Adenovirus Infections, Human: Respiratory and conjunctival infections caused by 33 identified serotypes of human adenoviruses.Adenoviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the ADENOVIRIDAE.Adenoviruses, Human: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS, causing a wide range of diseases in humans. Infections are mostly asymptomatic, but can be associated with diseases of the respiratory, ocular, and gastrointestinal systems. Serotypes (named with Arabic numbers) have been grouped into species designated Human adenovirus A-F.Adenoviridae: A family of non-enveloped viruses infecting mammals (MASTADENOVIRUS) and birds (AVIADENOVIRUS) or both (ATADENOVIRUS). Infections may be asymptomatic or result in a variety of diseases.Adenovirus E1A Proteins: Proteins transcribed from the E1A genome region of ADENOVIRUSES which are involved in positive regulation of transcription of the early genes of host infection.Adenovirus E1B Proteins: Proteins transcribed from the E1B region of ADENOVIRUSES which are involved in regulation of the levels of early and late viral gene expression.Adenovirus E4 Proteins: Proteins transcribed from the E4 region of ADENOVIRUSES. The E4 19K protein transactivates transcription of the adenovirus E2F protein and complexes with it.Adenovirus Early Proteins: Proteins encoded by adenoviruses that are synthesized prior to, and in the absence of, viral DNA replication. The proteins are involved in both positive and negative regulation of expression in viral and cellular genes, and also affect the stability of viral mRNA. Some are also involved in oncogenic transformation.Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-Like Membrane Protein: An Ig superfamily transmembrane protein that localizes to junctional complexes that occur between ENDOTHELIAL CELLS and EPTHELIAL CELLS. The protein may play a role in cell-cell adhesion and is the primary site for the attachment of ADENOVIRUSES during infection.Adenovirus E3 Proteins: Proteins transcribed from the E3 region of ADENOVIRUSES but not essential for viral replication. The E3 19K protein mediates adenovirus persistence by reducing the expression of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on the surface of infected cells.Mastadenovirus: A genus of ADENOVIRIDAE that infects MAMMALS including humans and causes a wide range of diseases. The type species is Human adenovirus C (see ADENOVIRUSES, HUMAN).Genetic Vectors: DNA molecules capable of autonomous replication within a host cell and into which other DNA sequences can be inserted and thus amplified. Many are derived from PLASMIDS; BACTERIOPHAGES; or VIRUSES. They are used for transporting foreign genes into recipient cells. Genetic vectors possess a functional replicator site and contain GENETIC MARKERS to facilitate their selective recognition.HeLa Cells: The first continuously cultured human malignant CELL LINE, derived from the cervical carcinoma of Henrietta Lacks. These cells are used for VIRUS CULTIVATION and antitumor drug screening assays.Aviadenovirus: A genus of ADENOVIRIDAE that infects birds. The type species is FOWL ADENOVIRUS A.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Receptors, Virus: Specific molecular components of the cell capable of recognizing and interacting with a virus, and which, after binding it, are capable of generating some signal that initiates the chain of events leading to the biological response.Adenovirus E1 Proteins: The very first viral gene products synthesized after cells are infected with adenovirus. The E1 region of the genome has been divided into two major transcriptional units, E1A and E1B, each expressing proteins of the same name (ADENOVIRUS E1A PROTEINS and ADENOVIRUS E1B PROTEINS).Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Capsid Proteins: Proteins that form the CAPSID of VIRUSES.ConjunctivitisCell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Gene Transfer Techniques: The introduction of functional (usually cloned) GENES into cells. A variety of techniques and naturally occurring processes are used for the gene transfer such as cell hybridization, LIPOSOMES or microcell-mediated gene transfer, ELECTROPORATION, chromosome-mediated gene transfer, TRANSFECTION, and GENETIC TRANSDUCTION. Gene transfer may result in genetically transformed cells and individual organisms.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.Inclusion Bodies, Viral: An area showing altered staining behavior in the nucleus or cytoplasm of a virus-infected cell. Some inclusion bodies represent "virus factories" in which viral nucleic acid or protein is being synthesized; others are merely artifacts of fixation and staining. One example, Negri bodies, are found in the cytoplasm or processes of nerve cells in animals that have died from rabies.Genetic Therapy: Techniques and strategies which include the use of coding sequences and other conventional or radical means to transform or modify cells for the purpose of treating or reversing disease conditions.Conjunctivitis, Viral: Inflammation, often mild, of the conjunctiva caused by a variety of viral agents. Conjunctival involvement may be part of a systemic infection.Adenoviruses, Canine: Species of the genus MASTADENOVIRUS that causes fever, edema, vomiting, and diarrhea in dogs and encephalitis in foxes. Epizootics have also been caused in bears, wolves, coyotes, and skunks. The official species name is Canine adenovirus and it contains two serotypes.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Spores, Protozoan: A vegetative stage in the life cycle of sporozoan protozoa. It is characteristic of members of the phyla APICOMPLEXA and MICROSPORIDIA.Peliosis Hepatis: A vascular disease of the LIVER characterized by the occurrence of multiple blood-filled CYSTS or cavities. The cysts are lined with ENDOTHELIAL CELLS; the cavities lined with hepatic parenchymal cells (HEPATOCYTES). Peliosis hepatis has been associated with use of anabolic steroids (ANABOLIC AGENTS) and certain drugs.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Adenovirus E2 Proteins: Proteins transcribed from the E2 region of ADENOVIRUSES. Several of these are required for viral DNA replication.Antibody-Coated Bacteria Test, Urinary: Fluorescent antibody technique for visualizing antibody-bacteria complexes in urine. The presence or absence of antibody-coated bacteria in urine correlates with localization of urinary tract infection in the kidney or bladder, respectively.Genes, Viral: The functional hereditary units of VIRUSES.Capsid: The outer protein protective shell of a virus, which protects the viral nucleic acid.Integrin alphaV: An alpha integrin with a molecular weight of 160-kDa that is found in a variety of cell types. It undergoes posttranslational cleavage into a heavy and a light chain that are connected by disulfide bonds. Integrin alphaV can combine with several different beta subunits to form heterodimers that generally bind to RGD sequence-containing extracellular matrix proteins.Gene Expression Regulation, Viral: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic factors influence the differential control of gene action in viruses.Organophosphonates: Carbon-containing phosphonic acid compounds. Included under this heading are compounds that have carbon bound to either OXYGEN atom or the PHOSPHOROUS atom of the (P=O)O2 structure.Viral Proteins: Proteins found in any species of virus.Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral: Visible morphologic changes in cells infected with viruses. It includes shutdown of cellular RNA and protein synthesis, cell fusion, release of lysosomal enzymes, changes in cell membrane permeability, diffuse changes in intracellular structures, presence of viral inclusion bodies, and chromosomal aberrations. It excludes malignant transformation, which is CELL TRANSFORMATION, VIRAL. Viral cytopathogenic effects provide a valuable method for identifying and classifying the infecting viruses.Cytosine: A pyrimidine base that is a fundamental unit of nucleic acids.Cell Transformation, Viral: An inheritable change in cells manifested by changes in cell division and growth and alterations in cell surface properties. It is induced by infection with a transforming virus.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Algeria: A country in northern Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between MOROCCO and TUNISIA. Its capital is Algiers.Transcription, Genetic: The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.Depsipeptides: Compounds consisting of chains of AMINO ACIDS alternating with CARBOXYLIC ACIDS via ester and amide linkages. They are commonly cyclized.Personal Space: Invisible boundaries surrounding the individual's body which are maintained in relation to others.Antiviral Agents: Agents used in the prophylaxis or therapy of VIRUS DISEASES. Some of the ways they may act include preventing viral replication by inhibiting viral DNA polymerase; binding to specific cell-surface receptors and inhibiting viral penetration or uncoating; inhibiting viral protein synthesis; or blocking late stages of virus assembly.Fowl adenovirus A: The type species of the genus AVIADENOVIRUS, family ADENOVIRIDAE, an oncogenic virus of birds. This is also called CELO virus for chick embryo lethal orphan virus.Transgenes: Genes that are introduced into an organism using GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Complement Fixation Tests: Serologic tests based on inactivation of complement by the antigen-antibody complex (stage 1). Binding of free complement can be visualized by addition of a second antigen-antibody system such as red cells and appropriate red cell antibody (hemolysin) requiring complement for its completion (stage 2). Failure of the red cells to lyse indicates that a specific antigen-antibody reaction has taken place in stage 1. If red cells lyse, free complement is present indicating no antigen-antibody reaction occurred in stage 1.Feces: Excrement from the INTESTINES, containing unabsorbed solids, waste products, secretions, and BACTERIA of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Transfection: The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Cell Nucleus: Within a eukaryotic cell, a membrane-limited body which contains chromosomes and one or more nucleoli (CELL NUCLEOLUS). The nuclear membrane consists of a double unit-type membrane which is perforated by a number of pores; the outermost membrane is continuous with the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM. A cell may contain more than one nucleus. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Immunocompromised Host: A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.Dependovirus: A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, which are dependent on a coinfection with helper adenoviruses or herpesviruses for their efficient replication. The type species is Adeno-associated virus 2.DNA-Binding Proteins: Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.Tumor Cells, Cultured: Cells grown in vitro from neoplastic tissue. If they can be established as a TUMOR CELL LINE, they can be propagated in cell culture indefinitely.Nasopharynx: The top portion of the pharynx situated posterior to the nose and superior to the SOFT PALATE. The nasopharynx is the posterior extension of the nasal cavities and has a respiratory function.Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.alpha-N-Acetylgalactosaminidase: A hexosaminidase with specificity for terminal non-reducing N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues in N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosaminides.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Promoter Regions, Genetic: DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.RNA Probes: RNA, usually prepared by transcription from cloned DNA, which complements a specific mRNA or DNA and is generally used for studies of virus genes, distribution of specific RNA in tissues and cells, integration of viral DNA into genomes, transcription, etc. Whereas DNA PROBES are preferred for use at a more macroscopic level for detection of the presence of DNA/RNA from specific species or subspecies, RNA probes are preferred for genetic studies. Conventional labels for the RNA probe include radioisotope labels 32P and 125I and the chemical label biotin. RNA probes may be further divided by category into plus-sense RNA probes, minus-sense RNA probes, and antisense RNA probes.DNA Replication: The process by which a DNA molecule is duplicated.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Oncolytic Viruses: Tumor-selective, replication competent VIRUSES that have antineoplastic effects. This is achieved by producing cytotoxicity-enhancing proteins and/or eliciting an antitumor immune response. They are genetically engineered so that they can replicate in CANCER cells but not in normal cells, and are used in ONCOLYTIC VIROTHERAPY.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Keratoconjunctivitis: Simultaneous inflammation of the cornea and conjunctiva.Transcription Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.Transduction, Genetic: The transfer of bacterial DNA by phages from an infected bacterium to another bacterium. This also refers to the transfer of genes into eukaryotic cells by viruses. This naturally occurring process is routinely employed as a GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUE.Cricetinae: A subfamily in the family MURIDAE, comprising the hamsters. Four of the more common genera are Cricetus, CRICETULUS; MESOCRICETUS; and PHODOPUS.Nuclear Proteins: Proteins found in the nucleus of a cell. Do not confuse with NUCLEOPROTEINS which are proteins conjugated with nucleic acids, that are not necessarily present in the nucleus.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Diarrhea: An increased liquidity or decreased consistency of FECES, such as running stool. Fecal consistency is related to the ratio of water-holding capacity of insoluble solids to total water, rather than the amount of water present. Diarrhea is not hyperdefecation or increased fecal weight.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Protein Biosynthesis: The biosynthesis of PEPTIDES and PROTEINS on RIBOSOMES, directed by MESSENGER RNA, via TRANSFER RNA that is charged with standard proteinogenic AMINO ACIDS.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Fluorescent Antibody Technique: Test for tissue antigen using either a direct method, by conjugation of antibody with fluorescent dye (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, DIRECT) or an indirect method, by formation of antigen-antibody complex which is then labeled with fluorescein-conjugated anti-immunoglobulin antibody (FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY TECHNIQUE, INDIRECT). The tissue is then examined by fluorescence microscopy.Mice, Inbred C57BLImmunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Adenovirus Vaccines: Vaccines used to prevent infection by any virus from the family ADENOVIRIDAE.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Cytoplasm: The part of a cell that contains the CYTOSOL and small structures excluding the CELL NUCLEUS; MITOCHONDRIA; and large VACUOLES. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990)Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Fever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Viral Load: The quantity of measurable virus in a body fluid. Change in viral load, measured in plasma, is sometimes used as a SURROGATE MARKER in disease progression.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Helper Viruses: Viruses which enable defective viruses to replicate or to form a protein coat by complementing the missing gene function of the defective (satellite) virus. Helper and satellite may be of the same or different genus.Defective Viruses: Viruses which lack a complete genome so that they cannot completely replicate or cannot form a protein coat. Some are host-dependent defectives, meaning they can replicate only in cell systems which provide the particular genetic function which they lack. Others, called SATELLITE VIRUSES, are able to replicate only when their genetic defect is complemented by a helper virus.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.beta-Galactosidase: A group of enzymes that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing beta-D-galactose residues in beta-galactosides. Deficiency of beta-Galactosidase A1 may cause GANGLIOSIDOSIS, GM1.
(1/452) Strain variation in adenovirus serotypes 4 and 7a causing acute respiratory disease.

In order to determine the suitability of vaccine strains established in the 1960s for a new vaccine, a comprehensive study of strain variation of adenovirus serotype 4 (AV 4) and AV 7 was undertaken. A 1,500-bp region of the hexon gene containing the AV neutralization epitopes from prototype, vaccine, and community-acquired strains and from wild-type strains from military personnel that cause acute respiratory disease (ARD) was sequenced and analyzed. The whole hexon gene from prototype strains, vaccine strains, and selected isolates was sequenced. AV 7 and AV 7a were found to have distinct genotypes, and all vaccine and wild-type strains recovered from 1963 to 1997 had the AV 7a genotype. There was no significant strain variation in the neutralization epitopes of the AV 7a genotype over a 42-year period. The evolution of AV 4 was more complex, with continuous genetic drift punctuated by replacement with a new strain. The current strain of AV 4, which has been in circulation since 1995, is significantly different from the AV 4 prototype and the vaccine strains. Genetic differences were confirmed to be antigenic differences by neutralization tests, which define the new strain as an AV 4 variant. A type-specific PCR for AV 4, AV 7/7a, and AV 21 was developed, and this PCR facilitated the rapid identification of isolates from outbreaks of ARD.  (+info)

(2/452) Serotyping of adenoviruses on conjunctival scrapings by PCR and sequence analysis.

To detect and identify adenovirus (Ad), we investigated hypervariable regions (HVRs) of Ad by using a combination of PCR and direct sequencing (PCR-sequence) method. Primers for nested PCR to amplify the conserved region in the hexon protein containing HVRs were designed based on hexon gene sequences derived from GenBank. These two primer sets amplified a DNA fragment of 7 HVRs from 16 prototypes of Ad, which were divided into five subgenera, including seven serotypes that are the predominant causative agents of acute conjunctivitis in Japan, and from 31 recent conjunctival scraping specimens from patients with adenoviral conjunctivitis. HVR DNA sequences were determined by means of universal sequence primers. Analysis of the predicted amino acid homology of HVRs among Ad prototypes suggested three regions, HVR4, -5, and -7, to be candidates for the neutralization epitopes. The clinical serotype of specimens was determined by the PCR-sequence method with reference to these three HVRs. The serotype determined according to this method was identical to that obtained by culture isolation and the neutralization test (NT) in all scraping samples, whereas the results of this method did not match PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis in five samples. It took only three days to detect Ad and to identify the serotype, in contrast to culture isolation-NT, which took at least 2 weeks. These findings indicate that our newly developed PCR-sequence method is applicable for the detection and serotyping of human Ads.  (+info)

(3/452) Molecular and serological characterization of adenovirus genome type 7h isolated in Japan.

In 1996, three adenovirus type 7 (Ad7) strains were isolated from children with fever and upper respiratory diseases in Japan. Restriction endonucleases (REs) analysis and PCR amplification of the E3 7.7 kDa ORF revealed that these strains were genotype Ad7h and closely related to an Argentine Ad7h strain, which has been reported to be highly virulent and so far predominant only in South America. These strains showed weak cross-neutralizing activity and specific haemagglutination-inhibition activity to Ad3 antiserum. The present findings suggest that Ad7h in South America has spread to other parts of the world. Since the seroprevalence to Ad7 in the current Japanese population is very low due to the absence of Ad7 circulation in Japan for decades, Ad7 outbreak as a typical case of re-emerging infectious diseases is a cause for serious concern.  (+info)

(4/452) Adenoviruses from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals, including two strains that represent new candidate serotypes Ad50 and Ad51 of species B1 and D, respectively.

Adenovirus (Ad) isolates from a large number of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals were compared serologically and genetically with Ad isolates from immunocompetent patients. Between 1982 and 1994, stool and urine samples from 137 subjects with AIDS hospitalized in The Netherlands yielded 143 Ad strains. Forty additional Ad strains were obtained from 35 HIV-positive patients in Manchester, United Kingdom, in 1992 and 1993. Of these 183 HIV-associated Ad strains, 84% belonged to species D and 3% belonged to species C. These strains were compared with 2,301 Ad strains collected during general diagnostic examinations in The Netherlands from 1973 to 1992. Of the latter strains, 5% belonged to species D and 49% belonged to species C. Two of the Ads isolated from fecal specimens of AIDS patients represent new serotypes: candidate Ad serotype 50 (prototype strain, Wan) of subspecies B1 and candidate Ad serotype 51 (prototype strain, Bom) of species D. The DNA restriction enzyme patterns of strains Wan and Bom differed from the patterns of all established prototypes.  (+info)

(5/452) Adenovirus infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

We report a 12% incidence of adenovirus infections among 532 recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from January 1986 through March 1997. The median time from day of stem cell infusion to first positive culture was 41 days. Recipients of allogeneic stem cells, as opposed to autologous stem cell recipients, were more likely to have a culture positive for adenovirus (16% vs. 3%; P<.0001). Pediatric patients were also more likely than adults to have a positive culture (23% vs. 9%; P<.0001). Among stem cell recipients with partially matched related donors, pediatric recipients appear to be at significantly greater risk for infection than adult recipients (P<.001). Positive cultures were associated with evidence of invasion in 64% of cases (41 of 64). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that isolating adenovirus from more than 1 site correlated with greater risk for invasive infections (P=.002). Invasive infections were associated with poorer chance of survival.  (+info)

(6/452) Large, persistent epidemic of adenovirus type 4-associated acute respiratory disease in U.S. army trainees.

In May 1997, a large, persistent epidemic of adenovirus type 4-associated acute respiratory disease began at Fort Jackson, South Carolina, the largest army basic training center. The epidemic lasted until December and declined when vaccine administration resumed. More than 1,000 male and female trainees were hospitalized; 66.1% of those hospitalized had an adenovirus type 4 isolate.  (+info)

(7/452) Efficacy of topical cidofovir on multiple adenoviral serotypes in the New Zealand rabbit ocular model.

PURPOSE: The goal of the present study was to determine the efficacy of topical 0.5% cidofovir twice daily for 7 days on the replication of multiple adenovirus (Ad) serotypes of subgroup C (Ad1, Ad5, Ad6) in the New Zealand rabbit ocular model. METHODS: In duplicate experiments for each serotype, a total of 20 rabbits (Ad5) or 16 rabbits each (Ad1 and Ad6) were inoculated topically in both eyes, with 1.5 X 10(6) pfu/eye of the appropriate virus. Twenty-four hours later, the rabbits in each serotype group were randomly divided into two topical treatment groups: I, 0.5% cidofovir; II, control vehicle. Treatment was twice daily for 7 days. All eyes were cultured for virus on days 0, 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 14. RESULTS: Compared to the control, treatment with 0.5% cidofovir reduced the following: mean Ad titer (days 1 to 7) for Ad1 (6.3 +/- 20 x 10(1) versus 2.5 +/- 3.9 X 102 pfu/ml; P < 0.0003), Ad5 (3.4 +/-5.8 x 102 versus 1.6 +/- 2.0 x 10(3) pfu/ml; P < 0.000001), and Ad6 (1.2 +/- 5.1 x 10(2) versus 5.5 +/-14 x 10(2) pfu/ml; P = 0.015); reduced Ad-positive eyes/total for Adl [45/128 (35%) versus 84/128 (66%); P = 0.000002], Ad5 [84/160 (53%) versus 131/152 (86%); P < 0.000001], and Ad6 [36/128 (28%) versus 82/128 (64%); P < 0.000001]: and reduced the duration of Ad shedding forAdl (4.9 +/-1.9 versus 9.3 +/- 3.3 days; P < 0.00007), Ad5 (6.4 +/- 2.8 versus 11.5 +/- 2.3 days; P < 0.0001), and Ad6 (4.4 +/- 2.1 versus 8.4 +/- 2.5 days; P < 0.00004). CONCLUSIONS: Topical 0.5% cidofovir twice daily for 7 days demonstrated significant antiviral activity against multiple adenoviral serotypes (Ad1, Ad5, and Ad6) in the New Zealand rabbit ocular model. These in vivo data expand in vitro studies indicating the efficacy of cidofovir against different adenovirus serotypes and support its use in clinical trials.  (+info)

(8/452) Molecular epidemiology of ocular isolates of adenovirus 8 obtained over nine years.

Twenty nine strains of adenovirus 8 have been isolated over nine years in Strasbourg, France, 22 of which were from one private ophthalmologist. To assess a possible relation between these strains, the DNA of adenovirus was analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism using eight different enzymes. Among these, three proved discriminant (Xba I, Bgl II, Eco RI) and made it possible to define 13 genotypes differing from each other by one to three DNA bands. Seven genotypes were unique isolates, while three, representing 16 strains, were isolated over five to eight years. All the genotypes but one were closely related, with 87% homology. All 13 differed from an adenovirus 8 strain from Lyon (homology 68-76%). This study confirmed the stability of adenovirus 8 in a given population.  (+info)

*  Adenovirus genome
"Human Adenovirus E Genome". NCBI. Retrieved 2013-01-17. "Human adenovirus E overview". NCBI. Retrieved 2013-01-17. " ... and in suppression of the host response to infection. The L1-L5 transcription units are transcribed later in the viral ... "Protein Details for Human adenovirus E". NCBI. Retrieved 2013-01-17. Russell, WC (Jan 2009). "Adenoviruses: update on structure ... The names, locations, and properties of the 38 protein-coding genes in the Human Adenovirus E genome are given in the following ...
*  Adenoviridae
Humans infected with adenoviruses display a wide range of responses, from no symptoms at all to the severe infections typical ... In humans, there are 57 accepted human adenovirus types (HAdV-1 to 57) in seven species (Human adenovirus A to G): A: 12, 18, ... Most infections with adenovirus result in infections of the upper respiratory tract. Adenovirus infections often show up as ... B Human mastadenovirus A Human mastadenovirus B Human mastadenovirus C Human mastadenovirus D Human mastadenovirus E Human ...
*  Mastadenovirus
serotype 14: can cause potentially fatal adenovirus infections. Canine adenovirus 1 (CAdV-1) can lead to death in puppies, or ... B Human mastadenovirus A Human mastadenovirus B Human mastadenovirus C Human mastadenovirus D Human mastadenovirus E Human ... very common human infection, estimated to be responsible for between 2% and 5% of all respiratory infections. usually mild ... Human, mammals, and vertebrates serve as natural hosts. There are currently 25 species in this genus, including the type ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C02)
... adenovirus infections, human MeSH C02.256.076.381 --- hepatitis, infectious canine MeSH C02.256.430.400 --- hepatitis b MeSH ... torovirus infections MeSH C02.782.620.365 --- influenza, human MeSH C02.782.620.375 --- influenza in birds MeSH C02.782.687.150 ... deltaretrovirus infections MeSH C02.782.815.200.260 --- enzootic bovine leukosis MeSH C02.782.815.200.470 --- htlv-i infections ... rubulavirus infections MeSH C02.782.580.600.680.500 --- mumps MeSH C02.782.580.830 --- rhabdoviridae infections MeSH C02.782. ...
*  DNA virus
Family Rudiviridae Unassigned families Family Adenoviridae-includes viruses which cause human adenovirus infection Family ... Benson SD, Bamford JK, Bamford DH, Burnett RM (1999). "Viral evolution revealed by bacteriophage PRD1 and human adenovirus coat ... Human isolates Isolates from this group have also been isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid and brains of patients with ... Human isolates Viruses in this group have been isolated from other cases of encephalitis, diarrhoea and sewage. Two viruses ...
*  Polymyalgia rheumatica
The viruses thought to be involved include the adenovirus, which causes respiratory infections; the human parvovirus B19, an ... infection that affects children; and the human parainfluenza virus. Some sufferers attribute the onset of PMR to stress. ... Persons having the HLA-DR4 type of human leucocyte antigen appear to have a higher risk of PMR. No specific test exists to ... CRP is produced by the liver in response to an injury or infection, and people with polymyalgia rheumatica usually have high ...
*  Adenovirus infection
"Human Adenovirus Ad-36 Promotes Weight Gain in Male Rhesus and Marmoset Monkeys". J. Nutr. 132 (10): 3155-3160. PMID 12368411. ... adenovirus infections can occur throughout the year. "Ad14 (for adenovirus serotype 14), has caused at least 140 illnesses in ... and serology can be used to identify adenovirus infections. Adenovirus typing is usually accomplished by hemagglutination- ... For some adenovirus serotypes, the clinical spectrum of disease associated with infection varies depending on the site of ...
*  S100A10
"Induction of endogenous genes following infection of human endothelial cells with an E1(-) E4(+) adenovirus gene transfer ... Falk W, Leonard EJ (May 1982). "Chemotaxis of purified human monocytes in vitro: lack of accessory cell requirement". Infection ... "The S100A10 subunit of the annexin A2 heterotetramer facilitates L2-mediated human papillomavirus infection". PLOS ONE. 7 (8): ... In humans, 19 family members are currently known, with most S100 genes (S100A1 to S100A16). The p11 protein can be found as a ...
*  Human herpesvirus 7
"Human herpesvirus 7 infection of lymphoid and myeloid cell lines transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the CD4 gene ... Dewhurst, S (2004). "Human Herpesvirus Type 6 and Human Herpesvirus Type 7 Infections of the Central Nervous System". Herpes: ... "Reactivation of human herpesvirus 6 by infection of human herpesvirus 7". Journal of Medical Virology. Wiley InterScience. 60 ( ... "Human herpesvirus 7 infection". UpToDate. Missing or empty ,url= (help) Hara, H; Kobayashi, M; Yokoyama, A; Tochigi, M; ...
*  Lower respiratory tract infection
Respiratory cryptosporidiosis Viral infections: Adenovirus Influenza A virus Influenza B virus Human parainfluenza viruses ... Typical Bacterial Infections: Haemophilus influenzae Staphylococcus aureus Klebsiella pneumonia Atypical Bacterial Infections: ... Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), while often used as a synonym for pneumonia, can also be applied to other types of ... Lower respiratory tract infections place a considerable strain on the health budget and are generally more serious than upper ...
*  Ebola vaccine
Recombinant Adenovirus-Based Vaccine Provides Long-Term Protection for Non-Human Primates from Lethal Ebola Infection". ... The Ad26.ZEBOV is derived from human adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) expressing the Ebola virus Mayinga variant glycoprotein ... These include replication-deficient adenovirus vectors, replication-competent vesicular stomatitis (VSV) and human ... from humans given the vaccine. Clinical trials involve the administration of the vaccine to healthy human subjects to evaluate ...
*  Viral vector
Since humans commonly come in contact with adenoviruses, which cause respiratory, gastrointestinal and eye infections, majority ... To overcome this problem scientists are currently investigating adenoviruses that infect different species to which humans do ... "Impact of Preexisting Adenovirus Vector Immunity on Immunogenicity and Protection Conferred with an Adenovirus-Based H5N1 ... Adenoviruses are being actively developed as vaccines. Retroviruses are one of the mainstays of current gene therapy approaches ...
*  Titi monkey adenovirus
The significance of the discovery lies in the fact that adenovirus infections have always been thought to be species-specific, ... of adenoviruses that can infect both monkeys and humans raises the possibility of zoonotic transmission of adenoviruses. List ... Titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV) is an adenovirus first identified in a New World titi monkey of the genus Callicebus, and the ... It is a large DNA-based virus which can cause death in monkeys, and respiratory illness has been recorded in humans. It was ...
*  Vectors in gene therapy
They cause respiratory, intestinal, and eye infections in humans (especially the common cold). When these viruses infect a host ... It was found that in the absence of the E1B-55Kd viral protein, adenovirus caused very rapid apoptosis of infected, p53(+) ... Antibodies to HSV-1 are common in humans, however complications due to herpes infection are somewhat rare. Caution for rare ... There are two main types of virus infection: lytic and lysogenic. Shortly after inserting its DNA, viruses of the lytic cycle ...
*  Antimicrobial properties of copper
Adenoviruses account for about 10% of acute respiratory infections in children. These viruses are a frequent cause of diarrhea ... The antifungal efficacy of copper was compared to aluminium on the following organisms that can cause human infections: ... Within six hours, 99.999% of the adenovirus particles were inactivated. Within six hours, 50% of the infectious adenovirus ... Adenovirus is a group of viruses that infect the tissue lining membranes of the respiratory and urinary tracts, eyes, and ...
*  Community-acquired pneumonia
Viruses include human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, adenovirus, human parainfluenza viruses, ... Viral infections weaken the immune system, making the body more susceptible to bacterial infection (including bacterial ... The most common viruses are influenza, parainfluenza, human respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus and adenovirus. ... Infants can acquire lung infections before birth by breathing infected amniotic fluid or through a blood-borne infection which ...
*  Saswati Chatterjee
This process REQUIRES the use of an adenovirus for the DNA to enter the cell and cause infection, thus being stably integrated ... Human Gene Therapy McGill University Dean's Honors' list Chatterjee has made contributions in 38 publications, many she has ... Adenovirus' have a Baltimore classification of level I, meaning that they have a liner dsDNA genome within an icosahedral ... replication-defective nonpathogenic human parvovirus with a 4.7kb DNA genome with a palindromic inverted terminal repeats" ...
*  HNRPUL1
... also participates in ATR protein kinase signalling pathways during adenovirus infection. Two transcript variants ... 2005). "A human protein-protein interaction network: a resource for annotating the proteome". Cell. 122 (6): 957-68. doi: ... 2005). "Protein arginine methylation during lytic adenovirus infection". Biochem. J. 383 (Pt 2): 259-65. doi:10.1042/BJ20040210 ... Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like protein 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HNRNPUL1 gene. This gene ...
*  Avian adenovirus
Adenoviruses, accessed 18/08/2011. Adenovirus Taxonomy 2005 Diagnosis of Adenovirus Infections in Psittacine Birds by DNA in ... The most common serogroups are serogroup 1, 2 and 3. No evidence of transmission from birds to humans has been identified. The ... Adenovirus infection may infect other organs, causing a splenitis, inclusion body hepatitis, bronchitis, pulmonary congestion ... Falcon adenovirus A and Inclusion Body Hepatitis (IBH). Avian adenoviruses have a worldwide distribution and it is common to ...
*  Sinusitis
... others caused by adenoviruses, human parainfluenza viruses, human respiratory syncytial virus, enteroviruses other than ... Most cases are caused by a viral infection. A bacterial infection may be present if symptoms last more than ten days or if a ... A computed tomograph showing infection of the ethmoid sinus Maxillary sinusitis caused by a dental infection associated with ... An infection that lasts between four and 12 weeks, and represents a transition between acute and chronic infection Chronic ...
*  Maurice Green (virologist)
They also emerged as a vehicle for human gene therapy Also in the early 1960s, Green and others showed that human adenoviruses ... and determining the molecular and kinetic parameters of adenovirus infection. He showed that adenoviruses could be divided into ... His major focus of investigation was human adenoviruses. He and his colleagues worked out the basic parameters for working with ... In 1962, scientists at the National Institutes of Health discovered that certain serotypes of human adenoviruses can induce ...
*  Rhinitis
... others caused by adenoviruses, human parainfluenza viruses, human respiratory syncytial virus, enteroviruses other than ... Rhinitis is commonly caused by a viral or bacterial infection, including the common cold, which is caused by Rhinoviruses, ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Sinus Infection And Allergic Rhinitis Specialist Library for ENT and Audiology ... In the case of infectious rhinitis, vaccination against influenza viruses, adenoviruses, measles, rubella, Streptococcus ...
*  Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis
... and adenovirus 11. AHC can only exist in a human host and is transmitted through human contact with an infected individual or ... There are 57 variants of this virus, that each cause 5-10% of upper respiratory infections in humans. These viruses are some of ... Adenoviruses are a medium-sized variant that are nonenveloped, like Enterovirus 70. They have a double-stranded linear DNA ... Within one to two days of infection, symptoms will begin to become apparent. Enterovirus 70 is a member of the genus of viruses ...
*  T-cadherin
Data show that HUVEC cells overexpressing T-cadherin after adenovirus infection enter S-phase more rapidly and exhibit ... CDH13 human gene location in the UCSC Genome Browser. CDH13 human gene details in the UCSC Genome Browser.. ... Re-expression of T-cadherin in human breast cancer cells (MDAMB435) in culture, which originally do not express T-cadherin, ... 1998). "Localization of human cadherin genes to chromosome regions exhibiting cancer-related loss of heterozygosity". Genomics ...
*  Defensin, beta 1
Gropp R, Frye M, Wagner TO, Bargon J (1999). "Epithelial defensins impair adenoviral infection: implication for adenovirus- ... 2001). "Expression of the peptide antibiotics human beta defensin-1 and human beta defensin-2 in normal human skin". J. Invest ... Hiratsuka T, Nakazato M, Ashitani J, Matsukura S (1999). "[A study of human beta-defensin-1 and human beta-defensin-2 in airway ... 1997). "Human beta-defensin-1 is a salt-sensitive antibiotic in lung that is inactivated in cystic fibrosis". Cell. 88 (4): 553 ...
*  Robert Huebner
In contrast to medical wisdom in the 1960s and 1970s, Huebner was confident that viruses were a cause of cancer in humans and ... From that culture they isolated cytomegalovirus, as well as the first of a large family of adenoviruses. Dr. Robert M. Chanock ... This led to the discovery of the role that cytomegalovirus plays in opportunistic infections in patients with immunodeficiency ...
*  GOLM1
Kladney RD, Tollefson AE, Wold WS, Fimmel CJ (2002). "Upregulation of the Golgi protein GP73 by adenovirus infection requires ... 2005). "A human protein-protein interaction network: a resource for annotating the proteome". Cell. 122 (6): 957-68. doi: ... Such cases of cirrhosis are usually due to infection caused by infectious hepatitis (usually hepatitis B or hepatitis C, though ... 2006). "Human plasma N-glycoproteome analysis by immunoaffinity subtraction, hydrazide chemistry, and mass spectrometry". J. ...
TACE Plus Recombinant Human Adenovirus for Hepatocellular Carcinoma - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov  TACE Plus Recombinant Human Adenovirus for Hepatocellular Carcinoma - Tabular View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Any active clinically serious infections (, grade 2 NCI-CTCAE ver 3.0). *HIV infection or AIDS-related illness or serious acute ... Drug: Recombinant Human Adenovirus Type 5 Injection After identifying the target artery of HCC, Recombinant Human Adenovirus ... Recombinant Human Adenovirus Type 5, an E1B gene deleted adenovirus, is known to have a significant antitumor activity. In ... Experimental: TACE Plus Adenovirus After identifying the target artery of HCC, Recombinant Human Adenovirus Type 5 Injection( ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT01869088
Structural and functional annotation of hypothetical proteins of human adenovirus: prioritizing the novel drug targets | BMC...  Structural and functional annotation of hypothetical proteins of human adenovirus: prioritizing the novel drug targets | BMC...
Human adenovirus associated with severe respiratory infection, Oregon, USA, 2013-2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(6):1044.View ... Seven known Human adenoviruses species from HAdV-A to HAdV-G are constitute of the genus Mastadenovirus in which all the human ... Human adenoviruses are small double stranded DNA viruses that provoke vast array of human diseases. Next generation sequencing ... Human adenoviruses are non-enveloped dsDNA viruses of almost 35 kb in size [1]. HAdV can infect a variety of tissues and cause ...
more infohttps://bmcresnotes.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13104-017-2992-z
Conjunctivitis - NYEE  Conjunctivitis - NYEE
Pink eye is usually caused by the following types of human adenovirus:. Viral conjunctivitis, which is the most common cause of ... Treatment for pink eye depends on whether the infection is viral or bacterial. If it's viral, the conjunctivitis will usually ... If you wear contacts, you need to remove and discard them and wear glasses until the infection clears up. ... It is the most common and contagious ocular infection in the United States and throughout the world. ...
more infohttp://www.nyee.edu/patient-care/ophthalmology/cornea-refractive-surgery/about/conjunctivitis
Vol 21: Study of Coxsackie B viruses interactions with Coxsackie Adenovirus receptor and Decay-Accelerating Factor using Human...  Vol 21: Study of Coxsackie B viruses interactions with Coxsackie Adenovirus receptor and Decay-Accelerating Factor using Human...
Vol 21: Study of Coxsackie B viruses interactions with Coxsackie Adenovirus receptor and Decay-Accelerating Factor using Human ... and variants with different additional ligands may arise during infection in humans as well as in tissue culture. Autor: Riabi ... Vol 21: Study of Coxsackie B viruses interactions with Coxsackie Adenovirus receptor and Decay-Accelerating Factor using Human ... Vol 21: Study of Coxsackie B viruses interactions with Coxsackie Adenovirus receptor and Decay-Accelerating Factor using Human ...
more infohttp://libros.duhnnae.com/2017/jun3/149686223245-Vol-21-Study-of-Coxsackie-B-viruses-interactions-with-Coxsackie-Adenovirus-receptor-and-Decay-Accelerating-Factor-using-Human-CaCo-2-cell-line-Ria.php
Reannotation of the CELO genome characterizes a set of previously unassigned open reading frames and points to novel modes of...  Reannotation of the CELO genome characterizes a set of previously unassigned open reading frames and points to novel modes of...
... which can be expected to have specific roles during the infection of birds, since they are unique to avian adenoviruses and ... Since adenoviruses have been a rich source of new insights into molecular cell biology and practical applications of CELO as ... has two terminal regions without detectable homology in mammalian adenoviruses that are left without annotation in the initial ... which are good candidates to substitute for the missing immunomodulatory functions of mammalian adenoviruses. ORF-16 (located ...
more infohttps://bmcbioinformatics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2105-4-55
Viruses | Free Full-Text | Preexisting Virus-Specific T Lymphocytes-Mediated Enhancement of Adenovirus Infections to Human...  Viruses | Free Full-Text | Preexisting Virus-Specific T Lymphocytes-Mediated Enhancement of Adenovirus Infections to Human...
However, we report here that preexisting virus-specific T cell responses also contribute to promoting adenovirus (Ad) infection ... In this study, we found that the efficacy of Ad infection into CD14+ monocytes was significantly decreased after CD3+ T ... And taken together, these results suggest a novel role of virus-specific T cells in mediating enhancement of viral infection, ... Further studies demonstrated that GM-CSF and IL-4 can promote Ad infection by up-regulating the expression of scavenger ...
more infohttps://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/11/2/154
Probable Donor-Derived Human Adenovirus Type 34 Infection in 2 Kidney  by Matthew A. Pettengill, Tara M. Babu et al.  "Probable Donor-Derived Human Adenovirus Type 34 Infection in 2 Kidney " by Matthew A. Pettengill, Tara M. Babu et al.
The source of such infections is often difficult to assess, that is, whether acquired as a primary infection, exposure to a ... We present here 2 cases of likely transplant-acquired HAdV-34 infection from the same organ donor, manifesting as ... infection is a recognized cause of transplant-associated hemorrhagic cystitis and, in rare cases, tubulointerstitial nephritis ... pathogen in the transplanted organ, or reactivation of an endogenous latent infection. ...
more infohttps://jdc.jefferson.edu/pacbfp/276/
Molecular Identification and Epidemiological Features of Human Adenoviruses Associated with Acute Respiratory Infections in...  Molecular Identification and Epidemiological Features of Human Adenoviruses Associated with Acute Respiratory Infections in...
Human adenovirus (HAdV) is one of the most common pathogens associated with viral ARI, and thus calls for specific diagnosis ... In addition, epidemiological features and co-infection with other human respiratory pathogens were investigated and analyzed. ... The most common co-infection pathogens with HAdV were MP (57.1%) and Human Bocavirus (HBoV) (16.7%). The majority of HAdV ... Seasonal peaks of HAdV infection occurred in the summer season of 2012 and 2013; the predominant HAdV type was HAdV-3 (70%), ...
more infohttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0155412
Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Infection with SV40 or Adenovirus-12 SV40 Hybrid Virus, or Transfection...  Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Infection with SV40 or Adenovirus-12 SV40 Hybrid Virus, or Transfection...
Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Infection with SV40 or Adenovirus-12 SV40 Hybrid Virus, or Transfection ... Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Infection with SV40 or Adenovirus-12 SV40 Hybrid Virus, or Transfection ... Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Infection with SV40 or Adenovirus-12 SV40 Hybrid Virus, or Transfection ... Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Infection with SV40 or Adenovirus-12 SV40 Hybrid Virus, or Transfection ...
more infohttps://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/48/7/1904?ijkey=1ec527e3e3a7bc987316824366a36eb1aaf91969&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
Localization of latent adenovirus infection in human lungs and lymph nodes by in situ PCR - UBC Library Open Collections  Localization of latent adenovirus infection in human lungs and lymph nodes by in situ PCR - UBC Library Open Collections
Localization of latent adenovirus infection in human lungs and lymph nodes by in situ PCR Behzad, Ali Reza 1998 pdf ... Localization of latent adenovirus infection in human lungs and lymph nodes by in situ PCR. ... Evans, A . S . Latent adenovirus infections of the human respiratory tract Am JHyg 67: 256-266, 1958. Feinberg, A P . , and ... Adenovirus 2 D N A (Ad 2) and human placental D N A (HPD) were used as templates to amplify E l A and H L A - D Q a D N A by ...
more infohttps://open.library.ubc.ca/cIRcle/collections/ubctheses/831/items/1.0099302
Replication-Deficient Human Adenovirus Type 35 Vectors for Gene Transfer and Vaccination: Efficient Human Cell Infection and...  Replication-Deficient Human Adenovirus Type 35 Vectors for Gene Transfer and Vaccination: Efficient Human Cell Infection and...
Replication-Deficient Human Adenovirus Type 35 Vectors for Gene Transfer and Vaccination: Efficient Human Cell Infection and ... Replication-Deficient Human Adenovirus Type 35 Vectors for Gene Transfer and Vaccination: Efficient Human Cell Infection and ... Replication-Deficient Human Adenovirus Type 35 Vectors for Gene Transfer and Vaccination: Efficient Human Cell Infection and ... Replication-Deficient Human Adenovirus Type 35 Vectors for Gene Transfer and Vaccination: Efficient Human Cell Infection and ...
more infohttps://jvi.asm.org/content/77/15/8263?ijkey=9c6b62e9f7f099cfbf8c0e05ac897e202284acf8&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
Permissivity of human HeLa cells to bovine adenovirus type 2 (BaV2 infection  Permissivity of human HeLa cells to bovine adenovirus type 2 (BaV2 infection
... ... Thus we speClllated that abortive infection of HeLa cells by adenoviruses may be averted by providing EtA functions in trans. ... Infection of hUlnan cells by bovine adenovirlls type 2 (BAV2) is abortive. To obtain a better understanding of this ... This further suggests that the abortive infection b:y BAV2 could be attributed to failure of EIA to express dlle to a ...
more infohttp://dr.library.brocku.ca/handle/10464/2003
Molecular characterization of human adenovirus associated with acute respiratory infections in Cameroon from 2011 to 2014 |...  Molecular characterization of human adenovirus associated with acute respiratory infections in Cameroon from 2011 to 2014 |...
The infection and hospitalization risk factors were assessed thought the Chi-square test. A total of 137/220 HAdV-positive ... including respiratory infections. Studies on HAdV molecular epidemiology are limited in Cameroon. The purpose of this study is ... This study reported HAdV species and types detected in children with acute respiratory infections in Cameroon between September ... to document the different types HAdV circulating in Cameroon in children with acute respiratory infections. Nasopharyngeal ...
more infohttps://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12985-018-1064-x/tables/3
A Common Virus Wreaks Uncommon Havoc in a New Jersey Nursing Home for Medically Fragile Children - Science-Based Medicine  A Common Virus Wreaks Uncommon Havoc in a New Jersey Nursing Home for Medically Fragile Children - Science-Based Medicine
But there is much more to the many adenoviruses than meets the eye. ... Ten children have died in the past few weeks as a result of a common viral infection that typically causes mild symptoms. ... A brief, yet satisfying primer on human adenovirus infections!. As previously mentioned, there isn't just one adenovirus out ... After most adenovirus infections, antibodies are produced which are specific to, and reduce the likelihood of future infection ...
more infohttps://sciencebasedmedicine.org/a-common-virus-wrecks-uncommon-havoc-in-a-new-jersey-nursing-home-for-medically-fragile-children/
MEDSCAPE CME QUIZ - Volume 17, Number 8-August 2011 - Emerging Infectious Disease journal - CDC  MEDSCAPE CME QUIZ - Volume 17, Number 8-August 2011 - Emerging Infectious Disease journal - CDC
... and describe 9 cases of HAdV-14p1 infection with characteristic mutations in the fiber and E1A genes that are phylogenetically ... particularly fatal infections, for which an etiology is not clear. ... Human adenovirus (HAdV) serotype 14 is rarely identified. However, an emerging variant, termed HAdV-14p1, recently has been ... Deaths Associated with Human Adenovirus-14p1 Infections, Europe, 2009-2010 Earning CME Credit. To obtain credit, you should ...
more infohttps://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/17/8/10-1760_quiz
Vaccine-preventable adenoviral respiratory illness in US military recruits, 1999-2004. - Semantic Scholar  Vaccine-preventable adenoviral respiratory illness in US military recruits, 1999-2004. - Semantic Scholar
The primary pathogen responsible for morbidity among US recruits in training was shown to be adenovirus. Highly efficacious ... Efforts to determine the burden of adenovirus and potential benefits of vaccination in civilian populations are being renewed. ... Restoration of an effective adenovirus vaccine effort within the military is anticipated by 2008, potentially reducing the ... nearly 12 million person-weeks were followed and an estimated 110,172 febrile respiratory illness cases and 73,748 adenovirus ...
more infohttps://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Vaccine-preventable-adenoviral-respiratory-illness-Russell-Hawksworth/6523bbbf0b74fd4f1ec212aa9ba13e48949b7e12
Rebetol  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe  Rebetol - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | The Medicine Shoppe
Adenovirus Infections, Human. *Hepatitis C, Chronic. *Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections. *Virus Diseases ... human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or any immunity problems. *mental health problems, including depression or thoughts of ... Rebetol monotherapy is not effective for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection and should not be used alone for ... Do Not take Rebetol alone to treat chronic hepatitis C infection. Rebetol should be used in combination with either interferon ...
more infohttps://www.medicineshoppe.com/rebetol
Ribasphere RibaPak  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki  Ribasphere RibaPak - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki
Adenovirus Infections, Human. *Hepatitis C, Chronic. *Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections. *Virus Diseases ... It is not known if Ribasphere RibaPak crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because ... The recommended dose range of Ribasphere RibaPak for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection in adults and in children 5 ... Ribasphere RibaPak treats chronic hepatitis C infection in individuals over the age of 5 years. Never take Ribasphere RibaPak ...
more infohttp://www.rxwiki.com/ribasphere-ribapak
Ribasphere  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki  Ribasphere - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki
Adenovirus Infections, Human. *Hepatitis C, Chronic. *Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections. *Virus Diseases ... human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or any immunity problems. *mental health problems, including depression or thoughts of ... Ribasphere monotherapy is not effective for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection and should not be used alone ... Do Not take Ribasphere alone to treat chronic hepatitis C infection. Ribasphere should be used in combination with either ...
more infohttps://www.rxwiki.com/ribasphere
TNF-α Gene Expression in Macrophages: Regulation by NF-κB Is Independent of c-Jun or C/EBPβ | The Journal of Immunology  TNF-α Gene Expression in Macrophages: Regulation by NF-κB Is Independent of c-Jun or C/EBPβ | The Journal of Immunology
Infection of human macrophages with adenovirus. The freshly isolated human peripheral monocytes were differentiated with 10% ... Suppression of LPS-induced TNF-α secretion by human macrophages transduced with adenovirus vectors expressing DN versions of NF ... Controversy exists as to the ability of the human κB3 site to activate the human TNF-α promoter (7, 8, 40). Our data clearly ... THP-1 human monocytic cells were obtained from ATCC and maintained in RPMI 1640 medium with 10% FCS. Human blood mononuclear ...
more infohttp://www.jimmunol.org/content/164/8/4277
  • Functional and structural annotation leading to detection of binding sites by means of docking analysis can indicate potential target for therapeutics to defeat adenoviral infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, ectopically expressed wild-type or dominant-negative (DN) versions of these transcription factors have not been employed to document their importance in the regulation of the TNF-α gene in primary human macrophages. (jimmunol.org)
  • In an interview with Alain Lafeuillade , Savarino is careful to note that the findings require confirmation in human studies because they could relate to unknown factors specific to the three macaques that controlled SIV in the experiment. (typepad.com)
  • High-titer, purified E1-lacking Ad35 virus was subsequently tested in vitro and in vivo, showing that a recombinant Ad35 vector successfully circumvents anti-Ad5 NA and that the tropism of Ad35 is favorable, compared to Ad5, on human dendritic cells, smooth muscle cells (SMC), and synoviocytes, considered important target cells for treatment or prevention of disease. (asm.org)
  • Previously, we found that CD14+ monocytes from Ad-seropositive individuals exhibited an increased susceptibility to Ad infection, when compared with that of Ad-seronegative individuals. (mdpi.com)
  • As previously mentioned, there isn't just one adenovirus out there ruining people's week with a bad cold and, or ending the lives of an unlucky few. (sciencebasedmedicine.org)
  • We have previously reported antitumoral efficacy and increased survival following intratumoral injection of ONYX-015 in human tumor xenografts grown in nude mice. (aacrjournals.org)
  • In this study, we found that the efficacy of Ad infection into CD14+ monocytes was significantly decreased after CD3+ T lymphocytes depletion from PBMC samples of Ad-seropositive individuals. (mdpi.com)
  • In contrast, adding virus-specific CD3+ T lymphocytes into PBMC samples of Ad-seronegative individuals resulted in a significant increase of infection efficacy. (mdpi.com)
  • Here, we report data documenting i.v. efficacy with a selectively replicating adenovirus (ONYX-015) against established tumors. (aacrjournals.org)
  • Our findings indicate that indirect in situ P C R allows the detection of 4 to 5 copies of adenovirus E l A D N A in Graham 293 cells. (ubc.ca)
  • Antigen-specific T lymphocytes play a critical role in controlling viral infections. (mdpi.com)
  • CD3+ T lymphocytes in PBMC samples from Ad-seropositive individuals were more sensitive to be activated by adenovirus stimulus, characterized by upregulation of multiple cytokines and activation markers and also enhancement of cell proliferation. (mdpi.com)
  • Since that report and the resulting media coverage , an additional 9 children have been diagnosed with the infection, and there have been 4 more fatalities . (sciencebasedmedicine.org)
  • Rebetol is a prescription medication used to treat hepatitis C infection in adults and children over 3 years old. (medicineshoppe.com)
  • Ribasphere RibaPak is a prescription medication used simultaneously with another prescription medication called peginterferon alfa-2a to treat chronic hepatitis C infection in adults and in children 5 years and older. (rxwiki.com)
  • Influenza-A infection in children. (springer.com)
  • Incidence of enteric adenoviruses among children in Thailand and the s" by John E. Herrmann, Neil R. Blacklow et al. (umassmed.edu)
  • To determine the incidence of adenovirus infection in a tropical climate, stools were collected from children under age 7 during a 1-year period at an outpatient clinic in Bangkok, Thailand. (umassmed.edu)
  • There were no significant differences in the association of bacterial or parasitic infections with either enteric or nonenteric adenovirus infections in either group of children studied. (umassmed.edu)
  • Rebetol treats hepatitis C infection. (medicineshoppe.com)
  • Rebetol is a prescription medicine used with either interferon alfa-2b ( Intron A ) or peginterferon alfa-2b ( PegIntron ) to treat chronic (lasting a long time) hepatitis C infection in people 3 years and older with liver disease. (medicineshoppe.com)
  • Do Not take Rebetol alone to treat chronic hepatitis C infection. (medicineshoppe.com)
  • Rebetol should be used in combination with either interferon alfa-2b ( Intron A ) or peginterferon alfa-2b ( PegIntron ) to treat chronic hepatitis C infection. (medicineshoppe.com)
  • Ribasphere RibaPak treats chronic hepatitis C infection in individuals over the age of 5 years. (rxwiki.com)
  • 1997) A recombinant E1-deleted canine adenoviral vector capable of transduction and expression of a transgene in human-derived cells and in vivo. (springer.com)
  • Ca. Similichlamydia in epitheliocystis co-infection of gilthead seabream gills: unique morphological features of a deep branching chlamydial family. (uzh.ch)