Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Adolescent Psychology: Field of psychology concerned with the normal and abnormal behavior of adolescents. It includes mental processes as well as observable responses.Adolescent Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological changes during ADOLESCENCE, approximately between the age of 13 and 18.Adolescent Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to adolescents, ages ranging from 13 through 18 years.Adolescent Medicine: A branch of medicine pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases occurring during the period of ADOLESCENCE.Adolescent Psychiatry: The medical science that deals with the origin, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in individuals 13-18 years.Adolescent Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Schools: Educational institutions.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Parenting: Performing the role of a parent by care-giving, nurturance, and protection of the child by a natural or substitute parent. The parent supports the child by exercising authority and through consistent, empathic, appropriate behavior in response to the child's needs. PARENTING differs from CHILD REARING in that in child rearing the emphasis is on the act of training or bringing up the children and the interaction between the parent and child, while parenting emphasizes the responsibility and qualities of exemplary behavior of the parent.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.United StatesPrevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Obesity: A status with BODY WEIGHT that is grossly above the acceptable or desirable weight, usually due to accumulation of excess FATS in the body. The standards may vary with age, sex, genetic or cultural background. In the BODY MASS INDEX, a BMI greater than 30.0 kg/m2 is considered obese, and a BMI greater than 40.0 kg/m2 is considered morbidly obese (MORBID OBESITY).Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Body Mass Index: An indicator of body density as determined by the relationship of BODY WEIGHT to BODY HEIGHT. BMI=weight (kg)/height squared (m2). BMI correlates with body fat (ADIPOSE TISSUE). Their relationship varies with age and gender. For adults, BMI falls into these categories: below 18.5 (underweight); 18.5-24.9 (normal); 25.0-29.9 (overweight); 30.0 and above (obese). (National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Family: A social group consisting of parents or parent substitutes and children.Family Relations: Behavioral, psychological, and social relations among various members of the nuclear family and the extended family.Family Therapy: A form of group psychotherapy. It involves treatment of more than one member of the family simultaneously in the same session.Puberty: A period in the human life in which the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal system takes place and reaches full maturity. The onset of synchronized endocrine events in puberty lead to the capacity for reproduction (FERTILITY), development of secondary SEX CHARACTERISTICS, and other changes seen in ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT.Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Violence: Individual or group aggressive behavior which is socially non-acceptable, turbulent, and often destructive. It is precipitated by frustrations, hostility, prejudices, etc.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Urban Population: The inhabitants of a city or town, including metropolitan areas and suburban areas.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Mother-Child Relations: Interaction between a mother and child.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Sex Education: Education which increases the knowledge of the functional, structural, and behavioral aspects of human reproduction.School Health Services: Preventive health services provided for students. It excludes college or university students.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Adolescent, Institutionalized: An adolescent who is receiving long-term in-patient services or who resides in an institutional setting.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Bullying: Aggressive behavior intended to cause harm or distress. The behavior may be physical or verbal. There is typically an imbalance of power, strength, or status between the target and the aggressor.Social Adjustment: Adaptation of the person to the social environment. Adjustment may take place by adapting the self to the environment or by changing the environment. (From Campbell, Psychiatric Dictionary, 1996)Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health: Longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood. (from http://www.cpc.unc.edu/projects/addhealth accessed 08/2012)Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Family Conflict: Struggle or disagreement between parents, parent and child or other members of a family.BrazilFather-Child Relations: Interaction between the father and the child.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Attitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Coitus: The sexual union of a male and a female, a term used for human only.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Television: The transmission and reproduction of transient images of fixed or moving objects. An electronic system of transmitting such images together with sound over a wire or through space by apparatus that converts light and sound into electrical waves and reconverts them into visible light rays and audible sound. (From Webster, 3rd ed)Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Video Games: A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Anthropometry: The technique that deals with the measurement of the size, weight, and proportions of the human or other primate body.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Anorexia Nervosa: An eating disorder that is characterized by the lack or loss of APPETITE, known as ANOREXIA. Other features include excess fear of becoming OVERWEIGHT; BODY IMAGE disturbance; significant WEIGHT LOSS; refusal to maintain minimal normal weight; and AMENORRHEA. This disorder occurs most frequently in adolescent females. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Authoritarianism: The personality pattern or syndrome consisting of behavioral and attitudinal characteristics reflecting a preoccupation with the factors of power and authority in interpersonal relationships.Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Diseases due to or propagated by sexual contact.Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Sexual Abstinence: Refraining from SEXUAL INTERCOURSE.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Social Support: Support systems that provide assistance and encouragement to individuals with physical or emotional disabilities in order that they may better cope. Informal social support is usually provided by friends, relatives, or peers, while formal assistance is provided by churches, groups, etc.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Crime Victims: Individuals subjected to and adversely affected by criminal activity. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Antisocial Personality Disorder: A personality disorder whose essential feature is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood. The individual must be at least age 18 and must have a history of some symptoms of CONDUCT DISORDER before age 15. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Courtship: Activities designed to attract the attention or favors of another.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Homeless Youth: Runaway and homeless children and adolescents living on the streets of cities and having no fixed place of residence.Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Contraception Behavior: Behavior patterns of those practicing CONTRACEPTION.Social Desirability: A personality trait rendering the individual acceptable in social or interpersonal relations. It is related to social acceptance, social approval, popularity, social status, leadership qualities, or any quality making him a socially desirable companion.Food Habits: Acquired or learned food preferences.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Cognitive Therapy: A direct form of psychotherapy based on the interpretation of situations (cognitive structure of experiences) that determine how an individual feels and behaves. It is based on the premise that cognition, the process of acquiring knowledge and forming beliefs, is a primary determinant of mood and behavior. The therapy uses behavioral and verbal techniques to identify and correct negative thinking that is at the root of the aberrant behavior.Social Control, Informal: Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.CaliforniaProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Linear Models: Statistical models in which the value of a parameter for a given value of a factor is assumed to be equal to a + bx, where a and b are constants. The models predict a linear regression.Conflict (Psychology): The internal individual struggle resulting from incompatible or opposing needs, drives, or external and internal demands. In group interactions, competitive or opposing action of incompatibles: antagonistic state or action (as of divergent ideas, interests, or persons). (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Tobacco Use Disorder: Tobacco used to the detriment of a person's health or social functioning. Tobacco dependence is included.Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Fathers: Male parents, human or animal.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Social Class: A stratum of people with similar position and prestige; includes social stratification. Social class is measured by criteria such as education, occupation, and income.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Includes two similar disorders: oppositional defiant disorder and CONDUCT DISORDERS. Symptoms occurring in children with these disorders include: defiance of authority figures, angry outbursts, and other antisocial behaviors.Social Behavior Disorders: Behaviors which are at variance with the expected social norm and which affect other individuals.Pediatric Obesity: BODY MASS INDEX in children (ages 2-12) and in adolescents (ages 13-18) that is grossly above the recommended cut-off for a specific age and sex. For infants less than 2 years of age, obesity is determined based on standard weight-for-length percentile measures.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Life Change Events: Those occurrences, including social, psychological, and environmental, which require an adjustment or effect a change in an individual's pattern of living.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Rejection (Psychology): Non-acceptance, negative attitudes, hostility or excessive criticism of the individual which may precipitate feelings of rejection.Informed Consent By Minors: Voluntary authorization by a person not of usual legal age for diagnostic or investigative procedures, or for medical and surgical treatment. (from English A, Shaw FE, McCauley MM, Fishbein DB Pediatrics 121:Suppl Jan 2008 pp S85-7).Object Attachment: Emotional attachment to someone or something in the environment.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Gender Identity: A person's concept of self as being male and masculine or female and feminine, or ambivalent, based in part on physical characteristics, parental responses, and psychological and social pressures. It is the internal experience of gender role.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Child Abuse, Sexual: Sexual maltreatment of the child or minor.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Advertising as Topic: The act or practice of calling public attention to a product, service, need, etc., especially by paid announcements in newspapers, magazines, on radio, or on television. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Child Abuse: Abuse of children in a family, institutional, or other setting. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Psychology: The science dealing with the study of mental processes and behavior in man and animals.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.Nutritional Status: State of the body in relation to the consumption and utilization of nutrients.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Personality Development: Growth of habitual patterns of behavior in childhood and adolescence.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Body Composition: The relative amounts of various components in the body, such as percentage of body fat.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Psychosexual Development: The stages of development of the psychological aspects of sexuality from birth to adulthood; i.e., oral, anal, genital, and latent periods.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Papillomavirus Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTIONS. Human vaccines are intended to reduce the incidence of UTERINE CERVICAL NEOPLASMS, so they are sometimes considered a type of CANCER VACCINES. They are often composed of CAPSID PROTEINS, especially L1 protein, from various types of ALPHAPAPILLOMAVIRUS.Parental Consent: Informed consent given by a parent on behalf of a minor or otherwise incompetent child.Nutrition Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to the nutritional status of a human population within a given geographic area. Data from these surveys are used in preparing NUTRITION ASSESSMENTS.Love: Affection; in psychiatry commonly refers to pleasure, particularly as it applies to gratifying experiences between individuals.Identification (Psychology): A process by which an individual unconsciously endeavors to pattern himself after another. This process is also important in the development of the personality, particularly the superego or conscience, which is modeled largely on the behavior of adult significant others.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Sedentary Lifestyle: Usual level of physical activity that is less than 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most days of the week.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Self Disclosure: A willingness to reveal information about oneself to others.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Individuation: A process of differentiation having for its goal the development of the individual personality.Braces: Orthopedic appliances used to support, align, or hold parts of the body in correct position. (Dorland, 28th ed)
(1/6) Ebola haemorrhagic fever among hospitalised children and adolescents in northern Uganda: epidemiologic and clinical observations.

BACKGROUND: A unique feature of previous Ebola outbreaks has been the relative sparing of children. For the first time, an out break of an unusual illness-Ebola haemorrhagic fever occurred in Northern Uganda Gulu district. OBJECTIVES: To describe the epidemiologic and clinical aspects of hospitalised children and adolescents on the isolation wards. METHODS: A retrospective descriptive survey of hospital records for hospitalised children and adolescents under 18 years on the isolation wards in Gulu, Northern Uganda was conducted. All patient test notes were consecutively reviewed and non was excluded because being deficient. RESULTS: Analysis revealed that 90 out of the 218 national laboratory confirmed Ebola cases were children and adolescents with a case fatality of 40%. The mean age was 8.2 years +/- SD 5.6 with a range of 16.99 years. The youngest child on the isolation wards was 3 days old. The under fives contributed the highest admission (35%) among children and adolescents; and case fatality because of prolonged close contact with the seropositive relatives among the laboratory confirmed cases. All (100%) Ebola positive children and adolescents were febrile while only 16% had hemorrhagic manifestations. CONCLUSION: Similar to previous Ebola outbreaks, a relative sparing of children in this outbreak was observed. The under fives were at an increased risk of contact with the sick and dying. RECOMMENDATIONS: Strategies to shield children from exposure to dying and sick Ebola relatives are recommended in the event of future Ebola outbreaks. Health education to children and adolescents to avoid contact with sick and their body fluids should be emphasized.  (+info)

(2/6) The PedsQL Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales: preliminary reliability and validity.

BACKGROUND: The PedsQL Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scales (PedsQL VAS) were designed as an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) instrument to rapidly measure present or at-the-moment functioning in children and adolescents. The PedsQL VAS assess child self-report and parent-proxy report of anxiety, sadness, anger, worry, fatigue, and pain utilizing six developmentally appropriate visual analogue scales based on the well-established Varni/Thompson Pediatric Pain Questionnaire (PPQ) Pain Intensity VAS format. METHODS: The six-item PedsQL VAS was administered to 70 pediatric patients ages 5-17 and their parents upon admittance to the hospital environment (Time 1: T1) and again two hours later (Time 2: T2). It was hypothesized that the PedsQL VAS Emotional Distress Summary Score (anxiety, sadness, anger, worry) and the fatigue VAS would demonstrate moderate to large effect size correlations with the PPQ Pain Intensity VAS, and that patient" parent concordance would increase over time. RESULTS: Test-retest reliability was demonstrated from T1 to T2 in the large effect size range. Internal consistency reliability was demonstrated for the PedsQL VAS Total Symptom Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .72, T2 alpha = .80; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .80, T2 alpha = .84) and Emotional Distress Summary Score (patient self-report: T1 alpha = .74, T2 alpha = .73; parent proxy-report: T1 alpha = .76, T2 alpha = .81). As hypothesized, the Emotional Distress Summary Score and Fatigue VAS were significantly correlated with the PPQ Pain VAS in the medium to large effect size range, and patient and parent concordance increased from T1 to T2. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate preliminary test-retest and internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the PedsQL Present Functioning VAS instrument for both pediatric patient self-report and parent proxy-report. Further field testing is required to extend these initial findings to other ecologically relevant pediatric environments.  (+info)

(3/6) Temporal relationship between substance use and delinquent behavior among young psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents.

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(4/6) Cognitive and social factors associated with NSSI and suicide attempts in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents.

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(5/6) Psychopathology in adolescent children of physicians.

The clinical records of 27 adolescent children of physicians who were treated in a psychiatric unit for adolescents were studied. Most of the children had been referred by their physician fathers for evaluation of conduct or mood disorders. These referrals were often the focus of family distress. There appeared to be no typical syndrome presented by physicians' children. Those treating such patients should be especially sensitive to the possibility that parental denial will increase the patient's resistance to therapy. Family therapy, an effective treatment for psychologic problems in adolescents, is often avoided by physicians.  (+info)

(6/6) Characteristics of adolescent work injuries reported to the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the study was to provide descriptive data and incidence data on adolescent work-related injuries and to determine whether such injuries are underreported to the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry. METHODS: The study consisted of a 1-year survey of 534 adolescent work-related injuries reported to the Department of Labor and Industry and a cross-sectional survey of 3312 public high school students from throughout Minnesota. The high school survey used an abbreviated questionnaire with a subset of items from the Department of Labor and Industry survey. RESULTS: Ninety-six percent of the injuries were strains and sprains, cuts and lacerations, burns, bruises and contusions, and fractures. There were 11 hospitalizations; 4 were for burns that occurred during work in restaurants. Eighty workers (15%) reported permanent impairment as a result of their injuries. It was estimated that there were 2268 reportable injuries to working adolescents in Minnesota during the study year. CONCLUSIONS: The most common serious injuries were injuries to the lower back and burns. The demographic characteristics of adolescents whose injuries were reported to the Department of Labor and Industry were similar to those of injured adolescent workers identified through the high school survey. The results suggest that there is substantial underreporting of adolescent work injuries.  (+info)

*  Repressed memory
"Incest reported by children and adolescents hospitalized for severe psychiatric problems". American Journal of Psychiatry. 140 ...
*  Id, ego and super-ego
A Study of Hospitalized Adolescents". Child Development. Blackwell Publishing on behalf of the Society for Research in Child ...
*  Dimensional models of personality disorders
"Comorbidity of borderline personality disorder with other personality disorders in hospitalized adolescents and adults". Lord, ...
*  Conduct disorder
"Effects of race on psychiatric diagnosis of hospitalized adolescents: A retrospective chart review". Journal of Child and ... "Evidenced-based assessment of conduct problems in children and adolescents". Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent ... Almost all adolescents who have a substance use disorder have conduct disorder-like traits, but after successful treatment of ... Individuals with adolescent-onset conduct disorder exhibit less impairment than those with the childhood-onset type and are not ...
*  Associated features of bipolar disorder
In a study of 34 adolescents hospitalized with mania, there was an association between earlier age of onset and previous ... Soutullo CA, DelBello MP, Ochsner JE (August 2002). "Severity of bipolarity in hospitalized manic adolescents with history of ... In a retrospective study of 80 adolescents hospitalized with bipolar disorder, 35% of patients had previously used stimulants ... A study conducted in 2008 of 245 bipolar adolescents found neither earlier age of onset nor severity of bipolar symptoms were ...
*  Diphenhydramine
Antihistamine Dependence in a Hospitalized Adolescent". Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. 20 (6): 521-524. ... Because the drug is cheap and sold over-the-counter in most countries, adolescents without access to stronger, illicit drugs ... Dinndorf PA, McCabe MA, Frierdich S (August 1998). "Risk of abuse of diphenhydramine in children and adolescents with chronic ... Quantification can be used to monitor therapy, confirm a diagnosis of poisoning in people who are hospitalized, provide ...
*  List of MeSH codes (M01)
... adolescent, hospitalized MeSH M01.643.154 --- adolescent, institutionalized MeSH M01.643.259 --- child, hospitalized MeSH ... File "2006 MeSH Trees".) MeSH M01.060.057 --- adolescent MeSH M01.060.116 --- adult MeSH M01.060.116.100 --- aged MeSH M01.060. ...
*  Ofer Grosbard
License for Insanity - a novel telling the story of an adolescent girl who is hospitalized in a Psychiatric adolescent ward and ...
*  Obras Sociais Irmã Dulce
... that complies with all the Ministry of Justice's requirements regarding the rights of hospitalized children and adolescents. ... Providing services to children and adolescents up to the age of eighteen, the hospital's facilities are adapted to accommodate ...
*  Pervasive refusal syndrome
Due to the fact that PRS is such a severe disorder, it is almost always required to hospitalize in a child and adolescent ... If the child or adolescent is experiencing the treatment intervention as forceful, then their feeling of helplessness increases ... Coghill, David; Sally Bonnar; Sandra Duke; Sarah Seth; Johnny Graham (2009). Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Oxford University ... Adolescent Psychiatry. 18 (11): 645-651. doi:10.1007/s00787-009-0027-6. PMC 2762526 . PMID 19458987. van der Walt M, Annette B ...
*  Pediatric Trials Network
March 2007). "Off-label drug use in hospitalized children". Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. 161 (3): 282-90. doi: ... "Adverse events associated with meropenem versus imipenem/cilastatin therapy in a large retrospective cohort of hospitalized ... clinical data and a population pharmacokinetic model to support dosing of clindamycin for premature infants to adolescents". ...
*  Overmedication
Examining Parental Reports of Lifetime Prescription Histories of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Children". Child and Adolescent ...
*  Adventure therapy
Ziven, H. S. (1988) The effects of the challenge group treatment program on psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. ... 62% of adolescents who participated in an adventure therapy group are at an advantage for coping with adolescent issues than ... There is a 12% improvement in self-concept for adolescents who participate in adventure therapy. Adolescents are approximately ... This era influenced the present day use and extent of adventure therapy programs with adolescents. The format for these ...
*  Rachelina Ambrosini
... coupled with severe meningitis for which she was hospitalized for on 26 February. The adolescent also predicted the date of her ... Rachelina Ambrosini (2 July 1925 - 10 March 1941) was an Italian Roman Catholic adolescent. Her childhood was marked with great ...
*  Jeff Weise
In May and June 2004, Weise tried twice to commit suicide and was briefly hospitalized. He was under treatment for depression, ... His case revived the public discussion about the use of Prozac for children and adolescents; the US Food and Drug ... Weise's murders and suicide reopened the public debate about Prozac use among children and adolescents. In October 2004, the ... his aunts arranged with the Red Lake Medical Center for him to be hospitalized at a facility away from the reservation. His ...
*  Pediatric massage
... for children and adolescents. Its goal is to reduce pain, anxiety, loneliness and fear when children are hospitalized or ... Diego M.A.; Hernandez-Reif M.; Field T.; Friedman L.; Shaw K. (2001). "HIV adolescents show improved immune function following ... Field T.; Grizzle N.; Scafidi F.; Schanberg S. (1996). "Massage and relaxation therapies' effects on depressed adolescent ... and anxiety levels are reduced with massage therapy in burned adolescents". J Burn Care Res. 31 (3): 429-32. doi:10.1097/bcr. ...
*  Panic disorder
Children differ from adolescents and adults in their interpretation and ability to express their experience. Like adults, ... Alessi NE, Magen J; Magen (November 1988). "Panic disorder in psychiatrically hospitalized children". Am J Psychiatry. 145 (11 ... Within the sample, adolescents were found to have the following comorbid disorders: major depressive disorder (80%), dysthymic ... 1999) also found a high number of comorbid disorders in a community-based sample of adolescents with panic attacks or juvenile ...
*  Free statistical software
Tuberculosis in children and adolescents, Taiwan, 1996-2003. Emerg Infect Dis [serial on the Internet]. 2007 Sep. Available ... "Epidemiology of Hospitalized Ocular Injuries in the Upper East Region of Ghana". Ghana Med J. 41 (4): 171-175. PMC 2350113 . ...
*  Child Mania Rating Scale
The items of the P-YMRS did not include the updated DSM-IV criteria for adolescent Bipolar Disorder, and it includes several ... Carlson, Gabrielle A; Kelly, Kevin L. "Manic symptoms in psychiatrically hospitalized children - what do they mean?". Journal ... Birmaher, B; Axelson, D (2006). "Course and outcome of bipolar spectrum disorder in children and adolescents: a review of the ... It is important that the CMRS accurately discriminate from symptoms of ADHD because core symptoms of adolescent Bipolar ...
*  Animal-assisted therapy
This was most effective when the patient was a child or adolescent. The theory behind AAT is what is known as Attachment theory ... Barker, Sandra B.; Dawson, Kathryn S. (1998). "The Effects of Animal-Assisted Therapy on Anxiety Ratings of Hospitalized ... Adolescent Social Work Journal. 15 (3): 177-185. doi:10.1023/A:1022284418096. Hoagwood, Kimberly (2016-01-25). "Animal-assisted ...
*  Iron Lad
He is an adolescent version of Kang the Conqueror, armed with a bio-metal suit that responds to mental commands. He is named ... Kang presses Nate to accept his future by killing the bully who would have hospitalized him. Instead, Nate takes the time ... moments before bullies would cause him to be hospitalized for years of his life from a knife attack, an event that originally ...
*  Karen Lewis (labor leader)
Lewis was hospitalized for a "serious illness". On October 13, a source confirmed that Lewis had been diagnosed with a ... National Board Certified Teacher in the area of Science for adolescents and young adulthood. 2015 - The Deborah W. Meier Hero ...
*  Study 329
"Paroxetine in adolescent major depression", Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 41(4), April ... Seven of the 10 were hospitalized. Two of the 10 experienced worsening depression; two conduct problems such as aggression; one ... "Paroxetine in adolescent major depression", 41(4), April 2002, p. 364. Keller, Martin; Ryan, Neal D.; Wagner, Karen Dineen. " ... In the UK 32,000 prescriptions of paroxetine were written for children and adolescents in 1999, and in the US that figure rose ...
*  Africa Humanitarian Action
In 2000 alone, the health care center in Kiziba refugee camp gave 24,152 consultations and hospitalized 630 people. In Uganda, ... Ante-natal care (ANC), pre- and post-natal care, family planning, adolescent sexuality and monitoring of GBV activities were ... More than 3,000 young refugees participated in an adolescent and youth education initiative on sexually transmitted diseases in ...
*  Orval Hobart Mowrer
He was hospitalized for three and a half months with depression complicated by symptoms resembling psychosis. Few effective ... Mower took Sullivan's ideas to heart and confessed to his wife some guilty secrets concerning his adolescent sexual behavior, ...
*  Hodgkin's lymphoma
Ward, E; DeSantis, C; Robbins, A; Kohler, B; Jemal, A (2014). "Childhood and adolescent cancer statistics, 2014". CA: A Cancer ... Check date values in: ,access-date= (help) "Delta Goodrem Hospitalized With Cancer". Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs. Henry Kaplan and ...
Caring for hospitalized adolescents - ONA  Caring for hospitalized adolescents - ONA
Physician discomfort with adolescent care. You should be comfortable with caring for an adolescent. Despite your board ... How do I approach interviewing an adolescent?. Consider introducing yourself first to the adolescent patient then having him/ ... "adolescent") should be considered to ensure that coverage of adolescents is continuous and consistent in the hospital. ... If the adolescent has asked to maintain privacy for some or all aspects of their medical care in the hospital (e.g. receiving ...
more infohttps://www.oncologynurseadvisor.com/hospital-medicine/caring-for-hospitalized-adolescents/article/603755/
Caring for hospitalized adolescents - Renal and Urology News  Caring for hospitalized adolescents - Renal and Urology News
Physician discomfort with adolescent care. You should be comfortable with caring for an adolescent. Despite your board ... IV Iron Doses Higher for HD Patients Hospitalized for Infections. *Length of Stay Predictors for Infants Hospitalized with ... How do I approach interviewing an adolescent?. Consider introducing yourself first to the adolescent patient then having him/ ... "adolescent") should be considered to ensure that coverage of adolescents is continuous and consistent in the hospital. ...
more infohttps://www.renalandurologynews.com/hospital-medicine/caring-for-hospitalized-adolescents/article/603754/
ERIC - Educational Functioning and Self-Esteem of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents., 1992-Aug  ERIC - Educational Functioning and Self-Esteem of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents., 1992-Aug
Adolescents often enter psychiatric treatment with poor school performance, having attended numerous schools, and have very ... Subjects were admissions to the adolescent psychiatric unit of a children's hospital. Subjects (N=22) in one group had only a ... The study compared these psychiatric adolescents with normed data on educational functioning and self-esteem, and gathered ... this study sought to learn more about two groups of adolescents: one group with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses, the other ...
more infohttps://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED349505
The CroHort Study: Cardiovascular Behavioral Risk Factors in Adults, School Children and Adolescents, Hospitalized...  The CroHort Study: Cardiovascular Behavioral Risk Factors in Adults, School Children and Adolescents, Hospitalized...
The CroHort Study: Cardiovascular Behavioral Risk Factors in Adults, School Children and Adolescents, Hospitalized Coronary ... "The CroHort Study: Cardiovascular Behavioral Risk Factors in Adults, School Children and Adolescents, Hospitalized Coronary ... "The CroHort Study: Cardiovascular Behavioral Risk Factors in Adults, School Children and Adolescents, Hospitalized Coronary ... The CroHort Study: Cardiovascular Behavioral Risk Factors in Adults, School Children and Adolescents, Hospitalized Coronary ...
more infohttps://hrcak.srce.hr/index.php?show=clanak&id_clanak_jezik=112441
Refeeding Hospitalized Adolescents with Restrictive Eating Disorders - Eating Disorders Review  Refeeding Hospitalized Adolescents with Restrictive Eating Disorders - Eating Disorders Review
Refeeding Hospitalized Adolescents with Restrictive Eating Disorders. Vol. 27 / No. 6 November 1, 2016. - Eating Disorders ... Once hospitalized, all patients received some type of nutrition support within the first 24 hours, including an oral diet only ... Correcting malnutrition in adolescents with anorexia nervosa has a special urgency because of impaired growth, loss of menses, ... Once the patients were medically stable, they were treated on an adolescent medical ward, and their NG feeding was decreased to ...
more infohttps://eatingdisordersreview.com/refeeding-hospitalized-adolescents-with-restrictive-eating-disorders/
Risk and Protective Factors of Children and Adolescents Who Were Hospitalized Due to Alcohol Intoxication - No Study Results...  Risk and Protective Factors of Children and Adolescents Who Were Hospitalized Due to Alcohol Intoxication - No Study Results...
Risk and Protective Factors of Children and Adolescents Who Were Hospitalized Due to Alcohol Intoxication (RiScA). This study ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/results/NCT01692054
Critical Pathways | AHRQ Patient Safety Network  Critical Pathways | AHRQ Patient Safety Network
A quality improvement initiative to reduce safety events among adolescents hospitalized after a suicide attempt. Get Citation ... researchers describe a multifaceted effort designed to reduce safety events among adolescents hospitalized for a suicide ... Patients hospitalized after a suicide attempt may be at increased risk for self-harm. In this quality improvement study, ... A considerable body of literature documents widespread variations in outcomes for patients hospitalized at different hospitals ...
more infohttps://psnet.ahrq.gov/search?topic=Electronic-health-records&%3Bamp%3Bf_topicIDs=679,503&%3Bamp%3Bf_resource_typeID=212&%3Bf_topicIDs=615&most_recent=true&f_topicIDs=607,102
Critical Pathways | AHRQ Patient Safety Network  Critical Pathways | AHRQ Patient Safety Network
A quality improvement initiative to reduce safety events among adolescents hospitalized after a suicide attempt. Get Citation ... researchers describe a multifaceted effort designed to reduce safety events among adolescents hospitalized for a suicide ... Patients hospitalized after a suicide attempt may be at increased risk for self-harm. In this quality improvement study, ... A considerable body of literature documents widespread variations in outcomes for patients hospitalized at different hospitals ...
more infohttps://psnet.ahrq.gov/search?topic=Education-and-Training&%3Bamp%3Bf_topicIDs=668,603,353,504,216&%3Bf_topicIDs=433&f_topicIDs=607
Home Page ::: Adolescent Psychiatry  Home Page ::: Adolescent Psychiatry
... and the official journal of the American Society for Adolescent Psychiatry, aims to provide mental health professionals who ... work with adolescents with current information relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders in adolescence. ... An Assessment of Digital Media-related Admissions in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents. , 2019; 9: 1 - 12 (E-Pub Ahead ... Adolescent Psychiatry. , Volume 9. - Number 1. Editorial Open Access Overcoming Treatment Barriers in Adolescent Psychiatry. , ...
more infohttps://benthamscience.com/journals/adolescent-psychiatry/
Repressed memory - Wikipedia  Repressed memory - Wikipedia
"Incest reported by children and adolescents hospitalized for severe psychiatric problems". American Journal of Psychiatry. 140 ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repressed_memory
Search of: H1N1 | Canada - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov  Search of: H1N1 | Canada - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov
A Study of Intravenous Zanamivir Versus Oral Oseltamivir in Adults and Adolescents Hospitalized With Influenza. *Influenza, ... Safety and Efficacy Study of Interferon to Treat Patients Hospitalized for Influenza. *Influenza ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=H1N1&cntry1=NA%3ACA
Spirituality, Religion, and Pediatrics: Intersecting Worlds of Healing | SUPPLEMENT | Pediatrics  Spirituality, Religion, and Pediatrics: Intersecting Worlds of Healing | SUPPLEMENT | Pediatrics
1985) Spiritual and religious concerns of the hospitalized adolescent. Adolescence. 20:217-224. ... 1996) Female adolescents with a history of sexual abuse-risk outcome and protective factors. J Interpersonal Violence. 11:503- ... 1991) Hospitalized school-age children express ideas, feelings, and behaviors toward God. J Pediatr Nurs. 6:337-349. ... 1999) Adolescent sibling bereavement as a catalyst for spiritual development. Death Stud. 23:529-546. ...
more infohttps://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/106/Supplement_3/899.full
Management of Bipolar Disorder - American Family Physician  Management of Bipolar Disorder - American Family Physician
Phenomenology and comorbidity of adolescents hospitalized for the treatment of acute mania. Biol Psychiatry. 1996;39:458-60. ... ADOLESCENTS. Manic symptoms in adolescents are similar to those in adults. Florid psychosis can be a presentation of bipolar ... In another study,19 the frequency of substance abuse was 39 percent in adolescents who had symptoms of bipolar disorder. ... Included in the differential diagnosis of mania in adolescents are substance abuse and schizophrenia, which may be challenging ...
more infohttps://www.aafp.org/afp/2000/0915/p1343.html
Repressed memory - Wikipedia  Repressed memory - Wikipedia
Emslie G.; Rosenfeld A. A. (1983). "Incest reported by children and adolescents hospitalized for severe psychiatric problems". ...
more infohttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Repressed_memory
Adolescent Assault Injury: Risk and Protective Factors and Locations of Contact for Intervention | Articles | Pediatrics  Adolescent Assault Injury: Risk and Protective Factors and Locations of Contact for Intervention | Articles | Pediatrics
Because we wished to oversample more serious injuries, we attempted to interview all assault-injured adolescents hospitalized ... If the adolescent was a minor (,18 years), parental consent (in person or by phone) and adolescent assent were obtained. If the ... Bijur PE, Kurzon M, Hamelsky V, Power C. Parent-adolescent conflict and adolescent injuries. Dev Behav Pediatr.1991;12 :92- 97 ... All hospitalized patients were recruited. After enrollment of a hospitalized case, the next appropriately matched control was ...
more infohttps://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/112/4/931?ijkey=a2937a7acd0bb25dd073e296bc57226f7e7ab6ed&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
6   CONSEQUENCES OF CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT | Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect | The National Academies Press  6 CONSEQUENCES OF CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT | Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect | The National Academies Press
1987 Sexual abuse and psychopathology in hospitalized adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent ... 1991b Childhood victimization and adolescent problem behaviors. In M.E. Lamb and R. Ketterlinus, eds., Adolescent Problem ... Journal of Adolescent Research 4:385-399.. Harter, S., P.C. Alexander, and R.A. Neimeyer. 1988 Long-term effects of incestuous ... and magnitude of adolescent problem behaviors among maltreated children compared with children and adolescents in control ...
more infohttps://www.nap.edu/read/2117/chapter/8
Depresjon - Wikipedia  Depresjon - Wikipedia
Pinto A, Francis G (1993). «Cognitive correlates of depressive symptoms in hospitalized adolescents». Adolescence. 28 (111): ... NICE (2005). NICE guidelines: Depression in children and adolescents. London: NICE. s. 5. ISBN 1-84629-074-0.. Bruk av , ... Brunsvold GL, Oepen G (2008). «Comorbid Depression in ADHD: Children and Adolescents». Psychiatric Times. 25 (10).. ... Goodyer IM, Dubicka B, Wilkinson P (2008). «A randomised controlled trial of cognitive behaviour therapy in adolescents with ...
more infohttps://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depressiv_lidelse
Jeanne Weiland, MSN, APRN, PNP  Jeanne Weiland, MSN, APRN, PNP
Individualized daily schedules for hospitalized adolescents with cystic fibrosis. J Pediatr Health Care. 2003 Nov-Dec;17(6):284 ... Improving influenza immunisation for high-risk children and adolescents. Qual Saf Health Care. 2007 Oct;16(5):363-8. ... MSN: Master of Science in Nursing, Specialization in Pediatric and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, University of Cincinnati, ...
more infohttps://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/bio/w/jeanne-weiland
2000</span>  2000</span>
Effects of physical abuse on hospitalized adolescent children of alcoholics. PhD thesis. ... Part A. disruptive disorders in adolescent girls: A neglected group. Part B. the clinical utility of the MMPI-A in the ... An empirical typology of adolescent delinquency. PhD thesis. Adams, S (2000).. MMPI frequency scale using a Hispanic population ... Psychological test usage with adolescent clients: survey update. Assessment, 7(3):227 --235. ...
more infohttps://www.upress.umn.edu/test-division/bibliography/2000-2009/2000
Instantiating the multiple levels of analysis perspective in a program of study on externalizing behavior | Development and...  Instantiating the multiple levels of analysis perspective in a program of study on externalizing behavior | Development and...
Exploratory factor analysis of borderline personality disorder criteria in hospitalized adolescents. Comprehensive Psychiatry, ... 2012). Differentiating adolescent self-injury from adolescent depression: Possible implications for borderline personality ... European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 13, 362-364.. Mead H. K., Beauchaine T. P., Brenner S. L., Crowell S., Gatzke-Kopp L. ... Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 41, 346-352.. Shaffer D., Fisher P., Lucas C. P., Mina K., & Schwab-Stone ...
more infohttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/development-and-psychopathology/article/instantiating-the-multiple-levels-of-analysis-perspective-in-a-program-of-study-on-externalizing-behavior/489A2EDA8F70E0A588892216B173A453
Nalliah RP[au] - PubMed - NCBI  Nalliah RP[au] - PubMed - NCBI
Outcomes of invasive mechanical ventilation in children and adolescents hospitalized due to status asthmaticus in United States ... Predictors of Complications of Tonsillectomy With or Without Adenoidectomy in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents in the ... Opioid abuse/dependence among those hospitalized due to periapical abscess.. Shroff D, Nalliah RP, Allareddy V, Chandrasekaran ... Obesity and its association with comorbidities and hospital charges among patients hospitalized for dental conditions. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Nalliah+RP%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50
Id, ego and super-ego - Wikipedia  Id, ego and super-ego - Wikipedia
A Study of Hospitalized Adolescents". Child Development. Blackwell Publishing on behalf of the Society for Research in Child ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Id,_ego_and_super-ego
Neural substrates of trait impulsivity, anhedonia, and irritability: Mechanisms of heterotypic comorbidity between...  Neural substrates of trait impulsivity, anhedonia, and irritability: Mechanisms of heterotypic comorbidity between...
Affect regulation and addictive aspects of repetitive self-injury in hospitalized adolescents. Journal of the American Academy ... 2012). Differentiating adolescent self-injury from adolescent depression: Possible implications for borderline personality ... Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 18, 565-571. De Brito, S. A., Mechelli, A., Wilke, M., Laurens, K. R., ... Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 25, 194-200. Gao, Y., Raine, A., Venables, P. H., Dawson, M. E., & Mednick ...
more infohttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/development-and-psychopathology/article/neural-substrates-of-trait-impulsivity-anhedonia-and-irritability-mechanisms-of-heterotypic-comorbidity-between-externalizing-disorders-and-unipolar-depression/761A2AF5E94EA8C5FD15D8E321384E5F
Published Ahead-of-Print : Sexually Transmitted Diseases  Published Ahead-of-Print : Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Improving Tracking of Post-Discharge Results of Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening Tests in Hospitalized Adolescents and ... Characteristics associated with HIV transmission networks involving adolescent girls and young women in HIV Prevention Trials ...
more infohttps://journals.lww.com/stdjournal/toc/publishahead
Recent Peer-Reviewed Publications (Late June-Early August 2015 Publications from PubMed) :: Nationwide Childrens Hospital  Recent Peer-Reviewed Publications (Late June-Early August 2015 Publications from PubMed) :: Nationwide Children's Hospital
... and Associated Conditions Among Adolescents Hospitalized with Crohn's Disease. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2015 Jul 24. [Epub ahead of ... Decision-making in adolescents with suicidal ideation: A case-control study. Psychiatry Res. 2015 Jun 27. pii: S0165-1781(15) ... Child Maltreatment and the Adolescent Patient With Severe Obesity: Implications for Clinical Care. J Pediatr Psychol. 2015 Aug; ... Use of Psychopharmacologic Medications in Adolescents With Restrictive Eating Disorders: Analysis of Data From the National ...
more infohttp://www.nationwidechildrens.org/medical-professional-publications/recent-peer-reviewed-publications-late-june-early-august-2015-publications-from-pubmed?contentid=144743
  • In recent years, much attention has been focused on the consequences of child sexual abuse, especially the adolescent and adult sexual behavior of the victim. (nap.edu)
  • Dr. Roxanne Dryden-Edwards is an adult, child, and adolescent psychiatrist. (medicinenet.com)
  • Sixteen-year-old Nathaniel "Nate" Richards is rescued by his time-traveling adult self, the villainous Kang the Conqueror, moments before bullies would cause him to be hospitalized for years of his life from a knife attack, an event that originally shaped his development into a villain. (wikipedia.org)
  • If this is not the case, consideration needs to be given not only to the comfort level and privileging of the admitting physician, but also covering physicians and allied health professionals involved with inpatient care of the adolescent. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Topics include adolescent development and developmental psychopathology, psychotherapy and other psychosocial treatment approaches, psychopharmacology, and service settings and programs. (benthamscience.com)
  • Individuals with adolescent-onset conduct disorder exhibit less impairment than those with the childhood-onset type and are not characterized by similar psychopathology. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1) To assess risk and protective factors for adolescent assault injury compared with 2 control groups of youth with unintentional injuries and noninjury complaints presenting to the emergency department and 2) to assess locations of contact with assault-injured youth for prevention programs. (aappublications.org)
  • Clinical Decision-Making Following Disasters: Efficient Identification of PTSD Risk in Adolescents. (cambridge.org)
  • This approach should include "providing age-appropriate comprehensive sexuality education for all young people, investing in girls' education, preventing child marriage, sexual violence and coercion, building gender-equitable societies by empowering girls and engaging men and boys and ensuring adolescents' access to sexual and reproductive health information as well as services that welcome them and facilitate their choices. (wikipedia.org)
  • If you are part of a group of physicians, having a defined policy as to whether your group will care for adolescents (and clearly defining the age group you consider to be an "adolescent") should be considered to ensure that coverage of adolescents is continuous and consistent in the hospital. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Consideration of your medical training, ongoing experience in this age group and comfort level with this population is critical in determining whether an adolescent should be under your care. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • This goal should be tempered, however, by the reality that lack of confidentiality can reduce the chances that adolescents will seek care and fully disclose details of their health. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Part A. disruptive disorders in adolescent girls: A neglected group. (umn.edu)
  • This means not focusing on changing the behaviour of girls but addressing the underlying reasons of adolescent pregnancy such as poverty, gender inequality, social pressures and coercion. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is an adolescent version of Kang the Conqueror, armed with a bio-metal suit that responds to mental commands. (wikipedia.org)