Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dentin-Bonding Agents: Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.Adhesives: Substances that cause the adherence of two surfaces. They include glues (properly collagen-derived adhesives), mucilages, sticky pastes, gums, resins, or latex.Dentin Permeability: The property of dentin that permits passage of light, heat, cold, and chemical substances. It does not include penetration by microorganisms.Dentin Desensitizing Agents: Substances which reduce or eliminate dentinal sensitivity or the pain associated with a source of stimulus (such as touch, heat, or cold) at the orifice of exposed dentinal tubules causing the movement of tubular fluid that in turn stimulates tooth nerve receptors.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Dentin SensitivityResin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Tissue Adhesives: Substances used to cause adherence of tissue to tissue or tissue to non-tissue surfaces, as for prostheses.Dentin, Secondary: Dentin formed by normal pulp after completion of root end formation.Acid Etching, Dental: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces and DENTAL MATERIALS with etching agents, usually phosphoric acid, to roughen the surface to increase adhesion or osteointegration.Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Tensile Strength: The maximum stress a material subjected to a stretching load can withstand without tearing. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p2001)Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Adhesiveness: A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate: The reaction product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate that undergoes polymerization when exposed to ultraviolet light or mixed with a catalyst. It is used as a bond implant material and as the resin component of dental sealants and composite restorative materials.Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Phosphoric Acids: Inorganic derivatives of phosphoric acid (H3PO4). Note that organic derivatives of phosphoric acids are listed under ORGANOPHOSPHATES.Dentin Dysplasia: An apparently hereditary disorder of dentin formation, marked by a normal appearance of coronal dentin associated with pulpal obliteration, faulty root formation, and a tendency for peripheral lesions without obvious cause. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)OdontoblastsShear Strength: The internal resistance of a material to moving some parts of it parallel to a fixed plane, in contrast to stretching (TENSILE STRENGTH) or compression (COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH). Ionic crystals are brittle because, when subjected to shear, ions of the same charge are brought next to each other, which causes repulsion.Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives: The hardening or polymerization of bonding agents (DENTAL CEMENTS) via exposure to light.Smear Layer: Adherent debris produced when cutting the enamel or dentin in cavity preparation. It is about 1 micron thick and its composition reflects the underlying dentin, although different quantities and qualities of smear layer can be produced by the various instrumentation techniques. Its function is presumed to be protective, as it lowers dentin permeability. However, it masks the underlying dentin and interferes with attempts to bond dental material to the dentin.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Dentin Solubility: The susceptibility of the DENTIN to dissolution.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Dentinogenesis: The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Tooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Dental Cavity Lining: An inner coating, as of varnish or other protective substance, to cover the dental cavity wall. It is usually a resinous film-forming agent dissolved in a volatile solvent, or a suspension of calcium hydroxide in a solution of a synthetic resin. The lining seals the dentinal tubules and protects the pulp before a restoration is inserted. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dentinal Fluid: The lymph or fluid of dentin. It is a transudate of extracellular fluid, mainly cytoplasm of odontoblastic processes, from the dental pulp via the dentinal tubules. It is also called dental lymph. (From Stedman, 26th ed, p665)Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Dental Marginal Adaptation: The degree of approximation or fit of filling material or dental prosthetic to the tooth surface. A close marginal adaptation and seal at the interface is important for successful dental restorations.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Wettability: The quality or state of being wettable or the degree to which something can be wet. This is also the ability of any solid surface to be wetted when in contact with a liquid whose surface tension is reduced so that the liquid spreads over the surface of the solid.Dental Etching: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces, and of materials bonded to teeth or DENTAL IMPLANTS, with agents and methods which roughen the surface to facilitate adhesion. Agents include phosphoric or other acids (ACID ETCHING, DENTAL) and methods include LASERS.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Acrylic ResinsDental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Tooth Remineralization: Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.Decalcification Technique: Removal of minerals from bones during bone examination.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Sialoglycoproteins: Glycoproteins which contain sialic acid as one of their carbohydrates. They are often found on or in the cell or tissue membranes and participate in a variety of biological activities.Tooth Attrition: The wearing away of a tooth as a result of tooth-to-tooth contact, as in mastication, occurring only on the occlusal, incisal, and proximal surfaces. It is chiefly associated with aging. It is differentiated from TOOTH ABRASION (the pathologic wearing away of the tooth substance by friction, as brushing, bruxism, clenching, and other mechanical causes) and from TOOTH EROSION (the loss of substance caused by chemical action without bacterial action). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p86)
  • Others suggest that due to the presence of patent dentinal tubules in areas of hypersensitive dentin, there may be increased irritation to the pulp, causing a degree of reversible inflammation. (wikipedia.org)
  • There was significant difference in the bond strength to ND between Clearfil SE Bond and UniFil Bond, but no significant differences to CAD and CID among the three adhesive systems. (elsevier.com)
  • Materials and Methods: One hundred fifty crowns of extracted bovine incisors were embedded in resin and ground to expose the buccal coronal dentin. (quintpub.com)
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dentin contamination with the caries infiltrant system (Icon, DMG) was simulated by applying either hydrochloric acid (15 % HCl, Icon Etch, 15 s), the resin infiltrant (Icon infiltrant, 4 min), or both prior to the application of the respective adhesives (each group n = 10). (uzh.ch)
  • Forty bovine crown fragments were obtained and the dentin surface was washed with 1.0 mL of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), followed by 0.1 mL of 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid application for 3 min, and final irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl. (unesp.br)
  • Evaluates the thirty-six-month clinical performance of filled, ethanol-based (OptiBond Solo, SDS Kerr) and unfilled acetone-based dental adhesives (Prime and Bond 2.1, Dentsply Caulk). (ebscohost.com)
  • It is presumed that IDS both reduces postoperative sensitivity and increases the bond strength to dentin as compared to DDS. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. (agd.org)
  • Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied and resin composite build-ups were created. (utu.fi)
  • Resin composite was condensed into a mold ({\o}4x2 mm), light irradiated and stored in water at 37°C. Four groups (n=10) were made per adhesive system: with and without prior acid etching and with and without thermal cycling between 5°C and 55°C for 10,000 cycles. (elsevier.com)
  • The mTBS values of each group were registered 24 h and one year after adhesive system application and resin composite block build-up (n=30). (unicamp.br)
  • Purpose: To evaluate the effect of endodontic irrigation regimens and calcium hydroxide root canal sealer (Sealapex) on the microtensile bond strengths (μTBS) of dual-curing resin composite (Clearfil DC Core Automix) to the intrapulpal dentin. (ebscohost.com)
  • The thickness of the acid-proof dentin layer for Clearfil photo bond, Scotchbond and Restobond was measured by means of the combination of the tracer and EPMA. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Tadao Fukushima and Takashi Horibe: 'Scanning electron microscopic and electronーprobe microanalysis investigate of interface layer on dentin' Journal of Dental Research. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Tadao Fukushima, Yusuke Inoue, Minoru Kawaguchi and Takashi Horibe: 'Electron-probe microanalysis examination of acid-proof dentin layer' J Jpn Dent Mater. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Tadao Fukushima and Takashi Horibe: 'Scanning electron microscopic and electron-probe microanalysis investigate of interface layer on dentin' J Dent Res. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Non-dentin layer is covered by enamel or cementum and gingiva. (wikipedia.org)
  • At fractured dentin, this complex was not present, while the actual layer of interaction of the adhesive was limited to about 100 nm. (elsevier.com)
  • An SEM examination of etched dentin and the structure of the hybrid layer. (nih.gov)
  • The microtensile bond strength of Adper Prompt L Pop self-etching adhesive system does not depend on hybrid layer thickness or resin tag length. (scielo.org.ar)
  • Our work aims to evaluate if the type of solvent and adhesive system influences the morphology of the hybrid layer and the occurrence of nanoleakage within it. (intechopen.com)
  • The type of adhesive, the number of steps, and the solvent seem to play a significant role in hybrid layer morphology and nanoleakage within it. (intechopen.com)
  • Fracture technique: a shallow groove was prepared across the dentin surface of the specimen, fixed in 10% buffered formalin, dehydrated in an ascending ethanol series up to 100%, critical-point dried, and fractured along the prepared groove. (hku.hk)
  • 2007) 6 , currently, bond to dentin is obtained by surface pre-treatment with acid, followed by adhesive system application containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic components. (bvsalud.org)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate the persistence of methacrylate-based cement residues on the dentin, after dentin surface cleaning with ethanol or acetone, with or without previous application of a dentin adhesive. (unesp.br)
  • The dentin surface was scrubbed until the cement residues could not be visually detected. (unesp.br)
  • Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding different concentrations of phosphate acidic functional groups grafted on silica nanoparticles surface (SiO 2 -POOH) on dentin bond strength of experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs). (springeropen.com)
  • SEM examination of resin replica showed that the mouthrinse and its active components not only had an anti-MMP action but also modified the dentin surface accessibility. (frontiersin.org)