Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Adolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Adolescent Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals 13-18 years.Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Schools: Educational institutions.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.United StatesPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Puberty: A period in the human life in which the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system takes place and reaches full maturity. The onset of synchronized endocrine events in puberty lead to the capacity for reproduction (FERTILITY), development of secondary SEX CHARACTERISTICS, and other changes seen in ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Adolescent, Institutionalized: An adolescent who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health: Longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood. (from http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth accessed 08/2012)Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.BrazilFather-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Coitus: The sexual union of a male and a female, a term used for human only.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Anorexia Nervosa: An eating disorder that is characterized by the lack or loss of APPETITE, known as ANOREXIA. Other features include excess fear of becoming OVERWEIGHT; BODY IMAGE disturbance; significant WEIGHT LOSS; refusal to maintain minimal normal weight; and AMENORRHEA. This disorder occurs most frequently in adolescent females. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Authoritarianism: The personality pattern or syndrome consisting of behavioral and attitudinal characteristics reflecting a preoccupation with the factors of power and authority in interpersonal relationships.Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Sexual Abstinence: Refraining from SEXUAL INTERCOURSE.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Homeless Youth: Runaway and homeless children and adolescents living on the streets of cities and having no fixed place of residence.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Contraception Behavior: Behavior patterns of those practicing CONTRACEPTION.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Social Control, Informal: Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.CaliforniaProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Tobacco Use Disorder: Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Pediatric Obesity: BODY MASS INDEX in children (ages 2-12) and in adolescents (ages 13-18) that is grossly above the recommended cut-off for a specific age and sex. For infants less than 2 years of age, obesity is determined based on standard weight-for-length percentile measures.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Informed Consent By Minors: Voluntary authorization by a person not of usual legal age for diagnostic or investigative procedures, or for medical and surgical treatment. (from English A, Shaw FE, McCauley MM, Fishbein DB Pediatrics 121:Suppl Jan 2008 pp S85-7).Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Child Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Personality Development: Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Psychosexual Development: The stages of development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to adulthood; i.e., oral, anal, genital, and latent periods.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Papillomavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Individuation: A process of differentiation having for its goal the development of the individual personality.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)
(1/5) Preliminary data on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in Brazilian male and female juvenile delinquents.

The aim of the present investigation was to study the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in a sample of delinquent adolescents of both genders and to compare the prevalence between genders. A total of 116 adolescents (99 males and 17 females) aged 12 to 19 on parole in the State of Rio de Janeiro were interviewed using the screening interview based on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children -- Present and Lifetime (KSADS-PL). Data were collected between May 2002 and January 2003. Of 373 male and 58 female adolescents present in May 2002 in the largest institution that gives assistance to adolescents on parole in the city of Rio de Janeiro, 119 subjects were assessed (three of them refused to participate). Their average age was 16.5 years with no difference between genders. The screening interview was positive for psychopathology for most of the sample, with the frequencies of the suggested more prevalent psychiatric disorders being 54% for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, 77% for conduct disorder, 41% for oppositional defiant disorder, 57% for anxiety disorder 57, 60% for depressive disorder 60, 63% for illicit drug abuse, and 58% for regular alcohol use. Internalizing disorders (depressive disorders, anxiety disorders and phobias) were more prevalent in the female subsample. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of illicit drug abuse between genders. There were more male than female adolescents on parole and failure to comply with the sentence was significantly more frequent in females. The high prevalence of psychopathology suggested by this study indicates the need for psychiatric treatment as part of the prevention of juvenile delinquency or as part of the sentence. However, treatment had never been available for 93% of the sample in this study.  (+info)

(2/5) Mental health problems in youths committed to juvenile institutions: prevalences and treatment needs.

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(3/5) Psychiatric symptoms of adolescents reared in an orphanage in Ankara.

This study compared male adolescents in an orphanage with adolescents raised by their families in terms of psychiatric symptoms, using the Brief Symptom Inventory. Anxiety, depression, negative self, hostility, and Global Severity Index points were significantly higher in adolescents in the orphanage, although they did not reach pathological levels except with respect to hostility. Adolescents reared in orphanages scored high points for hostility, reaching pathological levels.  (+info)

(4/5) Rehabilitation of the disabled adolescent: experience with a local authority assessment centre.

School leavers and young adults who are severely physically disabled pose particular problems for habilitation and rehabilitation. A local authority unit, the Fourways Assessment Centre, has been providing a comprehensive service to this group of people for the past 10 years. Rather than operating as an independent self contained unit it has been closely integrated with the local authority social services and educational services.  (+info)

(5/5) Melatonin treatment in an institutionalised child with psychomotor retardation and an irregular sleep-wake pattern.

An institutionalised 13 year old girl with psychomotor retardation suffered from an irregular sleep-wake pattern. Multiple measurements of urinary sulphatoxy-melatonin (aMT6) concentrations were abnormally low, without any significant day-night differences. Administration of exogenous melatonin (3 mg) at 18:00 resulted in increased nocturnal urinary aMT6 concentrations and improvements in her sleep-wake pattern. Melatonin may help disabled children suffering from sleep disorders.  (+info)

*  List of MeSH codes (M01)
... adolescent, hospitalized MeSH M01.643.154 --- adolescent, institutionalized MeSH M01.643.259 --- child, hospitalized MeSH ... File "2006 MeSH Trees".) MeSH M01.060.057 --- adolescent MeSH M01.060.116 --- adult MeSH M01.060.116.100 --- aged MeSH M01.060. ... M01.643.364 --- child, institutionalized MeSH M01.643.470 --- inpatients MeSH M01.643.630 --- outpatients MeSH M01.643.673 --- ...
*  Institutional syndrome
Notes on the Mental Health of Institutionalized Adolescents in Brazil", Transcultural Psychiatry, 41 (2): 281-293, doi:10.1177/ ... In other words, many of these patients had become "institutionalized" and were unable to adjust to independent living. One of ... That's institutionalized. "Red" The Shawshank Redemption In clinical and abnormal psychology, institutionalization or ... "X is institutionalized" may mean either that X has been placed in an institution, or that X is suffering the psychological ...
*  Alternatives to incarceration
... are ones that are started by the community as they want to reduce the percentage of adolescents being institutionalized. One of ... Male Adolescents, and Their Families and Communities". American Journal of Public Health. 95 (10): 1725-1736. doi:10.2105/AJPH. ...
*  Protestant youth ministry
... even younger adolescents began to see their organizations as institutionalized and irrelevant. Denominations stopped publishing ... "Mapping American Adolescent Religious Participation" Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. 41, (4). 597-612.. ...
*  Jerome G. Miller
... reformer capable of taking on entrenched state-level systems overly reliant on institutionalizing children and adolescents, ... Lyman School was the first reformatory for delinquent adolescent boys to be established in the United States. Anticipating the ...
*  Alberta Adolescent Recovery Centre
... clients with a sense of still being in a homely environment and can effectively relieve feelings of being institutionalized. ... The Alberta Adolescent Recovery Centre, or AARC, is a drug rehabilitation centre for adolescents located in Calgary, Alberta. ... in particular adolescents. Since AARC's inception in 1991, it has treated over 510 addicted adolescents and their families. ... The AARC program was modeled off of the doctoral work of Dean Vause PhD titled "The Alberta Adolescent Recovery Centre: A ...
*  Age segregation
Examples of institutionalized age segregation include age segregation in schools and age-segregated housing. There are studies ... Age grading in schools has significant impact on age segregation among adolescent peer groups. Age segregation in the U.S. was ... of informal age segregation among adolescents. Age segregation in schools, age grading, or graded education is the separation ...
*  Juan S. Alano Memorial Hospital
... to further institutionalize private-sector led programs aimed at disseminating vital information on Adolescent Reproductive ... It is currently working out a program on Adolescent Reproductive Health (ARH)initiatives with the Consuelo Foundation, ...
*  Youth
Thomas, A. (2003) "Psychology of Adolescents", Self-Concept, Weight Issues and Body Image in Children and Adolescents, p. 88. ... Discrimination against overweight children begins early in childhood and becomes progressively institutionalized. Obese ... Around the world, the English terms youth, adolescent, teenager, kid, and young person are interchanged, often meaning the same ... In an international survey of adolescent health-related behaviors, the percentage of students who reported being bullied at ...
*  Egocentrism
There are various reasons as to why adolescents experience egocentrism: Adolescents are often faced with new social ... Tesch S.; Whitbourne S. K.; Nehrke M. F. (1978). "Cognitive egocentrism in institutionalized adult". Journal of Gerontology. 33 ... Frankenberger K. D. (2000). "Adolescent egocentrism: A comparison among adolescents and adults". Journal of Adolescence. 23 (3 ... In the invincibility fable, the adolescent believes in the idea that he or she is immune to misfortune and cannot be harmed by ...
*  Future orientation
German adolescents include material comfort and Finnish adolescents list property and leisure activities. Specific country ... Trommsdorff, Gisela; Lamm, Helmut (1980). "Future orientation of institutionalized and noninstitutionalized delinquents and ... are also reflected in the lists of adolescents from different cultures. Israeli Arab and Druze adolescents, growing up in ... and parental support are also related to adolescents' self-efficacy and motivation to engage in future thought. Adolescents who ...
*  Krupp
His wife was institutionalized for insanity. Upon Fritz's death, his teenage daughter Bertha inherited the firm. In 1903, the ... where he enjoyed the companionship of forty or so adolescent Italian boys. He had a subsequent publicity disaster and was found ...
*  Achuar
Before being married, young boys do nothing all day while adolescent girls work in the garden. During the rest of the day, ... An example of this is an institutionalized form of reciprocal violence that entitles a person to revert any harmful incidents ...
*  Forced conversion
A form of forced conversion became institutionalized during the Ottoman Empire in the practice of devşirme, a human levy in ... the devşirme-janissary system enslaved an estimated 500,000 to one million non-Muslim adolescent males. These boys would attain ...
*  Chin (deity)
Institutionalized pederastic prostitution, including transvestism, is recorded in 17th-century Spanish reports of the Itzá ... as well as similar relations prevailing among adolescents receiving instruction in the temples. Chin, together with Cu, Cavil ...
*  Respite care in the United States
A 1999 study of Vermont's then 10-year-old respite care program for families with children or adolescents with serious ... Forty percent said they were less likely to institutionalize the care recipient because of respite. Caregivers of relatives ...
*  Visual impairment
Jan, James; Freeman, Roger; Scott, Eileen (1977). Visual Impairment in Children and Adolescents. 111 Fifth Avenue New York, NY ... "Estimated 1987 prevalence of non-institutionalized 'severe visual impairment' by age base on 1977 estimated rates: U. S.", 1987 ...
*  School resource officer
... institutionalized the SRO Program by permanently placing armed, uniformed police officers in secondary schools. Like School ... this comes at the cost of exposing youth/adolescents to the Criminal Justice System and tarnishing their educational ... concerns that their presence in secondary schools creates an atmosphere that leads to an increase of youth/adolescents being ...
*  Hans Steiner
"US News Best Child and Adolescent Psychiatrists". Retrieved 28 February 2012. "American Academy of Child and Adolescent ... "Identifying Mental Health Treatment Needs Among Serious Institutionalized Delinquents Using Paper-and Pencil Screening ... 1996): Treating Adolescents. Hoboken, NJ: Jossey-Bass. ISBN 0-7879-0206-3 Steiner, Hans. (1997): Treating Preschool Children. ... Hans Steiner (born 1946, Vienna) is Professor (Emeritus, Active) of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Child & Adolescent ...
*  Jane Aronson
Aronson JE, Who takes care of HIV-infected children on Long Island? Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescents Medicine. April 1995 ... Parent Network for the Post-Institutionalized Child, 1999. Severe Sepsis in Infants and Children. Sepsis and Multiorgan Failure ... Supplement to Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. April 1995. Abstract 280, p 109. Aronson JE, A pediatric resident ... Growth parameters help predict neurologic competence in profoundly deprived institutionalized children in Romania. Pediatric ...
*  Women's Refugee Commission
The Women's Refugee Commission illuminates and addresses the critical needs of adolescent girls in crisis settings to ensure ... to institutionalize these important safeguards. To address the gap in knowledge on the issue and to place refugees with ... Protecting and Empowering Adolescent Girls - Huff Post Getting Away with Murder at the Border - Huff Post Skills to Survive: ...
*  Pinky Lee
The "Peanut Gallery", an audience usually composed almost entirely of pre-adolescent children who were coached by a staff ... The incident also spawned rumors that Lee had been institutionalized after going insane on live television. In 1957, Lee hosted ...
*  American juvenile justice system
The number of adolescents incarcerated peaked in 1995, with 107,637 in confinement in a single day. In contrast, there were ... was institutionalized. This century saw the opening of the first programs targeting juvenile delinquency. Barry Krisberg and ... argue that adolescents are affected by a juvenile system that does not have effective public policies. Currently the juvenile ... 410,900 of the cases involved Black adolescents, which represents about one-third of the total court cases. The number of cases ...
*  Adultism
Institutionalized discrimination is also viewed as structural violence. See Kelly, P. "Fighting for Hope" (1984) for specific ... The opposite of adultism is jeunism, which is defined as the preference of young people and adolescents over adults. At least ... institutionalized adultism, cultural adultism, and other forms. In a publication published by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, ... each of which in their own respects have struggled with the effects of institutionalized and cultural adultism. A growing ...
*  Scoliosis
The prevalence of scoliosis is 1% to 2% among adolescents, however the likelihood of progression among adolescents with a Cobb ... Thometz, J. G.; Simon, S. R. (1988-10-01). "Progression of scoliosis after skeletal maturity in institutionalized adults who ... Scoliosis that develops after 10 is referred to as adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Screening adolescents without symptoms for ... The age of onset is usually between 10 years and 15 years (can occur at a younger age) in children and adolescents, making up ...
*  Women in Chile
The dictatorship, which institutionalizes social inequality, is founded on inequality in the family." These inequalities began ... Ahumada, Claudia (June 2009). "Statutory Rape Law in Chile: For or Against Adolescents?". Journal of Politics and Law. 2 (2). ...
Prevalences and configurations of mental disorders among institutionalized adolescents.  Prevalences and configurations of mental disorders among institutionalized adolescents.
... Anckarsater, Henrik; Nilsson, Thomas; ... Child and Adolescent Psychiatry publishing date. 2007. type. Contribution to journal publication status. published. subject. * ... Prevalences and configurations of mental disorders among institutionalized adolescents.}, volume = {10}, year = {2007}, } ...
more infohttps://lup.lub.lu.se/search/publication/541070
Oral hygiene habits and oral health status of female adolescents under state protection: a pilot study  Oral hygiene habits and oral health status of female adolescents under state protection: a pilot study
The institutionalized children had significantly poor oral hygiene (higher PI and GI scores) compared to the children who are ... Dentistry for the child and adolescent. 8th. Elsevier: Mosby; 2004. 2. Bodur H, Bodur A, Yücesoy V, Baloş K. The evaluation of ... The impact of income on children's and adolescents' preventive dental visits. J Am Dent Assoc. 2001;132(11):1580-1587. doi: ... Oral hygiene habits and oral health status of female adolescents under state protection: a pilot study. Cenker Zeki Koyuncuoglu ...
more infohttp://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC5573488/
van den Heuvel S[au] - PubMed - NCBI  van den Heuvel S[au] - PubMed - NCBI
Duration of early adversity and structural brain development in post-institutionalized adolescents. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=van+den+Heuvel+S%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50
Jennifer Lau - Research Outputs - Research Portal, Kings College, London  Jennifer Lau - Research Outputs - Research Portal, King's College, London
Japanese residential care quality and perceived competency in institutionalized adolescents: A preliminary assessment of the ... Adult and adolescent social reciprocity: experimental data from the Trust Game. Belli, S. R., Rogers, R. D. & Lau, J. Y. F., ... Changes in the adolescent brain and the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. Keshavan, M. S., Giedd, J., Lau, J. Y. F., ... The plasticity of adolescent cognitions: data from a novel cognitive bias modification training task. Lau, J. Y. F., Molyneaux ...
more infohttps://kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/en/persons/jennifer-lau
Homeless children facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Homeless children  Homeless children facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Homeless children
From this community, six adolescents were institutionalized and sterilized.. The Current Status of Homeless and Runaway ... If homeless or runaway children were determined to be feeble-minded, it was not uncommon for them to be institutionalized and ... This situation has frightening implications for the health and well-being of children born to homeless adolescent females, ... Homeless and runaway children and adolescents were the most likely to be sterilized. ...
more infohttps://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences-and-law/sociology-and-social-reform/sociology-general-terms-and-concepts/homeless
Development and Cross-Cultural Validity of a Brief Measure of Separation-Individuation | SpringerLink  Development and Cross-Cultural Validity of a Brief Measure of Separation-Individuation | SpringerLink
Separation from parents is a key aspect of adolescent development and has been linked to a variety of important mental and ... A comparison of hospitalized adolescents, institutionalized adolescents, and controls. The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 173, ... Individuation Cross-cultural validity Parent-child relationship Item response theory Adolescent The original version of this ... Separation from parents is a key aspect of adolescent development and has been linked to a variety of important mental and ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10826-018-1140-2
Research | Drug Strategies  Research | Drug Strategies
"Preventing and reducing substance use among institutionalized adolescents." Adolescence, 35(137):1-28, 2000. ... Adolescent Drug Abuse: Assessment and Treatment. 1994.. -. Adolescent Drug Abuse: Clinical Assessment and Therapeutic ... "Adolescent substance abuse: A review of the past 10 years." Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, ... Center for Adolescent Health & the Law. Adolescents in Public Health Insurance Programs: Medicaid and SCHIP. Chapel Hill, NC: ...
more infohttp://www.drugstrategies.com/treating-teens/research/
Omni Hotels & Resorts Company Profile  Omni Hotels & Resorts Company Profile
EFFECT OF STRENGTH TRAINING ON THE QUALITY AND DURATION OF SLEEP AND DAYTIME SLEEPINESS OF INSTITUTIONALIZED ADOLESCENTS ... daytime sleepiness in institutionalized adolescents (14 to 19 years of age). Thirty-one adolescen... ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/corporate/company/10906/Omni-Hotels-Resorts.html
Frontiers | Social and Emotional Learning and Academic Achievement in Portuguese Schools: A Bibliometric Study | Psychology  Frontiers | Social and Emotional Learning and Academic Achievement in Portuguese Schools: A Bibliometric Study | Psychology
... on Institutionalized and Non-Institutionalized Adolescents. Master thesis, Available in Repository of Lisbon University. ... The conceptual and scientific underpinnings of SEL are reviewed and the approach's relationship to children's and adolescents' ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01913/full
Find Scholarly Works
             - Arizona State University  Find Scholarly Works - Arizona State University
Self-concepts of institutionalized adolescents: A framework for conceptualizing labeling effects. Chassin, L., Presson, C., ... Salient self-conceptions in normal and deviant adolescents. Chassin, L. & Young, R. D., 1981, In : Adolescence. 16, 63, p. 613- ...
more infohttps://asu.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/?format=&page=2233
RMMG - Revista Médica de Minas Gerais  RMMG - Revista Médica de Minas Gerais
Keywords Violence; Children; Adolescent; Institutionalized Adolescent. 18 - Adenoma da papila de Vater associado a tumor ...
more infohttp://rmmg.org/sumario/15
RMMG - Revista Médica de Minas Gerais  RMMG - Revista Médica de Minas Gerais
Keywords Violence; Children; Adolescent; Institutionalized Adolescent. 18 - Adenoma da papila de Vater associado a tumor ...
more infohttp://www.rmmg.org/Sumario/15
nature.com search  nature.com search
Catch-up growth, metabolic, and cardiovascular risk in post-institutionalized Romanian adolescents *Alva Tang ... and cardiovascular risk in post-institutionalized Romanian adolescents . Opens in a new window. ...
more infohttp://www.nature.com/search?author=%22A%20Nelson%22&error=cookies_not_supported&code=3fca163c-9dac-4390-8c42-fbdeca1e2a19
Racial/ethnic variations in substance-related disorders among adolescents in the United States  Racial/ethnic variations in substance-related disorders among adolescents in the United States
34 Findings also do not apply to institutionalized or homeless adolescents, who were not included in NSDUH. Nicotine dependence ... Jessor R. New perspectives on adolescent risk behavior. In: Jessor R, editor. New Perspectives on Adolescent Risk Behavior. ... or integrate adolescents into programs serving adults. Even within adolescent-specific programs, key elements for effective ... weighted interviewing response rates for adolescents aged 12-17: 85-87%).31,32 This study examined adolescents aged 12-17 years ...
more infohttp://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3395319/?lang=en-ca
Aggressive Behaviour | Article about Aggressive Behaviour by The Free Dictionary  Aggressive Behaviour | Article about Aggressive Behaviour by The Free Dictionary
... to 15-yearold urban non-institutionalized adolescents residing in Medellin during 2007.. The role of the neighborhood, family ... Data about aggressive behaviour was taken from the Colombian Health Association's (ASSALUD) Survey of Adolescents living in ... A number of psychologists contend that children and adolescents are vulnerable to media portrayals of violence, particularly in ... Depression and aggressive behaviour in adolescents offenders and non-offenders/Depresion y agresividad en adolescentes ...
more infohttp://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Aggressive+Behaviour
E-Motion: Trapped Emotional Energy Is Linked to Disease  E-Motion: Trapped Emotional Energy Is Linked to Disease
A 2009 study5 of 16 institutionalized adolescent boys with histories of physical or psychological abuse showed substantially ... 5 Soulmedicineinstitute.org, Single Session Reduction of the Intensity of Traumatic Memories in Abused Adolescents: A ...
more infohttps://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/03/14/trapped-emotional-energy.aspx
The influences of intrinsic motivation on execution of social behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour - Chatzisarantis...  The influences of intrinsic motivation on execution of social behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour - Chatzisarantis...
Predicting daily-life antisocial behaviour in institutionalized adolescents with Transgression-related Implicit Association ... International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, 2017, 29, 3. CrossRef ... crossing two types of action planning with mental simulation for the promotion of physical activity among adolescents, ...
more infohttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ejsp.299/abstract
List of MeSH codes (M01) - Wikipedia  List of MeSH codes (M01) - Wikipedia
... adolescent, hospitalized MeSH M01.643.154 --- adolescent, institutionalized MeSH M01.643.259 --- child, hospitalized MeSH ... File "2006 MeSH Trees".) MeSH M01.060.057 --- adolescent MeSH M01.060.116 --- adult MeSH M01.060.116.100 --- aged MeSH M01.060. ... M01.643.364 --- child, institutionalized MeSH M01.643.470 --- inpatients MeSH M01.643.630 --- outpatients MeSH M01.643.673 --- ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_MeSH_codes_(M01)
  • Hans Steiner (born 1946, Vienna) is Professor (Emeritus, Active) of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Human Development at Stanford University, School of Medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • He then went on to fellowship training in child & adolescent psychiatry at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1976-1978), where he also was the Chief Resident in the years 1977/78. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analyses within the ever institutionalized group revealed no effects of the age of placement into foster care, but number of caregiving disruptions experienced and the percentage of the child's life spent in institutional care were significant predictors of signs of attachment disorders assessed in early adolescence. (stanford.edu)
  • the neighborhood exerted an indirect influence on adolescent behavior which was mainly transmitted through families and the quality of friends within a particular community. (scielosp.org)
  • In the current study, we investigated how adaptations in affective processing (i.e., positive valence bias) and family-level protective factors (i.e., secure parent-child relationships) moderate risk for internalizing symptoms in previously institutionalized (PI) youth. (stanford.edu)
  • Mead described the goal of her research as follows: "I have tried to answer the question which sent me to Samoa: Are the disturbances which vex our adolescents due to the nature of adolescence itself or to the civilization? (wikipedia.org)
  • During my past 30 years as a rehabilitation professional, I have been involved in issues of institutionalization, both as a participant in facilitating placement, as well as in assisting institutionalized people with limited physical and experiential skills to move back into the community. (independentliving.org)
  • Student Resource Officers are becoming more commonplace in American and Canadian schools and there are increasing concerns that their presence in secondary schools creates an atmosphere that leads to an increase of youth/adolescents being introduced to the Criminal Justice System. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, this comes at the cost of exposing youth/adolescents to the Criminal Justice System and tarnishing their educational achievements for situations that in the past would likely have been handled through disciplinary action within the school. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coming of Age in Samoa is a book by American anthropologist Margaret Mead based upon her research and study of youth - primarily adolescent girls - on the island of Ta'u in the Samoan Islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before being married, young boys do nothing all day while adolescent girls work in the garden. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Women's Refugee Commission illuminates and addresses the critical needs of adolescent girls in crisis settings to ensure that they stay safe and make positive changes in their lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1970s, Joan continued her art therapy work with adolescents at Mt. Zion Hospital in San Francisco. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greater response interference to pain faces under low perceptual load conditions in adolescents with impairing pain: A role for poor attention control mechanisms in pain disability? (kcl.ac.uk)
  • An example of this is an institutionalized form of reciprocal violence that entitles a person to revert any harmful incidents or material another sent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family Therapy has found to be effective in the treatment of drug and alcohol addiction and has been correlated with higher success rates for those suffering from addiction, in particular adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fifty-three single nucleotide polymorphism markers in the DNA that are significantly associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were identified through a genome-wide association study. (wikipedia.org)