Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Platelet Adhesiveness: The process whereby PLATELETS adhere to something other than platelets, e.g., COLLAGEN; BASEMENT MEMBRANE; MICROFIBRILS; or other "foreign" surfaces.Cell Aggregation: The phenomenon by which dissociated cells intermixed in vitro tend to group themselves with cells of their own type.Cell Adhesion Molecules: Surface ligands, usually glycoproteins, that mediate cell-to-cell adhesion. Their functions include the assembly and interconnection of various vertebrate systems, as well as maintenance of tissue integration, wound healing, morphogenic movements, cellular migrations, and metastasis.Endothelium, Vascular: Single pavement layer of cells which line the luminal surface of the entire vascular system and regulate the transport of macromolecules and blood components.Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1: A cell-surface ligand involved in leukocyte adhesion and inflammation. Its production is induced by gamma-interferon and it is required for neutrophil migration into inflamed tissue.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1: Cytokine-induced cell adhesion molecule present on activated endothelial cells, tissue macrophages, dendritic cells, bone marrow fibroblasts, myoblasts, and myotubes. It is important for the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. (From Pigott & Power, The Adhesion Molecule FactsBook, 1993, p154)Bacterial Adhesion: Physicochemical property of fimbriated (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) and non-fimbriated bacteria of attaching to cells, tissue, and nonbiological surfaces. It is a factor in bacterial colonization and pathogenicity.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Leukocyte Rolling: Movement of tethered, spherical LEUKOCYTES along the endothelial surface of the microvasculature. The tethering and rolling involves interaction with SELECTINS and other adhesion molecules in both the ENDOTHELIUM and leukocyte. The rolling leukocyte then becomes activated by CHEMOKINES, flattens out, and firmly adheres to the endothelial surface in preparation for transmigration through the interendothelial cell junction. (From Abbas, Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 3rd ed)Phenylbutazone: A butyl-diphenyl-pyrazolidinedione that has anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, and analgesic activities. It has been used in ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS; RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS; and REACTIVE ARTHRITIS.N-Formylmethionine: Effective in the initiation of protein synthesis. The initiating methionine residue enters the ribosome as N-formylmethionyl tRNA. This process occurs in Escherichia coli and other bacteria as well as in the mitochondria of eucaryotic cells.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Lymphocyte Function-Associated Antigen-1: An integrin heterodimer widely expressed on cells of hematopoietic origin. CD11A ANTIGEN comprises the alpha chain and the CD18 antigen (ANTIGENS, CD18) the beta chain. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 is a major receptor of T-CELLS; B-CELLS; and GRANULOCYTES. It mediates the leukocyte adhesion reactions underlying cytolytic conjugate formation, helper T-cell interactions, and antibody-dependent killing by NATURAL KILLER CELLS and granulocytes. Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 has been defined as a ligand for lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.E-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates neutrophil, monocyte, and memory T-cell adhesion to cytokine-activated endothelial cells. E-selectin recognizes sialylated carbohydrate groups related to the Lewis X or Lewis A family.Integrins: A family of transmembrane glycoproteins (MEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEINS) consisting of noncovalent heterodimers. They interact with a wide variety of ligands including EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX PROTEINS; COMPLEMENT, and other cells, while their intracellular domains interact with the CYTOSKELETON. The integrins consist of at least three identified families: the cytoadhesin receptors(RECEPTORS, CYTOADHESIN), the leukocyte adhesion receptors (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION), and the VERY LATE ANTIGEN RECEPTORS. Each family contains a common beta-subunit (INTEGRIN BETA CHAINS) combined with one or more distinct alpha-subunits (INTEGRIN ALPHA CHAINS). These receptors participate in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion in many physiologically important processes, including embryological development; HEMOSTASIS; THROMBOSIS; WOUND HEALING; immune and nonimmune defense mechanisms; and oncogenic transformation.Cadherins: Calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins. They are important in the formation of ADHERENS JUNCTIONS between cells. Cadherins are classified by their distinct immunological and tissue specificities, either by letters (E- for epithelial, N- for neural, and P- for placental cadherins) or by numbers (cadherin-12 or N-cadherin 2 for brain-cadherin). Cadherins promote cell adhesion via a homophilic mechanism as in the construction of tissues and of the whole animal body.Antigens, CD18: Cell-surface glycoprotein beta-chains that are non-covalently linked to specific alpha-chains of the CD11 family of leukocyte-adhesion molecules (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION). A defect in the gene encoding CD18 causes LEUKOCYTE-ADHESION DEFICIENCY SYNDROME.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Monocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Integrin alpha4beta1: Integrin alpha4beta1 is a FIBRONECTIN and VCAM-1 receptor present on LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; EOSINOPHILS; NK CELLS and thymocytes. It is involved in both cell-cell and cell- EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX adhesion and plays a role in INFLAMMATION, hematopoietic cell homing and immune function, and has been implicated in skeletal MYOGENESIS; NEURAL CREST migration and proliferation, lymphocyte maturation and morphogenesis of the PLACENTA and HEART.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Vinculin: A cytoskeletal protein associated with cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The amino acid sequence of human vinculin has been determined. The protein consists of 1066 amino acid residues and its gene has been assigned to chromosome 10.Cytoskeleton: The network of filaments, tubules, and interconnecting filamentous bridges which give shape, structure, and organization to the cytoplasm.Intercellular Junctions: Direct contact of a cell with a neighboring cell. Most such junctions are too small to be resolved by light microscopy, but they can be visualized by conventional or freeze-fracture electron microscopy, both of which show that the interacting CELL MEMBRANE and often the underlying CYTOPLASM and the intervening EXTRACELLULAR SPACE are highly specialized in these regions. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p792)Selectins: Transmembrane proteins consisting of a lectin-like domain, an epidermal growth factor-like domain, and a variable number of domains that are homologous to complement regulatory proteins. They are important cell adhesion molecules which help LEUKOCYTES attach to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM.Fibronectins: Glycoproteins found on the surfaces of cells, particularly in fibrillar structures. The proteins are lost or reduced when these cells undergo viral or chemical transformation. They are highly susceptible to proteolysis and are substrates for activated blood coagulation factor VIII. The forms present in plasma are called cold-insoluble globulins.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Glass: Hard, amorphous, brittle, inorganic, usually transparent, polymerous silicate of basic oxides, usually potassium or sodium. It is used in the form of hard sheets, vessels, tubing, fibers, ceramics, beads, etc.Adenine NucleotidesEpoxy Resins: Polymeric resins derived from OXIRANES and characterized by strength and thermosetting properties. Epoxy resins are often used as dental materials.Umbilical Veins: Venous vessels in the umbilical cord. They carry oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood from the mother to the FETUS via the PLACENTA. In humans, there is normally one umbilical vein.P-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that mediates the adhesion of neutrophils and monocytes to activated platelets and endothelial cells.Chemotaxis, Leukocyte: The movement of leukocytes in response to a chemical concentration gradient or to products formed in an immunologic reaction.Limb Buds: Distinct regions of mesenchymal outgrowth at both flanks of an embryo during the SOMITE period. Limb buds, covered by ECTODERM, give rise to forelimb, hindlimb, and eventual functional limb structures. Limb bud cultures are used to study CELL DIFFERENTIATION; ORGANOGENESIS; and MORPHOGENESIS.Eye Enucleation: The surgical removal of the eyeball leaving the eye muscles and remaining orbital contents intact.Edetic Acid: A chelating agent that sequesters a variety of polyvalent cations such as CALCIUM. It is used in pharmaceutical manufacturing and as a food additive.Cytochalasin B: A cytotoxic member of the CYTOCHALASINS.Calreticulin: A multifunctional protein that is found primarily within membrane-bound organelles. In the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM it binds to specific N-linked oligosaccharides found on newly-synthesized proteins and functions as a MOLECULAR CHAPERONE that may play a role in PROTEIN FOLDING or retention and degradation of misfolded proteins. In addition calreticulin is a major storage form for CALCIUM and functions as a calcium-signaling molecule that can regulate intracellular calcium HOMEOSTASIS.Desmosomes: A type of junction that attaches one cell to its neighbor. One of a number of differentiated regions which occur, for example, where the cytoplasmic membranes of adjacent epithelial cells are closely apposed. It consists of a circular region of each membrane together with associated intracellular microfilaments and an intercellular material which may include, for example, mucopolysaccharides. (From Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Endothelium: A layer of epithelium that lines the heart, blood vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, VASCULAR), lymph vessels (ENDOTHELIUM, LYMPHATIC), and the serous cavities of the body.Pigment Epithelium of Eye: The layer of pigment-containing epithelial cells in the RETINA; the CILIARY BODY; and the IRIS in the eye.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Macrophage-1 Antigen: An adhesion-promoting leukocyte surface membrane heterodimer. The alpha subunit consists of the CD11b ANTIGEN and the beta subunit the CD18 ANTIGEN. The antigen, which is an integrin, functions both as a receptor for complement 3 and in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesive interactions.Fimbriae, Bacterial: Thin, hairlike appendages, 1 to 20 microns in length and often occurring in large numbers, present on the cells of gram-negative bacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae and Neisseria. Unlike flagella, they do not possess motility, but being protein (pilin) in nature, they possess antigenic and hemagglutinating properties. They are of medical importance because some fimbriae mediate the attachment of bacteria to cells via adhesins (ADHESINS, BACTERIAL). Bacterial fimbriae refer to common pili, to be distinguished from the preferred use of "pili", which is confined to sex pili (PILI, SEX).Methods: A series of steps taken in order to conduct research.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.Matched-Pair Analysis: A type of analysis in which subjects in a study group and a comparison group are made comparable with respect to extraneous factors by individually pairing study subjects with the comparison group subjects (e.g., age-matched controls).Antigens, CD11: A group of three different alpha chains (CD11a, CD11b, CD11c) that are associated with an invariant CD18 beta chain (ANTIGENS, CD18). The three resulting leukocyte-adhesion molecules (RECEPTORS, LEUKOCYTE ADHESION) are LYMPHOCYTE FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN-1; MACROPHAGE-1 ANTIGEN; and ANTIGEN, P150,95.Colchicine: A major alkaloid from Colchicum autumnale L. and found also in other Colchicum species. Its primary therapeutic use is in the treatment of gout, but it has been used also in the therapy of familial Mediterranean fever (PERIODIC DISEASE).Laminin: Large, noncollagenous glycoprotein with antigenic properties. It is localized in the basement membrane lamina lucida and functions to bind epithelial cells to the basement membrane. Evidence suggests that the protein plays a role in tumor invasion.Antigens, CD29: Integrin beta-1 chains which are expressed as heterodimers that are noncovalently associated with specific alpha-chains of the CD49 family (CD49a-f). CD29 is expressed on resting and activated leukocytes and is a marker for all of the very late activation antigens on cells. (from: Barclay et al., The Leukocyte Antigen FactsBook, 1993, p164)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Chick Embryo: The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.Chemotactic Factors: Chemical substances that attract or repel cells. The concept denotes especially those factors released as a result of tissue injury, microbial invasion, or immunologic activity, that attract LEUKOCYTES; MACROPHAGES; or other cells to the site of infection or insult.Microscopy, Phase-Contrast: A form of interference microscopy in which variations of the refracting index in the object are converted into variations of intensity in the image. This is achieved by the action of a phase plate.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Rheology: The study of the deformation and flow of matter, usually liquids or fluids, and of the plastic flow of solids. The concept covers consistency, dilatancy, liquefaction, resistance to flow, shearing, thixotrophy, and VISCOSITY.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Hemagglutination: The aggregation of ERYTHROCYTES by AGGLUTININS, including antibodies, lectins, and viral proteins (HEMAGGLUTINATION, VIRAL).N-Formylmethionine Leucyl-Phenylalanine: A formylated tripeptide originally isolated from bacterial filtrates that is positively chemotactic to polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and causes them to release lysosomal enzymes and become metabolically activated.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.L-Selectin: Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that serves as a homing receptor for lymphocytes to lymph node high endothelial venules.Extracellular Matrix: A meshwork-like substance found within the extracellular space and in association with the basement membrane of the cell surface. It promotes cellular proliferation and provides a supporting structure to which cells or cell lysates in culture dishes adhere.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Microscopy, Electron: Microscopy using an electron beam, instead of light, to visualize the sample, thereby allowing much greater magnification. The interactions of ELECTRONS with specimens are used to provide information about the fine structure of that specimen. In TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY the reactions of the electrons that are transmitted through the specimen are imaged. In SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY an electron beam falls at a non-normal angle on the specimen and the image is derived from the reactions occurring above the plane of the specimen.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Cell Size: The quantity of volume or surface area of CELLS.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Adhesins, Bacterial: Cell-surface components or appendages of bacteria that facilitate adhesion (BACTERIAL ADHESION) to other cells or to inanimate surfaces. Most fimbriae (FIMBRIAE, BACTERIAL) of gram-negative bacteria function as adhesins, but in many cases it is a minor subunit protein at the tip of the fimbriae that is the actual adhesin. In gram-positive bacteria, a protein or polysaccharide surface layer serves as the specific adhesin. What is sometimes called polymeric adhesin (BIOFILMS) is distinct from protein adhesin.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.ZymosanCell Communication: Any of several ways in which living cells of an organism communicate with one another, whether by direct contact between cells or by means of chemical signals carried by neurotransmitter substances, hormones, and cyclic AMP.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Embryo Implantation: Endometrial implantation of EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN at the BLASTOCYST stage.Cytoskeletal Proteins: Major constituent of the cytoskeleton found in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They form a flexible framework for the cell, provide attachment points for organelles and formed bodies, and make communication between parts of the cell possible.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Hypercholesterolemia: A condition with abnormally high levels of CHOLESTEROL in the blood. It is defined as a cholesterol value exceeding the 95th percentile for the population.Fibrinolysis: The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Fibroblasts: Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate: A phorbol ester found in CROTON OIL with very effective tumor promoting activity. It stimulates the synthesis of both DNA and RNA.Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Leukocytes, Mononuclear: Mature LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES transported by the blood to the body's extravascular space. They are morphologically distinguishable from mature granulocytic leukocytes by their large, non-lobed nuclei and lack of coarse, heavily stained cytoplasmic granules.Chemotaxis: The movement of cells or organisms toward or away from a substance in response to its concentration gradient.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Epithelium: One or more layers of EPITHELIAL CELLS, supported by the basal lamina, which covers the inner or outer surfaces of the body.Magnesium: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.Extracellular Matrix Proteins: Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).Trypsin: A serine endopeptidase that is formed from TRYPSINOGEN in the pancreas. It is converted into its active form by ENTEROPEPTIDASE in the small intestine. It catalyzes hydrolysis of the carboxyl group of either arginine or lysine. EC 3.4.21.4.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Erythrocytes: Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Membrane Proteins: Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.Neoplasm Invasiveness: Ability of neoplasms to infiltrate and actively destroy surrounding tissue.Adenosine Diphosphate: Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.beta Catenin: A multi-functional catenin that participates in CELL ADHESION and nuclear signaling. Beta catenin binds CADHERINS and helps link their cytoplasmic tails to the ACTIN in the CYTOSKELETON via ALPHA CATENIN. It also serves as a transcriptional co-activator and downstream component of WNT PROTEIN-mediated SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.PolysaccharidesClone Cells: A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Up-Regulation: A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Arginine: An essential amino acid that is physiologically active in the L-form.Interleukin-1: A soluble factor produced by MONOCYTES; MACROPHAGES, and other cells which activates T-lymphocytes and potentiates their response to mitogens or antigens. Interleukin-1 is a general term refers to either of the two distinct proteins, INTERLEUKIN-1ALPHA and INTERLEUKIN-1BETA. The biological effects of IL-1 include the ability to replace macrophage requirements for T-cell activation.Antigens, Surface: Antigens on surfaces of cells, including infectious or foreign cells or viruses. They are usually protein-containing groups on cell membranes or walls and may be isolated.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Phosphorylation: The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Aorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Membrane Glycoproteins: Glycoproteins found on the membrane or surface of cells.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Tyrosine: A non-essential amino acid. In animals it is synthesized from PHENYLALANINE. It is also the precursor of EPINEPHRINE; THYROID HORMONES; and melanin.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Enzyme Activation: Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Protein Kinase C: An serine-threonine protein kinase that requires the presence of physiological concentrations of CALCIUM and membrane PHOSPHOLIPIDS. The additional presence of DIACYLGLYCEROLS markedly increases its sensitivity to both calcium and phospholipids. The sensitivity of the enzyme can also be increased by PHORBOL ESTERS and it is believed that protein kinase C is the receptor protein of tumor-promoting phorbol esters.Mice, Inbred BALB CCell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Mice, Inbred C57BL

The forward rate of binding of surface-tethered reactants: effect of relative motion between two surfaces. (1/1085)

The reaction of molecules confined to two dimensions is of interest in cell adhesion, specifically for the reaction between cell surface receptors and substrate-bound ligand. We have developed a model to describe the overall rate of reaction of species that are bound to surfaces under relative motion, such that the Peclet number is order one or greater. The encounter rate between reactive species is calculated from solution of the two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation. The probability that each encounter will lead to binding depends on the intrinsic rate of reaction and the encounter duration. The encounter duration is obtained from the theory of first passage times. We find that the binding rate increases with relative velocity between the two surfaces, then reaches a plateau. This plateau indicates that the increase in the encounter rate is counterbalanced by the decrease in the encounter duration as the relative velocity increases. The binding rate is fully described by two dimensionless parameters, the Peclet number and the Damkohler number. We use this model to explain data from the cell adhesion literature by incorporating these rate laws into "adhesive dynamics" simulations to model the binding of a cell to a surface under flow. Leukocytes are known to display a "shear threshold effect" when binding selectin-coated surfaces under shear flow, defined as an increase in bind rate with shear; this effect, as calculated here, is due to an increase in collisions between receptor and ligand with increasing shear. The model can be used to explain other published data on the effect of wall shear rate on the binding of cells to surfaces, specifically the mild decrease in binding within a fixed area with increasing shear rate.  (+info)

Adhesion energy of receptor-mediated interaction measured by elastic deformation. (2/1085)

We investigated the role of receptor binding affinity in surface adhesion. A sensitive technique was developed to measure the surface energy of receptor-mediated adhesion. The experimental system involved a functionalized elastic agarose bead resting on a functionalized glass coverslip. Attractive intersurface forces pulled the two surfaces together, deforming the bead to produce an enlarged contact area. The Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model was used to relate the surface energy of the interaction to the elasticity of the bead and the area of contact. The surface energies for different combinations of modified surfaces in solution were obtained from reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) measurements of the contact area formed by the bead and the coverslip. Studies with surfaces functionalized with ligand-receptor pairs showed that the relationship between surface energy and the association constant of the ligand binding has two regimes. At low binding affinity, surface energy increased linearly with the association constant, while surface energy increased logarithmically with the association constant in the high affinity regime.  (+info)

Steric effects of N-acyl group in O-methacryloyl-N-acyl tyrosines on the adhesiveness of unetched human dentin. (3/1085)

We have prepared various O-methacryloyl-N-acyl tyrosines (MAATY) to reveal the relationship between molecular structure near carboxylic acid and adhesive strength of MAATY-HEMA type adhesive resin to unetched dentin. In this study, we attempted to change the steric hindrance effect without changing the HLB value, i.e., introducing an iso-acyl group instead of n-acyl group into MAATY. O-methacryloyl-N-ethylbutyryl tyrosine (MIHTY) showed significantly lower adhesive strength when compared with O-methacryloyl-N-hexanoyl tyrosine even though both MAATY have the same HLB value. The possible explanation of the significantly different adhesive strength was that the 2-ethylbutyryl group in MIHTY was bulky, resulting in inhibition of the hydrogen bonding of the carboxylic group. The HLB value is independent of the steric effect of molecular structure, and thus the steric factor should be taken into consideration for the explanation of different adhesive strengths within the adhesive monomers having the same HLB value but different molecular structures.  (+info)

Adhesion of adhesive resin to dental precious metal alloys. Part I. New precious metal alloys with base metals for resin bonding. (4/1085)

New dental precious metal alloys for resin bonding without alloy surface modification were developed by adding base metals (In, Zn, or Sn). Before this, binary alloys of Au, Ag, Cu, or Pd containing In, Zn, or Sn were studied for water durability and bonding strength with 4-META resin. The adhesion ability of the binary alloys was improved by adding In equivalent to 15% of Au content, Zn equivalent to 20% of Ag content, and In, Zn, or Sn equivalent to 5% of Cu content. There was no addition effect of the base metals on Pd, however 15% of In addition improved adhesion with Pd-based alloys containing equi-atomic % of Cu and Pd. The alloy surfaces were analyzed by XPS and showed that oxides such as In2O3, ZnO, or SnO play an important role in improving the adhesive ability of the alloys.  (+info)

Adhesion of adhesive resin to dental precious metal alloys. Part II. The relationship between surface structure of Au-In alloys and adhesive ability with 4-META resin. (5/1085)

Adhesion of 4-META to Au-In alloy was improved by adding In equivalent to .15% of Au content. On the basis of the results of Au-In alloys analyzed by XPS, the present study investigated the reason why adhesion of the Au-In alloy was improved. The O 1s spectrum could be separated into three oxygen chemical states, In2O3, chemisorbed H2O, and physisorbed H2O. The amount of chemisorbed H2O decreased remarkably with increasing amount of In. It is considered that the poor adhesive ability of the pure gold and alloys containing only small amounts of In was due to the chemisorbed H2O molecules and insufficient indium oxide on the alloy surface. It was established that excellent adhesion requires an oxide with chemical affinity for 4-META to cover at least 50% of the alloy surface.  (+info)

Coating of extracorporeal circuit with heparin does not prevent sequestration of propofol in vitro. (6/1085)

Propofol is sequestered in extracorporeal circuits, but the factors responsible for the phenomenon are mostly unknown. We have compared two extracorporeal circuits (oxygenators, reservoirs and tubings) coated with heparin with two corresponding uncoated circuits for their capacity to sequester propofol in vitro. Three experiments were conducted with each circuit. The circuit was primed with a mixture of Ringer's acetate solution and whole blood, and the study conditions (pump flow, temperature, pH) were standardized. Propofol was added to the solution to achieve a concentration of 2 micrograms ml-1. These studies were followed with concentrations of 10- and 100-fold to assess possible saturation of propofol binding. Serial samples were obtained from the circulating solution for measurement of propofol concentration. Propofol concentrations decreased to 22-32% of the initial predicted concentration of 2 micrograms ml-1 in the circuits (no significant difference between circuits). With greater concentrations, the circuits did not become saturated with propofol, even with the highest predicted concentration of 200 micrograms ml-1. We conclude that propofol was sequestered in extracorporeal circuits in vitro, irrespective of coating the circuit with heparin.  (+info)

An ex vivo investigation into the bond strength of orthodontic brackets and adhesive systems. (7/1085)

The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Adhesive Precoated Brackets (APC) with that of two types of uncoated bracket bases, Straight-Wire and Dyna-Lock. Two types of orthodontic adhesives were used, Transbond XT and Right-On. Three different curing times were evaluated with the APC brackets in order to find the best. Adhesive remnants on the enamel surface following debond were evaluated using the Adhesive Remnant Index (Artun and Bergland, 1984). Bond strengths ranged from 11.00 to 22.08 MPa. For both types of brackets Transbond produced a significant increase in bond strength compared to Right-On. The Dyna-Lock/Right-On combination produced the poorest results. APC brackets cured for 40 s had similar bond strengths to uncoated brackets fixed by means of Transbond. Overall, 79 per cent of specimens had less than half the tooth surface covered with adhesive following debond. Significantly more adhesive remained on tooth surfaces following debond of the Straight-Wire/Right-On group than any other bracket/adhesive combination. Bond strengths were higher with light-cured Transbond than with chemically-cured Right-On. When Transbond is used in association with APC brackets a 40-second cure time is recommended.  (+info)

The influence of epitope availability on atomic-force microscope studies of antigen-antibody interactions. (8/1085)

The ability of the atomic-force microscope (AFM) to detect interaction forces between individual biological molecules has recently been demonstrated. In this study, force measurements have been obtained between AFM probes functionalized with the beta-subunit of human chorionic gonadotrophin (betahCG) and surfaces functionalized with anti-betahCG antibody. A comparison of the obtained results with previous anti-ferritin antibody-binding data identifies differences when the antigen molecule expresses only a single epitope (betahCG), rather than multiple epitopes (ferritin), for the monoclonal antibodies employed. Specifically, the probability of observing probe-sample adhesion is found to be higher when the antigen expresses multiple epitopes. However, the periodic force observed in the adhesive-force distribution, due to the rupture of single antigen-antibody interactions, is found to be larger and more clearly observed for the mono-epitopic system. Hence, these findings indicate the potential of the AFM to distinguish between multivalent and monovalent antibody-antigen interactions, and demonstrate the influence of the number of expressed epitopes upon such binding studies.  (+info)

Methods and compositions are provided for enhancing the bioadhesive properties of polymers used in drug delivery devices. The bioadhesive properties of a polymer are enhanced by incorporating a anhydrideoligome into the polymer to enhance the ability of the polymer to adhere to a tissue surface such as a mucosal membrane. Anhydrideoligomes which enhance the bioadhesive properties of a polymer include water-insoluble anhydrideoligomes such as water-insoluble metal oxides, including oxides of calcium, iron, copper and zinc. The anhydrideoligomes can be incorporated within a wide range of polymers including proteins, polysaccharides and synthetic biocompatible polymers. In one embodiment, metal oxides can be incorporated within polymers used to form or coat drug delivery devices, such as microspheres, which contain a drug or diagnostic agent. The metal oxides can be provided in the form of a fine dispersion of particles on the surface of a polymer that coats or forms the devices, which enhances the ability
The remarkable underwater adhesion strategy employed by mussels has inspired bioadhesives that have demonstrated promise in connective tissue repair, wound closure, and local delivery of therapeutic cells and drugs. While the pH of oxygenated blood and internal tissues is typically around 7.4, skin and tumor tissues are significantly more acidic. Additionally, blood loss during surgery and ischemia can lead to dysoxia, which lowers pH levels of internal tissues and organs. Using 4-armed PEG end-capped with dopamine (PEG-D) as a model adhesive polymer, the effect of pH on the rate of intermolecular cross-linking and adhesion to biological substrates of catechol-containing adhesives was determined. Adhesive formulated at an acidic pH (pH 5.7-6.7) demonstrated reduced curing rate, mechanical properties and adhesive performance to pericardium tissues. Although a faster curing rate was observed at pH 8, these adhesives also demonstrated reduced mechanical and bioadhesive properties when compared to ...
All information about the latest scientific publications of the Clínica Universidad de Navarra. Bioadhesive properties and biodistribution of cyclodextrin-poly(anhydride) nanoparticles
Analyse the texture of any kind of fruit or vegetable with the versatile Agrosta® Fruit Texture Analyser that can be used for either penetrometry or deflection measurements. The texture of a product is a very important to the consumer - e.g. a mushy, floury apple will not be perceived as good quality. A consistent texture is a critical quality assurance parameter.. This economical Texture Analyser can be used for the measurement of any kind of fruit or vegetable.. Measurements can be viewed on your PC with the free software that is provided.. ...
Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field that aims to repair or regenerate lost or damaged tissues and organs in the body. For the repair of certain load-bearing parts of the body, success of a tissue regeneration strategy can be dependent on scaffold adhesion or integration with the surrounding host tissue to prevent dislocation. One such area is the regeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). The objective of this work is to generate a bioadhesive polymer that, in addition to bonding with tissue, can support encapsulated cell survival post-adhesion. Thermosensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) was grafted with chondroitin sulfate (CS) (PNIPAAm-g-CS) and blended with aldehyde-modified CS to achieve covalent adhesion upon contact with tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM) loaded lipid vesicles (liposomes) were incorporated into the copolymer for enhanced cellular biocompatibility. The bioadhesive strength was evaluated in contact with porcine ear cartilage. Additionally, the cytotoxicity
We found no difference in the adhesive force or the motion of clinging digits between before and after death treatments (figure 2b,f). Although previous research and anecdotes have shown that some adhesion can still occur after death in geckos [15-17], our controlled experiments are the first to show that dead animals maintain the ability to adhere with the same force as living animals. These results refute the hypothesis that actions by a living animal, such as muscle recruitment or neural activity, are required for gecko feet to generate our high measured forces.. The high variation in adhesive force among trials on both living and dead geckos is surprising. Despite the controlled pulling force applied by our pulling device, peak adhesive force spanned a range that was 19.9 times the mean body weight. When averaged among individuals, the mean coefficients of variation for adhesive force before and after death were 0.33 and 0.36, respectively. After pooling alive and dead trials, a multiple ...
Cohesive and adhesive forces are associated with bulk (or macroscopic) properties and hence the terms are not applicable to discussion of atomic and molecular properties. When a liquid comes into …
5x4.5Window Clings are made from a special paint that acts like static that clings to your window. These amazing clings are so darn cute that youll f
The science on display is the capillary action of the water - that is, how the flower drinks even without its roots. This ability draws water against the force of gravity up the stem and into the petals. It works because the water evaporating from the petals and leaves of the plant "pulls" water up the narrow tubes in the stem (the xylem) to replace that which is lost. The tubes need to be narrow so that the combination of the surface tension of the water (caused by cohesion in the water - how well it sticks to itself) and the adhesive forces between the water and the walls of the xylem are strong enough to lift the water against the force of gravity. The adhesive forces are proportional to the diameter of the tube, whilst the weight of the water is proportional to this diameter squared - hence a smaller diameter favours the adhesive forces ...
How to Make Window Clings. Window clings are a fun way to decorate your windows for the holidays and other occasions. They are easy to peel off, rearrange, and replace. Unfortunately, store-bought ones dont come in a lot of designs, and...
Flow Range: 50 - 2,400 U.S. GPM (11 - 545 m³/hr). The LAKOS Self-Cleaning PC Screen offers continuous pump protection without the worry of routine maintenance. The internal backwash system blows debris off and away from the screen, allowing water to flow freely to the pump intake. The entire screen rotates so that debris is blown away. Better than stationary screens, which waste time and energy due to repeated clogging. Save energy, end routine maintenance, and protect the environment with LAKOS PC Self-Cleaning Pump Intake Screens.. Fish-Safe Applications ...
...Let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith... Hebrews 12:1b-2a
Taxonomic Characterization: A minute diaphanous anchialine cyclopoid. The genus Speleoithona is distinguished from other cyclopoids by several characteristics. The rostrum is enlarged and notched medially. The inner apical seta on the caudal rami is absent. The mandible has a smooth and quadrangular basal segment 2, and a 2-segmented endopodite with an unarmed proximal segment and 3 setae on the terminal segment. The antennule is 18-segmented, with aesthetascs on segments 8,17, and 18. On the second through fourth legs, the endopodite 3 has a row of pinnules on the caudal face. The fifth legs are 2-segmented, bear long seta, and are joined by an intercoxal plate. In males, the fifth legs also have 2 short setae on the inner side of the distal segment. S. salvadorensis can be distinguished from other Speleoithona by the following characteristics ...
Some people love washing their cars, but many folks would appreciate having the fresh-from-the-showroom look without all of the effort. And dont forget the environmental impact of car washing, which drains water reserves and spills pollutants into endangered wetlands. If only our cars would clean themselves.. Thanks to some researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, we may be closer to a perpetually polished Prius. The scientists didnt invent a brand-new nanotechnology. Instead, they took an existing water-resistant product, already in use on some vehicles, and made it better. The original coating worked because it came embedded with nanocapsules in its surface. Those tiny capsules both repelled water and contained cleaning agents or paint droplets so that when they were ruptured, say by a key scratch, they released their contents and healed the blemish. Unfortunately, the capsules had a limited shelf life. To extend the self-cleaning/healing properties of the ...
Synonyms for adhesiveness in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for adhesiveness. 3 synonyms for adhesiveness: adherence, adhesion, bond. What are synonyms for adhesiveness?
A self-cleaning electric oven uses intense heat to burn away food residue, often heating to more than 900 degrees Fahrenheit. The process requires several hours to complete and cool down, and it can...
M. B. Avinash, E. Verheggen, C. Schmuck and T. Govindaraju, Self-cleaning Functional Molecular Materials, Angew. Chem., 124, 10470-10474 ( 2012);, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed 51, 10324 - 10328 (2012). , (Chosen as a Hot Paper by the Editors for its importance in a rapidly evolving field of high current interest). Highlighted in ChemistryViews: Self-Assembling and Self-Cleaning. Microarrays of a naphthalenediimide derivative can be used to fabricate self-cleaning surfaces ...
Only the Sigillite can save Revuel Arvidas body, and only his primarch can save his soul.[1] His body ravaged by the flesh-change, Thousand Sons sorcerer Revuel Arvida clings to life by the merest thread. And even if Malcador the Sigillite can save him, what will remain?[1] The Thousand Sons sorcerer Revuel Arvida guided his White Scars kinsmen through all the horrors of the ruinstorm, even though the psychic exertion almost killed him. Now on Terra, he clings to life by the merest thread, his body ravaged by the curse of his Legion - the insidious flesh-change. The primarch Jaghatai Khan demands that Arvida be saved, no matter the cost. But even if such a thing were possible, what would remain of his mind and soul?[1] ...
Diminishing career... what to do?... film flops... badly... people laughing in the streets... Madonnas escape plan: guest role in Will & Grace... surely not testing the ground for Maddie, a sitcom where she plays a former rock star juggling her career and family? ...
|p style=text-align: center;||span style=font-size: medium; color: #005298;||strong|Betco Kling Toilet Bowl Cleaner does just what the name implies—it clings to toilet bowl surfaces, providing more contact time to allow the product to remove rus
I finally roasted some of the Anaheim chilis and jalapeños last night. If you havent roasted peppers, you should try it. Not only is it an easy way to cook them but after you throw them in a bowl and cover it with cling film/plastic wrap, they peel very easily. Right now were eating them…
He wants to stick to them just like an afraid child clings to his mother. Pathetic, I know. But if was it ever so easy to make this stupid heart understand, I wouldve done the job already. It just wont listen to me anymore
Public News Sites, Mainstream Media ia and behavioral thoughts. While we are to cling the DaysCancel of this d, we cannot be that it lets Now financial. Beyond this, we re now interest again to its g for any F.
I knew the second I saw this scene that this would be my main pic tonight. JY might not realize it yet, but he didnt mean to lose his grip on sanity - he was actually trying to cling to his better half. The side of him that he has nurtured, encouraged, and cheered on these past three years. KW has become more…
As amazing and breathtaking as the worlds oceans may be, theyre even more mysterious and sometimes cling unyieldingly to their secrets and mysteries.
If youre someone who always keeps a backup on the bench while youre dating, read this. A relationships coach gets real about why we cling to backups.
Powerful 48-hour hydration in a lightweight serum suitable for all skin types, including combination. Ultra-light texture softens and deeply comforts skin all day, without stickiness or oiliness.
We dont know much about the genetic evolution of the human brain. Now experiments suggest genes involved in cell stickiness may have given our brain its folds
Techniques Cell culture WiDr cell lines have MAP キナーゼ 阻害剤 been obtained in the American Variety Culture Collection, and had been cultured in accordance to your
Van der Waals forces: Van der Waals forces, relatively weak electric forces that attract neutral molecules to one another in gases, in liquefied and solidified gases, and in almost all organic liquids and solids. The forces are named for the Dutch physicist Johannes Diderik van der Waals, who in 1873 first postulated
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Downloadable! To investigate the banking sector integration across euro area countries in terms of loan interest rate stickiness, we estimate structural loan rate curves for 12 euro area countries using time-varying regressions with stochastic volatility. Our results show that the loan rates are sticky to a policy interest rate in all countries for all loan maturities, the degree of stickiness differs across the countries, and the degree of difference is more prominent for longer loan maturities. For short-term loans, the loan rate stickiness decreases and for intermediate- and long-term loans the loan rate stickiness converge to average levels during the sample periods. Banking integration in the euro area is not yet complete, but the degree of heterogeneity in the loan rate stickiness decreases.
Cell adhesion to surfaces represents the basis for niche colonization and survival. Here we establish serial quantification of adhesion forces of different cell types using a single probe. The pace of single-cell force-spectroscopy was accelerated to up to 200 yeast and 20 mammalian cells per probe when replacing the conventional cell trapping cantilever chemistry of atomic force microscopy by underpressure immobilization with fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM). In consequence, statistically relevant data could be recorded in a rapid manner, the spectrum of examinable cells was enlarged, and the cell physiology preserved until approached for force spectroscopy. Adhesion forces of Candida albicans increased from below 4 up to 16 nN at 37°C on hydrophobic surfaces, whereas a Δhgc1-mutant showed forces consistently below 4 nN. Monitoring adhesion of mammalian cells revealed mean adhesion forces of 600 nN of HeLa cells on fibronectin and were one order of magnitude higher than those observed for ...
Article Modeling study of the effects of the coagulation kernel with van der Waals forces and turbulence on the particle size distribution. In this study, variations in the size distributions due to different assumptions for the coagulation kernel ar...
Specialized tarsal setae with an attachment function have evolved independently several times among arthropods (Gorb and Beutel, 2001). They enable effective, dynamic attachment to various surfaces during locomotion. In hairy adhesive pads, the adhesive performance is enhanced by multiple contact sites (Jagota and Bennison, 2002), a high compliance of setae (Persson, 2003) and terminal contact elements (Persson and Gorb, 2003), and a hierarchical organization (Kim and Bushan, 2007; Gasparetto et al., 2009). Adhesion enhancement due to multiple contacts can be explained by the involvement of various effects, such as crack propagation prevention (Chung and Chaudhury, 2005) and surface roughness compatibility (Peressadko and Gorb, 2004a; Bhushan et al., 2006).. Under natural conditions, animals attach to unpredictable surfaces of very different roughness, which normally reduces adhesion even in the hairy attachment devices of geckos and insects. In previous work, it has been shown that there is a ...
The ability to climb is a significant advantage for animals, as it makes available habitats not accessible to non-climbers or non-flyers. Indeed, many animal phyla and groups are represented in arboreal habitats. These animals are characterised by mechanisms that facilitate climbing and reduce the risk of falling. On rough surfaces, friction pads and claws can be effective, but on smooth surfaces and significant overhangs, some mechanism of adhesion is essential (Peattie, 2009). Adhesion allows an organism to remain attached to an inclined, vertical or even an upside down surface whilst resisting falling or slipping. Animals have evolved two different mechanisms for adhesion - dry and wet. Dry adhesion, typified by geckos, involves toe pads covered in very large numbers of finely branching setae, each ending in a flattened spatula. These spatulae make such close contact with the surface that van der Waals forces, which hold molecules together in solids, form the adhesive bonds (Autumn et al., ...
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... A description of the different factors affecting the hydraulic design of self-cleaning sewage tunnels with a free water surface is presented. It is found that the two most important problems involved are related to shear stress distribution and critical shear stress to secure self-cleaning. Based on a shear stress distribution normally assumed for open channels, a trapezoidal bottom shape is suggested. A value for critical shear stress to prevent settlement of sand in a mixture of wastewater is recommended, but design data are also included for alternative values of critical shear stress. Curves for determining shape, slope, and size of tunnels with known minimum and maximum rate of flow are given.
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In figure 1, a nanoparticle is shown dispersed in a liquid, which also contains surface active molecules (adhesion molecules). The particle diffuses towards the cell surface, makes contact and then wanders around the local area. It may find a point of entry or it may dislodge and continue its Brownian exploration of the fluid [4]. This process is similar to that involved in a virus infecting lung cells. A paper in this volume shows that the presence of nanoparticles can influence the progress of influenza virus infection [5].. To start this volume, we describe van der Waals force which is the source of adhesion in geckos that run up walls and under ceilings without any adhesive [6]. Next, by considering adhesion of ants feet under water [7], it becomes clear that the presence of a liquid has a large influence on van der Waals adhesion, decreasing the adhesion force by an order of magnitude. However, there is also the confusing effect that liquids may hugely increase the contact area, which may ...
What makes kitchen plastic wrap cling so maddeningly to itself, and so conveniently to the sides of bowls and plates? Learn more on this Moment of Science.
Find the outdoor temperature from inside. Outdoor Easy to Read Windowpane Thermometer by KleerTemp. Clings electrostatically. Large, readable numbers in full view. No tools needed. 7.25 Diameter. One year warranty. No batteries or power needed. Reads both Fahrenheit and Centigrade.
Mandible with 6 to 7 teeth; maxillary palps 6-segmented; labial palps 4-segmented; erect setae on dorsum of head randomly placed; typically with abundant erect setae on head, scapes, legs and dorsum of mesosoma, although a few species lack erect setae on head, scapes and legs. Eyes typically well developed and placed midlength and laterally on head. Dorsal mesosomal setae arranged loosely in pairs; propodeum lacking erect setae (with one exception); propodeum with a low- to high-domed dorsal face; generally overall mesosoma shape compact. Nylanderia workers can generally be easily distinguished from other formicines based on the presence of 6 mandibular teeth, erect macrosetae on the scapes and legs, and paired erect macrosetae on the pronotum and mesonotum. These morphological features are considered synapomorphies for the genus, and will effectively separate this genus from other genera. Overall, the body shape for most Nylanderia workers is compact and robust in that the mesosomal regions are ...
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Sample preparation: The samples were placed in specially designed sample cuvettes, which exposed a flat circular surface with a diameter of 5 cm for measurement. Samples were placed in the cuvettes such that the interior of the fillets was exposed for autofluorescence measurements. Before measurements, the samples were conditioned at 18°C for at least one hour.. Fluorescence spectroscopy: The samples were excited with a 332 nm interference filter where after the emission was measured from 360 to 600 nm. Two spectra were collected and the average was used for further analysis.. Texture: Texture was evaluated instrumentally by compression using a Texture Analyzer TA.XT2 equipped with a cylindrical plunger. The plunger was pressed into the fillets at a constant rate of 1 mm-1 until it reached 90 % of the sample height. The resistance force was recorded at the maximum force obtained during compression. Two measurements were performed on each fillet, and the mean value was used for the analysis. The ...
Van Itallie CM, Anderson JM (1997). "Occludin confers adhesiveness when expressed in fibroblasts". J. Cell Sci. 110 (9): 1113- ...
"Coaggregation ability ofWeissella cibariaisolates withFusobacterium nucleatumand their adhesiveness to epithelial cells". FEMS ...
Increase platelet adhesiveness. *Lipid *Increase HDL, triglyceride. *Decrease LDL, fat deposition. *Fluid balance *Salt (sodium ...
Heat and light intensities can also cause sticky traps to loos their adhesiveness. Pollen traps are used to measure production ...
Xia, Yu; Wang, Yubo; Wang, Yi; Chin, Francis Y. L.; Zhang, Tong (23 May 2016). "Cellular adhesiveness and cellulolytic capacity ...
... and foreign surface adhesiveness of human leukocytes". The American Journal of Pathology. 90 (3): 537-50. PMC 2018255 . PMID ... these responses result from an increase in neutrophil adhesiveness to each other and/or vascular endothelium); the release (see ...
Berg, KJ; Skaga, E; Skjaeggestad, O; Stormorken, H (13 November 1965). "Effect of linseed oil on platelet adhesiveness and ...
It is also used for the functionalization of polymer surfaces by UV-induced grafting to improve wettability and adhesiveness. 1 ...
increase platelet adhesiveness. Fluid balance: *salt (sodium) and water retention. *increase growth hormone ...
... high solubility and good adhesiveness. The extremely low bulk density makes the salt highly prized in the fast-food industry ...
"Loss of Kindlin-3 in LAD-III eliminates LFA-1 but not VLA-4 adhesiveness developed under shear flow conditions". Blood. 114 (11 ...
Scott TG, Smyth CJ, Keane CT (February 1987). "In vitro adhesiveness and biotype of Gardnerella vaginalis strains in relation ...
... and L-selectin increases adhesiveness and shear resistance under hydrodynamic force". Nat Immunol. 7 (8): 883-9. doi:10.1038/ ...
... s may change conformation, adhesiveness or water retention properties, due to slight changes in pH, ionic strength ...
... thicker bond lines than the thermal grease as it cures while still allowing an easy disassembly thanks to limited adhesiveness ...
The CYTH1 is highly expressed in natural killer and peripheral T cells, and regulates the adhesiveness of integrins at the ...
... a cause of loss of intercellular adhesiveness in human cancer cell lines". Cancer Research. 54 (23): 6282-7. PMID 7954478. ...
... a cause of loss of intercellular adhesiveness in human cancer cell lines". Cancer Res. 54 (23): 6282-7. PMID 7954478. Roe S, ... a cause of loss of intercellular adhesiveness in human cancer cell lines". Cancer Res. 54 (23): 6282-7. PMID 7954478. McPherson ...
... a cause of loss of intercellular adhesiveness in human cancer cell lines". Cancer Res. 54 (23): 6282-7. PMID 7954478. Hazan RB ...
... increasing their electronegativity and thus reducing erythrocyte aggregation and platelet adhesiveness. Dextrans also reduce ...
An inkometer is a specialized measuring instrument used by the printing industry to measure the "tack" (adhesiveness) of an ink ...
... platelet adhesiveness MeSH G09.188.261.560.600.640 --- platelet aggregation MeSH G09.188.261.780 --- phagocytosis MeSH G09.330. ... platelet adhesiveness MeSH G09.188.250.680 --- prothrombin time MeSH G09.188.250.760 --- reticulocytosis MeSH G09.188.250.840 ...
... it might divest the gum of its native adhesiveness throughout, which would make it better than the native gum. Upon further ...
... on the infected red blood cell surface and the modified display of malaria surface proteins reduces parasite adhesiveness ( ...
... and increases in their cell surface adhesiveness as indicated by their aggregation to each other. Since a previously discovered ...
Platelet adhesiveness is the adhesion of platelets to other structures. It can be contrasted with platelet aggregation, which ... May 2004). "Assessment of platelet adhesiveness and aggregation in mild acute pancreatitis using the PFA-100 system". JOP. 5 (3 ... Platelet membrane glycoprotein Platelet adhesiveness at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) ...
adhesiveness synonyms, adhesiveness pronunciation, adhesiveness translation, English dictionary definition of adhesiveness. adj ... Adhesiveness - definition of adhesiveness by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/adhesiveness ... adhesiveness. Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia. ad·he·sive. (ăd-hē′sĭv, -zĭv). adj.. 1. Tending to adhere ... adhesiveness - the property of sticking together (as of glue and wood) or the joining of surfaces of different composition; " ...
T-cell receptor cross-linking transiently stimulates adhesiveness through LFA-1.. Dustin ML1, Springer TA. ...
JNK and decapentaplegic signaling control adhesiveness and cytoskeleton dynamics during thorax closure in Drosophila. Enrique ... JNK and decapentaplegic signaling control adhesiveness and cytoskeleton dynamics during thorax closure in Drosophila ... JNK and decapentaplegic signaling control adhesiveness and cytoskeleton dynamics during thorax closure in Drosophila ... JNK and decapentaplegic signaling control adhesiveness and cytoskeleton dynamics during thorax closure in Drosophila ...
Retrieved from "http://www.biology-online.org/bodict/index.php?title=Adhesiveness&oldid=24337" ...
Effect of a Nonionic Surface-Active Agent on Blood Viscosity and Platelet Adhesiveness. FREDERICK L. GROVER, MICHAEL W. HERON, ... Platelet adhesiveness decreased markedly in six patients within ten minutes after intravenous injection. Pluronic F68 has many ... Its potential in the treatment of diseases in which high viscosity or increased platelet adhesiveness are present deserves ... The effects of Pluronic F68, a nonionic surface-active agent, on blood viscosity and platelet adhesiveness during ...
Occludin confers adhesiveness when expressed in fibroblasts Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from Journal of ... that the extracellular surface of occludin is directly involved in cell-cell adhesion and the ability to confer adhesiveness ...
If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Centers RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.. ...
Effect of flavonoids on the platelet adhesiveness in repeatedly bred rats ... Platelet adhesiveness the effect of inst centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet rich plasma human. ... Platelet adhesiveness before and following hysterectomy and the effect of VK 744 and Adumbran on platelet adhesiveness. ... Platelet adhesiveness: the effect of centrifugation on the measurement of adhesiveness in platelet-rich plasma. Journal of ...
Abstract: A51.00006 : To stick or not to stick - Chlamydomonas Microalgae Switch their Adhesiveness by Light. 9:24 AM-9:36 AM ... Light-switchable adhesiveness is regulated by a blue-light photoreceptor and mediated by flagella membrane proteins that ...
... Massoumi, Ramin LU (2002 ... Regulation of the cytoskeleton and the adhesiveness of intestinal epithelial cells by leukotriene D4}, year = {2002}, } ...
Interleukin-18 Binding Protein Reduces B16 Melanoma Hepatic Metastasis by Neutralizing Adhesiveness and Growth Factors of ... Interleukin-18 Binding Protein Reduces B16 Melanoma Hepatic Metastasis by Neutralizing Adhesiveness and Growth Factors of ... Interleukin-18 Binding Protein Reduces B16 Melanoma Hepatic Metastasis by Neutralizing Adhesiveness and Growth Factors of ... Interleukin-18 Binding Protein Reduces B16 Melanoma Hepatic Metastasis by Neutralizing Adhesiveness and Growth Factors of ...
Carvedilol Inhibited the Adhesiveness of MNCs to TNF-α-Stimulated HAECs. HAECs were pretreated with 10 μmol/L carvedilol, 10 ... Coincubated with prazosin and 10 or 50 μmol/L of propranolol did not inhibit MNC adhesiveness to HAECs (Figure 1a to 1i). The ... Figure 1. The adhesiveness of TNF-α-stimulated HAECs to isolated human MNCs. HAECs were treated for 18 hours with 10 μmol/L ... However, both could inhibit endothelial adhesiveness to human MNCs in a similar degree. Taken together, VCAM-1 may play a ...
Adrenomedullin Reduces VEGF-Induced Endothelial Adhesion Molecules and Adhesiveness Through a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase ... Adrenomedullin Reduces VEGF-Induced Endothelial Adhesion Molecules and Adhesiveness Through a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase ... Adrenomedullin Reduces VEGF-Induced Endothelial Adhesion Molecules and Adhesiveness Through a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase ... Adrenomedullin Reduces VEGF-Induced Endothelial Adhesion Molecules and Adhesiveness Through a Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase ...
Britland, S and Clark, P and Connolly, P and Moores, G (1992) Micropatterned substratum adhesiveness : a model for ... It is generally considered that tracks of cell adhesiveness are important in controlling cell migration during the development ... Here we describe a simplified photolithographic technique for patterning cell adhesiveness which allows a high degree of ... We have quantified, using adhesion and spreading characteristics of BHK cells, the differential adhesiveness that can be ...
Both the level of serum insulin and the adhesiveness of platelets are correlated with sucrose intake in men with peripheral ... Sugar intake, serum insulin and platelet adhesiveness in men with and without peripheral vascular disease ... Sugar intake, serum insulin and platelet adhesiveness in men with and without peripheral vascular disease ...
The phosphorylation state of ICAM-4 and CD36 is probably not involved in the over-adhesiveness of SAD erythrocytes. ... ICAM-4 and CD36 are implicated in the abnormal adhesiveness to endothelium of sickle cell SAD mouse erythrocytes ... Background and objectives Abnormal adhesiveness of red blood cells to endothelium has been implicated in vasoocclusive crisis ... ICAM-4 and CD36 are implicated in the abnormal adhesiveness to endothelium of sickle cell SAD mouse erythrocytes ...
Increased leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation is a most useful indicator of disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel ... Increased leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation is a most useful indicator of disease activity in patients with inflammatory bowel ... The erythrocyte sedimentation rate, platelet and white blood cell count, C reactive protein, and the leucocyte adhesiveness/ ...
The effect of dietary sucrose on blood lipids, serum insulin, platelet adhesiveness and body weight in human volunteers ... The effect of dietary sucrose on blood lipids, serum insulin, platelet adhesiveness and body weight in human volunteers ... The effect of dietary sucrose on blood lipids, serum insulin, platelet adhesiveness and body weight in human volunteers ...
In vitro adhesiveness and biotype of Gardnerella vaginalis strains in relation to the occurrence of clue cells in vaginal ... In vitro adhesiveness and biotype of Gardnerella vaginalis strains in relation to the occurrence of clue cells in vaginal ...
NO and endothelial adhesiveness. Monocyte adhesion to the endothelium is regulated via a variety of different cell surface ... 1997) Adhesiveness of mononuclear cells in hypercholesterolemic humans is normalized by dietary L-arginine. Arterioscler Thromb ... This effect of ADMA and L-NMMA mimics the increase in adhesiveness observed when endothelial cells are preincubated with nLDL; ... 1995) Exposure to shear stress alters endothelial adhesiveness: role of nitric oxide. Circulation 92:3513-3519. ...
Assessment of Platelet Adhesiveness and Aggregation in Mild Acute Pancreatitis Using the PFA-100TM System ... This confirms increased platelet adhesiveness and aggregation [13] in the early stages of the inflammatory process of acute ... Using this method, we demonstrated that, in the early stages of acute pancreatitis, platelet adhesiveness and aggregation is ... a platelet function analyzer has never been used before to evaluate augmented platelet adhesiveness/aggregation and ...
The Effect of Adenosine A2a Receptor Activation on Leukocyte Adhesiveness. Shuali, Annika ...
Antonyms for adhesiveness. 3 synonyms for adhesiveness: adherence, adhesion, bond. What are synonyms for adhesiveness? ... Synonyms for adhesiveness. the property of sticking together (as of glue and wood) or the joining of surfaces of different ... SEM analysis of the cell matrix samples showed that the apparent selective adhesiveness of these localized area may be due to ... Caption: Electrostatic forces play a role in gecko adhesiveness, a new study finds, despite 80 years of belief to the contrary. ...
Previously we have shown that adhesiveness of endothelial cells for mesenchymal stem cells correlates with the inhibition of ... We hypothesized that von Willebrand factor is an auto/paracrine regulator of endothelial cell adhesiveness and studied the ... were used to evaluate the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the regulation of endothelial cell adhesiveness for ... of p38 MAPK in endothelial cells by von Willebrand factor is responsible for the regulation of endothelial cell adhesiveness ...
  • Hardness (maximum force required in the first compression of the sample in g), cohesiveness (ratio between the positive area of the curve during the second and the first compression, dimensionless), elasticity (ratio between the time of the second cycle and the first cycle, dimensionless) and adhesiveness parameters (negative area of the force after the first compression, in gs) were evaluated. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The scientists evaluated the textural characteristics of all of the experimental caprine cheeses for hardness, adhesiveness , resilience, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness using a commercial texture analyzer. (freethesaurus.com)
  • In order to investigate this experimentally, a number of techniques have in the past been employed to make patterns of differential adhesiveness for in vitro studies. (strath.ac.uk)
  • In vitro adhesiveness and biotype of Gardnerella vaginalis strains in relation to the occurrence of clue cells in vaginal discharges. (bmj.com)
  • Whether C is preactivated in vitro and then infused intravenously, activated in vivo by administration of cobra venom factor, or activated during extracorporeal circulation in human hemodialysis, a close correlation between changing granulocyte adhesiveness and granulocyte levels is noted. (umn.edu)
  • In vitro, AM inhibited MNC apoptosis, promoted MNC adhesiveness to a human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayer, and increased the number of MNC-derived endothelial progenitor cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • The research also showed that the content of crude fiber positively correlated with shear force and cutting power, but negatively correlated with hardness, adhesiveness and flexibility. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Compared with control condition, pretreatment of carvedilol (10 μmol/L for 18 hours) or probucol (5 μmol/L for 18 hours), but not propanolol, prazosin, or both propanolol and prazosin significantly decreased TNF-α-stimulated adhesiveness of cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to MNCs. (ahajournals.org)
  • In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of curcumin on ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesiveness as well as its underlying action mechanism in the TNF-α-stimulated keratinocytes. (kpubs.org)
  • To study the influence of CD44 a cell-matrix adhesion molecule on the proliferation, adhesiveness and invasiveness of osteosarcoma cell lines, in order to investigate the growth and invasion mechanism of osteosarcoma. (bvsalud.org)
  • HUVEC treatment with ICOS-Fc did not modulate expression of adhesion molecules and cytokines, but it substantially downmodulated ERK phosphorylation induced by E-selectin triggering or osteopontin, which may influence HUVEC adhesiveness. (unito.it)
  • We also examined the expression of adhesion molecules and the adhesiveness to stromal cells of CD34 + cells fractionated on the basis of cell-cycle status. (bloodjournal.org)
  • Under physiologic conditions, we compared the adhesiveness of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes from nontreated patients with acute, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and from healthy donors. (unimi.it)
  • SEM analysis of the cell matrix samples showed that the apparent selective adhesiveness of these localized area may be due to processing or natural variations in the collagen layer. (freethesaurus.com)
  • Shortly after C activation, circulating granulocytes disappear, while their adhesiveness (measured by nylon fiber filtration) increases strikingly. (umn.edu)
  • Consequently, the ester linkages brought adhesiveness , resulting in good physical properties. (freethesaurus.com)
  • The nicotine transdermal delivery system has good adhesiveness and cohesion, and simultaneously achieves low irritation to the skin during peeling off and a fine feeling during adhesion. (google.com.au)
  • Caption: Electrostatic forces play a role in gecko adhesiveness , a new study finds, despite 80 years of belief to the contrary. (freethesaurus.com)
  • Ultraviolet ray-hardening inks employing a multifunctional monomer superior in adhesiveness to recording medium were developed as the inks suitable for printing on non-water absorbing recording medium, but these inks, which were dispersed inwater, were dried more slowly and could not give a favorable full color image. (patentgenius.com)
  • Taken together, these results suggest that CD34 + progenitors in G 0 /G 1 phase of the cell cycle differ from those in S+G 2 /M phase in adhesiveness mediated by VLA-4 in the hematopoietic microenvironment. (bloodjournal.org)