Fibrin Tissue Adhesive: An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Cyanoacrylates: A group of compounds having the general formula CH2=C(CN)-COOR; it polymerizes on contact with moisture; used as tissue adhesive; higher homologs have hemostatic and antibacterial properties.Hemostatics: Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.Lacerations: Torn, ragged, mangled wounds.Fibrin: A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.Enbucrilate: A tissue adhesive that is applied as a monomer to moist tissue and polymerizes to form a bond. It is slowly biodegradable and used in all kinds of surgery, including dental.Adhesives: Substances that cause the adherence of two surfaces. They include glues (properly collagen-derived adhesives), mucilages, sticky pastes, gums, resins, or latex.Equipment Reuse: Further or repeated use of equipment, instruments, devices, or materials. It includes additional use regardless of the original intent of the producer as to disposability or durability. It does not include the repeated use of fluids or solutions.Sutures: Materials used in closing a surgical or traumatic wound. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Nylons: Polymers where the main polymer chain comprises recurring amide groups. These compounds are generally formed from combinations of diamines, diacids, and amino acids and yield fibers, sheeting, or extruded forms used in textiles, gels, filters, sutures, contact lenses, and other biomaterials.Wound Closure Techniques: Methods to repair breaks in tissue caused by trauma or to close surgical incisions.Patents as Topic: Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.Semicircular Canals: Three long canals (anterior, posterior, and lateral) of the bony labyrinth. They are set at right angles to each other and are situated posterosuperior to the vestibule of the bony labyrinth (VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH). The semicircular canals have five openings into the vestibule with one shared by the anterior and the posterior canals. Within the canals are the SEMICIRCULAR DUCTS.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Foreign Bodies: Inanimate objects that become enclosed in the body.Inventions: A novel composition, device, or process, independently conceived de novo or derived from a pre-existing model.Cucurbita: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, which includes pumpkin, gourd and squash.Pollen Tube: A growth from a pollen grain down into the flower style which allows two sperm to pass, one to the ovum within the ovule, and the other to the central cell of the ovule to produce endosperm of SEEDS.Neural Tube Defects: Congenital malformations of the central nervous system and adjacent structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy generally occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Ectodermal and mesodermal malformations (mainly involving the skull and vertebrae) may occur as a result of defects of neural tube closure. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp31-41)Neural Tube: A tube of ectodermal tissue in an embryo that will give rise to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, including the SPINAL CORD and the BRAIN. Lumen within the neural tube is called neural canal which gives rise to the central canal of the spinal cord and the ventricles of the brain. For malformation of the neural tube, see NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS.Foramen Ovale, Patent: A condition in which the FORAMEN OVALE in the ATRIAL SEPTUM fails to close shortly after birth. This results in abnormal communications between the two upper chambers of the heart. An isolated patent ovale foramen without other structural heart defects is usually of no hemodynamic significance.Fallopian Tubes: A pair of highly specialized muscular canals extending from the UTERUS to its corresponding OVARY. They provide the means for OVUM collection, and the site for the final maturation of gametes and FERTILIZATION. The fallopian tube consists of an interstitium, an isthmus, an ampulla, an infundibulum, and fimbriae. Its wall consists of three histologic layers: serous, muscular, and an internal mucosal layer lined with both ciliated and secretory cells.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Tissue Adhesions: Pathological processes consisting of the union of the opposing surfaces of a wound.Sound Localization: Ability to determine the specific location of a sound source.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.Focal Adhesions: An anchoring junction of the cell to a non-cellular substrate. It is composed of a specialized area of the plasma membrane where bundles of the ACTIN CYTOSKELETON terminate and attach to the transmembrane linkers, INTEGRINS, which in turn attach through their extracellular domains to EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS.Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted: Computer-assisted mathematical calculations of beam angles, intensities of radiation, and duration of irradiation in radiotherapy.Hand Disinfection: The act of cleansing the hands with water or other liquid, with or without the inclusion of soap or other detergent, for the purpose of destroying infectious microorganisms.Soaps: Sodium or potassium salts of long chain fatty acids. These detergent substances are obtained by boiling natural oils or fats with caustic alkali. Sodium soaps are harder and are used as topical anti-infectives and vehicles in pills and liniments; potassium soaps are soft, used as vehicles for ointments and also as topical antimicrobials.Fumigation: The application of smoke, vapor, or gas for the purpose of disinfecting or destroying pests or microorganisms.Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Pleurodesis: The production of adhesions between the parietal and visceral pleura. The procedure is used in the treatment of bronchopleural fistulas, malignant pleural effusions, and pneumothorax and often involves instillation of chemicals or other agents into the pleural space causing, in effect, a pleuritis that seals the air leak. (From Fishman, Pulmonary Diseases, 2d ed, p2233 & Dorland, 27th ed)Talc: Finely powdered native hydrous magnesium silicate. It is used as a dusting powder, either alone or with starch or boric acid, for medicinal and toilet preparations. It is also an excipient and filler for pills, tablets, and for dusting tablet molds. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Oils, Volatile: Oils which evaporate readily. The volatile oils occur in aromatic plants, to which they give odor and other characteristics. Most volatile oils consist of a mixture of two or more TERPENES or of a mixture of an eleoptene (the more volatile constituent of a volatile oil) with a stearopten (the more solid constituent). The synonym essential oils refers to the essence of a plant, as its perfume or scent, and not to its indispensability.Mid-Atlantic Region: A geographical area of the United States comprising the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Particulate Matter: Particles of any solid substance, generally under 30 microns in size, often noted as PM30. There is special concern with PM1 which can get down to PULMONARY ALVEOLI and induce MACROPHAGE ACTIVATION and PHAGOCYTOSIS leading to FOREIGN BODY REACTION and LUNG DISEASES.Brucea: A plant genus of the family SIMAROUBACEAE. Members contain bruceosides and bruceanols (quassinoids). The astringent seeds have been used to treat dysentery in southeastern Asia.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Scoliosis: An appreciable lateral deviation in the normally straight vertical line of the spine. (Dorland, 27th ed)Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Orthopedic Fixation Devices: Devices which are used in the treatment of orthopedic injuries and diseases.Lumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Pterygium: An abnormal triangular fold of membrane in the interpalpebral fissure, extending from the conjunctiva to the cornea, being immovably united to the cornea at its apex, firmly attached to the sclera throughout its middle portion, and merged with the conjunctiva at its base. (Dorland, 27th ed)Fractures, Cartilage: Breaks in CARTILAGE.Humidity: A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.Conjunctiva: The mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the eyelids and the anterior pericorneal surface of the eyeball.Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the eye or any of its parts.Sunlight: Irradiation directly from the sun.Autografts: Transplant comprised of an individual's own tissue, transferred from one part of the body to another.
The fibrin then connects the two adjacent structures where damage of the tissues occurred. The fibrin acts like a glue to seal ... Adhesive capsulitis[edit]. In the case of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (also known as frozen shoulder), adhesions grow ... This often causes inflammation and causes fibrin deposits onto the damaged tissues.[2] ... They may be thought of as internal scar tissue that connects tissues not normally connected. ...
Khiste, Sujeet Vinayak; Naik Tari, Ritam (2013). "Platelet-Rich Fibrin as a Biofuel for Tissue Regeneration". ISRN Biomaterials ... Luxation of the adjacent tooth: The application of force, during the extraction procedure, must strictly be limited to the ... adhesives, absorbable agents, biologics, and combination of products (iii) Combination of both A resorbable haemostatic pack, ... In a surgical extraction the doctor may elevate the soft tissues covering the tooth and bone and may also remove some of the ...
Granulation tissue is the perfused, fibrous connective tissue that replaces a fibrin clot in healing wounds. It typically grows ... A lubricating role of hyaluronan in muscular connective tissues to enhance the sliding between adjacent tissue layers has been ... By producing anti-adhesive HA, HAS can allow tumor cells to release from the primary tumor mass, and if HA associates with ... Their related activity could be involved in regulating the sliding ability between adjacent muscular connective tissues. ...
doi:10.1007/s00441-012-1345-4. Man, Alan (2011). "Neurite Outgrowth in Fibrin Gels Is Regulated by Substrate Stiffness". Tissue ... It has also been shown that these adhesive cadherin molecules are internalized, and recycled by the migratory neuron. This ... Cell-cell adhesions provide chemical and mechanical connections between adjacent cells. Of special importance to neuronal ... This suggests that in addition to tissue repair, thy-1 might have roles in early CNS tissue development and organization. The ...
Origins of these fibroblasts are thought to be from the adjacent uninjured cutaneous tissue (although new evidence suggests ... Fibrin and fibronectin cross-link together and form a plug that traps proteins and particles and prevents further blood loss.[ ... or adhesive tape or glue. ... The new tissue is not the same as the tissue that was lost. ... After injury, structural tissue heals with incomplete or complete regeneration.[69][70] Whereas, tissue without an interruption ...
Granulation tissue is the perfused, fibrous connective tissue that replaces a fibrin clot in healing wounds. It typically grows ... A lubricating role of hyaluronan in muscular connective tissues to enhance the sliding between adjacent tissue layers has been ... By producing anti-adhesive HA, HAS can allow tumor cells to release from the primary tumor mass, and if HA associates with ... Their related activity could be involved in regulating the sliding ability between adjacent muscular connective tissues.[11] ...
... prevents ingress of tissue into the bore of the tube, and allows markers to pass out of the orifice when marker delivery is ... to adhere to adjacent tissue within the body of a patient, such as at a biopsy site. The adhesive component may comprise a ... fibrin glue (e.g., Tisseal™), collagen adhesive, or mixtures thereof. ... newly grown tissue at least partially filling a biopsy cavity, tissue injured when the biopsy was taken, or other tissue. ...
... preferably a fibrin adhesive. In doing so it is achieved that the cells are introduced through the transplant into the adjacent ... fibrin or collagen. Such membranes are tissue-tolerable, durable and resistent. It is also particularly advantageous if the ... The suspension in a fibrin adhesive as transportation matrix allows for gentle transportation and a reliable transfer of the in ... in-vitro cultured autologous urothelial cells are injected as a suspension in a fibrin adhesive by using the syringe (not ...
The fibrin then connects the two adjacent structures where damage of the tissues occurred. The fibrin acts like a glue to seal ... Adhesive capsulitis[edit]. In the case of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (also known as frozen shoulder), adhesions grow ... This often causes inflammation and causes fibrin deposits onto the damaged tissues.[2] ... They may be thought of as internal scar tissue that connects tissues not normally connected. ...
Platelet-enriched fibrin glue and platelet-rich plasma in the repair of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants. In: ... Platelet-enriched fibrin glue and platelet-rich plasma in the repair of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants. ... Platelet-enriched fibrin glue and platelet-rich plasma in the repair of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants. / ... T1 - Platelet-enriched fibrin glue and platelet-rich plasma in the repair of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants ...
... operations are known to be associated with increased deposition of fibrin which tends to form bridges between adjacent tissues ... series, adhesive intestinal obstruction developed within 2 years in 80% of their patients, and in another series adhesive ... Adhesive Intestinal Obstruction in Infants and Children: The Place of Conservative Treatment. Ahmed H. Al-Salem and Mohammad ... Adhesive intestinal obstruction (AIO) is rare in the pediatric age group and its treatment is still controversial. This is a ...
Fibrin sealants and fibrin glues and adhesives based on combining fibrinogen-containing solutions with thrombin-containing ... which spontaneously polymerizes into an insoluble gel matrix that can attach to adjacent tissue. The gel matrix stops bleeding ... Multicomponent tissue adhesive application device and holder for such device. US6394982. 31 Jan 2000. 28 May 2002. United ... Arrangement for applying a tissue adhesive. US4753536 *. 9 Mar 1987. 28 Jun 1988. Spehar Edward R. Dispensing mixer for the ...
Said collagenous dressing is tissue-agglutinable and does not have the disadvantages of conventional fibrin bonding in ... Fibrin sealants or adhesives comprising a hyaluronic acid derivative material US5081106A (en) 1992-01-14. Wound dressing ... to tissue by the use of adhesives based on resorcinol-formaldehyde. While such adhesives are hemostatic, they are not suited ... In the process, new peptide bonds are formed between glutamic acid and lysine respectively located on adjacent chins. Through ...
... emulate cancellous bone and are at locations on the body member corresponding generally to the area where connective tissue ... Ligaments 146 and 152 are attached to adjacent connective tissue and/or bone (not shown) to draw these tissues to the implant, ... the ligamentous means also may be secured to the periphery of the body member with a biologic adhesive such as fibrin glue, ... mooring means for directly attaching the body member to adjacent connective tissue while drawing the connective tissue to the ...
The chemical adhesive 1010 may include fibrin backed adhesive, cyanoacrylate bond adhesive or aldehyde bond adhesive. ... The combination of a chemical adhesive with a tissue growth promoting material in a specific area of the lung would promote a ... The device of claim 1 including a suture in combination with the implantable structure to hold the parietal pleura adjacent to ... of a fibrin backed adhesive, a cyanoacrylate bond adhesive, and a aldehyde bond adhesive. 13. ...
The tissue implant may be bioabsorbable, consists of a biocompatible polymeric foam. The tissue implant also includes a ... fibrin clots, platelet rich plasma, platelet poor plasma, blood clots, biologically compatible adhesives, and combinations ... wherein the implant is placed adjacent to a lesion that constitutes tear such that the implant reinforces the tissue. 7. The ... A biocompatible tissue implant. The tissue implant may be bioabsorbable, consists of a biocompatible polymeric foam. The tissue ...
An adhesive such as a fibrin sealant, or a resorbable cyanoacrylateadhesive may further be utilized to secure the rolled ... Adjacent tissues preferably press at least portions of the rolled resorbable membrane 101, or windows thereof, into proximity ... The space within the rolled resorbable membrane 101 is protected fromany prolapse of adjacent soft tissues, for example, and is ... Thesecells are present in these tissues and are involved in the perpetual renewal of each specific tissue, although in their ...
Introduction: Tissue adhesives can be used as adjacent to sutures to drop or avoid bleeding in cardiovascular operations.. ... In contrast to synthetic adhesives, fibrin adhesives present the advantage of being biocompatible and biodegradable. The fibrin ... biological origin TA is the fibrin adhesive and the synthetic origin TA is the cyanoacrylate. The fibrin adhesive is made up of ... Tests of experimental tissue adhesive sealants:analysis of strength effects in relation to tissue adhesive sealant standards. ...
... processes of formation and lysis of stroma that more actively occurring at the boundary between tumour and adjacent tissue may ... The morphological features of the CV type-1 testify that the disorder of the adhesive properties of tumour cells is of the key ... promote the formation of a fibrin matrix and a migration of endothelial cells [28]. There is a good reason to believe that the ... 1. Folkman J. Is tissue mass regulated by vascular endothelial cells? Prostate as the first evidence. Endocrinology. 1998;139(2 ...
... reaction can kill adjacent bone tissue. Also, the poor bonding to bone leads to aseptic loosening, the major cause of PMMA ... 0004]Fibrin glues, based on the blood clotting protein fibrinogen, have been tested for fixing bone grafts and repairing ... and applying the bone-tissue scaffold to the bone and tissue. 49. The method of claim 48, wherein the tissue comprises ... 0062]In other aspects, the adhesive complex coacervates can be used to secure scaffolds to bone and other tissues such as, for ...
adhesive inflammation. promotes adhesion of adjacent surfaces.. atrophic inflammation. one that causes atrophy and deformity. ... one marked by an exudate of coagulated fibrin.. fibrous inflammation. leads to the development of fibrous tissue. ... that in which necrosis on or near the surface leads to loss of tissue and creation of a local defect or ulcer. ... manifested by the development of a fibrinous exudate which is firmly attached to the underlying tissue, such that it cannot be ...
adhesive inflammation. promotes adhesion of adjacent surfaces.. atrophic inflammation. one that causes atrophy and deformity. ... one marked by an exudate of coagulated fibrin.. fibrous inflammation. leads to the development of fibrous tissue. ... Fibrin strands are the first signs of clot formation. 3, Pavementing of leukocytes is mediated by adhesion molecules activated ... ulcerative inflammation that in which necrosis on or near the surface leads to loss of tissue and creation of a local defect ( ...
... dissected can the adjacent conjunctiva, Tenons tissue and scar tissue be excised without risk. ... component of the fibrin adhesive can be applied to the graft stroma while the less viscous thrombin component is applied over ... dissected can the adjacent conjunctiva, Tenons tissue and scar tissue be excised without risk. ... If fibrin adhesive is not available or affordable, then the conjunctival graft can be entirely secured with a total of six ...
Lung volume reduction is performed in a minimally invasive manner by isolating a lung tissue segment, optionally reducing gas ... Other sealing methods include the use of tissue adhesives, such as fibrin glues, cyanoacrylate, etc.; the use of occlusive ... 4D, in some instances it will be desirable to reduce or selectively control the inflation of the lung tissue adjacent to the ... Any puncture holes left in the lung could then be sealed with a suitable adhesive, such as a fibrin glue. In a third aspect of ...
The more adhesive fibrin-FN-rich regions of the provisional matrix would promote stable cell-matrix contacts needed for new ... In wounds, the fibrin-FN provisional matrix supports fibroblast movements and interactions vital for tissue repair (Clark 1996 ... FN mediates cell adhesion primarily through heterodimeric integrin receptors binding to the arg-gly-asp (RGD) and adjacent ... Filopodia form in response to a fibrin-FN+tenascin-C matrix. Fibrin-FN (A and B), fibrin-FN+tenascin-C (C and D), and fibrin-FN ...
Abstract Introduction: Tissue adhesives can be used as adjacent to sutures to drop or avoid bleeding in cardiovascular ... Objective: To verify the efficiency of fibrin and cyanoacrylate adhesive to seal arterial sutures and if the adhesives ... Conclusion: There was a significant rise in the bursting pressure when tissue adhesives were used as adjacent to arterial ... Comparison of Arterial Repair through the Suture, Suture with Fibrin or Cyanoacrylate Adhesive in Ex-Vivo Porcine Aortic ...
Reduce blood loss due to the incision adjacent to pathologically adhesive placenta ... Abnormal blood supply of invaded tissue, adhesions, a narrow operating space and a lack of dissection planes may make this ... such as fibrin glue and polyglycolic mesh. They performed an antero-posterior fundal extra hysterotomy (DI) to extract the ... The surface area of the implantation site involved and the depth of trophoblastic tissue ingrowth are variable among women, but ...
... stitches and fibrin glue was injected to seal the two layers.40 Sutureless repair Availability of tissue adhesive materials has ... A TachoSil® patch is applied to widely cover the ventricular wall rupture and the adjacent infarcted tissues. ... More recently, the availa- bility of tissue adhesive materials and surgical glues have allowed the wide diffusion of the ... Fibrin glues function by reproducing the normal clotting cascade and result in a stable fibrin matrix after the degradation of ...
Different types of tissue adhesives that are currently available include fibrin glue, cyanoacrylate adhesives and ... there is an idea of gluing the skin flap and adjacent tissues together with tissue adhesive to physically close up any dead ... In this study, a novel aldehyde-free double-crosslinked tissue adhesive is designed and developed by constituting (1) gelatin- ... glutaraldehyde-based adhesives, but these tissues adhesives are not suitable for large-area in vivo uses to prevent seroma ...
The use of tissue adhesives instead of sutures in ophthalmic surgery was first proposed in the 1960s (1). In a previous study ... 6. Spierer A, Barequet I, Rosner M, Solomon A, Martinowitz U. Reattachment of extraocular muscles using fibrin glue in a rabbit ... Figure 1: A silastic strip inserted beneath the muscle with the proximal end adjacent to the scleral insertion. ... Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesives : an advance in wound care. JAMA 1997; 277:1559-1560. ...
This disclosure relates to surgical stapling apparatus for enhancing one or more properties of body tissue that is or is to be ... Examples of sealants which can be employed include fibrin sealants and collagen-based and synthetic polymer-based tissue ... Enhancement of activation for biological tissue adhesives, bonding agents and sealants using "color change" chromophores. ... within the staple slots for mechanically securing adjacent layers of body tissue to one another, and at least one conduit ...
  • The fibrin acts like a glue to seal the injury and builds the fledgling adhesion, said at this point to be "fibrinous. (wikipedia.org)
  • Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of platelet-enriched fibrin glue and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the repair of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants. (elsevier.com)
  • Six gaps were left empty (control group), 6 gaps were filled with autogenous particulate bone mixed with PRP (PRP group), and 6 gaps were filled with autogenous particulate bone mixed with platelet-enriched fibrin glue (fibrin glue group). (elsevier.com)
  • 05). Discussion and Conclusion: Greater bone-implant contact was achieved with platelet-enriched fibrin glue than with PRP. (elsevier.com)
  • The results indicate that platelet-enriched fibrin glue can induce a stronger peri-implant bone reaction than PRP in the treatment of bone defects adjacent to titanium dental implants. (elsevier.com)
  • It is also more economical, only requiring a short additional surgical time when combined with fibrin glue application. (healio.com)
  • Definitive hemostasis can subsequently be obtained if necessary by rapidly with drawing the sponge and either performing cauterization or dripping the two-part fibrin glue into the depth of the wound to produce an adhesive seal. (healio.com)
  • Different types of tissue adhesives that are currently available include fibrin glue, cyanoacrylate adhesives and glutaraldehyde-based adhesives, but these tissues adhesives are not suitable for large-area in vivo uses to prevent seroma formation. (ntu.edu.sg)
  • The results were encouraging in terms of both the tensile strength and the absence of significant signs of tissue inflammatory response to the glue. (ispub.com)
  • Surgeons should not jib to perform episioproctotomy for rectovaginal reported from advancement flaps, fibrin glue, and anal fistula fistula indirect to cryptoglandular or obstetrical origination. (nippon-kan.org)
  • Interest of the scientific Introduction principle championing the success of fibrin glue is not decent its know-how to stock up music pretension and fluid tightness through the polymerization of thedirectorship of fistula-in-ano remains a difficult and fibrinogen within the fistula area, but also its proficiency to frustrating problem for surgeons and patients alike. (nippon-kan.org)
  • Eye rubbing causing conjunctival graft dehiscence following pterygium surgery with fibrin glue. (medscape.com)
  • Shown here is this an example where a fibrin glue was injected into the cyst (red dot). (burtonreport.com)
  • Kanazawa H, Kasamatsu A, Uzawa K. Mucosal defect repair with a polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue after resection of large pleomorphic adenoma of the palate. (edoriumjournals.com)
  • In this case, we examined the validity of grafting a polyglycolic acid sheet and fibrin glue over a mucosal defect of the palate with a bony surface, as a substitute for a surgical splint. (edoriumjournals.com)
  • The patient underwent wide local resection of the lesion, and the mucosal defect was immediately covered with polyglycolic acid sheets, that were fixed with a fibrin glue spray. (edoriumjournals.com)
  • Grafting the polyglycolic acid sheet with fibrin glue fixation is a useful substitute for the conventional surgical splint to cover a mucosal defect of the hard palate. (edoriumjournals.com)
  • Polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets, a soft non-woven fabric, followed by its fixation using fibrin glue spray has been used to cover wounds and to prevent bleeding and leakage during surgery on the liver, pancreas, and lung because of its ability to be strongly affixed to the wound . (edoriumjournals.com)
  • This results in the activation of fibrin , which forms a mesh and acts as "glue" to bind platelets to each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expression levels of fibronectin (FN), an adhesive protein, and tenascin-C, an ECM protein that modulates cell-FN interactions, vary during wound repair, tumor formation, and embryonic development. (rupress.org)
  • In search During the stipulatory matrix that forms in the wound these reasons surgeons clothed searched in the service of substitute methods during early healing, fibrin becomes coated with vitronec- of treating fistula-in-ano. (nippon-kan.org)
  • Wound healing involves the synthesis of several types of tissue and scar formation. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The fibrin clot acts like a highway for the migration of cells into the wound site. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The first principle of wound care is the removal of nonviable tissue, including necrotic (dead) tissue, slough, foreign debris, and residual material from dressings. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The first principle of wound care is the removal of non-viable tissue including necrotic (dead) tissue, slough, foreign debris, and residual material from dressings. (encyclopedia.com)
  • It's effective also on wound protection achieving a faster healing of soft-tissue. (dentalxp.com)
  • Burn wound management consists of measures to limit bacterial infection in the wound and on adjacent tissue. (gii.co.jp)
  • The medium is favorable for pathogenic growth because of the necrotic tissue and warm environment that exist within the burn wound dressing. (gii.co.jp)
  • Rapid closure of an integumentary or visceral wound is essential for restoration of tissue and organ integrity. (jci.org)
  • Wound healing is a complex process in which the skin, and the tissues under it, repair themselves after injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Concurrently, re-epithelialization of the epidermis occurs, in which epithelial cells proliferate and 'crawl' atop the wound bed, providing cover for the new tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4 The degree of pressure to the wounded tissue is small, but when all areas of the wound work together in an effort to close toward the center point, the effect of negative pressure becomes impressive and results in quicker healing and resolution. (tripod.com)
  • The adhesive drape helps to provide a semiocclusive environment that supports moist wound healing, which has been the standard for wound care since the mid-1980s. (tripod.com)
  • The tissue surrounding a wound is typically characterized by a localized buildup of interstitial (third-space) fluid. (tripod.com)
  • The European wound and tissue management market includes moist, antimicrobial and interactive wound dressings, negative pressure wound therapy, bandages, wound closure devices, hemostats, tissue sealants and anti-adhesion products. (giichinese.com.tw)
  • The European market for wound and tissue management includes any device that treats wounds to the skin, dermal layers and adjacent subcutaneous tissues in addition to devices that manage trauma to tissue and blood vessels during surgery. (giichinese.com.tw)
  • Wound closure devices hold together tissue long enough for the body to develop scar tissue. (giichinese.com.tw)
  • Wound and tissue management devices are essential to individuals who lack a properly functioning circulatory system and who have a decreased ability to induce blood coagulation or the inflammatory response. (giichinese.com.tw)
  • Rise in aging population, growing rates of chronic diseases, enhanced focus on hospital acquired infections, increasing awareness about different wound care products and technological advancements are some of the key factors driving the European wound and tissue management market. (giichinese.com.tw)
  • Additional cytokines and the hypoxic condition at the site of injury may also influence peritoneal fibroblasts to attain a phenotype supporting formation of adhesion tissue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • MPs are subcellular fragments or organelles that serve as carriers of lipids, adhesive receptors, cytokines, nucleic acids, and tissue-degrading enzymes that are unique to the parental cells. (springer.com)
  • It functions in primary hemostasis by forming an adhesive bridge between platelets and vascular subendothelial structures as well as between adjacent platelets at sites of endothelial injury. (diabetesaid.com)
  • Cytokine Activation of Vascular Endothelium, Effects on Tissue-Type 1 Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor" The J. of Biological Chem. (patentgenius.com)
  • In this review, we take a brief look at the developments of this technology through the years, with a focus on the more recent developments of laser-assisted vascular anastomoses, the unilink system, vascular closure staples, tissue adhesives, and magnets. (scitemed.com)
  • Ever since the 1900's, research had started on other methods of vascular anastomosis and still being continued till this day, concerning the use of lasers, tissue adhesives, extraluminal cuffing rings, and everting pinned-ring devices, metallic stapling devices, and magnets. (scitemed.com)
  • This new and very vascular connective tissue is referred to as granulation tissue. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Thrombosis in the deep veins has been associated with remote tissue injury, combined with a period of vascular stasis. (ahajournals.org)
  • A vascular prosthesis comprises pericardial, fascial, or other tissue formed over a tubular support frame. (justia.com)
  • The tissue is preferably obtained from the patient who is to receive the vascular prosthesis, with the tissue being mounted over the frame immediately prior to use. (justia.com)
  • The present invention relates generally to medical methods and devices, and more particularly to a method and apparatus for forming vascular prostheses from host tissue sources. (justia.com)
  • Conversely, we now know that vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) produce proteins like tissue factor that modulate the coagulation cascade in the absence of endothelial disruption. (ahajournals.org)
  • In the circulation, factor Xa and its cofactor Va activate thrombin, and the activation of Xa is controlled by tissue factor, a membrane protein that is expressed at sites of vascular injury. (ahajournals.org)
  • The inflammatory response is dependent on the depth and volume of tissue loss from the injury. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Delay or failure to do so can facilitate exposure to luminal antigens and potentially direct invasion of luminal microorganisms into the host, resulting in a heightened pro‐inflammatory response, worsened tissue damage, and systemic infection. (embopress.org)
  • Synthetic BioGlue caused an acute inflammatory response that resulted in a delayed gliosis in the superficial cerebral cortex, but the deep layers and adjacent areas of cortex were spared. (bvsalud.org)
  • Leukocyte and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF) is a 3-D autogenous biomaterial derived via simple and rapid centrifugation of whole blood patient samples, in the absence of anti-coagulants, bovine thrombin, additives or any gelifying agents. (intechopen.com)
  • They may be thought of as internal scar tissue that connects tissues not normally connected. (wikipedia.org)
  • This muscle often becomes enmeshed in scar tissue, especially in recurrent cases, and disguises its identity, placing it at risk of being damaged or even severed unless extreme caution is exercised during the dissection. (healio.com)
  • Only when the rectus muscle is clearly identified (with a traction suture or muscle hook) and cleanly dissected can the adjacent conjunctiva, Tenon's tissue and scar tissue be excised without risk. (healio.com)
  • During this time the loose strands are transformed into dense scar tissue, blood vessels and even nerve endings appear in them. (iliveok.com)
  • After 4 weeks, the muscles presented a tendon-like appearance, and histological examination revealed a leukocyte infiltration followed (8 and 10 weeks) by the appearance of fibrous tissue, which gradually replaced almost all of the muscle fibres in the segment attached to the strip. (ispub.com)
  • This requires thorough understanding of the molecular sequence that results in the attachment of injured peritoneum and the development of fibrous tissue. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 7. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of adding to the tissue at least one additional material from a group which consists of antibiotics, bone growth enhancers, tricalcium phosphate, fibrin, allograft material and autograft material. (google.co.uk)
  • Severe gum disease which may affect the supporting tissues and bone structures of teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue grafting, including bone grafting, is well known. (justia.com)
  • Tissue such as bone is removed from one part of a body (the donor site) and inserted into tissue in another (the host site) part of the same (or another) body. (justia.com)
  • The process of pulverizing or milling the bone materials destroys the structure of the bone tissue. (justia.com)
  • The use of living tissue in a graft will promote bone healing. (justia.com)
  • Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a well-defined, expansive bone resorption of the adjacent right upper alveolar ridge of the molar region (Figure 2A) . (edoriumjournals.com)
  • The use of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) for repair of large bone defects is one of the few protein-based tissue engineering strategies that are currently in widespread clinical use. (sciencemag.org)
  • Suppression of GTPase activation allows tenascin-C expression to act as a regulatory switch to reverse the effects of adhesive proteins on Rho function. (rupress.org)
  • This provides a mechanism for modulating cell functions through temporal and spatial variations in proportions of adhesive and anti-adhesive ECM proteins. (rupress.org)
  • Biomolecular therapies (e.g. genes and proteins), cell-based therapies, (e.g. stem cells and chondrocytes), and total disc replacement (allogeneic or tissue-engineered) are the broad categories of research in biologics for DDD. (cureus.com)
  • Here, we report that tenascin-C markedly altered cell phenotype on a three-dimensional fibrin matrix containing FN, resulting in suppression of actin stress fibers and induction of actin-rich filopodia. (rupress.org)
  • The brain tissues were obtained from 3 groups at 6 months and 12 months to examine the differences in histology and cell proliferation between control and RF exposure groups, but we could not find any change upon RF radiation. (bvsalud.org)
  • Quantitative analysis of three-dimensional human mammary epithelial tissue architecture reveals a role for tenascin-C in regulating c-met function. (genes2cognition.org)
  • Epithelial tissues line the external and internal surfaces of the body and provide an effective environment to protect the organism from the outside world. (jimmunol.org)
  • Epithelial tissues, including the skin, intestine, and lung are the largest organs in the body and, together, are the residence of the vast majority of lymphocytes in the body ( 1 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • There is a resident population of γδ T cells in the epithelial tissues of all mammalian species ( 2 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • In other epithelial tissues, including the intestine and lung, the γδ T cells coexist with αβ T cells and other lymphocyte populations. (jimmunol.org)
  • Strikingly, the TCR γ and δ genes are rearranged and expressed in an ordered manner during thymic ontogeny, and T cells expressing specific Vγ and Vδ gene pairs migrate from the developing thymus to take up residence in specific epithelial tissues ( Fig. 1 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • The γδ T cells that localize in epithelial tissues have mainly tissue-specific TCRs with limited or no diversity. (jimmunol.org)
  • The extracellular matrix material serves as tissue regenerating material. (google.de)
  • Remodeling of the stromal extracellular matrix and elevated expression of specific proto-oncogenes within the adjacent epithelium represent cardinal features of breast cancer, yet how these events become integrated is not fully understood. (genes2cognition.org)
  • In concert with these data, another study of circulating tissue factor procoagulant activity found elevated factor VIIc, tissue factor, and thrombin complexes in patients with DM2 (46). (diabetesaid.com)
  • our specialty has come to face complex cases where hard and soft tissue deficiencies are quite common. (dentalxp.com)
  • Several forms of denture-related hyperplastic soft-tissue lesions are recognised but they all arise as a result of loss of denture fit and are therefore more often seen in the 'old denture' wearer, who is often the satisfied denture wearer. (mitchmedical.us)
  • The field of tissue engineering combines the methods of engineering with the principles of life science to understand the structural and functional relationships in normal and pathological mammalian tissues. (google.com.au)
  • Here, we demonstrate that fibrous networks of the blood clotting protein fibrin undergo a strong and irreversible increase in their mechanical rigidity in response to compression. (groundai.com)
  • The primary pathway of coagulation is initiated or triggered by the interaction of circulating factor VIIa with its cofactor tissue factor (TF). (tomhsiung.com)
  • 11 . A tube system according to any one of claims 8 to 10 , characterised in that autologous urothelial cells, preferably in-vitro cultured autologous urothelial cells, are provided in the space ( 4 ) between the tubes ( 2 , 5 ) which cells are suspended in a transportation matrix, preferably in a fibrin adhesive. (google.com)
  • Means are preferably provided for monitoring and controlling the amount of force or pressure applied to the piece of tissue, in order to maintain the tissue in a viable living condition. (justia.com)
  • They are either round or oval, adhered internally to the pia by a wide base pedicle (Figure 1) with direct contact with the venous sinuses as they appear submerged in them, while the opposite end appears to protrude toward the subarachnoid compartment, including some connective tissue, trabeculae intertwined with other trabeculae coming from the veins but saturated, in the inward space, mostly as a sponge, by CSF. (populus.org)
  • Coronary and peripheral atherosclerosis are characterized by partial or total occlusion of the arteries resulting from the accumulation of lipids, smooth muscle cells, connective tissue, and glycosaminoglycans on the arterial wall. (justia.com)
  • The invention is directed to bioengineered graft prostheses made from two or more superimposed, chemically bonded layers of processed tissue material prepared from cleaned tissue material derived from animal sources. (google.com.au)
  • The bioengineered graft prostheses of the invention are prepared using methods that preserve cell compatibility, strength, and bioremodelability of the processed tissue matrix. (google.com.au)
  • The invention is directed to bioengineered graft prostheses prepared from cleaned tissue material derived from animal sources. (google.com.au)
  • It is desirable to be able to remove a piece of tissue graft material which is the exact size and shape needed for the host site where it will be implanted. (justia.com)
  • Specifically, applicant has found that it is desirable to maintain graft tissue in a living state during the grafting process. (justia.com)
  • Pericardial tissue is harvested from the patient and formed into a tubular graft by suturing along a longitudinal line. (justia.com)