies in this review. The included studies were conducted in 10 out of the 54 countries in Africa. The 18 studies focused on a wide range of adolescent vaccines. Thirteen studies evaluated vaccines against Human Papilloma Virus, while each of the remaining 5 studies, evaluated vaccines against rabies, HIV, tetanus toxoid, tuberculosis and adolescent vaccines in general. Among the key players, we found low to moderate levels of knowledge about adolescent vaccination. Positive attitudes and practices towards adolescent vaccination, especially against Human Papilloma Virus were reported. Despite the low knowledge, our results showed high levels of acceptability to adolescent vaccination among adolescents, parents and teachers.. CONCLUSIONS ...
The study also showed that the vast majority of fathers living with adolescents (68.1 percent) used alcohol, but did not have a drinking disorder. About one third, (33.2 percent) of these fathers adolescent children engaged in underage drinking in the past year. Nearly 1 in 4 fathers living with adolescents (24.2 percent) abstained from drinking alcohol in the past year. On the other hand, 1 in 12 fathers living with adolescents (7.9 percent) met the clinical definition of having an alcohol use disorder.. The study also indicates that paternal alcohol use affects the likelihood of adolescent use of illicit drugs. Adolescents living with fathers who abstained from alcohol were far less likely to use illicit drugs in the past year than their counterparts living with fathers who had alcohol use disorders (14.0 percent versus 24.2 percent). The rate among adolescents living with fathers who drank, but did not have drinking disorders was 18.4 percent.. Fathers Alcohol Use and Substance Use among ...
The present study aimed to examine the factors associated with increased Mediterranean diet (MD) adherence among a sample of Italian adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 1135 students (13-16 years) attending 13 secondary schools of Sicily, southern Italy. Validated instruments were used for dietary assessment and the KIDMED score to assess adolescents adherence to the MD. A higher adherence to the MD was associated with high socioeconomic status (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.53, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.03-2.26) and high physical activity (OR 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.70), whereas lower adherence was associated with living in an urban environment (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44-0.97) and being obese (OR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37-0.94). The adolescents KIDMED scores were inversely associated with adolescents intake of sweets, fast foods, fried foods, and sugary drinks, and directly with fruit, vegetables, pasta, fish, and cheese intakes. Urban-living adolescents were less likely to eat fruit and more prone
addresses the social, health, educational and economic challenges of adolescent pregnancy by providing comprehensive case management services to expectant and parenting teens and their children. The program emphasizes building upon an adolescents strengths and resources. Case managers work closely with youth to improve the health and well-being of themselves and their children. The California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Division has developed an affirming and prevention-based approach to the program called Positive Youth Development (PYD). This approach to working with adolescents aims to develop their resilience by strengthening their developmental assets. Through PYD, young people become empowered to pursue life goals. Youth are provided with ongoing support and opportunities to develop the resilience and skills that will help them thrive during and after they exit the program. ...
This guideline is for DHB funded infant, child and adolescent mental health, and youth-focused alcohol and drug services. It assists them to develop and implement planning processes for young people who are transitioning from their services.
A Full Time job in Cincinnati, OH by Talbert House in the Social Services field: Adolescent Mental Health Therapist - licensed - 02096- 210
This was the first study to report third-variable impacts of a body-perception variable on the relationship between adolescent weight status and HRQoL. Adolescents weight perceptions significantly moderated the relationship between overweight/obesity and reduced HRQoL. Adolescents who were outside the normal weight range and misperceived their objectively measured weight status enjoyed a higher HRQoL than adolescents whose weight perception was concordant with their actual weight status. These findings suggest that practitioners may need to exercise caution when educating adolescents about their weight status, as such reality checks may negatively impact on adolescent HRQoL. It is suggested that more research be conducted to examine this potential effect.. ...
The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The files contained in this ...
Medical information on Adolescent Conduct Disorder, Adolescent Conduct Disorder Overview, Causes, & Risk Factors, Adolescent Conduct Disorder Symptoms & Signs, Adolescent Conduct Disorder Diagnosis & Tests, Adolescent Conduct Disorder Prevention & Expectations, Adolescent Conduct Disorder Treatment & Monitoring, Adolescent Conduct Disorder Attribution.
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The Foundations in Clinical Psychology MSc is aimed at students who have had little exposure to clinical psychology in their first degree and for intercalating MBBS students. It provides you with the knowledge, understanding and skills required for careers in the clinical psychology sectors.. The course provides you with a sound basis to apply for an assistant psychologist post. It will also provide the necessary academic and research skills for you to apply for further training, if you have the relevant work experience. This might include vocational training eg doctoral training in Clinical Psychology, training as a Forensic Psychologist or Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programmes.. You also benefit from this course if you are a Psychology graduate who is keen to pursue a research career in the clinical aspects of psychology, including clinically-oriented PhDs.. As a student on this course you will gain knowledge and understanding of:. ...
Clinical psychologists study a generalist program in psychology plus postgraduate training and/or clinical placement and supervision. The length of training differs across the world, ranging from four years plus post-Bachelors supervised practice[23] to a doctorate of three to six years which combines clinical placement.[24] In the USA, about half of all clinical psychology graduate students are being trained in Ph.D. programs-a model that emphasizes research-with the other half in Psy.D. programs, which has more focus on practice (similar to professional degrees for medicine and law).[20] Both models are accredited by the American Psychological Association[25] and many other English-speaking psychological societies. A smaller number of schools offer accredited programs in clinical psychology resulting in a Masters degree, which usually take two to three years post-Bachelors.. In the U.K., clinical psychologists undertake a Doctor of Clinical Psychology (D.Clin.Psych.), which is a practitioner ...
The degree of Doctor of Clinical Psychology (DClinPsy/DClinPsych/ClinPsyD) is a professional doctorate in clinical psychology, awarded mainly in the United Kingdom. The degree has both clinical and research components, and qualifies the holder to practice as a clinical psychologist in Britains National Health Service and other clinical settings. While it bears some similarities to the Doctor of Psychology degree in the United States, the research component means that US credentialing services consider it equivalent to a Doctor of Philosophy. In Denmark the corresponding degree is called "specialpsykolog" (Special Psychologist) or "specialist i **" (Specialist Psychologist in **); in the Netherlands the corresponding degree is "gezondheidszorgpsycholoog" (Healthcare Psychologist).[1] In Spain, the postgraduate training in Clinical Psychology is carried out as 4 years intern residence within the National Health System and the title obtained is "Especialista en Psicología Clínica [Specialist in ...
The program in Clinical Psychology curriculum follows the scientist-practitioner model and APA guidelines on accreditation of doctoral clinical psychology programs. It also considers state licensing guidelines and various publications that have been written on the topic of doctoral education, training, and credentialing in clinical psychology, as well as the specialty areas of Clinical Neuropsychology, Clinical Health Psychology, Cognitive and Behavioral Psychology, Clinical Child Psychology and/or Forensic Psychology.. The following section outlines the courses required for graduation for entering Bachelors-level students. The PhD program curriculum requires the student to earn a minimum of 90.0 credits. Typically, students enroll in 27.0 credits during the first year, 22.0 credits during the second and third years, 12.0 credits in the fourth year, and 8.0 credits during the fifth/final internship year. Drexel University operates on a calendar of four eleven-week terms. Students in the program ...
The School of Psychology at the University of Surrey is one of the most active and highly regarded psychology departments in the UK. We specialise in applied and policy-oriented teaching and research with a strong theoretical context. Were at the cutting edge of psychology research, and have been the focus for many cross-national studies. Weve received funding from many research councils, as well as local and national government. We offer excellent graduate employment prospects, and are one of the biggest psychology postgraduate training schools in the country. Our PsychD Clinical Psychology offers a combination of opportunities thats hard to match elsewhere. Youll get training that combines theory and methods, as well as experience of contemporary clinical psychology practice. This course puts special emphasis on psychological practice, and will prepare you for a career as a professional psychologist. Completing our PsychD Clinical Psychology will make you eligible to register with the Health Care
Get information, facts, and pictures about Clinical psychology at Encyclopedia.com. Make research projects and school reports about Clinical psychology easy with credible articles from our FREE, online encyclopedia and dictionary.
View a list of faculty labs in the Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology Division at Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center.
The CPIP uniquely integrates complementary training experiences at the Psychiatry Departments Vermont Center for Children, Youth, and Families (VCCYF) and the Psychology Departments Behavior Therapy and Psychotherapy Center (BTPC). At the VCCYF, interns receive advanced training in the application of evidence-based interventions from the family perspective, directly addressing both child and parent emotional and behavioral strengths and difficulties. In the framework of the Vermont Family Based Approach, interns apply health promotion, prevention, and intervention to help the well families remain well, prevent at-risk children from developing emotional and behavioral problems, and intervene comprehensively with children and families challenged by psychopathology. At the VCCYF, interns collaborate with professionals in psychiatry, psychology, social work, nursing, and genetics. At the BTPC, interns receive advanced training in culturally competent, evidence-based treatment of torture survivors ...
The past 30 years have seen the field of clinical neuropsychology grow to become an influential discipline within mainstream clinical psychology and an established component of most professional courses. It remains one of the fastest growing specialities within mainstream clinical psychology, neurology, and the psychiatric disciplines.
Peter Kyriakoulis is the director of the Positive Psychology Clinic and the Positive Psychology Wellness Centre. He is a clinical psychologist who specialises in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. He completed his undergraduate studies with honours at the University of Athens in 2000, and in 2003 he completed a Masters in Clinical Psychology in Melbourne. Since 2003 he has been working in private practice as a psychologist, and over the ensuing years has worked in community health and various psychiatric settings, becoming a member of the Clinical College of the Australian Psychological Society in 2007. Peter has a wide interest in applying positive psychology and neuropsychotherapy principles in clinical practice whilst maintaining a cognitive behavioural framework. He also specialises in psychological assessment using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-2). He is currently completing his PhD on Panic Disorder. ...
Dr. Phillips is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, and she has extensive training in the most cutting edge scientific and evidence based treatments in psychology. She is an expert at treating several childhood disorders such as Selective Mutism, Separation Anxiety, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Encopresis/Enuresis, and Tourettes Syndrome. She also specializes in the treatment of anxiety, depression, panic, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and anger. Dr. Phillips practices Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), an orientation that has been proven to provide patients with fast results.. Dr. Phillips received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Hawaii. She completed her clinical internship at USC Childrens Hospital and has practiced psychology for 12 years. In addition to her clinical practice, Dr. Phillips trains other therapists in the delivery of CBT. Dr. Phillips is a Diplomate of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, an organization which sets the standard of excellence ...
Martin Binks Ph.D. is Associate Professor, Nutritional Sciences, at Texas Tech University and leads the Behavioral Medicine & Translational Research Lab. He is a clinical psychologist specializing in behavioral medicine and obesity research. Dr. Binks received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Fairleigh Dickenson University, trained at the Bronx VA Medical Center and completed pre and postdoctoral training in Behavioral Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina. He is formerly an Assistant Professor at Duke University Medical Center, Division of Medical Psychology. He was Director of Behavioral Health, Research, and New Business and Strategic Alliances at the Duke Diet & Fitness Center.. Martin has authored many research publications and the book The Duke Diet. He is an outspoken public advocate for obesity research funding, treatment for people with obesity, and scientific integrity. His research interests include: lifestyle modification, pharmacologic and surgical obesity ...
Conversion Disorder: The conversion of psychological distress into physical symptoms, such as blindness or paralysis. The process of conversion is unconscious, i.e., patients are not "faking it" and are not willfully producing their symptoms. Often, however, they seem strangely unconcerned about their physical symptoms ("la belle indifference"). Conversion symptoms were frequently found among Sigmund Freuds patients, and were observed in abundance in military personnel during the world wars (e.g., a front-line soldier is "struck blind" or becomes unable to walk, and thus has to be evacuated to a safer position). According to Freud, the conversion symptom is a "compromise formation" that provides a (less than ideal) solution to an unconscious conflict (e.g., the desire to flee from danger versus the desire to do ones duty). Conversion symptoms seem to have become more rare, but it is possible that they have simply become more subtle, and thus more difficult to detect. A large number of seizure ...
Local resource for applied behavior analysis therapists in Glendale. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to applied behavior analysis therapy, applied behavior analysis clinics, applied behavior analysis specialists, autism therapy, autism treatments, autism clinics, and applied behavior analysis support, as well as advice and content on autism support groups and autism societies.
Local resource for applied behavior analysis therapists in Valdosta. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to applied behavior analysis therapy, applied behavior analysis clinics, applied behavior analysis specialists, autism therapy, autism treatments, autism clinics, and applied behavior analysis support, as well as advice and content on autism support groups and autism societies.
Dr. Yurkovsky is a licensed clinical psychologist and hypnotherapist with over 10 years of experience as a school psychologist and five years of experience as the Director of Student Support in prestigious private schools in New York, New Jersey, and south Florida. Dr. Yurkovsky specializes in working with children, adolescents and adults with ADHD, learning disabilities and often co-existing emotional issues such as depression, anxiety, lack of motivation and underachievement. She has successfully treated myriad emotional and behavioral disorders, such as anxiety disorders, eating disorders, sleep disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorders. She has also worked with many families as they have gone through the divorce process.. Dr. Yurkovsky is a certified clinical hypnotherapist. She has seen incredible success with the students, athletes, and executives with whom she has worked. She has used hypnosis and neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) to reduce test-taking and performance anxiety, which ...
Joseph G. Sheehan (Ph.D., Michigan, 1950) is Assistant Professor of Psychology, and Clinical Psychologist in the Student Health Service, University of California at Los Angeles ...
William (Bill) Anton is the creator of CEOeffectiveness.com and Chief Executive Officer of CEO Effectiveness LLC, and Anton Holdings LLC. He advises CEOs, directors, and senior business leaders on people, leadership, cultural issues and strategy. Bill is a clinical psychologist, psychoanalyst, and a former major university counseling center director and senior administrator at a large public university. He is the author of Business Success Through Self-Knowledge (2013) and Ascend: Forging a Path to Your Truer Self (fall of 2015) and several other major publications in professional psychology. He is also senior author of The College Adjustment Scales and The Employee Assistance Program Inventory. Both of these instruments have been translated into several languages and are widely used in schools, university counseling centers and employee assistance programs throughout the world. Bill currently serves as the treasurer of the Sant Yago (St. James) Educational Foundation which has given over ...
The University of Arizona (UA) Behavioral Sleep Medicine Clinic is dedicated to the identification, treatment and prevention of sleep disorders and their consequences by studying psychological, behavioral, and physiological patterns that impede restful and restorative sleep. We can address sleep disorders, sleep problems that exist as a result of other causes, and the daytime consequences of sleep difficulties. In most cases, we do this without the use of extra medications. Our expert staff includes clinical psychologists, physicians, and other healthcare professionals specially trained to work with sleep difficulties.. What is different about Behavioral Sleep Medicine?. Behavioral Sleep Medicine is a field that focuses on "behavioral" treatments for sleep disorders. This is different from more traditional medical treatment that usually focuses on medications. For example, in the case of insomnia Behavioral Sleep Medicine treatments are the recommended approach by most major medical ...
14 Social Services Institute For Applied Behavior Analysis jobs hiring near you. Browse Social Services Institute For Applied Behavior Analysis jobs and apply online. Search Social Services Institute For Applied Behavior Analysis to find your next Social Services Institute For Applied Behavior Analysis job near you.
Health Psychology Third Edition Chapter 13 Managing Pain. 1. A condition in which a chronic pain sufferer becomes more sensitive to pain over time. (399). Congenital insensitivity to pain Nociception Gate control theory Hyperalgesia Guided imagery. Slideshow 2095078 by kapila
As of January 2018, the Applied Behavior Analysis program is not accepting applicants.**. The Department of Psychology at Central Washington University is excited to offer a Masters degree in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). The Behavior Analyst Certification Board, Inc.® (BACB) has approved our course sequence as meeting the coursework requirements for eligibility to take the Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) Examination®. Applicants have to meet additional requirements to fully qualify for certification. These requirements are outlined on the BACB website.. In addition to the formal coursework, the CWU ABA program arranges one academic year of supervised internship. Most students are hired by local agencies during their internship and remain with these agencies following graduation in order to complete the remaining fieldwork hours required for certification. Most students finish their fieldwork hours within 6-9 months of graduation and receive promotions as BCBAs within their ...
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The 24-credit Advanced Certificate program in Applied Behavior Analysis provides students with the knowledge base and skills stipulated by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB©) as constituting basic competence for behavior analysts. These competences include the following: Knowledge of professional issues and ethics; basic characteristics of the science of behavior analysis; principles, processes and concepts; behavioral assessment; measurement of behavior; experimental evaluation of interventions; interpretation of data; selection of intervention outcomes and strategies; behavior change procedures; and, systemic work with agencies and institutions. The purpose of the program is to educate and train behavior analysts who will serve children and adults who present with autism, autism spectrum disorders, and other related issues particularly in complex, urban settings. We are currently accepting two types of students:. Certified school-based professionals (i.e., classroom teachers, ...
Year 1: psychological research methods 1; introducing psychological approaches; introducing real world psychology; psychological research methods 2; exploring psychological approaches; exploring real world psychology. Year 2: psychological research methods 3; the psychology of learning and memory; the psychology of feelings; psychological research methods 4; the psychology of behaviour with others; the psychology of thinking and communication. Year 3: empirical project. Plus four options from: psychology of mental health; health psychology; investigative psychology; development of brain and behaviour in infancy; psychopharmacology; psychology of addictive behaviours; psychology of group processes; extended essay; thinking: past, present and future; developmental disorders; art, awareness and the brain; applied psychometrics; forensic psychology; neuropsychology; counselling psychology.. ...
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CU Denver offers a fully online, fully accredited Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate, which are comprised of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA®) and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBA®).
Review Applied Behavior Analysis Degrees & Graduate Programs in Nova Scotia on GradSchools.com the top site for accredited colleges.
Victoria Clarke is a senior lecturer in social psychology at the University of the West of England, Bristol, UK. She has published a number of papers on lesbian and gay parenting, same-sex relationships, the history of LGBTQ psychologies, and qualitative methods in journals such as Sexualities, British Journal of Social Psychology, Qualitative Research in Psychology and Lesbian & Gay Psychology Review. She has edited (with Sara-Jane Finlay and Sue Wilkinson) two special issues of Feminism & Psychology on marriage, and edited (with Elizabeth Peel) special issues of Feminism & Psychology, Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy, Lesbian & Gay Psychology Review and Psychology of Women Section Review on LGBTQ psychologies. She is also the editor with Elizabeth Peel and Jack Drescher of British LGB Psychologies: Theory, research and practice (Haworth Press, 2007). She is a member of the British Psychological Societys Lesbian & Gay Psychology Section and Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section. She ...
Though psychology as a discipline has grown enormously in popularity in recent years, compulsory courses in research methods and statistics are seldom embarked upon with any great enthusiasm within the undergraduate and postgraduate communities. Many postgraduate and PhD students start their research ill-equipped to design effective experiments and to properly analyse their results.
Behavior analysts provide services to individuals, families, group homes, schools, mental health agencies, hospitals, industrial and business settings, and other agencies working with individuals who require intensive behavioral training and/or consultation. Special populations such as individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other developmental disabilities have been shown to benefit greatly from Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) services. Applied Behavior Analysis is also frequently used in the field of education for both neuro-typical students and students with disabilities. Behavior analyst professionals are strongly encouraged by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) to pursue Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) or Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA) certification. BCBA and BCaBA certifications are considered the industry standard in this field and are nationally and internationally recognized. The Applied Behavior Analysis Certificate of Advanced Study ...
Translational Applied Behavior Analysis Lab The TABA Lab is dedicated to accurately understanding and treating severe problem behaviors in children and adolescents with Fragile X syndrome, such as aggression, self-injury, and deficits in social skills deficits. Our research is led by Dr. Scott Hall, a board certified behavior analyst and neuroimaging investigator, and is supported by a highly experienced and integrated study team of board certified behavior analysts and neuroimaging research coordinators. We use state-of-the-art brain imaging and behavioral assessments based on the principles of applied behavior analysis to determine how environmental and biological factors affect the development of severe problem behaviors in Fragile X syndrome, toward the goal of developing targeted treatments.
Hey, would any of you mind taking part in my sisters research on artificial sweeteners for her dissertation? Its just a tickbox survey that will literally take 10/15 minutes and you can do it on your phone. Shes doing a health psychology masters and researching public opinion on artificial sweeteners in relation to the obesity crisis.She needs at least 400 people to do it so 10 minutes of your time would be much appreciated! Thank ...
This two-day workshop will illustrate through extensive use of video how applying the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis to teaching Verbal Behavior (VB) can be effective in classroom settings for students with autism and other developmental disabilities.
West Virginia University. Email Dr. Claire St. Peter. Dr. Claire St. Peter received her Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 2006, under the mentorship of Dr. Timothy R. Vollmer. She is currently an Associate Professor of Psychology, and the Coordinator of the Behavior Analysis program area at West Virginia University. Claires primary research interests are on the assessment and intervention of challenging behavior. She is particularly interested in the development of effective interventions for challenging behavior displayed in school contexts (including effects of degraded integrity on intervention efficacy) and with the dissemination of behavioral approaches to caregivers. She serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Behavior Analyst, The Psychological Record, and the Mexican Journal of Behavior Analysis. In addition, she has served as a guest associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Behavior Analyst, and the Journal of ...
Hertfordshire has a transition team that sits within the councils health and community services (formerly adult care services) department and starts to work with young people with autism from the age of 16 years. One of the practice issues currently for Hertfordshire is the criteria we have in place for service users diagnosed as having an autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). At present if someone is diagnosed with an ASD and a learning disability and they meet Fair Access to Care Services (FACS) criteria (substantial or critical) then they are eligible for a service from the transition team from 16. However if they have autism without a learning disability or Asperger syndrome then this does not happen.. If an individual with Asperger syndrome meets eligibility criteria then adult mental health services, within Hertfordshire Partnership Trust, becomes responsible for their social care from the age of 18, along with any psychiatric or psychology services. However they do not currently work with ...
Aidan Moran BA, MA, PhD, FPsSI, AFBPsS, Reg Psychol., C. Psychol., is Full Professor of Cognitive Psychology and Director of the Psychology Research Laboratory in UCD. He received a BA degree (1st Class Hons, 1st place; 1977) and MA degree (1st Class Hons, 1st place; 1978) in Psychology from UCD and a PhD degree in Psychology from National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG, 1984). His doctoral research in cognitive psychology explored the relationship between cognitive style and problem solving. Between 1978 and 1979, he worked as a Research Psychologist for AnCO/FAS in Dublin. Between 1979 and 1985, he was employed as a lecturer in Psychology in NUIG. In 1985, he joined the Department of Psychology in UCD as a lecturer and Director of the Psychology Research Laboratory. He was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 1996, to Associate Professor in 1999 and to Full Professor in 2006. Prof Moran has served as Head of Department on two occasions (1998-1999; 2001-2002). He has published extensively in ...
This presentation will cover pediatric incident rates, how the developing brain responds differently from a mature brain with respect to emerging challenges, assessment procedures and treatment. We will highlight the use of applied behavior analysis and functional assessment as an efficient strategy for developing treatments likely to be effective. Evidence based decision making using single subject designs will also be used to illustrated treatment effectiveness.. Michael Mozzoni is the Director of Behavioral Services for Lakeview NeuroRehabilitation Center in Effingham NH. He is a board certified behavior analyst and certified brain injury specialist clinical trainer who has worked with people with brain injuries since 1985. He holds a Ph.D. in applied behavior analysis from Florida State University and a M.A. in experimental psychology from Harvard University. He served as treasurer for both the ACRM (American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine) Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group and ...
Experimental psychology emerged as a modern academic discipline in the 19th century when Wilhelm Wundt introduced a mathematical and experimental approach to the field.Introduction to Experimental Psychology Consciousness (Chapter 3 in Myers) Consciousness as a process: The study of consciousness has a frustratingly long history in.Introduction to Educational Psychology What is Educational Psychology.Experimental psychology is an approach to psychology that treats it as one of the natural sciences, and therefore assumes that it is susceptible to the experimental.. The birth of experimental psychology as a discipline in its own right is often dated from the appearance of Wilhelm Wundts great handbook, the Grundzüge der...Introduction to the basic topics of psychology, including learning, motivation, cognition, development, abnormal, physiological, social, and personality ...
Looking for online definition of countertransference in the Medical Dictionary? countertransference explanation free. What is countertransference? Meaning of countertransference medical term. What does countertransference mean?
WCSU offers a graduate certificate approved by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board®, Inc. (BACB®), to prepare students for the national certification examinations sponsored by the BACB. All four courses are offered online and can be completed in one year to earn the certificate.. Two Online Behavior Analysis Certificates. Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst (BCaBA) Certificate. This 16-credit, four-course sequence is designed for people who have completed an accredited bachelors degree. Completion of the four course sequence and completion of 1000 hours of Supervised Independent Fieldwork in behavior analysis makes the student eligible to take the BCaBA certification examination sponsored by the BACB®. Visit http://bacb.com for more information.. Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) Certificate. This 19-credit, five-course sequence is designed for people who have completed an accredited graduate degree. Completion of the five course sequence and completion of 1500 hours of ...
Behavioral Medicine Institute, p.c. - We are a Group of Psychologists, Social Workers, Psychiatrists, Nurse Practitioners, and...  Behavioral Medicine Institute, p.c. - We are a Group of Psychologists, Social Workers, Psychiatrists, Nurse Practitioners, and...
She earned her Master of Arts degree in clinical child and adolescent psychology from East Carolina University in 2005 and ... Bariatric Psychology Services. The bariatric psychology services provided at BMI are designed to assist patients throughout the ... Posted in CLINICIANS , Tagged Child/Adolescent Medicine Management, Pediatric, Psychiatrist Elizabeth Penegar. Posted on ... Posted in CLINICIANS , Tagged Anxiety, Chronic Illness, Chronic Pain, Depression, Insomnia, Panic, Phobias, Psychology, Sleep ...
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DClinPsy Clinical Psychology - University of Plymouth  DClinPsy Clinical Psychology - University of Plymouth
Professional Doctorate in Clinical Psychology - become a competent and capable clinical psychologist from this joint ... adolescents and learning disabled people. ... School of Psychology. DClinPsy Clinical Psychology. Become a ... DClinPsy Clinical Psychology 4083 The modules shown for this course or programme are those being studied by current students, ... 2 degree in Psychology who have also completed a further postgraduate academic research qualification in psychology may also be ...
more infohttps://www.plymouth.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/dclinpsy-clinical-psychology
Wyoming Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology - City Directory  Wyoming Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology - City Directory
Adolescent Psychologists, including ratings, contact information, and more. ... Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology in Wyoming. Find comprehensive information, ratings and contact information. ...
more infohttps://www.healthgrades.com/clinical-child-and-adolescent-psychology-directory/wy-wyoming
Maryland Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology - City Directory  Maryland Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology - City Directory
Adolescent Psychologists, including ratings, contact information, and more. ... Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology. in Maryland. Find comprehensive information, ratings and contact information. ...
more infohttps://www.healthgrades.com/clinical-child-and-adolescent-psychology-directory/md-maryland
Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology - Wikipedia  Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology - Wikipedia
The Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology is a bimonthly peer-reviewed journal covering child and adolescent ... the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The editor-in-chief is Andres De Los Reyes (University of Maryland at ... "Psychology, Clinical". "Journals Ranked by Impact: Psychology, Developmental". 2015 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science ( ... It was established in 1971 as the Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, obtaining its current name in 2001. It is published by ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journal_of_Clinical_Child_&_Adolescent_Psychology
Download Developmental Psychopathology Psychology Adolescent, psych...  Download Developmental Psychopathology Psychology Adolescent, psych...
An Evidence-based Workbook for Assessing and Treating Children and Adolescents - Cara Daily from ebook-reader ... Developmental Psychopathology Psychology Adolescent: 20 assigned downloads, like The Key to Autism: ... Similar tags: addiction • adolescent • autism • child • children with special needs • clinical psychology • developmental • ... Brief Interventions For Adolescent Alcohol And Substance Abuse. Bringing together leading experts, this book demonstrates the ...
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Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology - Wikipedia  Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology - Wikipedia
Adolescent Psychology American Psychological Association Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology Divisions of the ... The Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (SCCAP) is an academic and professional society in the United States ... "A Brief History of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology (SCCAP) from Section 1, APA Division 12, status ... These contributions include strong, long term impact of publication on the area of clinical child and adolescent psychology, ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_of_Clinical_Child_and_Adolescent_Psychology
Depressive Disorders (Children and Adolescents) | Psychology Today  Depressive Disorders (Children and Adolescents) | Psychology Today
... and disorders ranging from major depression to bipolar disorder are increasingly diagnosed in children and adolescents. ... Fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and their combination for adolescents with depression: Treatment for Adolescents with ... Depressive Disorders (Children and Adolescents). Children can get depressed, and disorders ranging from major depression to ... Adolescent onset of the gender difference in lifetime rates of major depression. Archives of General Psychiatry, 2000; 57: 21- ...
more infohttps://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/depressive-disorders-children-and-adolescents?tab=Symptoms
Download Child Psychotherapy Psychology Adolescent Medical, child, ...  Download Child Psychotherapy Psychology Adolescent Medical, child, ...
Child Psychotherapy Psychology Adolescent Medical: 20 assigned downloads, like Bright Kids Who Cant Keep Up: Help Your Child ... Child And Adolescent Clinical Psychopharmacology Made Simple - , John D. Preston. This second edition of Child and Adolescent ... Similar tags: adolescent • child • developmental • education • family • general • medical • mental health • pediatrics • ... Group Work With Adolescents, Third Edition: Principles And Practice - Andrew Malekoff. A trusted course text and professional ...
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Parental Resentment Toward A Self-Centered Adolescent | Psychology Today  Parental Resentment Toward A Self-Centered Adolescent | Psychology Today
For the sake of your present relationship with the adolescent and for the sake of the adolescents important relationships ... Adolescent Substance Use and the Problem of Denial. Neither teenager nor parents want to admit substance use should be a ... For example, it can be harder to give love in the face of more adolescent resistance and opposition. It can be harder to elicit ... Except, what they are charging the adolescent with is not the problem, only a reflection of it. The problem is that parents ...
more infohttps://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/surviving-your-childs-adolescence/201212/parental-resentment-toward-self-centered-adolescent
Caversham Booksellers: Von Tetzchner, Stephen; Child and Adolescent Psychology: Typical and Atypical Development (1138823392)...  Caversham Booksellers: Von Tetzchner, Stephen; Child and Adolescent Psychology: Typical and Atypical Development (1138823392)...
... psychology; in-store, at conferences and via mail order. 15,000 titles actively stocked ... The developmental pathways that children and adolescents follow can be typical or atypical, and our understanding of each is ... It provides a more nuanced and comprehensive understanding of developmental psychology than any other textbook available ... textbook provides an engaging and comprehensive overview of the major themes and perspectives within developmental psychology, ...
more infohttp://www.cavershambooksellers.com/search/1138823392
Free Books | Health, Mind & Body | Psychology & Counseling | Adolescent Psychology | Treatment Of Drug-dependent Individuals...  Free Books | Health, Mind & Body | Psychology & Counseling | Adolescent Psychology | Treatment Of Drug-dependent Individuals...
Adolescent Psychology , Treatment Of Drug-dependent Individuals With Comorbid Mental Disorders ... Free eBooks , Health, Mind & Body , Psychology & Counseling , Adolescent Psychology , Treatment Of Drug-dependent Individuals ...
more infohttp://2020ok.com/books/0/treatment-of-drug-dependent-individuals-with-comorbid-mental-disorders-19900.htm
ERIC - Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Eating Problems and Eating Disorders, Journal of Clinical Child and...  ERIC - Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Eating Problems and Eating Disorders, Journal of Clinical Child and...
Modes of therapy examined in adolescent samples include family therapy, cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, and cognitive ... a synthesis of existing data concerning the efficacy of various psychosocial interventions for eating disorders in adolescent ... Eating disorders represent a significant source of psychological impairment among adolescents. However, most controlled ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. , v37 n1 p39-61 Jan 2008 ...
more infohttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ791179
Frontiers | Psychometric Properties of the Positivity Scale among Chinese Adults and Early Adolescents | Psychology  Frontiers | Psychometric Properties of the Positivity Scale among Chinese Adults and Early Adolescents | Psychology
... among Chinese adults and early adolescents, using a sample of 552 adults (Study 1) and a sample of 888 early adolescents (i.e ... The two studies both provided evidence for its reliability and validity among Chinese adults and early adolescents. For the ... The two studies both provided evidence for its reliability and validity among Chinese adults and early adolescents. For the ... and a sample of 888 early adolescents (i.e., middle school students) (Study 2). First, item analyses and factor analyses were ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00197/full
Adolescent psychology (Topic) - Waubonsee Community College  Adolescent psychology (Topic) - Waubonsee Community College
Adolescent psychology Resource Information The topic Adolescent psychology represents a specific aggregation or gathering of ... Adolescents and risk : making sense of adolescent psychology, Patrick B. Johnson and Micheline S. Malow-Iroff ... Adolescent psychology,/a,,/span, - ,span property=potentialAction typeOf=OrganizeAction,,span property=agent typeof= ... Adolescent psychology,/a,,/span, - ,span property=potentialAction typeOf=OrganizeAction,,span property=agent typeof= ...
more infohttp://link.library.waubonsee.edu/resource/LMNFlhLriJY/
Adolescent Psychology - The Most Difficult Transition Phase  Adolescent Psychology - The Most Difficult Transition Phase
Adolescent psychology studies the difficulties that teens face. From peer pressure to feeling accepted as well as learning, ... Adolescent Psychology. Child and adolescent psychology involves looking at the issues, stages and various influences that a ... Child and adolescent psychology can be divided into two main areas - the actual process of psychological development that the ... Adolescent. Sports. Social. Schools. Educational. Clinical. Counseling. Abnormal. Cognitive. Industrial. Health. Analytical. ...
more infohttp://psychologycampus.com/adolescent-psychology/
Foundations of Play Therapy, 2nd Edition | Child & Adolescent Clinical Psychology | Clinical Psychology | Psychology | Subjects...  Foundations of Play Therapy, 2nd Edition | Child & Adolescent Clinical Psychology | Clinical Psychology | Psychology | Subjects...
Charles E. Schaefer, PhD, RPT-S, is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey. He is ... play therapy practice with children and adolescents. ...
more infohttps://www.wiley.com/en-us/Foundations+of+Play+Therapy%2C+2nd+Edition-p-9781118013267
Which Arizona Schools Offer Adolescent Psychology Degree Programs?  Which Arizona Schools Offer Adolescent Psychology Degree Programs?
Adolescent psychology degree programs might help candidates to know about what transpires within the kids as they turn into ... Adolescent psychologists work with various developmental issues of child psychology.. The ideal educational criterion for a ... Become a Psychologist Psychology Careers Counseling Careers Social Work Careers Therapist Careers Psychiatry Careers Careers By ... It is important to be familiar with all the aspects of psychology in the growing children such as genetic makeup, learning, ...
more infohttps://www.psychologyschoolguide.net/adolescent-psychology/arizona/
Which Schools Offer Adolescent Psychology Programs in Missouri?  Which Schools Offer Adolescent Psychology Programs in Missouri?
Being a new but thriving field, adolescent psychology strongly focuses on children who are not fit. Practitioners observe, ... Through appropriate education from one of the adolescent psychology schools in Missouri, you could become a highly qualified ... It is recommended to start the academic life with a bachelors degree in psychology and then to advance one could decide to ... Become a Psychologist Psychology Careers Counseling Careers Social Work Careers Therapist Careers Psychiatry Careers Careers By ...
more infohttps://www.psychologyschoolguide.net/adolescent-psychology/missouri/
  • Bringing together leading experts, this book demonstrates the unique value of brief motivational interventions for addressing adolescent alcohol and other. (tradebit.com)
  • This review provides a synthesis of existing data concerning the efficacy of various psychosocial interventions for eating disorders in adolescent samples. (ed.gov)
  • Modes of therapy examined in adolescent samples include family therapy, cognitive therapy, behavioral therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy mostly in patients with anorexia nervosa. (ed.gov)
  • Addresses basic concepts and methods of statistical data analysis as applied in psychology and other social/behavioral sciences, including organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. (albertus.edu)
  • Participants were 304 African-American adolescent females enrolled in a sexually transmitted disease prevention trial. (frontiersin.org)
  • Expanded to include EMDR therapy with infants to adolescents, this updated and revised manual--the only resource of its kind--accompanies the. (tradebit.com)
  • In the case of Ben, his parents need to embrace a systematic psychology therapy to make him avoid being involved in drug abuse by acting as role models to him. (philosophyessays.net)
  • Most often, it's depression, but one of the interesting findings in this paper was that we also saw that disorders like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , conduct disorder , eating disorders, and intermittent explosive disorder-all significantly predicted which adolescents with suicidal thoughts go on to make a suicide attempt. (medicalxpress.com)
  • As part of that survey, adolescents and their parents were interviewed about their history of suicidal thoughts, plans, and attempts, as well as a wide range of potential risk and protective factors, and their receipt of treatment. (medicalxpress.com)
  • We also looked at the treatment of suicidal adolescents and the surprise was that the vast majority-more than 80 percent-of adolescents with suicidal thoughts, plans, and attempts have received treatment. (medicalxpress.com)
  • More than half-55 percent-of adolescents who think about suicide, and two-thirds of those who make an attempt actually received treatment before their suicidal thoughts or attempt. (medicalxpress.com)
  • This second edition of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology Made Simple offers all the information parents and medical professionals need about. (tradebit.com)
  • When parents express ongoing resentment toward their adolescent, I take it seriously because of what it often connotes - a lack of adequate returns from the teenager in their relationship at a time when he or she has become increasingly preoccupied with developing a more individual, grown up, and independent sense of Self. (psychologytoday.com)
  • It can be harder to find enjoyable ways to be together now that parents have fewer interests to enjoy in common with the adolescent than was true with the child. (psychologytoday.com)
  • It's not that parents should expect equity of investment from their adolescent. (psychologytoday.com)
  • After all, simply as a function of their caretaking responsibility parents invest much more of themselves in their adolescent than the young person ever invests in them. (psychologytoday.com)
  • What parents need to do when their resentment is infecting their relationship with the adolescent is to stop action, and before giving or giving into whatever the adolescent wants next, start insisting on adequate mutuality, specifying three kinds of needs that both they and the teenager share. (psychologytoday.com)
  • In one such study, Robertson and Simons (1989, cited in McPherson, 2004) found that adolescents who felt rejected by their parents were more likely to be depressed than those who did not feel rejected. (whatispsychology.biz)
  • The Collaborative on Adolescent Development (COAD) supports young adolescents' learning and development. (niu.edu)
  • This has the effect of protecting young people against exploitation and society against inept workers, but it also makes adolescents outsiders in an adult world. (questia.com)
  • John E. Lochman is Professor and Doddridge Saxon Chair in Clinical Psychology at The University of Alabama, USA, and directs the Center for Prevention of Youth Behavior Problems there. (wiley.com)