Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Hospitals, University: Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Hospital Bed Capacity: The number of beds which a hospital has been designed and constructed to contain. It may also refer to the number of beds set up and staffed for use.Hospitals, Special: Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Hospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)Financial Management, Hospital: The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Hospital Planning: Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.United StatesPatient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Hospital Units: Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Hospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Surgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Radiology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of x-ray diagnostic and therapeutic services.Equipment and Supplies, Hospital: Any materials used in providing care specifically in the hospital.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and management of services provided for obstetric and gynecologic patients.Emergency Medical Services: Services specifically designed, staffed, and equipped for the emergency care of patients.Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and overLibraries, Hospital: Information centers primarily serving the needs of hospital medical staff and sometimes also providing patient education and other services.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.EnglandUnited States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Hospitals, Municipal: Hospitals controlled by the city government.Triage: The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Food Service, Hospital: Hospital department that manages and supervises the dietary program in accordance with the patients' requirements.Pathology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers and provides pathology services.American Hospital Association: A professional society in the United States whose membership is composed of hospitals.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Hospitals, Religious: Private hospitals that are owned or sponsored by religious organizations.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Laboratories, Hospital: Hospital facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Emergency Treatment: First aid or other immediate intervention for accidents or medical conditions requiring immediate care and treatment before definitive medical and surgical management can be procured.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Cardiology Service, Hospital: The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cardiac patient.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Psychiatric Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.Patient Transfer: Interfacility or intrahospital transfer of patients. Intrahospital transfer is usually to obtain a specific kind of care and interfacility transfer is usually for economic reasons as well as for the type of care provided.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Nursing Service, Hospital: The hospital department which is responsible for the organization and administration of nursing activities.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Hospitals, Maternity: Special hospitals which provide care to women during pregnancy and parturition.Hospitals, Military: Hospitals which provide care for the military personnel and usually for their dependents.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.Great BritainCohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.United States Department of Defense: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government whose mission is to provide the military forces needed to deter WARFARE and to protect the security of our country.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Bed Occupancy: A measure of inpatient health facility use based upon the average number or proportion of beds occupied for a given period of time.Tertiary Care Centers: A medical facility which provides a high degree of subspecialty expertise for patients from centers where they received SECONDARY CARE.Hospital Shared Services: Cooperation among hospitals for the purpose of sharing various departmental services, e.g., pharmacy, laundry, data processing, etc.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Urology Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the urologic patient.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Health Services Misuse: Excessive, under or unnecessary utilization of health services by patients or physicians.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Anesthesia Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration of functions and activities pertaining to the delivery of anesthetics.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Admitting Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the flow of patients and the processing of admissions, discharges, transfers, and also most procedures to be carried out in the event of a patient's death.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Hospital Bed Capacity, under 100Emergency Nursing: The specialty or practice of nursing in the care of patients admitted to the emergency department.Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Personnel Staffing and Scheduling: The selection, appointing, and scheduling of personnel.Health Facility Size: The physical space or dimensions of a facility. Size may be indicated by bed capacity.CaliforniaSeverity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Oncology Service, Hospital: The hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of diagnostic and therapeutic services for the cancer patient.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Age Distribution: The frequency of different ages or age groups in a given population. The distribution may refer to either how many or what proportion of the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Hospitals, AnimalAttitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Crowding: An excessive number of individuals, human or animal, in relation to available space.Transportation of Patients: Conveying ill or injured individuals from one place to another.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Catchment Area (Health): A geographic area defined and served by a health program or institution.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Nurseries, Hospital: Hospital facilities which provide care for newborn infants.Purchasing, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the purchasing of supplies and equipment.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Chest Pain: Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Ambulances: A vehicle equipped for transporting patients in need of emergency care.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.ScotlandHealth Facility Closure: The closing of any health facility, e.g., health centers, residential facilities, and hospitals.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.BrazilChi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.IndiaPatient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Local Government: Smallest political subdivisions within a country at which general governmental functions are carried-out.Medication Systems, Hospital: Overall systems, traditional or automated, to provide medication to patients in hospitals. Elements of the system are: handling the physician's order, transcription of the order by nurse and/or pharmacist, filling the medication order, transfer to the nursing unit, and administration to the patient.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Formularies, Hospital: Formularies concerned with pharmaceuticals prescribed in hospitals.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Medical Records Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the creating, care, storage and retrieval of medical records. It also provides statistical information for the medical and administrative staff.Housekeeping, Hospital: Hospital department which manages and provides the required housekeeping functions in all areas of the hospital.Sex Distribution: The number of males and females in a given population. The distribution may refer to how many men or women or what proportion of either in the group. The population is usually patients with a specific disease but the concept is not restricted to humans and is not restricted to medicine.Child, Hospitalized: Child hospitalized for short term care.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Hospital-Physician Relations: Includes relationships between hospitals, their governing boards, and administrators in regard to physicians, whether or not the physicians are members of the medical staff or have medical staff privileges.AccidentsWorkload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Personnel Administration, Hospital: Management activities concerned with hospital employees.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.SwitzerlandSex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Health Facility Merger: The combining of administrative and organizational resources of two or more health care facilities.Radiology Information Systems: Information systems, usually computer-assisted, designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information for planning, organizing, directing, and controlling administrative activities associated with the provision and utilization of radiology services and facilities.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.United States Department of Agriculture: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with improving and maintaining farm income and developing and expanding markets for agricultural products. Through inspection and grading services it safeguards and insures standards of quality in food supply and production.Nigeria: A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.France: A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.Uncompensated Care: Medical services for which no payment is received. Uncompensated care includes charity care and bad debts.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Malaysia: A parliamentary democracy with a constitutional monarch in southeast Asia, consisting of 11 states (West Malaysia) on the Malay Peninsula and two states (East Malaysia) on the island of BORNEO. It is also called the Federation of Malaysia. Its capital is Kuala Lumpur. Before 1963 it was the Union of Malaya. It reorganized in 1948 as the Federation of Malaya, becoming independent from British Malaya in 1957 and becoming Malaysia in 1963 as a federation of Malaya, Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore (which seceded in 1965). The form Malay- probably derives from the Tamil malay, mountain, with reference to its geography. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p715 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p329)New York CityEconomic Competition: The effort of two or more parties to secure the business of a third party by offering, usually under fair or equitable rules of business practice, the most favorable terms.Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.Multi-Institutional Systems: Institutional systems consisting of more than one health facility which have cooperative administrative arrangements through merger, affiliation, shared services, or other collective ventures.Societies, Hospital: Societies having institutional membership limited to hospitals and other health care institutions.Hospitals, Group Practice: Hospitals organized and controlled by a group of physicians who practice together and provide each other with mutual support.Risk Adjustment: The use of severity-of-illness measures, such as age, to estimate the risk (measurable or predictable chance of loss, injury or death) to which a patient is subject before receiving some health care intervention. This adjustment allows comparison of performance and quality across organizations, practitioners, and communities. (from JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Hospitals, Chronic Disease: Hospitals which provide care to patients with long-term illnesses.Day Care: Institutional health care of patients during the day. The patients return home at night.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Northern IrelandContinuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Hong Kong: The former British crown colony located off the southeast coast of China, comprised of Hong Kong Island, Kowloon Peninsula, and New Territories. The three sites were ceded to the British by the Chinese respectively in 1841, 1860, and 1898. Hong Kong reverted to China in July 1997. The name represents the Cantonese pronunciation of the Chinese xianggang, fragrant port, from xiang, perfume and gang, port or harbor, with reference to its currents sweetened by fresh water from a river west of it.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Predictive Value of Tests: In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.New York
(1/18) Can admission notes be improved by using preprinted assessment sheets?

Inpatient medical notes often fail to record important details of patient history and findings on clinical examination. To overcome problems with content and legibility of notes we introduced preprinted notes for the admission of children to this hospital. The quality of the information recorded for 100 children whose admissions were clerked with the preprinted notes was compared with that recorded for 100 whose admissions were recorded with the traditional notes. All case notes were selected randomly and retrospectively from traditional notes written from April to October 1993 and from preprinted notes written from October 1993 to April 1994. The quality of information was assessed according to the presence or absence of 25 agreed core clinical details and the number of words per clerking. In admissions recorded with the preprinted notes the mean number of core clinical details present was significantly higher than those recorded with traditional notes (24.0 v 17.6, p < 0.00001). Admissions recorded with the preprinted notes were also significantly shorter (mean 144 words v 184 words, p < 0.0001). The authors conclude that information about children admitted to hospital is both more complete and more succinct when recorded using preprinted admission sheets.  (+info)

(2/18) The Sheffield experiment: the effects of centralising accident and emergency services in a large urban setting.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of centralisation of accident and emergency (A&E) services in a large urban setting. The end points were the quality of patient care judged by time to see a doctor or nurse practitioner, time to admission and the cost of the A&E service as a whole. METHODS: Sheffield is a large industrial city with a population of 471000. In 1994 Sheffield health authority took a decision to centralise a number of services including the A&E services. This study presents data collected over a three year period before, during and after the centralisation of adult A&E services from two sites to one site and the centralisation of children's A&E services to a separate site. A minor injury unit was also established along with an emergency admissions unit. The study used information from the A&E departments' computer system and routinely available financial data. RESULTS: There has been a small decrease in the number of new patient attendances using the Sheffield A&E system. Most patients go to the correct department. The numbers of acute admissions through the adult A&E have doubled. Measures of process efficiency show some improvement in times to admission. There has been measurable deterioration in the time to be seen for minor injuries in the A&E departments. This is partly offset by the very good waiting time to be seen in the minor injuries unit. The costs of providing the service within Sheffield have increased. CONCLUSION: Centralisation of A&E services in Sheffield has led to concentration of the most ill patients in a single adult department and separate paediatric A&E department. Despite a greatly increased number of admissions at the adult site this change has not resulted in increased waiting times for admission because of the transfer of adequate beds to support the changes. There has however been a deterioration in the time to see a clinician, especially in the A&E departments. The waiting times at the minor injury unit are very short.  (+info)

(3/18) Improving the quality of the admission process in a French psychiatric hospital: impact on the expertise of the professional team.

INTRODUCTION: A 20-month quality improvement project was undertaken in order to improve the patient admission process at a 350-bed French public psychiatric hospital. In addition to improving the quality of patient admissions, the project was expected to increase the expertise of quality improvement team members. METHODS: The project team consisted of two physicians, three heads of nursing, one senior manager, one member of the admissions staff and one secretary. A pharmacist acted as internal facilitator. The team used problem-solving methodology to identify and correct any shortcomings in the existing admission process. Validated data were collected before and after implementation of corrective actions. The team was trained to become more effective on the basis of a published how-to manual for building an effective work team. Team effectiveness was compared before and after the project. RESULTS: Changes in relevant variables were as follows: (i) patients going through the admissions department (40% after corrective action, versus 20% before); (ii) no delay in admission formalities for patients entering hospital by long-standing arrangement (100% versus 20%); and (iii) no delay in admission formalities for patients whose hospitalisation was not predetermined but foreseen (45% versus 0%). The expertise of team members improved in terms of the four tested items: meeting customers' needs and expectations (P< 2 x 10(-6)); contribution of the team to the internal quality improvement strategy (P< 0.01); understanding of the methodology (P< 0.04) and accountability (P< 2 x 10(-5)). Improvements in adherence to the mission statement were also observed. A total of 728 hours were spent on project management. DISCUSSION: Objective improvements were achieved; in particular, the team was shown to have become more effective. The extent to which the lessons learned here can be extrapolated may depend on the openness to change of members of other project teams. CONCLUSION: This project demonstrated that it is possible to put theory into action and thereby make progress. In order to advance further, a second quality improvement project is planned.  (+info)

(4/18) Booked inpatient admissions and hospital capacity: mathematical modelling study.

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the variability of patients' length of stay in intensive care after cardiac surgery. To investigate potential interactions between such variability, booked admissions, and capacity requirements. DESIGN: Mathematical modelling study using routinely collected data. SETTING: A cardiac surgery department. SOURCE OF DATA: Hospital records of 7014 people entering intensive care after cardiac surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Length of stay in intensive care; capacity requirements of an intensive care unit for a hypothetical booked admission system. RESULTS: Although the vast majority of patients (89.5%) had a length of stay in intensive care of < or = 48 hours, there was considerable overall variability and the distribution of stays has a lengthy tail. A mathematical model of the operation of a hypothetical booking system indicates that such variability has a considerable impact on intensive care capacity requirements, indicating that a high degree of reserve capacity is required to avoid high rates of operation cancellation because of unavailability of suitable postoperative care. CONCLUSION: Despite the considerable enthusiasm for booked admissions systems, queuing theory suggests that caution is required when considering such systems for inpatient admissions. Such systems may well result in frequent operational difficulties if there is a high degree of variability in length of stay and where reserve capacity is limited. Both of these are common in the NHS.  (+info)

(5/18) How evidence based are therapeutic decisions taken on a medical admissions unit?

OBJECTIVES: To audit the proportion of drug treatments started on a medical admissions unit that is justified by published evidence, and the proportion for which no justification could be found. METHODS: Retrospective review of randomly selected case notes to identify drug treatments started and the problem(s) for which they were prescribed, followed by literature searches. RESULTS: A total of 132 treatment-problem pairs were found, comprising 85 unique treatment-problem pairs. An evidence base was found in support of 78 of the treatments started (59.1%). A further 41 treatment-problem pairs could be argued to be reasonable practice (sometimes included in guidelines), even though no published trial data support them. Ninety per cent of drug treatments started on the medical admissions unit have either an evidence base or are accepted practice. CONCLUSIONS: Regular audit of this nature could be carried out on units admitting acute medical patients. Similar audits in internal medicine have delivered consistent results (50%-60%); there is a baseline level against which units can compare themselves. Clinical audit is an integral feature of clinical governance; all wards admitting acute medial patients could conduct similar audits on a random sample of patients.  (+info)

(6/18) Post-endoscopy checklist reduces length of stay for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of improved gastroenterologist-to-admitting service communication on hospital stay for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. HYPOTHESIS: a detailed checklist addressing factors relevant to discharge planning would shorten hospital stay, when added to the procedure report. DESIGN: Pre-post intervention design, recording balance measures (potential confounders). SETTING: A Canadian university hospital. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: Intermittent 5- to 7-day batches of consecutive emergency patients presenting with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding as their primary problem. The durations of the background and intervention periods were 3 months (beginning 9 June 2003) and 4 weeks (beginning 8 September 2003), respectively. INTERVENTION: The gastrointestinal bleeding Quality Improvement and Health Information multidisciplinary team (quality improvement personnel; emergency physicians, hospitalists, gastroenterologists, in-patient and endoscopy nurses) developed a one-page checklist, outlining detailed recommendations (3-Ds-diet, drugs, discharge plan) to append to the procedure report. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Difference in median length of hospital stay was the primary endpoint. As balance measures, demographics, bleeding severity, comorbidities, readmission rates, and various benchmark times were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients met the criteria in the background period (4 months, intermittently sampled), and 22 in the intervention period (4 weeks, continuously sampled). There were no significant baseline differences. Median in-patient stay was 7.0 (95% interquartile range 2-24) versus 3.5 (95% interquartile range 1-12) days for the background and intervention periods, respectively (P = 0.003). This remained significant when outliers (stay > 10 days) were removed (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: A checklist, with very specific recommendations to the admitting service, significantly reduced hospital stay for non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding.  (+info)

(7/18) The anatomy of decision support during inpatient care provider order entry (CPOE): empirical observations from a decade of CPOE experience at Vanderbilt.

The authors describe a pragmatic approach to the introduction of clinical decision support at the point of care, based on a decade of experience in developing and evolving Vanderbilt's inpatient "WizOrder" care provider order entry (CPOE) system. The inpatient care setting provides a unique opportunity to interject CPOE-based decision support features that restructure clinical workflows, deliver focused relevant educational materials, and influence how care is delivered to patients. From their empirical observations, the authors have developed a generic model for decision support within inpatient CPOE systems. They believe that the model's utility extends beyond Vanderbilt, because it is based on characteristics of end-user workflows and on decision support considerations that are common to a variety of inpatient settings and CPOE systems. The specific approach to implementing a given clinical decision support feature within a CPOE system should involve evaluation along three axes: what type of intervention to create (for which the authors describe 4 general categories); when to introduce the intervention into the user's workflow (for which the authors present 7 categories), and how disruptive, during use of the system, the intervention might be to end-users' workflows (for which the authors describe 6 categories). Framing decision support in this manner may help both developers and clinical end-users plan future alterations to their systems when needs for new decision support features arise.  (+info)

(8/18) Exploring if day and time of admission is associated with average length of stay among inpatients from a tertiary hospital in Singapore: an analytic study based on routine admission data.

BACKGROUND: It has been postulated that patients admitted on weekends or after office hours may experience delays in clinical management and consequently have longer length of stay (LOS). We investigated if day and time of admission is associated with LOS in Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH), a 1,400 bed acute care tertiary hospital serving the central and northern regions of Singapore. METHODS: This was a historical cohort study based on all admissions from TTSH from 1st September 2003 to 31st August 2004. Data was extracted from routinely available computerized hospital information systems for analysis by episode of care. LOS for each episode of care was log-transformed before analysis, and a multivariate linear regression model was used to study if sex, age group, type of admission, admission source, day of week admitted, admission on a public holiday or eve of public holiday, admission on a weekend and admission time were associated with an increased LOS. RESULTS: In the multivariate analysis, sex, age group, type of admission, source of admission, admission on the eve of public holiday and weekends and time of day admitted were independently and significantly associated with LOS. Patients admitted on Friday, Saturday or Sunday stayed on average 0.3 days longer than those admitted on weekdays, after adjusting for potential confounders; those admitted on the eve of public holidays, and those admitted in the afternoons and after office hours also had a longer LOS (differences of 0.71, 1.14 and 0.65 days respectively). CONCLUSION: Cases admitted over a weekend, eve of holiday, in the afternoons, and after office hours, do have an increased LOS. Further research is needed to identify processes contributing to the above phenomenon.  (+info)

*  Patricia Benner
Benner decided to become a nurse while working in a hospital admitting department during college. She earned an associate ...
*  Sam Strachan
Sam would return in a guest appearance when Grace is admitted into the hospital's emergency department. His return aided the ... Sam's initial function in the show was that of hospital Lothario - romancing and fathering a child with his boss, Connie ... However, the series 8 plot strand which saw Connie strive to turn Holby City Hospital into a Cardiothoracic Centre of ... Prior to beginning work on the show, Chambers underwent observational training at the NHS Heart Hospital in London, watching ...
*  List of MeSH codes (N04)
... hospital communication systems MeSH N04.452.442.422 --- hospital departments MeSH N04.452.442.422.040 --- admitting department ... hospital MeSH N04.452.442.422.750 --- surgery department, hospital MeSH N04.452.442.422.790 --- urology department, hospital ... hospital MeSH N04.452.442.422.298 --- dental service, hospital MeSH N04.452.442.422.310 --- education department, hospital MeSH ... medical records department, hospital MeSH N04.452.442.422.472 --- nuclear medicine department, hospital MeSH N04.452.442.422. ...
*  List of MeSH codes (N02)
... hospital communication systems MeSH N02.278.354.422 --- hospital departments MeSH N02.278.354.422.040 --- admitting department ... hospital MeSH N02.278.354.422.750 --- surgery department, hospital MeSH N02.278.354.422.790 --- urology department, hospital ... hospital MeSH N02.278.354.422.298 --- dental service, hospital MeSH N02.278.354.422.310 --- education department, hospital MeSH ... medical records department, hospital MeSH N02.278.354.422.472 --- nuclear medicine department, hospital MeSH N02.278.354.422. ...
*  Gerald Champion Regional Medical Center
Air Force physicians from Holloman Air Force Base are credentialed at the hospital to admit and treat Department of Defense ... It has been so successful that 60% of the department's revenue comes from outside the hospital. The Otero County Hospital ... The hospital's food and nutrition services department operates a catering service, Mountain View Catering, that caters both on- ... "Many Attend Hospital Dedication Ceremony". Alamogordo News. 1949-08-04. p. 1. OCLC 10674593. "Hospital Named for Drive Head". ...
*  Problem gambling
A 2010 Australian hospital study found that 17% of suicidal patients admitted to the Alfred Hospital's emergency department ... Department of Neuroscience. Retrieved 9 February 2015. Volkow ND, Koob GF, McLellan AT (January 2016). "Neurobiologic Advances ... Voberg, Rachel (March 22, 2002). Gambling and Problem Gambling in Nevada (PDF) (Report). Nevada Department of Human Resources. ... at the South Oaks Hospital in New York City. In recent years the use of SOGS has declined due to a number of criticisms, ...
*  Health Management Associates (Florida company)
The Justice Department accused HMA of admitting patients to hospitals regardless of whether they needed hospital care and ... The hospital chain is being investigated by the US Justice Department, Kroft added, which has subpoenaed records pertaining to ... Prime enforcer of pressuring doctors to wrongfully admit, Page Vaughan is currently working at a small rural hospital in ... The hospital is located at 809 East Marion Avenue. Lake Norman Regional Medical Center - 123-bed hospital, orthopedic center, ...
*  2013 dengue outbreak in Singapore
He was admitted to Khoo Teck Puat Hospital emergency department (ED) on 22 June 2013 with fever and low blood pressure. He was ... The woman, who was first seen at Tan Tock Hospital's Emergency Department on 11 November, had a history of fever. She was ... The victim was diagnosed as having viral fever on 23 May at Tan Tock Seng Hospital's Emergency Department. He was then ... The patient, who lived at Yishun Ring Road, had gone to the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital's Emergency Department on 28 September 2013 ...
*  American Base Hospital No. 116
On July 20, 1918 the hospital began to operate a neuropsychiatric department where it admitted 1,048 cases. Three months after ... During the First World War the hospital moved to Bazoilles-sur-Meuse, Department Vosges, in the advance section, France were it ... American Base Hospital No. 116 was an American military hospital formed in New York City, United States. ... To deal with casualties the AEF would take they set a series of hospitals throughout Europe. American Base Hospital No. 116 was ...
*  Townsville Hospital
... the hospital admitted 54,941 patients, and had 60,676 presentations to the emergency department. The hospital is also the major ... The Emergency Department is currently the largest in Queensland. There have been three general hospital in Townsville over the ... The Townsville Hospital is the major teaching hospital of the James Cook University School of Medicine. The current chief ... The Townsville Hospital is a public tertiary care hospital in Douglas, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. It provides ...
*  Hypertensive urgency
Retrospective analysis of data from 1,290,804 adults admitted to hospital emergency departments in United States from 2005 ... "Severe acute hypertension among inpatients admitted from the emergency department". Journal of Hospital Medicine. 7 (3): 203- ... Based on another study in a US public teaching hospital about 60% of hypertensive crises are due to hypertensive urgencies. ... results from a public teaching hospital". Journal of Human Hypertension. 13 (4): 249-255. ISSN 0950-9240. PMID 10333343. ...
*  University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System
... over 57,000 patients visited the emergency department, and 20,000 patients were admitted to the hospital. Through its ... The University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System was ranked as the 5th best hospital in the Chicago metropolitan ... The University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System itself is composed of the 485-bed University of Illinois Hospital ... The Hospital serves as a referral site for the seriously ill throughout the city, state and world. In fiscal year 2010, ...
*  Hypertensive emergency
"Severe acute hypertension among inpatients admitted from the emergency department". Journal of Hospital Medicine. 7 (3): 203- ... About 14% of adults seen in hospital emergency departments in United States have a systolic blood pressure ≥180 mmHg. As a ... The rates of hypertensive crises has increased and hospital admissions tripled between 1983 and 1990, from 23,000 to 73,000 per ...
*  Health Sciences North
In a typical year the hospital sees 328,207 outpatients, 61,540 people in the emergency department and admits 22,633 people. ... The three hospitals officially amalgamated in 1997 to form one corporation, the Hôpital Régional de Sudbury Regional Hospital ( ... HSN was formed through the amalgamation of three separate hospitals in 2010. The city formerly had three community hospitals; ... In 2000, the construction of the new one-site hospital began and was completed in 2010. In October 2012, the new one-site ...
*  Health information exchange
CliniSync members will receive notifications when a patient is discharged or admitted to the hospital or Emergency Department ... Elkerliek Hospital, Catharina Hospital Eindhoven, St. Anna Hospital Regional Exchange Network West-Brabant Image Exchange ... This HIE grew over time from 12 hospitals in the center of the state with approximately 5,000 physicians, to 106 hospitals out ... the Ohio Hospital Association, BioOhio and the Ohio Department of Insurance.[citation needed] CliniSync is an independent ...
*  Palliative care
"Half Of Older Americans Seen In Emergency Department In Last Month Of Life; Most Admitted To Hospital, And Many Die There". ... Olav's Hospital/Trondheim University Hospital and coordinates efforts between groups and individual researchers across Europe, ... hospitals, and prisons.[citation needed] The first United States hospital-based palliative care consult service was developed ... and other hospital support staff work systematically together to carry out end of life care and comfort in the hospital setting ...
*  University Hospital Waterford
... of which 17,264 were admitted. 70.7% of all admissions were made via the accident and emergency department. The hospital saw ... University Hospital Waterford (formerly known as Ardkeen Hospital, and later Waterford Regional Hospital abbreviated as WRH) is ... Luke's Hospital, Rathgar; Whitfield Centre, Waterford; and Cork University Hospital. The national median waiting time for ... permanent dead link] "Report on a National Acute Hospitals Hygiene Audit undertaken on behalf of the National Hospitals Office ...
*  Westmead Hospital
... more than 55,000 presentations to emergency department of which nearly one-third are admitted to hospital. Westmead Hospital is ... the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney Hospital, Royal North Shore Hospital and St Vincent's Hospital. The Westmead Hospital, ... Westmead Hospital is a major tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia. Opened on 10 November 1978, the 975-bed hospital forms ... Westmead Hospital, together with the Parramatta Hospital, was initially governed by a local hospital Board. When local boards ...
*  Gold Coast Hospital
The Gold Coast Hospital had one of the busiest emergency departments in the state. The Hospital admitted over 60,000 patients ... Gold Coast Hospital, Robina Campus Gold Coast University Hospital Gold Coast University Hospital (GCUH) Robina Hospital ... "Heavy demand for Gold Coast Hospital emergency dept". ABC News. Retrieved 2008-02-12. "Gold Coast Hospital". gold coast health ... Gold Coast portal Queensland portal Gold Coast University Hospital List of hospitals in Australia "Gold Coast Hospital" ( ...
*  Monklands Hospital
... to Monklands District General Hospital. The first patients were admitted in 1977, however, some hospital departments were open ... Hairmyres Hospital, Monklands and Wishaw General Hospital. Each of these hospitals has an accident and emergency department and ... Monklands hospital can be described as a medium-sized general hospital, apart from wards 1 and 2, all the hospital wards and ... Similarly some hospital wards and departments do not have rooms numbered 13. As part of NHS Lanarkshire's A Picture of Health ...
*  Services Hospital
... examinations are performed totally free for all the patients admitted in the hospital and in Accident and Emergency department ... Subsequently renamed as Services Hospital. 1977: Services Hospital becomes the teaching hospital for the newly formed Allama ... 2002: Services Hospital declared as the teaching hospital for the newly formed Services Institute of Medical Sciences(SIMS). ... 1958: A separate outdoor mini hospital for government employees, as a satellite clinic of Mayo Hospital. 1960: Clinic named as ...
*  Ilie Cazac
... the mother of Ilie Cazac was admitted to the gastroenterology department of the Republican Hospital in Chişinău. Her husband, ...
*  Saugus General Hospital
On August 30, the Public Health Department asked the hospital not to admit any new patients, perform any non-emergency ... After the hospital's closure, area residents nearest hospitals were Melrose-Wakefield Hospital, Lynn General Hospital (since ... Saugus General Hospital (previously known as Wendell Hospital) was a hospital located in Saugus, Massachusetts. At the time of ... the Public Health Department reported over 100 deficiencies following an inspection of the hospital. In 1977, the hospital ...
*  Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda
In 2007, 42,566 patients presented to the emergency department, of which 17,831 were admitted. 80.8% of all admissions were ... The hospital was opened by the Medical Missionaries of Mary as the International Missionary Training Hospital (IMTH) in 1957, ... Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital (OLLH or OLOL) is a public hospital located in Drogheda, County Louth, Ireland, part of the Louth ... permanent dead link] "Report on a National Acute Hospitals Hygiene Audit undertaken on behalf of the National Hospitals Office ...
*  Chest pain
... presenting with chest pain in the emergency department will be placed in an observation unit or admitted to the hospital. 1.5 ... of all emergency department in the United States and is the most common reason for hospital admission. The rate of emergency ... In the emergency department the typical approach to chest pain involves ruling out the most dangerous causes: heart attack, ... Children with chest pain account for 0.3% to 0.6% of pediatric emergency department visits. Chest pain may present in different ...
*  Walter E. Ellis
Milwaukee Police Department Homicide Detective Steven Spingola authored an e-magazine article, The Killer in Our Midst: the ... Ellis died at a Sioux Falls, South Dakota hospital on December 1, 2013 from apparent natural causes, according to a South ... and was convicted despite not admitting his guilt. On February 24, 2011, he was given seven life sentences, to be served ... retired before Detectives Gilbert Hernandez and Kathy Hein of the Milwaukee Police Department's cold case homicide unit, ...
Emergency department care 2016-17: Australian hospital statistics | APO  Emergency department care 2016-17: Australian hospital statistics | APO
about 31% of patients were admitted to hospital after their emergency department care; 49% were admitted in 4 hours or less, ... Emergency departments are a critical component of Australia's health care system. Many of Australia's public hospitals have ... there were about 7.8 million presentations to Australian public hospital emergency departments, an average of more than 21,000 ... presentations to emergency departments increased by 3.7% on average each year. After adjusting for coverage changes, ...
more infohttp://apo.org.au/node/121266
The impact of primary care on emergency department presentation and hospital admission with pneumonia: a case-control study of...  The impact of primary care on emergency department presentation and hospital admission with pneumonia: a case-control study of...
Children were more likely to be admitted when antibiotics were prescribed in primary care (OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.43-4.55). ... presentation and hospital admission. Quality primary care may prevent some of these hospital visits. AIMS: The aim of this ... The association of primary care factors with ED presentation and hospital admission, controlling for available confounding ... Hospital admission was less likely if children did not have a usual GP (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.11-0.40) or self-referred to the ...
more infohttps://www.phctrials.ox.ac.uk/publications/506616
Admitting Department | Serhal Hospital  Admitting Department | Serhal Hospital
Our Admitting department, located in the main lobby, is at your disposal for any information you may require during the ... Our Admitting department, located in the main lobby, is at your disposal for any information you may require during the ...
more infohttp://www.hopitaldrsserhal.com/en/administration?width=900px&height=700px&inline=true
Social obstetrics: non-local expectant mothers admitted through accident and emergency department in a public hospital in Hong...  Social obstetrics: non-local expectant mothers admitted through accident and emergency department in a public hospital in Hong...
Social obstetrics: non-local expectant mothers admitted through accident and emergency department in a public hospital in Hong ... 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kwong Wah Hospital, 25 Waterloo Road, Hong Kong ... 3 Department of Accident and Emergency, Kwong Wah Hospital, 25 Waterloo Road, Hong Kong ... 2 Department of Paediatrics, Kwong Wah Hospital, 25 Waterloo Road, Hong Kong ...
more infohttp://www.hkmj.org/abstracts/v20n3/213.htm
Efficacy of hospital in the home services providing care for patients admitted from emergency departments:  an integrative...  Efficacy of hospital in the home services providing care for patients admitted from emergency departments: an integrative...
Efficacy of hospital in the home services providing care for patients admitted from emergency departments: an integrative ... Increases in emergency department (ED) demand may compromise patient outcomes, leading not only to overcrowding in the ED, ... Hospital in the home (HiTH) services may offer one means of reducing ED demand. ... This integrative review sought to assess the efficacy of admission-avoidance HiTH services that admit patients directly from ...
more infohttps://insights.ovid.com/ijoeb/201406000/01787381-201406000-00005
The burden of vaccine-preventable invasive bacterial infections and pneumonia in children admitted to hospital in urban Nepal. ...  The burden of vaccine-preventable invasive bacterial infections and pneumonia in children admitted to hospital in urban Nepal. ...
12 years admitted to an urban hospital in Nepal with suspected bacteremia, meningitis, or pneumonia. Patan Hospital is a non- ... profit hospital with the second largest pediatric unit in the Kathmandu Valley. RESULTS: Of 2039 children enrolled in the study ... 2018 University of Oxford, Department of Paediatrics, Level 2, Children's Hospital, John Radcliffe, Headington, Oxford, OX3 9DU ... 12 years admitted to an urban hospital in Nepal with suspected bacteremia, meningitis, or pneumonia. Patan Hospital is a non- ...
more infohttps://www.paediatrics.ox.ac.uk/publications/118981
Preventing Chronic Disease | Survey of New York City Resident Physicians on Cause-of-Death Reporting, 2010 - CDC  Preventing Chronic Disease | Survey of New York City Resident Physicians on Cause-of-Death Reporting, 2010 - CDC
In most teaching hospitals, resident physicians complete death certificates. The objective of this study was to examine the ... Death certificates are typically processed by personnel in the hospital admitting department. The admitting personnel may help ... Hospital/admitting department personnel. 17 (4.9). 10 (7.1). The death certificate system not allowing certain diagnoses as ... In most hospitals the admitting department staff assists physicians in proper completion of death certificates. Have you ever ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2013/12_0288.htm
Patricia Benner - Wikipedia  Patricia Benner - Wikipedia
Benner decided to become a nurse while working in a hospital admitting department during college. She earned an associate ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patricia_Benner
Gascoigne has emergency stomach surgery | sports | Hindustan Times  Gascoigne has emergency stomach surgery | sports | Hindustan Times
Gascoigne's agent, Jane Morgan, said in a statement on the BBC that he was admitted to hospital on Sunday with "severe stomach ... Have queries on direct tax issues? Ask I-T dept's 'online chat' for answer ... "He underwent emergency surgery for a perforated stomach ulcer and will remain in hospital for a few days," the statement said ... IBPS RRB officers scale 1 main admit card/call letter released, download it now ...
more infohttp://www.hindustantimes.com/sports/gascoigne-has-emergency-stomach-surgery/story-S0reA5z6tqlUtOcJ3XdOfI.html
2018 Quality Payment Program Proposed Rule Aug 2017  2018 Quality Payment Program Proposed Rule Aug 2017
Standard 15: Shares clinical information with admitting hospitals and emergency departments.. - Standard 18: Exchanges patient ... U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. 7500 Security Boulevard. Baltimore, MD 21244 ... Standard 19: Implements a process to consistently obtain patient discharge summaries from the hospital and other facilities. ... Standard 18: Exchanges patient information with the hospital during a patient's hospitalization. ...
more infohttp://www.ncqa.org/public-policy/comment-letters/2018-quality-payment-program-proposed-rule-aug-2017
NCQA Comments on Final Rule for QPP Year 2 Nov 2017  NCQA Comments on Final Rule for QPP Year 2 Nov 2017
Standard 15: Shares clinical information with admitting hospitals and emergency departments. - Standard 18: Exchanges patient ... Standard 19: Implements a process to consistently obtain patient discharge summaries from the hospital and other facilities. ... U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. 7500 Security Boulevard. Baltimore, MD 21244 ... o Demonstrates its process for consistently obtaining patient discharge summaries from the hospital and other facilities. ...
more infohttp://www.ncqa.org/public-policy/comment-letters/ncqa-comments-on-final-rule-for-qpp-year-2-nov-2017
Lean Project Repository | Eccles Health Sciences Library | J. Willard Marriott Digital Library  Lean Project Repository | Eccles Health Sciences Library | J. Willard Marriott Digital Library
Efficiency, Organizational; Total Quality Management; Admitting Department, Hospital; Psychiatric Department, Hospital; ... Hospital; Reference Standards; Data Collection; Ancillary Services, Hospital; LEAN Project. 2013 Lean Project Repository: ... To Reduce the Number of Unnecessary ECGs Ordered and Performed in the Pre-Op Clinic of Anesthesiology Department. Terry ... Efficiency, Organizational; Total Quality Management; Cost Savings; Outpatient Clinics, Hospital; Appointments and Schedules; ...
more infohttps://collections.lib.utah.edu/search?page=1&facet_setname_s=%22ehsl_lean%22&%3Bq=identifier_t%3A20180304_nanos_posters_061%2A&sort=facet_title_s+asc
Importance and added value of functional impairment to predict mortality: a cohort study in Swedish medical inpatients | BMJ...  Importance and added value of functional impairment to predict mortality: a cohort study in Swedish medical inpatients | BMJ...
The department has four wards, with a total of 100 beds. Patients are admitted through the hospital's emergency department. ... 2 Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden *Correspondence to Dr Gustav Torisson; gustav. ... The study was carried out at the Department of General Internal Medicine at Skåne University Hospital in Malmö, Sweden. This ... Normally, the patients in the department are elderly with multiple comorbidities. More specialised medical departments ( ...
more infohttps://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/5/e014464
Frontiers | Postpartum Depressive Symptoms and Associated Factors in Married Women: A Cross-sectional Study in Danang City,...  Frontiers | Postpartum Depressive Symptoms and Associated Factors in Married Women: A Cross-sectional Study in Danang City,...
Depression in mothers of premature babies admitted to neonatal department, hospital for children 1. Ho Chi Minh City Med Mag ( ... according to the statistics of the Department of Culture, Sports and Tourism in 2014, the victims of domestic violence were ... Postpartum Depressive Disorder in Pregnant Women Giving Birth in Tu Du Hospital. (2002). Available from: http://www.bvtt-tphcm. ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpubh.2017.00093/full
Marshall Power Equipment Stresses Lawn Mower Safety to Prevent Injury  Marshall Power Equipment Stresses Lawn Mower Safety to Prevent Injury
... or were admitted to the hospital. The experts at Marshall Power Equipment give easy tips to follow to insure a safe lawn mowing ... In 2012 more than 234,000 people were treated for lawn mower-related injuries in a clinic or emergency department, ... or were admitted to the hospital. More than 17,900 of them are children under age 18, and approximately one-third of lawn mower ... in 2012 more than 234,000 people were treated for lawn mower related injuries in a clinic or emergency department, ...
more infohttp://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/6/prweb10785706.htm
Use of Temporary Names for Newborns and Associated Risks | Articles | Pediatrics  Use of Temporary Names for Newborns and Associated Risks | Articles | Pediatrics
Clerical staff in the hospitals' admitting departments were trained to use the new naming convention when creating an account ... In 2012 there were 4 million infants born in US hospitals, with ∼12% being admitted to NICUs.1,2 The Eunice Kennedy Shriver ... We thank the Montefiore NICU staff, Admitting Department staff, Health Information Management staff, and the Registration ... affiliated with the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and which includes 3 general hospitals, 1 children's hospital, and 2 ...
more infohttps://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/136/2/327
What Could Possibly Go Wrong? A Lot -...  'What Could Possibly Go Wrong?' A Lot -...
After being treated in the emergency department, he was admitted to the hospital. ... After being treated in the emergency department, he was admitted to the hospital. ... After treatment in the emergency department, he was admitted to the intensive care unit with Todd's paralysis and discharged ... was admitted to the hospital for dehydration and rhabdomyolsis, or muscle breakdown. ...
more infohttp://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1113005952/what-could-possibly-go-wrong-a-lot/
Sonoma Medicine Winter 2016 by Sonoma County Medical Association - Issuu  Sonoma Medicine Winter 2016 by Sonoma County Medical Association - Issuu
Departments: boosting the local health care workforce; Mystery Case; reviews of... ... The following day he was evaluated in an emergency department and admitted to a local hospital. Prior to adm ission, Mike was ... CHI is composed of representatives of all major local medical groups, SCMA, hospitals, and the county's departments of Health ... of patients from state hospitals to the community (2) increasing paucity of psychiatric hospital beds, and (3) harsher and ...
more infohttps://issuu.com/sosborn/docs/sonoma_medicine_winter_2016_3ecb0f0d7d7990
Animal attacks in US cost more than $1 billion a year, and theyre becoming more common | FOX31 Denver  Animal attacks in US cost more than $1 billion a year, and they're becoming more common | FOX31 Denver
Only 3% of those who were seen in an emergency department were admitted to the hospital. One-third of hospital admissions came ... "Very few of these cases were admitted to the hospital," he said. "The question is, how many actually needed to go to an ... Those who had isolated abdominal injuries were most likely to be admitted to the hospital or die. ... "We looked at approximately 20% of the emergency departments in the United States over a span of five years, so 2010 to 2014, ...
more infohttps://kdvr.com/2018/12/15/animal-attacks-in-us-cost-more-than-1-billion-a-year-and-theyre-becoming-more-common/
PPT - INTRODUCTION TO TBI DATABASE RESEARCH PowerPoint Presentation - ID:801231  PPT - INTRODUCTION TO TBI DATABASE RESEARCH PowerPoint Presentation - ID:801231
A project funded by the US Department of Education National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Project Design ... Admitted to system's hospital emergency department within 72 hours of injury.. *16 years of age or older at the time of injury. ... A project funded by the US Department of Education National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Project Design ... Receives acute care and comprehensive inpatient rehabilitation within the model system hospitals. ...
more infohttps://www.slideserve.com/omer/introduction-to-tbi-database-research
  • The impact of primary care on emergency department presentation and hospital admission with pneumonia: a case-control study of preschool-aged children. (ox.ac.uk)
  • BACKGROUND: In children, community-acquired pneumonia is a frequent cause of emergency department (ED) presentation and hospital admission. (ox.ac.uk)
  • AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify primary care factors associated with ED presentation and hospital admission of preschool-aged children with community-acquired pneumonia. (ox.ac.uk)
  • The association of primary care factors with ED presentation and hospital admission, controlling for available confounding factors, was determined using logistic regression. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Hospital admission was less likely if children did not have a usual GP (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.11-0.40) or self-referred to the ED (OR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.26-0.89). (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Accessible and continuous primary care is associated with a decreased likelihood of preschool-aged children with pneumonia presenting to the ED and an increased likelihood of hospital admission, implying more appropriate referral. (ox.ac.uk)
  • METHODS: A case-control study was conducted by enrolling three groups: children presenting to the ED with pneumonia and admitted (n = 326), or discharged home (n = 179), and well-neighbourhood controls (n = 351). (ox.ac.uk)
  • Children were more likely to be admitted when antibiotics were prescribed in primary care (OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.43-4.55). (ox.ac.uk)
  • Pediatric early warning scores (PEWS) are physiology-based scoring systems developed to identify patients admitted to inpatient pediatric wards at risk for clinical deterioration. (aappublications.org)
  • The study was a retrospective analysis of blood cultures performed during the past 5 years (January 2005 -December 2009) at the Microbiology Section, Central Pathology Laboratory (CPL), Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. (scielo.org.za)
  • In this retrospective study, the seizure information of patients was collected from Chia-Yi Christian Hospital between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2014. (hindawi.com)
  • We studied the causative agents of BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacterial isolates at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. (scielo.org.za)
  • Launched in 2006, the program was initially provided through hospitals and has expanded into community settings such as primary care and mental health facilities. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Information on the program at Pomona Valley Hospital, a community based unopposed program in Southern California. (dmoztools.net)
  • A 25-year-old woman who sustained an electrical shock to the chest just before the finish line, after which she was given a beer to drink, was admitted to the hospital for dehydration and rhabdomyolsis, or muscle breakdown. (redorbit.com)
  • During a 2-year period, there were 256 episodes of seizures requiring hospital admission. (hindawi.com)
  • The data came from the Nationwide Emergency Department Survey by the federal Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. (kdvr.com)
  • The death registration process involves physicians and hospital staff, funeral directors, the medical examiner's office, and the health department bureau of vital statistics. (cdc.gov)
  • No training on earth can adequately prepare participants for elements such as jumping from a nine-foot height or running through a field of electrical wires while wet and hot," said lead study author Marna Rayl Greenberg, DO MPH, of Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network in Allentown, Pa. (redorbit.com)
  • Databases analysed were the Home Accident Surveillance System (HASS) and Leisure Accident Surveillance System (LASS), and Hospital Episode Statistics (HES). (lshtm.ac.uk)
  • Dr. Greenberg and her team reported in depth on five patients injured at a 2-day event, who were treated (along with 33 other participants not included in the case series) at a local emergency department. (redorbit.com)
  • Hospital administrative staff helps to prepare the certificate and ensures it is completed in a timely manner. (cdc.gov)
  • Medications will be administered while you wait and your blood sugars will be monitored and treated by the hospital staff. (islet.ca)
  • Sam's initial function in the show was that of hospital Lothario - romancing and fathering a child with his boss, Connie Beauchamp (Amanda Mealing), as well as engaging in relationships with Ward Sisters Chrissie Williams (Tina Hobley) and Faye Morton (Patsy Kensit), SHO Maddy Young (Nadine Lewington), and Staff Nurse Zoe Foxe (Alicia Davies). (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the series 8 plot strand which saw Connie strive to turn Holby City Hospital into a Cardiothoracic Centre of Excellence required a similar expansion of ward staff, and so three new Cardiothoracic surgical characters were created - Consultant Elliot Hope (Paul Bradley), and Registrars Sam Strachan and Joseph Byrne (Luke Roberts). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cases were recruited from emergency department presentations and calls to New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australian poisons information centres. (mja.com.au)
  • All women who held the People's Republic of China passport or the two-way permit and those non-eligible persons whose spouses were Hong Kong Identity Card holders, who delivered in Kwong Wah Hospital from 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2012. (hkmj.org)
  • There was no significant difference in the maternal and neonatal outcomes between women who had no booking and those who had a booking in another Hospital Authority or private hospital. (hkmj.org)