Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Hospital Costs: The expenses incurred by a hospital in providing care. The hospital costs attributed to a particular patient care episode include the direct costs plus an appropriate proportion of the overhead for administration, personnel, building maintenance, equipment, etc. Hospital costs are one of the factors which determine HOSPITAL CHARGES (the price the hospital sets for its services).United StatesLength of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.Inpatients: Persons admitted to health facilities which provide board and room, for the purpose of observation, care, diagnosis or treatment.Patient Admission: The process of accepting patients. The concept includes patients accepted for medical and nursing care in a hospital or other health care institution.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.): A component of the Department of Health and Human Services to oversee and direct the Medicare and Medicaid programs and related Federal medical care quality control staffs. Name was changed effective June 14, 2001.Hospitals, Psychiatric: Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Medicare Part B: The voluntary portion of Medicare, known as the Supplementary Medical Insurance (SMI) Program, that includes physician's services, home health care, medical services, outpatient hospital services, and laboratory, pathology, and radiology services. All persons entitled to Medicare Part A may enroll in Medicare Part B on a monthly premium basis.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Utilization Review: An organized procedure carried out through committees to review admissions, duration of stay, professional services furnished, and to evaluate the medical necessity of those services and promote their most efficient use.Hospital-Patient Relations: Interactions between hospital staff or administrators and patients. Includes guest relations programs designed to improve the image of the hospital and attract patients.Medicare Part A: The compulsory portion of Medicare that is known as the Hospital Insurance Program. All persons 65 years and older who are entitled to benefits under the Old Age, Survivors, Disability and Health Insurance Program or railroad retirement, persons under the age of 65 who have been eligible for disability for more than two years, and insured workers (and their dependents) requiring renal dialysis or kidney transplantation are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A.Patient Discharge: The administrative process of discharging the patient, alive or dead, from hospitals or other health facilities.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.EnglandProspective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Cost Allocation: The assignment, to each of several particular cost-centers, of an equitable proportion of the costs of activities that serve all of them. Cost-center usually refers to institutional departments or services.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Diagnosis-Related Groups: A system for classifying patient care by relating common characteristics such as diagnosis, treatment, and age to an expected consumption of hospital resources and length of stay. Its purpose is to provide a framework for specifying case mix and to reduce hospital costs and reimbursements and it forms the cornerstone of the prospective payment system.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Hospitals, Teaching: Hospitals engaged in educational and research programs, as well as providing medical care to the patients.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Muscle Weakness: A vague complaint of debility, fatigue, or exhaustion attributable to weakness of various muscles. The weakness can be characterized as subacute or chronic, often progressive, and is a manifestation of many muscle and neuromuscular diseases. (From Wyngaarden et al., Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2251)Personal Narratives as Topic: Works about accounts of individual experience in relation to a particular field or of participation in related activities.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Hospital Bed Capacity: The number of beds which a hospital has been designed and constructed to contain. It may also refer to the number of beds set up and staffed for use.Prospective Payment System: A system wherein reimbursement rates are set, for a given period of time, prior to the circumstances giving rise to actual reimbursement claims.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Group Practice: Any group of three or more full-time physicians organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of health care services, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Hospitals, General: Large hospitals with a resident medical staff which provides continuous care to maternity, surgical and medical patients.Hospitals, Urban: Hospitals located in metropolitan areas.Patient Readmission: Subsequent admissions of a patient to a hospital or other health care institution for treatment.Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and overContinuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Reimbursement, Incentive: A scheme which provides reimbursement for the health services rendered, generally by an institution, and which provides added financial rewards if certain conditions are met. Such a scheme is intended to promote and reward increased efficiency and cost containment, with better care, or at least without adverse effect on the quality of the care rendered.Fee-for-Service Plans: Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Financial Management, Hospital: The obtaining and management of funds for hospital needs and responsibility for fiscal affairs.Patients: Individuals participating in the health care system for the purpose of receiving therapeutic, diagnostic, or preventive procedures.Hospital Planning: Areawide planning for hospitals or planning of a particular hospital unit on the basis of projected consumer need. This does not include hospital design and construction or architectural plans.Insurance, Health, Reimbursement: Payment by a third-party payer in a sum equal to the amount expended by a health care provider or facility for health services rendered to an insured or program beneficiary. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Physician Incentive Plans: Compensatory plans designed to motivate physicians in relation to patient referral, physician recruitment, and efficient use of the health facility.CaliforniaHealth Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Direct Service Costs: Costs which are directly identifiable with a particular service.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Patient Care: The services rendered by members of the health profession and non-professionals under their supervision.Models, Economic: Statistical models of the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services, as well as of financial considerations. For the application of statistics to the testing and quantifying of economic theories MODELS, ECONOMETRIC is available.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Hospitalists: Physicians who are employed to work exclusively in hospital settings, primarily for managed care organizations. They are the attending or primary responsible physician for the patient during hospitalization.Process Assessment (Health Care): An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Narration: The act, process, or an instance of narrating, i.e., telling a story. In the context of MEDICINE or ETHICS, narration includes relating the particular and the personal in the life story of an individual.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Hospitals, Pediatric: Special hospitals which provide care for ill children.Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services: Insurance providing for payment of services rendered by the pharmacist. Services include the preparation and distribution of medical products.Bed Occupancy: A measure of inpatient health facility use based upon the average number or proportion of beds occupied for a given period of time.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Actinin: A protein factor that regulates the length of R-actin. It is chemically similar, but immunochemically distinguishable from actin.Reimbursement Mechanisms: Processes or methods of reimbursement for services rendered or equipment.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Hospitals, Proprietary: Hospitals owned and operated by a corporation or an individual that operate on a for-profit basis, also referred to as investor-owned hospitals.Cost Sharing: Provisions of an insurance policy that require the insured to pay some portion of covered expenses. Several forms of sharing are in use, e.g., deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments. Cost sharing does not refer to or include amounts paid in premiums for the coverage. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Insurance, Hospitalization: Health insurance providing benefits to cover or partly cover hospital expenses.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Nursing Staff, Hospital: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in a hospital.Hospitals, Special: Hospitals which provide care for a single category of illness with facilities and staff directed toward a specific service.Hospitals, District: Government-controlled hospitals which represent the major health facility for a designated geographic area.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.NorwayPsychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Models, Econometric: The application of mathematical formulas and statistical techniques to the testing and quantifying of economic theories and the solution of economic problems.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Great BritainManaged Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Hospitals, Community: Institutions with permanent facilities and organized medical staff which provide the full range of hospital services primarily to a neighborhood area.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Intermediate Care Facilities: Institutions which provide health-related care and services to individuals who do not require the degree of care which hospitals or skilled nursing facilities provide, but because of their physical or mental condition require care and services above the level of room and board.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Risk Adjustment: The use of severity-of-illness measures, such as age, to estimate the risk (measurable or predictable chance of loss, injury or death) to which a patient is subject before receiving some health care intervention. This adjustment allows comparison of performance and quality across organizations, practitioners, and communities. (from JCAHO, Lexikon, 1994)Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Patient Preference: Individual's expression of desirability or value of one course of action, outcome, or selection in contrast to others.Ownership: The legal relation between an entity (individual, group, corporation, or-profit, secular, government) and an object. The object may be corporeal, such as equipment, or completely a creature of law, such as a patent; it may be movable, such as an animal, or immovable, such as a building.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Hospitals, Private: A class of hospitals that includes profit or not-for-profit hospitals that are controlled by a legal entity other than a government agency. (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed)Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Critical Pathways: Schedules of medical and nursing procedures, including diagnostic tests, medications, and consultations designed to effect an efficient, coordinated program of treatment. (From Mosby's Medical, Nursing & Allied Health Dictionary, 4th ed)Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Hospital Units: Those areas of the hospital organization not considered departments which provide specialized patient care. They include various hospital special care wards.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Academic Medical Centers: Medical complexes consisting of medical school, hospitals, clinics, libraries, administrative facilities, etc.Hospital Departments: Major administrative divisions of the hospital.Accounting: System of recording financial transactions.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Psychiatric Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Economics, Medical: Economic aspects of the field of medicine, the medical profession, and health care. It includes the economic and financial impact of disease in general on the patient, the physician, society, or government.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.Surgical Procedures, Elective: Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.Health Facility Closure: The closing of any health facility, e.g., health centers, residential facilities, and hospitals.Rehabilitation Centers: Facilities which provide programs for rehabilitating the mentally or physically disabled individuals.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Skilled Nursing Facilities: Extended care facilities which provide skilled nursing care or rehabilitation services for inpatients on a daily basis.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Colonography, Computed Tomographic: A non-invasive imaging method that uses computed tomographic data combined with specialized imaging software to examine the colon.Rate Setting and Review: A method of examining and setting levels of payments.Ancillary Services, Hospital: Those support services other than room, board, and medical and nursing services that are provided to hospital patients in the course of care. They include such services as laboratory, radiology, pharmacy, and physical therapy services.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Multi-Institutional Systems: Institutional systems consisting of more than one health facility which have cooperative administrative arrangements through merger, affiliation, shared services, or other collective ventures.Operating Rooms: Facilities equipped for performing surgery.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Recovery Room: Hospital unit providing continuous monitoring of the patient following anesthesia.GermanySurgery Department, Hospital: Hospital department which administers all departmental functions and the provision of surgical diagnostic and therapeutic services.Chi-Square Distribution: A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Hospital Records: Compilations of data on hospital activities and programs; excludes patient medical records.Insurance Claim Reporting: The design, completion, and filing of forms with the insurer.Patient Transfer: Interfacility or intrahospital transfer of patients. Intrahospital transfer is usually to obtain a specific kind of care and interfacility transfer is usually for economic reasons as well as for the type of care provided.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Hospital Administration: Management of the internal organization of the hospital.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Medicare Payment Advisory Commission: The Commission was created by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 under Title XVIII. It is specifically charged to review the effect of Medicare+Choice under Medicare Part C and to review payment policies under Parts A and B. It is also generally charged to evaluate the effect of prospective payment policies and their impact on health care delivery in the US. The former Prospective Payment Assessment Commission (ProPAC) and the Physician Payment Review Commission (PPRC) were merged to form MEDPAC.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Insurance, Medigap: A supplemental health insurance policy sold by private insurance companies and designed to pay for health care costs and services that are not paid for either by Medicare alone or by a combination of Medicare and existing private health insurance benefits. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: An Act prohibiting a health plan from establishing lifetime limits or annual limits on the dollar value of benefits for any participant or beneficiary after January 1, 2014. It permits a restricted annual limit for plan years beginning prior to January 1, 2014. It provides that a health plan shall not be prevented from placing annual or lifetime per-beneficiary limits on covered benefits. The Act sets up a competitive health insurance market.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Fee Schedules: A listing of established professional service charges, for specified dental and medical procedures.Vascular Surgical Procedures: Operative procedures for the treatment of vascular disorders.Databases as Topic: Organized collections of computer records, standardized in format and content, that are stored in any of a variety of computer-readable modes. They are the basic sets of data from which computer-readable files are created. (from ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Outpatients: Persons who receive ambulatory care at an outpatient department or clinic without room and board being provided.Financing, Personal: Payment by individuals or their family for health care services which are not covered by a third-party payer, either insurance or medical assistance.New YorkEmergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Episode of Care: An interval of care by a health care facility or provider for a specific medical problem or condition. It may be continuous or it may consist of a series of intervals marked by one or more brief separations from care, and can also identify the sequence of care (e.g., emergency, inpatient, outpatient), thus serving as one measure of health care provided.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Child, Hospitalized: Child hospitalized for short term care.MassachusettsLong-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Medical Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.Insurance Selection Bias: Adverse or favorable selection bias exhibited by insurers or enrollees resulting in disproportionate enrollment of certain groups of people.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.
In many cases, patients who are transferred to a nursing home from a hospital will have a portion of their nursing home stay ... Should a patient receive respite in an inpatient hospice unit the care would be similar to what other patients of the hospice ... The cost of hospice care may be met by health insurance providers, including Medicare or Medicaid for eligible Americans. ... It is for patients who are experiencing severe symptoms and need temporary extra support. Once a patient is on continuous care ...
... of patients seek re-admission within 6 months after treatment and the average duration of hospital stay is 6 days. ... National Inpatient Hospital Costs: The Most Expensive Conditions by Payer, 2011. HCUP Statistical Brief #160. Agency for ... "Efficacy of β blockers in patients with heart failure plus atrial fibrillation: an individual-patient data meta-analysis". The ... Congestive heart failure is a leading cause of hospital readmissions in the U.S. In a study of 18 States, Medicare patients ...
In particular, these patients have a higher risk of hospitalization and longer hospital stays, are less likely to comply with ... clinics and hospitals, seeking to improving quality and avoid unnecessary health care costs. The Centers for Medicare and ... and patient experience. Unlike proposed quality incentive programs in the United States, funding for primary care was increased ... Thirteen inpatient indicators are recommended for use at the hospital level, and five are designated area indicators. Inpatient ...
In addition to focusing on improving patient experience of care and reducing costs, hospitals must also focus on improving the ... Providers get paid more for keeping their patients healthy and out of the hospital. Studies have shown that inpatient admission ... practice guidelines Engage in risk-management outreach Acquire external data Communicate with patients Educate patients and ... community-based clinics in areas with high proportion of residents using the emergency department as primary care, and patient ...
... visit resulting in an Inpatient Hospital Admission gets transferred to the Hospital Inpatient Stays event file (identifiable ... what patients experience, how they behave, and who pays for the cost of care. The MEPSnet Query Tools interactive table builder ... As an analytic shortcut, data users might simply limit this data set to each unique person-plan's first interview record of the ... This file includes medical visits by hospice providers, which are generally paid for home-based care through the Medicare ...
... used on patients; when the diagnosis is made, it doesn't stay with most patients over time; and it has questionable diagnostic ... Assessment and treatment may be done on an outpatient basis; admission to an inpatient facility is considered if there is a ... non-primary source needed] Outcomes for people with DSM-5 diagnosed schizoaffective disorder depend on data from prospective ... people experiencing psychosis should be referred to an emergency department or hospital. Delirium should be ruled out, which ...
This payment compensates teaching hospitals for their higher Medicare inpatient hospital operating costs due to a number of ... Beyond objective admissions criteria, many programs look for candidates who have had unique experiences in community service, ... where students see patients in hospitals and clinics. These rotations are usually at teaching hospitals but are occasionally at ... Herbert Pardes and others have suggested that medical school debt has been a direct cause of the US primary care shortage. ...
... treating and managing pre-hospital and hospital-to-hospital patient transport by air or ground ambulance. In the outpatient ... more frequent than home treatment plans because admissions are usually due to an increased need for therapy during the stay. ... Home-health care Outside of clinics and hospitals, Respiratory Therapists often manage home oxygen needs of patients and their ... Medicare Respiratory Therapy Initiative Act of 2011 110th Congress (2007) (Oct 25, 2007). "H.R. 3968". Legislation. GovTrack.us ...
"Costs for Hospital Stays in the United States, 2011". Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (Statistical Brief #168). PMID ... A Meta-analysis of Individual Patient Data from Randomized Trials". American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ... who had multiple sepsis hospital admissions in 2010, those who were discharged to a skilled nursing facility or long term care ... Some people may experience severe long-term cognitive decline following an episode of severe sepsis, but the absence of ...
... of total aggregate inpatient hospital costs in the United States.[87] At $8,000, the mean cost per stay billed to Medicaid was ... defined as Medicaid patients with four or more admissions in one year) account for more hospital stays (5.9 vs.1.3 stays), ... Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (2003). *Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act (2005) ... Using data on credit offers and pricing, we document that improvements in households' financial health led to better terms for ...
For example, GP visits cost €11 per visit with annual €33 cap; hospital outpatient treatment €22 per visit; a hospital stay, ... primary care, in-patient care, long-term healthcare, psychiatric care and treatments, ophthalmology, and dentistry. All ... main goals of care management is to ensure that patients do not experience a delay of more than 18 weeks from initial hospital ... Only 36.1% of hospital admissions are from a waiting list, with the remainder being either emergencies admitted immediately or ...
... patients can arrange to see a specialist of their choice at any hospital. Those going into hospital for a planned stay need to ... In the early 2000s, policy has focused on improving primary health care facilities and cutting the cost of inpatient facilities ... Among these 882 of these hospitals are government owned and 1509 are private hospitals. According to the Worldbank data in 2012 ... hospitals and several specialist clinics, each specializing in and catering to different patient needs, at varying costs. ...
But, hospitals and physicians can take into consideration the pre-inpatient admission time when determining if a patient's care ... and at what cost. Moreover, since Medicare collects data about utilization and costs for its enrollees-data that private ... found that 1.8 million Medicare patients aged 65 and older were readmitted within 30 days of an initial hospital stay in 2011; ... Medicare has more experience managing the care of older adults, and is already expanding coordinated care programs under the ...
But, hospitals and physicians can take into consideration the pre-inpatient admission time when determining if a patient's care ... and at what cost.[84] Moreover, since Medicare collects data about utilization and costs for its enrollees-data that private ... found that 1.8 million Medicare patients aged 65 and older were readmitted within 30 days of an initial hospital stay in 2011; ... "Medicare's Single-Payer Experience". National Affairs. Retrieved January 20, 2016.. *^ Improvements Needed in Provider ...
For example, GP visits cost €11 per visit with annual €33 cap; hospital outpatient treatment €22 per visit; a hospital stay, ... The NHS provides, among other things, primary care, in-patient care, long-term healthcare, psychiatric care and treatments, ... main goals of care management is to ensure that patients do not experience a delay of more than 18 weeks from initial hospital ... with a Medicare levy surcharge, for those on high income who do not have appropriate private patient hospital cover (1% for ...
... indicator using routinely collected health data. We included all inpatient cases of the department of medicine during 2016 with ... Swiss coding guidelines of 2016 and the definitions of the Swiss medical statistics of hospitals were analyzed to evaluate the ... The diagnoses were revised by applying the information present-on-admission by a coding specialist and by a medical expert, ... In this study we analyzed the diagnostic value and reliability of the present-on-admission (POA) ...
... which are costly because of increased lengths of hospital stay and associated opportunity costs (3). Measures of cost- ... Nevertheless, the ethical concern of preventing patient and personnel harm remains primary. ... in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery were detected during initial admission, 63% were detected on ... Public health and hospital professionals from 6 states described their experiences with mandatory hospital reporting; all ...
In a study of Medicare patients, the costs of inpatient care and administration were higher at for-profit hospitals than at ... The NIS contains uniform inpatient stay data collected from hospital discharge datasets maintained by state agencies, hospital ... illness severity of adult patients and costs of admission were greater at teaching than at nonteaching hospitals.2 However, no ... Hospital Ownership. Results of this study supported the primary hypotheses. Adjusted mean total hospital charges for children ...
Patient characteristics of inpatient stays involving M/SUD diagnoses are provided and compared with all other types of stays. ... For the most common primary diagnoses, admission through the emergency department and select patient characteristics are ... Adult hospital stays with mental and substance use disorders (M/SUDs) in 2012 are presented. ... Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals. Maine Health Data Organization. Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission. ...
... and are associated with poor outcomes including increased rates of hospital admissions and death. In a pilot study of... ... Data obtained will include patient admission, and inpatient stay characteristics, as well as providing ICD-10 categorised data ... The primary outcome measure for the cost-effectiveness analysis will be the quality adjusted life years (QALY) derived from SF_ ... and Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) records. Consent will also be requested to access patient information from the Integrated ...
The data also suggested that adult medicine patients were associated with excess inpatient stays when compared with national ... The study data indicated that the principal source of adult medicine patients, in hospital emergency departments, increased by ... The study data also suggested that adult medicine patients were a major source of medical and surgical readmissions. The study ... Another analysis showed that adult medicine discharges comprised the largest inpatient population and were closely correlated ...
... hospital data from the Michigan Inpatient Discharge Database for 1989-1993 for children aged less than 15 years with a primary ... and length of stay (if the patient was hospitalized). Patients aged less than 19 years who had a diagnosis of asthma (ICD-9-CM- ... and managed-care data (34). Hospital discharge data and the billing and insurance data (e.g., Medicare and Medicaid) would ... Wisconsin analyzed billing data from hospital emergency rooms to develop a low-cost surveillance system for asthma. The main ...
7,800 per patient annually. The study also found that these patients experienced fewer ER visits and inpatient hospital stays. ... medication costs, ER visits, hospital and nursing home admissions, risk of death and other areas of concern. Order your copy ... especially among Medicare patients. A CVS Caremark Corporation study published in "Health Affairs" in 2011 found that patients ... Availability of medication adherence programs in the primary care office, at hospital discharge, during home visits and other ...
Everett GD, Anton MP, Jackson BK, Swigert C, Uddin N. "Comparison of hospital costs and length of stay associated with general ... Healthaffairs.org, "Use of Medicare claims data to monitor provider-specific performance among patients with severe chronic ... support the timely notification of the primary care physician of nine critical landmark events related to patient status that ... Because of my experience treating patients with pneumonia, I was able to determine that the circumstances did not require an ...
This approach excluded many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease likely to benefit while including others ... Diagnosis-related group coding determines eligibility for many Medicare bundled payment initiatives. ... hospital length of stay (LOS), and cost utilization between these groups. Based on our experiences participating in the BPCI, ... ICD-9 Medicare FFS-only patients also had higher rates of ICU admission and in-hospital mortality and longer hospital LOS. ...
Data. Using the 100% Medicare inpatient claims data from 2008 through 2013, we examined all hospital stays for Medicare fee for ... We also excluded patients enrolled in hospice services prior to admission and patients who left hospitals against medical ... patient experience, and, more recently, cost efficiency.6 7 Funding for HVBP is designed to be budget neutral; Medicare ... and the proportion of patients with Medicare/Medicaid as the primary payer. ...
... which uses technology to remotely connect patients in hard-to-reach rural or frontier areas to health care and social services. ... In the five months prior to her referral, the hospital had billed Medicare close to $100,000 for her inpatient stays and ED use ... high-cost Medicare patients in Billings, Kalispell, and Helena, Montana. Last year, additional support through the Robert Wood ... largely attributable to multiple hospital admissions and ED visits.. For the majority of these patients, physical and social ...
... is a national data system that collects, analyzes, and distributes information about end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the ... Between 2007 and 2016, adjusted hospital admission rate for dialysis patients declined from 2.0 to 1.7 per patient-year (PPY), ... Observation stays are used by some hospitals as an alternative when an inpatient admission may not strictly be warranted, but a ... Patients with CKD and ESRD experienced 30-day readmissions following 21.6% and 35.4% of hospital discharges, respectively, as ...
Patient Population. The NIS is a hospital discharge database representing 20% of inpatient admissions to nonfederal hospitals ... Hospital Costs Data. When performing our multivariate model, we found that increased age (P,0.0001), longer length of stay (P, ... For Medicare patients in 2008, hospitals typically lost ≈$4000 for each patient with a good outcome and $4000 for each patient ... Hospital costs, our primary end point, were determined by multiplying the total hospital charges by the provided mean cost-to- ...
... and hospital bed size. Data on in-hospital length of stay and hospital costs were analyzed. ... inpatient or outpatient), admission status (elective or emergency), and hospital characteristics were identified. Patient ... of patients. Between 20% and 30% of patients had a primary diagnosis of closed fracture of lumbar vertebra without mention of ... in this study to this population allows estimation of the total costs that will be passed on by hospitals to the Medicare ...
In many cases, patients who are transferred to a nursing home from a hospital will have a portion of their nursing home stay ... Should a patient receive respite in an inpatient hospice unit the care would be similar to what other patients of the hospice ... The cost of hospice care may be met by health insurance providers, including Medicare or Medicaid for eligible Americans. ... It is for patients who are experiencing severe symptoms and need temporary extra support. Once a patient is on continuous care ...
... advocacy and legal assistance to help older people and people with disabilities obtain fair access to Medicare and quality ... The Center for Medicare Advocacy, is a national nonprofit, nonpartisan law organization that provides education, ... and thus should be admitted to inpatient status, or whether patients medically necessary stays in the hospital will be shorter ... all telling similar patient and family experiences. A recent call involved a 90-year old man whose leg hematoma exploded. He ...
In particular, these patients have a higher risk of hospitalization and longer hospital stays, are less likely to comply with ... clinics and hospitals, seeking to improving quality and avoid unnecessary health care costs. The Centers for Medicare and ... and patient experience. Unlike proposed quality incentive programs in the United States, funding for primary care was increased ... Thirteen inpatient indicators are recommended for use at the hospital level, and five are designated area indicators. Inpatient ...
Because of these trends, hospitals are recruiting 1.5 FTEs to replace 1 FTE. The Minnesota Hospital Association has data on ... Surveys have found that rural OB/GYNs experience a lower volume of patients while doing more on-call hours. A positive trend is ... Another consideration is the balance between patient choice and practitioner liability. Tort reform will address costs for call ... The data shows the majority of providers who do a fellowship or advanced training in rural areas are more likely to stay in ...
This approach directly improves the patient experience-when patients stay healthy, or get better quicker, they need less care. ... and keep patients healthy and out of the hospital. Though hospital admission and readmission rates have improved since 2011 for ... Patients would continue to receive all of Medicares traditional benefits. They could also reduce their out-of-pocket costs for ... CareMores ESRD inpatient admission rate dropped to 22% below the national average, inpatient bed days fell to 73% below ...
... of patients seek re-admission within 6 months after treatment and the average duration of hospital stay is 6 days. ... National Inpatient Hospital Costs: The Most Expensive Conditions by Payer, 2011. HCUP Statistical Brief #160. Agency for ... "Efficacy of β blockers in patients with heart failure plus atrial fibrillation: an individual-patient data meta-analysis". The ... Congestive heart failure is a leading cause of hospital readmissions in the U.S. In a study of 18 States, Medicare patients ...
In addition, patients with WRF had longer lengths of stay, higher in-hospital costs, increased in-hospital mortality, and ... Data source. We obtained inpatient medical records for a geographically diverse sample of HF patients hospitalized between July ... However, that study included only Medicare patients and needs to be validated in a general HF population. Therefore, we ... were performed on 1,004 consecutive patients admitted for a primary diagnosis of HF from 11 geographically diverse hospitals. ...
National Hospital Utilization and Costs Trends in Inpatient Stays Most Common Diagnoses for Inpatient Stays Most Common ... indicates where the patient was located prior to admission to the hospital. Emergency admission indicates the patient was ... Payer is the expected primary payer for the hospital stay. To make coding uniform across all HCUP data sources, payer combines ... Medicare includes fee-for-service and managed care Medicare patients. *Medicaid includes fee-for-service and managed care ...
... elective vs nonelective admission, length of stay) and hospital data (region, hospital type, bed size, wage index) for all ... database.Consecutive patients enrolled in an ASD database from four spinal deformity centers.Total in-patient EOC costs and ... Demographic data and costs of BMP, primary surgery, and revision surgery for pseudarthrosis were collected. Patients with less ... we believe that patient education strategies, as modeled in our bundle, can improve patients hospital experiences and have a ...
... advocacy and legal assistance to help older people and people with disabilities obtain fair access to Medicare and quality ... The Center for Medicare Advocacy, is a national nonprofit, nonpartisan law organization that provides education, ... 9] Office of Inspector General, Hospitals Use of Observation Stays and Short Inpatient Stays for Medicare Beneficiaries, OEI- ... it skews hospitals readmission data. Federal law imposes financial penalties on hospitals that readmit patients (with certain ...
  • Methods Chart reviews were performed on 1,004 consecutive patients admitted for a primary diagnosis of HF from 11 geographically diverse hospitals. (onlinejacc.org)
  • We report a novel endoscopist-driven approach to intubation during ERCP using an ultra-slim, flexible gastroscope with an endotracheal tube backloaded onto it.MATERIALS AND METHODS: We identified patients who underwent ERCP from 2014 to 2019, and MAC to GA conversion events. (stanford.edu)
  • In this chapter, we describe the data sources, preparation and management, variable definitions, and analytical methods used to produce the statistics presented in Volume 1 of the 2017 USRDS Annual Data Report (ADR), which focuses on chronic kidney disease (CKD) prior to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). (usrds.org)
  • OBJECTIVES: To describe the incidence of and risk factors for vascular injury associated with P-SCD.METHODS: We used data from the HCUP-NIS from 2015-2016 and defined a cohort of patients with sternoclavicular dislocation (SCD) using ICD-10-CM diagnosis codes. (stanford.edu)
  • Immediate post-procedure extubation was successful in all endoscopist-facilitated intubation patients and none exhibited radiographic evidence of aspiration pneumonia.CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopist-facilitated intubation using an ultra-slim flexible gastroscope is feasible and expeditious for MAC to GA conversion during ERCP. (stanford.edu)
  • Conclusions: By limiting EMS protocols to only obtain 12 Lead prehospital ECGs to patients who complain of chest pain can significantly delay diagnosis of AMIs which negatively impacts treatment time. (lww.com)
  • This white paper draws upon the experiences of an expert panel, as well as conclusions from clinical trials that have addressed the 30-day readmission problem and associated behavioral issues related to the need for pulmonary rehabilitation. (nonin.com)
  • The majority of media attention, however, focused on the staggering statistics: from 44,000 to 98,000 preventable deaths annually due to medical error in hospitals, 7,000 preventable deaths related to medication errors alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inpatient rehabilitation facilities would also be subjected to new quality measures including Medicare spending per beneficiary, post admission rates for potential preventable conditions, and reviews of drug regimen practices. (bakertilly.com)
  • Although generally preventable, not all pressure ulcers can be classified as preventable or potentially curable, due to impaired blood circulation, sensory loss, and immobility, causing some patients to become more vulnerable to them. (netce.com)
  • This approach excluded many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease likely to benefit while including others without the disease. (ajmc.com)
  • Diabetes, similar to other chronic medical conditions, is associated with increased risk of hospital readmission ( 3 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Chronic conditions are positively correlated with the use of medical treatment and with costs. (asaging.org)
  • In 2010, Medicare spent about $2,000 on recipients with one or no chronic conditions, but more than $12,000 on those with four or five conditions. (asaging.org)
  • The current healthcare delivery model treats patients with COPD primarily when they present in an acute phase of the illness, but very few patients receive active management for the chronic component. (nonin.com)
  • Diabetes is a well-documented example of a high cost prevalent chronic illness where a significant quality chasm exists. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • It is one of the most expensive chronic illnesses affecting over 23 million Americans ( 2 ) at a cost of $174 billion in 2007 ( 3 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The mission of Burke Rehabilitation's inpatient rehabilitation program is to provide the most comprehensive, patient centered and effective rehabilitation to maximize recovery from physical, cognitive and psychological impairments caused by conditions such as but not limited to: traumatic or acquired spinal cord dysfunction and neurological dysfunction, traumatic and acquired brain injuries, stroke, chronic and acute lung disease, cardiac dysfunction, amputation, and orthopedic dysfunction. (burke.org)
  • Inconsistencies were particularly prominent in the following data elements: American Society for Anesthesiologists score, duration of procedure, endoscope use, and extent of surgical site infection (superficial, deep, organ-space). (cdc.gov)
  • Thirty-two percent of surgical site infections (SSIs) in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery were detected during initial admission, 63% were detected on readmission, and 5% were detected by postdischarge surveillance. (cdc.gov)
  • Romero-Brufau S, Morlan BW, Johnson M, Hickman J, Kirkland LL, Naessens JM , Huddleston J. Evaluating Automated Rules for Rapid Response System Alarm Triggers in Medical and Surgical Patients. (mayo.edu)
  • It always has been and continues to be our goal to provide area patients with the latest minimally invasive surgical options close to home," says Elizabeth Sheridan, R.N., M.A., chief operating officer of Inspira Medical Center Vineland and chief nursing executive. (southjersey.com)
  • The real surgical site infection rate was only 0.7% with another 1.1% of patients suffering from sepsis. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • The APSF marked the first use of the term "patient safety" in the name of professional reviewing organization. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both the authorization form/letter must state your name, date of birth, social security number, date of service, name of hospital where services were performed, the person/organization to receive the information, along with the address where the information is to be sent. (stvincent.org)
  • The piece was written by Leah Binder, who is president of The Leapfrog Group, a well-known patient safety advocacy organization. (physiciansweekly.com)
  • There were, however, inconsistencies between medical records and NHSN data entry. (cdc.gov)
  • Cost increases in medical supplies and pharmaceuticals. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Robert M. Wachter, MD, associate chair in the department of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and medical service chief at Moffitt-Long Hospitals, coined the term hospitalist in an article in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1996 (15). (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Miller adds that at Baptist, as is the case at most hospitals, the medical complexity of patients dictates a need for cooperation in order to successfully treat illness. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Paola Coppola, MD, ED director at Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center, says, "From an ER perspective, a call to the hospitalist replaces multiple calls to specialists. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Under hospice, medical and social services are supplied to patients and their families by an interdisciplinary team of professional providers and volunteers, who take a patient-directed approach to managing illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tom Crowley (CEO, St. Elizabeth's Medical Center) - St. Elizabeth's hospital in Wabasha has about 85 births each year. (mn.us)
  • Medical staff was not happy when the hospital board discontinued obstetric services. (mn.us)
  • The frequency and magnitude of avoidable adverse events experienced by patients was not well known until the 1990s, when multiple countries reported staggering numbers of patients harmed and killed by medical errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ten years after a groundbreaking Australian study revealed 18,000 annual deaths from medical errors, Professor Bill Runciman, one of the study's authors and president of the Australian Patient Safety Foundation since its inception in 1989, reported himself a victim of a medical dosing error. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2004, the Canadian Adverse Events Study found that adverse events occurred in more than 7% of hospital admissions, and estimated that 9,000 to 24,000 Canadians die annually after an avoidable medical error. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facility, not located within a hospital, with an organized professional staff that provides medical treatments on an outpatient basis only. (alaha.org)
  • Medical professionals hold a conference regarding a patient, January 2013. (americanprogress.org)
  • Is there a cost to obtain a copy of my medical record? (stvincent.org)
  • Your medical records do not contain Billing Statements, our Patient Financial Services Department can provide you with this information. (stvincent.org)
  • In the first few years of service, our hospitalists covered 20-25% of the total number of medical admissions to the Norwalk Hospital. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • We have also developed a hospital medicine elective where medical residents experience what being a hospitalist is "really like. (the-hospitalist.org)
  • Adjustments are made both for Add-on payments are made for only for the Parisian area (Ile-de- long and very short stays and medical education, research, and France) and for overseas territories. (who.int)
  • However, you do not need to work within the current rules and roles of Medicare, Medi-caid, and private insurance, or the barriers that separate medical treatment on the one hand and social supports and services on the other. (asaging.org)
  • Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation, University at Buffalo Foundation Activities, and the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. (rcjournal.com)
  • Pneumonia is a common comorbidity among hospitalized older adults and may impede functional restoration and increase medical cost. (rcjournal.com)
  • Secondary data analysis of medical records obtained from 919 in-patient rehabilitation facilities in the United States. (rcjournal.com)
  • Pneumonia is a potential complication in older adults who experience a hip fracture or other lower extremity factures and are receiving in-patient medical rehabilitation. (rcjournal.com)
  • 3 Pneumonia can compound disability, inhibit functional restoration, and increase medical costs. (rcjournal.com)
  • Dr. Tiep is the Director of Pulmonary Rehabilitation at City of Hope Medical Center in Duarte, CA and Medical Director of the Respiratory Disease Management Institute in Monrovia, CA. He has published articles on pulmonary rehabilitation disease management, and co-authored the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society 2004 Standards for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Patients with COPD. (nonin.com)
  • My outrage was based on the egregious hospital waste I observed, along with what may have happened if I had a critical medical condition. (lifeextension.com)
  • and how a new payment system would impact patient access to the latest developments in medical treatment. (nap.edu)
  • Medicare has expanded coverage for telemedicine, and on April 2 the Federal Communications Commission approved a $200 million program to help defray a medical provider's cost of connecting with patients. (law360.com)
  • From sirens to ALS, the medical literature continues to challenge pre-hospital dogma. (epmonthly.com)
  • Or they may decide that money spent on scribes could go further on other staffing solutions, from medical assistants to nurse practitioners, depending on their patient population and their type of workload. (todayshospitalist.com)
  • Dr. Samuels' day-long training experience is unfortunate, but it's only the opening chords of a much longer symphony of time commitments required by electronic medical records (EHRs). (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • Research in U.S. hospitals and medical offices suggest that these systems can add a half-hour or much more time to a day. (thehealthcareblog.com)
  • The rehabilitation team consists of the patient, his or her family and/or caregivers, and medical, nursing and other rehabilitation personnel who, by virtue of their education, training, and experience, are qualified to work with this patient population. (burke.org)
  • Medical costs, however, represent only a portion-even a relatively small portion-of the total economic impact of gun violence. (johnjayrec.nyc)
  • Using the NIS for years 2001 to 2008, ischemic stroke patients were identified using International Classification of Diseases version 9 codes 433-X1 (occlusion and stenosis of cerebral artery with infarction) and 434-X1 (occlusion of cerebral artery with infarction). (ahajournals.org)
  • And of not I would like to point out that dollar for dollar Medicare RBRVS conversion factor in 1998 was $36.69, 2001 $38.26 and in 2013 $34.36 If you factor in inflation its even worse. (medpagetoday.com)
  • A secondary outcome measure was to determine whether the introduction of the HVBP program was particularly beneficial for a subgroup of hospital-poor performers at baseline-that may benefit the most. (bmj.com)
  • The primary outcome variable, differences in total hospital cost between vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty, was assessed by using analysis of covariance. (ajnr.org)
  • Patients older than 65 years had a threefold increase in risk of adverse outcome compared with patients 18 to 44 years of age. (thejns.org)
  • Patients older than 64 years were much more likely to have an adverse outcome (odds ratio [OR] 20.8) and a prolonged hospital stay (OR 2.2). (thejns.org)
  • A single postoperative complication increased the mean LOS by 3 days, more than tripled the odds of an adverse outcome, and increased the hospital charges by more than US $7000. (thejns.org)
  • Patients receiving intravenous tissue-type plasminogen activator were identified using the International Classification of Diseases version 9 procedure code 99.10 (infusion of thrombolytic agent). (ahajournals.org)
  • Previous studies evaluating vertebral augmentation procedure costs have not made detailed comparisons between vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. (ajnr.org)
  • 5 The results of these studies contrast with those of 2 recent randomized controlled trials, in which improvements in pain and pain-related disability among patients who received vertebroplasty were similar to those among patients who received a simulated procedure without cement. (ajnr.org)
  • The ambulatory patient classification system classifies some 7,000 services and procedures into about 300 procedure groups. (alaha.org)
  • Patients who had an inpatient procedure within a specialty of interest (cardiac, vascular, non-cardiac thoracic, solid organ, general, reproductive organ, knee/hip replacement, or spinal surgery) during 2006-2007 were identified. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Whether you or a loved one are at St. Vincent for an outpatient procedure or inpatient stay, we want your visit to be as comfortable as possible. (stvincent.org)