A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.
A group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of diphosphate bonds in compounds such as nucleoside di- and tri-phosphates, and sulfonyl-containing anhydrides such as adenylylsulfate. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 3.6.
A subclass of adenosine A2 receptors found in LEUKOCYTES, the SPLEEN, the THYMUS and a variety of other tissues. It is generally considered to be a receptor for ADENOSINE that couples to the GS, STIMULATORY G-PROTEIN.
An enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates to nucleoside diphosphates. It may also catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleotide triphosphates, diphosphates, thiamine diphosphates and FAD. The nucleoside triphosphate phosphohydrolases I and II are subtypes of the enzyme which are found mostly in viruses.
A subtype of ADENOSINE RECEPTOR that is found expressed in a variety of tissues including the BRAIN and DORSAL HORN NEURONS. The receptor is generally considered to be coupled to the GI, INHIBITORY G-PROTEIN which causes down regulation of CYCLIC AMP.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ADENOSINE to INOSINE with the elimination of AMMONIA.
A sub-family of RHO GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that is involved in regulating the organization of cytoskeletal filaments. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
A subtype of ADENOSINE RECEPTOR that is found expressed in a variety of locations including the BRAIN and endocrine tissues. The receptor is generally considered to be coupled to the GI, INHIBITORY G-PROTEIN which causes down regulation of CYCLIC AMP.
Enzymes that hydrolyze GTP to GDP. EC 3.6.1.-.
A subclass of adenosine A2 receptors found in the CECUM, the COLON, the BLADDER, and a variety of other tissues. It is generally considered to be a low affinity receptor for ADENOSINE that couples to the GS, STIMULATORY G-PROTEIN.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of ADP plus AMP from adenosine plus ATP. It can serve as a salvage mechanism for returning adenosine to nucleic acids. EC 2.7.1.20.
A member of the Rho family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS. It is associated with a diverse array of cellular functions including cytoskeletal changes, filopodia formation and transport through the GOLGI APPARATUS. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
A subclass of ADENOSINE RECEPTORS that are generally considered to be coupled to the GS, STIMULATORY G-PROTEIN which causes up regulation of CYCLIC AMP.
Compounds that selectively bind to and activate ADENOSINE A2 RECEPTORS.
A large family of MONOMERIC GTP-BINDING PROTEINS that are involved in regulation of actin organization, gene expression and cell cycle progression. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
Compounds that selectively bind to and block the activation of ADENOSINE A2 RECEPTORS.
A class of cell surface receptors that prefer ADENOSINE to other endogenous PURINES. Purinergic P1 receptors are widespread in the body including the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, and nervous systems. There are at least two pharmacologically distinguishable types (A1 and A2, or Ri and Ra).
Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS.
A rac GTP-binding protein involved in regulating actin filaments at the plasma membrane. It controls the development of filopodia and lamellipodia in cells and thereby influences cellular motility and adhesion. It is also involved in activation of NADPH OXIDASE. This enzyme was formerly listed as EC 3.6.1.47.
Compounds that bind to and stimulate ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS.
A class of enzymes that transfers nucleotidyl residues. EC 2.7.7.
Compounds that bind to and block the stimulation of PURINERGIC P1 RECEPTORS.
Protein factors that promote the exchange of GTP for GDP bound to GTP-BINDING PROTEINS.
Purine bases found in body tissues and fluids and in some plants.
Compounds that bind to and stimulate PURINERGIC P1 RECEPTORS.
Adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety in the 2'-, 3'-, or 5'-position.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.
Multisubunit enzymes that reversibly synthesize ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE. They are coupled to the transport of protons across a membrane.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
An enzyme that catalyzes the active transport system of sodium and potassium ions across the cell wall. Sodium and potassium ions are closely coupled with membrane ATPase which undergoes phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, thereby providing energy for transport of these ions against concentration gradients.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.

Membrane deinsertion of SecA underlying proton motive force-dependent stimulation of protein translocation. (1/12201)

The proton motive force (PMF) renders protein translocation across the Escherichia coli membrane highly efficient, although the underlying mechanism has not been clarified. The membrane insertion and deinsertion of SecA coupled to ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively, are thought to drive the translocation. We report here that PMF significantly decreases the level of membrane-inserted SecA. The prlA4 mutation of SecY, which causes efficient protein translocation in the absence of PMF, was found to reduce the membrane-inserted SecA irrespective of the presence or absence of PMF. The PMF-dependent decrease in the membrane-inserted SecA caused an increase in the amount of SecA released into the extra-membrane milieu, indicating that PMF deinserts SecA from the membrane. The PMF-dependent deinsertion reduced the amount of SecA required for maximal translocation activity. Neither ATP hydrolysis nor exchange with external SecA was required for the PMF-dependent deinsertion of SecA. These results indicate that the SecA deinsertion is a limiting step of protein translocation and is accelerated by PMF, efficient protein translocation thereby being caused in the presence of PMF.  (+info)

Stable remodeling of tailless nucleosomes by the human SWI-SNF complex. (2/12201)

The histone N-terminal tails have been shown previously to be important for chromatin assembly, remodeling, and stability. We have tested the ability of human SWI-SNF (hSWI-SNF) to remodel nucleosomes whose tails have been cleaved through a limited trypsin digestion. We show that hSWI-SNF is able to remodel tailless mononucleosomes and nucleosomal arrays, although hSWI-SNF remodeling of tailless nucleosomes is less effective than remodeling of nucleosomes with tails. Analogous to previous observations with tailed nucleosomal templates, we show both (i) that hSWI-SNF-remodeled trypsinized mononucleosomes and arrays are stable for 30 min in the remodeled conformation after removal of ATP and (ii) that the remodeled tailless mononucleosome can be isolated on a nondenaturing acrylamide gel as a novel species. Thus, nucleosome remodeling by hSWI-SNF can occur via interactions with a tailless nucleosome core.  (+info)

Arginine methylation and binding of Hrp1p to the efficiency element for mRNA 3'-end formation. (3/12201)

Hrp1p is a heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is involved in the cleavage and polyadenylation of the 3'-end of mRNAs and mRNA export. In addition, Hrplp is one of several RNA-binding proteins that are posttranslationally modified by methylation at arginine residues. By using functional recombinant Hrp1p, we have identified RNA sequences with specific high affinity binding sites. These sites correspond to the efficiency element for mRNA 3'-end formation, UAUAUA. To examine the effect of methylation on specific RNA binding, purified recombinant arginine methyltransferase (Hmt1p) was used to methylate Hrp1p. Methylated Hrp1p binds with the same affinity to UAUAUA-containing RNAs as unmethylated Hrpl p indicating that methylation does not affect specific RNA binding. However, RNA itself inhibits the methylation of Hrp1p and this inhibition is enhanced by RNAs that specifically bind Hrpl p. Taken together, these data support a model in which protein methylation occurs prior to protein-RNA binding in the nucleus.  (+info)

The Golgi apparatus plays a significant role in the maintenance of Ca2+ homeostasis in the vps33Delta vacuolar biogenesis mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (4/12201)

The vacuole is the major site of intracellular Ca2+ storage in yeast and functions to maintain cytosolic Ca2+ levels within a narrow physiological range. In this study, we examined how cellular Ca2+ homeostasis is maintained in a vps33Delta vacuolar biogenesis mutant. We found that growth of the vps33Delta strain was sensitive to high or low extracellular Ca2+. This strain could not properly regulate cytosolic Ca2+ levels and was able to retain only a small fraction of its total cellular Ca2+ in a nonexchangeable intracellular pool. Surprisingly, the vps33Delta strain contained more total cellular Ca2+ than the wild type strain. Because most cellular Ca2+ is normally found within the vacuole, this suggested that other intracellular compartments compensated for the reduced capacity to store Ca2+ within the vacuole of this strain. To test this hypothesis, we examined the contribution of the Golgi-localized Ca2+ ATPase Pmr1p in the maintenance of cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. We found that a vps33Delta/pmr1Delta strain was hypersensitive to high extracellular Ca2+. In addition, certain combinations of mutations effecting both vacuolar and Golgi Ca2+ transport resulted in synthetic lethality. These results indicate that the Golgi apparatus plays a significant role in maintaining Ca2+ homeostasis when vacuolar biogenesis is compromised.  (+info)

Deletion mutation analysis of the mutS gene in Escherichia coli. (5/12201)

The MutS protein is part of the dam-directed MutHLS mismatch repair pathway in Escherichia coli. We have constructed deletion derivatives in the mutS gene, which retain the P-loop coding region for ATP binding. The mutant proteins were assayed for ATP hydrolysis, heteroduplex DNA binding, heterodimer MutS formation, and the ability to interact with MutL. Dimerization was assayed by expressing His6-tagged wild-type and non-tagged deletion mutant proteins in the same cell and isolating the His6-tagged protein followed by MutS immunoblotting after SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. MutS-MutL interaction was measured using the same technique except that the MutL protein carried the His6 tag. Our results indicate that DNA binding ability resides in the N-terminal end of MutS, and dimerization and MutL interactions are located in the C-terminal end. Given the extensive amino acid homology in the MutS family our results with E. coli should be applicable to MutS homologues in other prokaryotes and eukaryotes.  (+info)

Evolutionary dynamics of a mitochondrial rearrangement "hot spot" in the Hymenoptera. (6/12201)

The arrangement of tRNA genes at the junction of the cytochrome oxidase II and ATPase 8 genes was examined across a broad range of Hymenoptera. Seven distinct arrangements of tRNA genes were identified among a group of wasps that have diverged over the last 180 Myr (suborder Apocrita); many of the rearrangements represent evolutionarily independent events. Approximately equal proportions of local rearrangements, inversions, and translocations were observed, in contrast to vertebrate mitochondria, in which local rearrangements predominate. Surprisingly, homoplasy was evident among certain types of rearrangement; a reversal of the plesiomorphic gene order has arisen on three separate occasions in the Insecta, while the tRNA(H) gene has been translocated to this locus on two separate occasions. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that this gene translocation is real and is not an artifactual translocation resulting from the duplication of a resident tRNA gene followed by mutation of the anticodon. The nature of the intergenic sequences surrounding this region does not indicate that it should be especially prone to rearrangement; it does not generally have the tandem or inverted repeats that might facilitate this plasticity. Intriguingly, these findings are consistent with the view that during the evolution of the Hymenoptera, rearrangements increased at the same time that the rate of point mutations and compositional bias also increased. This association may direct investigations into mitochondrial genome plasticity in other invertebrate lineages.  (+info)

Characterisation of copper-binding to the second sub-domain of the Menkes protein ATPase (MNKr2). (7/12201)

The Menkes ATPase (MNK) has an essential role in the translocation of copper across cellular membranes. In a complementary manner, the intracellular concentration of copper regulates the activity and cellular location of the ATPase through its six homologous amino-terminal domains. The roles of the six amino-terminal domains in the activation and cellular trafficking processes are unknown. Understanding the role of these domains relies on the development of an understanding of their metal-binding properties and structural properties. The second conserved sub-domain of MNK was over-expressed, purified and its copper-binding properties characterised. Reconstitution studies demonstrate that copper binds to MNKr2 as Cu(I) with a stoichiometry of one copper per domain. This is the first direct evidence of copper-binding to the MNK amino-terminal repeats. Circular dichroism studies suggest that the binding or loss of copper to MNKr2 does not cause substantial changes to the secondary structure of the protein.  (+info)

The interaction of the human MutL homologues in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer. (8/12201)

Germline mutations in two human mismatch repair (MMR) genes, hMSH2 and hMLH1, appear to account for approximately 70% of the common cancer susceptibility syndrome hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Although the hMLH1 protein has been found to copurify with another MMR protein hPMS2 as a heterodimer, their function in MMR is unknown. In this study, we have identified the physical interaction regions of both hMLH1 with hPMS2. We then examined the effects of hMLH1 missense alterations found in HNPCC kindreds for their interaction with hPMS2. Four of these missense alterations (L574P, K616Delta, R659P, and A681T) displayed >95% reduction in binding to hPMS2. Two additional missense alterations (K618A and K618T) displayed a >85% reduction in binding to hPMS2, whereas three missense alterations (S44F, V506A, and E578G) displayed 25-65% reduction in binding to hPMS2. Interestingly, two HNPCC missense alterations (Q542L and L582V) contained within the consensus interaction region displayed no effect on interaction with hPMS2, suggesting that they may affect other functions of hMLH1. These data confirm that functional deficiencies in the interaction of hMLH1 with hPMS2 are associated with HNPCC as well as suggest that other unknown functional alteration of the human MutL homologues may lead to tumorigenesis in HNPCC kindreds.  (+info)

Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This reaction releases energy, which is used to drive various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, transport of ions across membranes, and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids.

ATPases are classified into several types based on their structure, function, and mechanism of action. Some examples include:

1. P-type ATPases: These ATPases form a phosphorylated intermediate during the reaction cycle and are involved in the transport of ions across membranes, such as the sodium-potassium pump and calcium pumps.
2. F-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and bacteria, and are responsible for generating a proton gradient across the membrane, which is used to synthesize ATP.
3. V-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in vacuolar membranes and endomembranes, and are involved in acidification of intracellular compartments.
4. A-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in the plasma membrane and are involved in various functions such as cell signaling and ion transport.

Overall, ATPases play a crucial role in maintaining the energy balance of cells and regulating various physiological processes.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Adenosine is a purine nucleoside that is composed of a sugar (ribose) and the base adenine. It plays several important roles in the body, including serving as a precursor for the synthesis of other molecules such as ATP, NAD+, and RNA.

In the medical context, adenosine is perhaps best known for its use as a pharmaceutical agent to treat certain cardiac arrhythmias. When administered intravenously, it can help restore normal sinus rhythm in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) by slowing conduction through the atrioventricular node and interrupting the reentry circuit responsible for the arrhythmia.

Adenosine can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help differentiate between narrow-complex tachycardias of supraventricular origin and those that originate from below the ventricles (such as ventricular tachycardia). This is because adenosine will typically terminate PSVT but not affect the rhythm of VT.

It's worth noting that adenosine has a very short half-life, lasting only a few seconds in the bloodstream. This means that its effects are rapidly reversible and generally well-tolerated, although some patients may experience transient symptoms such as flushing, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

Acid anhydride hydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis (breakdown) of acid anhydrides, which are chemical compounds formed by the reaction between two carboxylic acids. This reaction results in the formation of a molecule of water and the release of a new carboxylic acid.

Acid anhydride hydrolases play important roles in various biological processes, including the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates, and amino acids. They are also involved in the regulation of intracellular pH and the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances).

Examples of acid anhydride hydrolases include esterases, lipases, and phosphatases. These enzymes have different substrate specificities and catalytic mechanisms, but they all share the ability to hydrolyze acid anhydrides.

The term "acid anhydride hydrolase" is often used interchangeably with "esterase," although not all esterases are capable of hydrolyzing acid anhydrides.

Adenosine A2A receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to the endogenous purine nucleoside, adenosine. It is a subtype of the A2 receptor along with the A2B receptor and is widely distributed throughout the body, particularly in the brain, heart, and immune system.

The A2A receptor plays an essential role in various physiological processes, including modulation of neurotransmission, cardiovascular function, and immune response. In the brain, activation of A2A receptors can have both excitatory and inhibitory effects on neuronal activity, depending on the location and context.

In the heart, A2A receptor activation has a negative chronotropic effect, reducing heart rate, and a negative inotropic effect, decreasing contractility. In the immune system, A2A receptors are involved in regulating inflammation and immune cell function.

Pharmacologically, A2A receptor agonists have been investigated for their potential therapeutic benefits in various conditions, including Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cancer. Conversely, A2A receptor antagonists have also been studied as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, and addiction.

Nucleoside-triphosphatase (NTPase) is not a medical term per se, but rather a biochemical term. However, it is often used in the context of molecular biology and genetics, which are essential components of medical research and practice. Therefore, I will provide a definition related to these fields.

Nucleoside-triphosphatase (NTPase) refers to an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) into nucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). NTPs, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), cytidine triphosphate (CTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP), are crucial for energy transfer in cells.

In the context of molecular biology, NTPases play essential roles in various cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, translation, and degradation. For example, DNA polymerase, an enzyme involved in DNA replication, is a type of NTPase that utilizes dNTPs (deoxynucleoside triphosphates) to synthesize new DNA strands. Similarly, RNA polymerase, which catalyzes the transcription of DNA into RNA, uses NTPs as substrates and has NTPase activity.

In summary, Nucleoside-triphosphatase (NTPase) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), releasing energy and playing a critical role in various cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, translation, and degradation.

Adenosine A1 receptor is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds to the endogenous purine nucleoside adenosine. When activated, it inhibits the production of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the cell by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity. This results in various physiological effects, such as decreased heart rate and reduced force of heart contractions, increased potassium conductance, and decreased calcium currents. The Adenosine A1 receptor is widely distributed throughout the body, including the brain, heart, kidneys, and other organs. It plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including cardiovascular function, neuroprotection, and inflammation.

Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the immune system by helping to regulate the levels of certain chemicals called purines within cells. Specifically, ADA helps to break down adenosine, a type of purine, into another compound called inosine. This enzyme is found in all tissues of the body, but it is especially active in the immune system's white blood cells, where it helps to support their growth, development, and function.

ADA deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that can lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a condition in which babies are born with little or no functional immune system. This makes them extremely vulnerable to infections, which can be life-threatening. ADA deficiency can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or gene therapy.

Rac (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate) GTP-binding proteins are a subfamily of the Rho family of small GTPases, which function as molecular switches that regulate various cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion, and gene transcription.

Rac GTP-binding proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state. When Rac is in its active state, it interacts with downstream effectors to regulate various signaling pathways that control cell behavior. Activation of Rac promotes the formation of lamellipodia and membrane ruffles, which are important for cell migration and invasion.

Rac GTP-binding proteins have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including embryonic development, immune function, and cancer. Dysregulation of Rac signaling has been associated with various diseases, such as inflammatory disorders, neurological disorders, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the regulation and function of Rac GTP-binding proteins is crucial for developing therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

Adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) is a type of G-protein coupled receptor that binds to adenosine, a purine nucleoside, and plays a role in various physiological processes. The activation of A3R leads to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity, which results in decreased levels of intracellular cAMP. This, in turn, modulates several downstream signaling pathways that are involved in anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects.

A3R is widely expressed in various tissues, including the brain, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, and immune cells. In the central nervous system, A3R activation has been shown to have neuroprotective effects, such as reducing glutamate release, protecting against excitotoxicity, and modulating neuroinflammation. Additionally, A3R agonists have been investigated for their potential therapeutic benefits in various pathological conditions, including pain management, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and neurodegenerative diseases.

Overall, the Adenosine A3 receptor is an important target for drug development due to its role in modulating inflammation and cellular responses in various tissues and diseases.

GTP (Guanosine Triphosphate) Phosphohydrolases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP (Guanosine Diphosphate) and inorganic phosphate. This reaction plays a crucial role in regulating various cellular processes, including signal transduction pathways, protein synthesis, and vesicle trafficking.

The human genome encodes several different types of GTP Phosphohydrolases, such as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), GTPase effectors, and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These enzymes share a common mechanism of action, in which they utilize the energy released from GTP hydrolysis to drive conformational changes that enable them to interact with downstream effector molecules and modulate their activity.

Dysregulation of GTP Phosphohydrolases has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these conditions.

Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) is a type of G protein-coupled receptor that binds the endogenous purine nucleoside adenosine. It is a subtype of the A2 class of adenosine receptors, which also includes A2A receptor.

The A2BAR is widely expressed in various tissues and cells, including vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, immune cells, and epithelial cells. Activation of the A2BAR by adenosine leads to a variety of cellular responses, such as relaxation of vascular smooth muscle, inhibition of platelet aggregation, modulation of inflammatory responses, and stimulation of fibroblast proliferation and collagen production.

The A2BAR has been implicated in several physiological and pathophysiological processes, such as cardiovascular function, pain perception, neuroprotection, tumor growth and metastasis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, the development of selective A2BAR agonists or antagonists has been an area of active research for therapeutic interventions in these conditions.

Adenosine kinase (ADK) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of adenosine levels in cells. The medical definition of adenosine kinase is:

"An enzyme (EC 2.7.1.20) that catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to form adenosine monophosphate (AMP) using ATP as the phosphate donor. This reaction helps maintain the balance between adenosine and its corresponding nucleotides in cells, and it plays a significant role in purine metabolism, cell signaling, and energy homeostasis."

Adenosine kinase is widely distributed in various tissues, including the brain, heart, liver, and muscles. Dysregulation of adenosine kinase activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Therefore, modulating adenosine kinase activity has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for treating these diseases.

CDC42 is a small GTP-binding protein that belongs to the Rho family of GTPases. It acts as a molecular switch, cycling between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state, and plays a critical role in regulating various cellular processes, including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell polarity, and membrane trafficking.

When CDC42 is activated by Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), it interacts with downstream effectors to modulate the assembly of actin filaments and the formation of membrane protrusions, such as lamellipodia and filopodia. These cellular structures are essential for cell migration, adhesion, and morphogenesis.

CDC42 also plays a role in intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of CDC42 has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and immune disorders.

In summary, CDC42 is a crucial GTP-binding protein involved in regulating multiple cellular processes, and its dysfunction can contribute to the development of several pathological conditions.

Adenosine A2 receptors are a type of G-protein coupled receptor that binds the endogenous purine nucleoside adenosine. They are divided into two subtypes, A2a and A2b, which have different distributions in the body and couple to different G proteins.

A2a receptors are found in high levels in the brain, particularly in the striatum, and play a role in regulating the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and glutamate. They also have anti-inflammatory effects and are being studied as potential targets for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis.

A2b receptors, on the other hand, are found in a variety of tissues including the lung, blood vessels, and immune cells. They play a role in regulating inflammation and vasodilation, and have been implicated in the development of conditions such as asthma and pulmonary fibrosis.

Both A2a and A2b receptors are activated by adenosine, which is released in response to cellular stress or injury. Activation of these receptors can lead to a variety of downstream effects, depending on the tissue and context in which they are expressed.

Adenosine A2 receptor agonists are pharmaceutical agents that bind to and activate the A2 subtype of adenosine receptors, which are G-protein coupled receptors found in various tissues throughout the body. Activation of these receptors leads to a variety of physiological effects, including vasodilation, increased coronary blood flow, and inhibition of platelet aggregation.

A2 receptor agonists have been studied for their potential therapeutic benefits in several medical conditions, such as:

1. Heart failure: A2 receptor agonists can improve cardiac function and reduce symptoms in patients with heart failure by increasing coronary blood flow and reducing oxygen demand.
2. Atrial fibrillation: These agents have been shown to terminate or prevent atrial fibrillation, a common abnormal heart rhythm disorder, through their effects on the electrical properties of cardiac cells.
3. Asthma and COPD: A2 receptor agonists can help relax airway smooth muscle and reduce inflammation in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
4. Pain management: Some A2 receptor agonists have been found to have analgesic properties, making them potential candidates for pain relief in various clinical settings.

Examples of A2 receptor agonists include regadenoson, which is used as a pharmacological stress agent during myocardial perfusion imaging, and dipyridamole, which is used to prevent blood clots in patients with certain heart conditions. However, it's important to note that these agents can have side effects, such as hypotension, bradycardia, and bronchoconstriction, so their use must be carefully monitored and managed by healthcare professionals.

Rho GTP-binding proteins are a subfamily of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, which function as molecular switches in various cellular signaling pathways. These proteins play crucial roles in regulating diverse cellular processes such as actin cytoskeleton dynamics, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and cell migration.

Rho GTP-binding proteins cycle between an active GTP-bound state and an inactive GDP-bound state. In the active state, they interact with various downstream effectors to regulate their respective cellular functions. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho GTP-binding proteins by promoting the exchange of GDP for GTP, while GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) inactivate them by enhancing their intrinsic GTP hydrolysis activity.

There are several members of the Rho GTP-binding protein family, including RhoA, RhoB, RhoC, Rac1, Rac2, Rac3, Cdc42, and Rnd proteins, each with distinct functions and downstream effectors. Dysregulation of Rho GTP-binding proteins has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, and inflammatory diseases.

Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical compounds that block the action of adenosine at A2 receptors. Adenosine is a naturally occurring molecule in the body that acts as a neurotransmitter and has various physiological effects, including vasodilation and inhibition of heart rate.

Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists work by binding to A2 receptors and preventing adenosine from activating them. This results in the opposite effect of adenosine, leading to vasoconstriction and increased heart rate. These drugs are used for a variety of medical conditions, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and heart failure.

Examples of Adenosine A2 receptor antagonists include theophylline, caffeine, and some newer drugs such asistradefylline and tozadenant. These drugs have different pharmacological properties and are used for specific medical conditions. It is important to note that adenosine A2 receptor antagonists can have side effects, including restlessness, insomnia, and gastrointestinal symptoms, and should be used under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Purinergic P1 receptors are a type of G-protein coupled receptor that bind to nucleotides such as adenosine. These receptors are involved in a variety of physiological processes, including modulation of neurotransmitter release, cardiovascular function, and immune response. There are four subtypes of P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) that have different signaling pathways and functions. Activation of these receptors can lead to a variety of cellular responses, including inhibition or stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, changes in intracellular calcium levels, and activation of various protein kinases. They play important roles in the central nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal system, and immune system.

Adenosine A1 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical compounds that block the action of adenosine at A1 receptors. Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside that acts as a neurotransmitter and modulator of various physiological processes, including cardiovascular function, neuronal excitability, and immune response.

Adenosine exerts its effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of cells, including A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors. The activation of A1 receptors leads to a variety of physiological responses, such as vasodilation, negative chronotropy (slowing of heart rate), and negative inotropy (reduced contractility) of the heart, as well as inhibition of neurotransmitter release in the brain.

Adenosine A1 receptor antagonists work by binding to and blocking the action of adenosine at A1 receptors, thereby preventing or reducing its effects on these physiological processes. These drugs have been investigated for their potential therapeutic uses in various conditions, such as heart failure, cardiac arrest, and neurological disorders.

Examples of adenosine A1 receptor antagonists include:

* Dipyridamole: a vasodilator used to treat peripheral arterial disease and to prevent blood clots.
* Caffeine: a natural stimulant found in coffee, tea, and chocolate, which acts as a weak A1 receptor antagonist.
* Rolofylline: an experimental drug that has been investigated for its potential use in treating acute ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury.
* KW-3902: another experimental drug that has been studied for its potential therapeutic effects in heart failure, cardiac arrest, and neurodegenerative disorders.

It's important to note that adenosine A1 receptor antagonists may have side effects and potential risks, and their use should be monitored and managed by healthcare professionals.

Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) is a GTP-binding protein, which belongs to the Rho family of small GTPases. These proteins function as molecular switches that regulate various cellular processes such as actin cytoskeleton organization, gene expression, cell proliferation, and differentiation.

Rac1 cycles between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state. When Rac1 is in its active form (GTP-bound), it interacts with various downstream effectors to modulate the actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell adhesion, and motility. Activation of Rac1 has been implicated in several cellular responses, including cell migration, membrane ruffling, and filopodia formation.

Rac1 GTP-binding protein plays a crucial role in many physiological processes, such as embryonic development, angiogenesis, and wound healing. However, dysregulation of Rac1 activity has been associated with various pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and neurological disorders.

Adenosine A1 receptor agonists are medications or substances that bind to and activate the adenosine A1 receptors, which are found on the surface of certain cells in the body, including those in the heart, brain, and other organs.

Adenosine is a naturally occurring molecule in the body that helps regulate various physiological processes, such as cardiovascular function and neurotransmission. The adenosine A1 receptor plays an important role in modulating the activity of the heart, including reducing heart rate and lowering blood pressure.

Adenosine A1 receptor agonists are used clinically to treat certain medical conditions, such as supraventricular tachycardia (a rapid heart rhythm originating from above the ventricles), and to prevent cerebral vasospasm (narrowing of blood vessels in the brain) following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Examples of adenosine A1 receptor agonists include adenosine, regadenoson, and capadenoson. These medications work by mimicking the effects of naturally occurring adenosine on the A1 receptors, leading to a decrease in heart rate and blood pressure.

It's important to note that adenosine A1 receptor agonists can have side effects, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, and flushing, which are usually transient and mild. However, they should be used with caution and under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as they can also have more serious side effects in certain individuals.

Nucleotidyltransferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nucleotides to an acceptor molecule, such as RNA or DNA. These enzymes play crucial roles in various biological processes, including DNA replication, repair, and recombination, as well as RNA synthesis and modification.

The reaction catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferases typically involves the donation of a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) to an acceptor molecule, resulting in the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the nucleotides. The reaction can be represented as follows:

NTP + acceptor → NMP + pyrophosphate

where NTP is the nucleoside triphosphate donor and NMP is the nucleoside monophosphate product.

There are several subclasses of nucleotidyltransferases, including polymerases, ligases, and terminases. These enzymes have distinct functions and substrate specificities, but all share the ability to transfer nucleotides to an acceptor molecule.

Examples of nucleotidyltransferases include DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase, telomerase, and ligase. These enzymes are essential for maintaining genome stability and function, and their dysregulation has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Purinergic P1 receptor antagonists are a class of pharmaceutical drugs that block the activity of purinergic P1 receptors, which are a type of G-protein coupled receptor found in many tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated by extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine and ATP, and play important roles in regulating a variety of physiological processes, including cardiovascular function, neurotransmission, and immune response.

Purinergic P1 receptor antagonists work by binding to these receptors and preventing them from being activated by nucleotides. This can have various therapeutic effects, depending on the specific receptor subtype that is targeted. For example, A1 receptor antagonists have been shown to improve cardiac function in heart failure, while A2A receptor antagonists have potential as anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agents.

However, it's important to note that the use of purinergic P1 receptor antagonists is still an area of active research, and more studies are needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential.

Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs) are a group of regulatory proteins that play a crucial role in the activation of GTPases, which are enzymes that regulate various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cytoskeleton reorganization, and vesicle trafficking.

GEFs function by promoting the exchange of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) for guanosine triphosphate (GTP) on GTPases. GTP is the active form of the GTPase, and its binding to the GTPase leads to a conformational change that activates the enzyme's function.

In the absence of GEFs, GTPases remain in their inactive GDP-bound state, and cellular signaling pathways are not activated. Therefore, GEFs play a critical role in regulating the activity of GTPases and ensuring proper signal transduction in cells.

There are many different GEFs that are specific to various GTPase families, including Ras, Rho, and Arf families. Dysregulation of GEFs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Xanthines are a type of natural alkaloids that are found in various plants, including tea leaves, cocoa beans, and mate. The most common xanthines are caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. These compounds have stimulant effects on the central nervous system and are often used in medication to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory issues.

Caffeine is the most widely consumed xanthine and is found in a variety of beverages like coffee, tea, and energy drinks. It works by blocking adenosine receptors in the brain, which can lead to increased alertness and reduced feelings of fatigue.

Theophylline is another xanthine that is used as a bronchodilator to treat asthma and other respiratory conditions. It works by relaxing smooth muscles in the airways, making it easier to breathe.

Theobromine is found in cocoa beans and is responsible for the stimulant effects of chocolate. While it has similar properties to caffeine and theophylline, it is less potent and has a milder effect on the body.

It's worth noting that while xanthines can have beneficial effects when used in moderation, they can also cause negative side effects such as insomnia, nervousness, and rapid heart rate if consumed in large quantities or over an extended period of time.

Purinergic P1 receptor agonists are substances that bind to and activate purinergic P1 receptors, which are a type of G protein-coupled receptor found in many tissues throughout the body. These receptors are activated by endogenous nucleotides such as adenosine and its metabolites.

Purinergic P1 receptors include four subtypes: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Each of these subtypes has distinct signaling pathways and physiological roles. For example, A1 receptor activation can lead to vasodilation, bradycardia, and anti-inflammatory effects, while A2A receptor activation can increase cyclic AMP levels and have anti-inflammatory effects.

Purinergic P1 receptor agonists are used in various therapeutic applications, including as cardiovascular drugs, antiplatelet agents, and anti-inflammatory agents. Some examples of purinergic P1 receptor agonists include adenosine, regadenoson, and dipyridamole.

It's important to note that the use of these substances should be under medical supervision due to their potential side effects and interactions with other medications.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a nucleotide that is the monophosphate ester of adenosine, consisting of the nitrogenous base adenine attached to the 1' carbon atom of ribose via a β-N9-glycosidic bond, which in turn is esterified to a phosphate group. It is an important molecule in biological systems as it plays a key role in cellular energy transfer and storage, serving as a precursor to other nucleotides such as ADP and ATP. AMP is also involved in various signaling pathways and can act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Phosphates, in a medical context, refer to the salts or esters of phosphoric acid. Phosphates play crucial roles in various biological processes within the human body. They are essential components of bones and teeth, where they combine with calcium to form hydroxyapatite crystals. Phosphates also participate in energy transfer reactions as phosphate groups attached to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, they contribute to buffer systems that help maintain normal pH levels in the body.

Abnormal levels of phosphates in the blood can indicate certain medical conditions. High phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia) may be associated with kidney dysfunction, hyperparathyroidism, or excessive intake of phosphate-containing products. Low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia) might result from malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or certain diseases affecting the small intestine or kidneys. Both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have significant impacts on various organ systems and may require medical intervention.

Proton-translocating ATPases are complex, multi-subunit enzymes found in the membranes of many organisms, from bacteria to humans. They play a crucial role in energy transduction processes within cells.

In simpler terms, these enzymes help convert chemical energy into a form that can be used to perform mechanical work, such as moving molecules across membranes against their concentration gradients. This is achieved through a process called chemiosmosis, where the movement of ions (in this case, protons or hydrogen ions) down their electrochemical gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, an essential energy currency for cellular functions.

Proton-translocating ATPases consist of two main domains: a catalytic domain responsible for ATP binding and hydrolysis, and a membrane domain that contains the ion transport channel. The enzyme operates in either direction depending on the energy status of the cell: it can use ATP to pump protons out of the cell when there's an excess of chemical energy or utilize the proton gradient to generate ATP during times of energy deficit.

These enzymes are essential for various biological processes, including nutrient uptake, pH regulation, and maintaining ion homeostasis across membranes. In humans, they are primarily located in the inner mitochondrial membrane (forming the F0F1-ATP synthase) and plasma membranes of certain cells (as V-type ATPases). Dysfunction of these enzymes has been linked to several diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase (also known as Na+/K+ ATPase) is a type of active transporter found in the cell membrane of many types of cells. It plays a crucial role in maintaining the electrochemical gradient and membrane potential of animal cells by pumping sodium ions (Na+) out of the cell and potassium ions (K+) into the cell, using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis.

This transporter is composed of two main subunits: a catalytic α-subunit that contains the binding sites for Na+, K+, and ATP, and a regulatory β-subunit that helps in the proper targeting and functioning of the pump. The Na+/K+ ATPase plays a critical role in various physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and kidney function.

In summary, Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase is an essential membrane protein that uses energy from ATP to transport sodium and potassium ions across the cell membrane, thereby maintaining ionic gradients and membrane potentials necessary for normal cellular function.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

No data available that match "adenosine triphosphatases"


Adenosine TriphosphatasesMagnesiumAdenosineAcid Anhydride HydrolasesReceptor, Adenosine A2ANucleoside-TriphosphataseReceptor, ... Adenosine triphosphatase test synonyms, adenosine triphosphatase test antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com. Synonyms for adenosine ... Adenosine A2BAdenosine Kinasecdc42 GTP-Binding ProteinReceptors, Adenosine A2Adenosine A2 Receptor Agonistsrho GTP-Binding ... Antonyms for adenosine triphosphatase test. 2 words related to adenosine: biochemistry, nucleoside. What are synonyms for ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases - Bacterial Proton-Translocating ATPases PubMed MeSh Term *Overview. Overview. subject area of * ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases - Minichromosome Maintenance Complex Component 7 PubMed MeSh Term *Overview. Overview. subject area ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases / chemistry * Amino Acid Sequence * DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase / chemistry* * Eukaryota / enzymology ...
ATPases (EC 3.6.1.3, Adenosine 5-TriPhosphatase, adenylpyrophosphatase, ATP monophosphatase, triphosphatase, SV40 T-antigen, ... Kielley WW (1961). "Myosin adenosine triphosphatase". In Boyer PD, Lardy H, Myrbäck K (eds.). The Enzymes. Vol. 5 (2nd ed.). ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to Adenosine triphosphatases. "ATP synthase - a splendid molecular machine" ATPase at the U ... Martin SS, Senior AE (November 1980). "Membrane adenosine triphosphatase activities in rat pancreas". Biochimica et Biophysica ...
Studies on Intestinal Adenosine Triphosphatases Enzyme (August,2017). Preservation of Adrenoceptor and Endothelin Receptor ...
Adenosine triphosphatase Is the Subject Area "Adenosine triphosphatase" applicable to this article? Yes. No. ...
Note.-ATPase = adenosine triphosphatase; HLA = human leukocyte antigen.. Table 6. Labeling Pattern of Histiocytes and Dendritic ...
PfATPase, Plasmodium falciparum adenosine triphosphatase; IC50, 50% inhibitory concentration.. Main Article ...
Adenosine Diphosphate/metabolism, Adenosine Triphosphatases/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism, Enzyme Activation, Enzyme ... Adenosine Diphosphate/metabolism; Adenosine Triphosphatases/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism; Enzyme Activation; Enzyme ...
Properties and drug sensitivity of adenosine triphosphatases from Schistosoma mansoni. Authors. Nechay BR; Hillman GR; Dotson ...
Dynein: a protein with adenosine triphosphatase activity from cilia. Science.. 149. :. 424 ...
... adenosine triphosphatase) and several minor capsid proteins). GC1 is the first tectivirus infecting an alphaproteobacterial ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases (1997-2017). DNA-Binding Proteins (1997-2017). MutS DNA Mismatch-Binding Protein (2006-2017). ...
2007; see ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATASES 1993-2006, see ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATASE 1963-1992, DNA-DEPENDENT ADENOSINETRIPHOSPHATASES ... DNA Dependent Adenosinetriphosphatases. DNA-Dependent ATPase. DNA-Dependent Adenosinetriphosphatases. Triphosphatase, Adenosine ... Adenosine triphosphatases Entry term(s):. ATPase. ATPase, DNA Dependent. ATPase, DNA-Dependent. ATPases. Adenosine ... Adenosine Triphosphatases - Preferred Concept UI. M0000391. Scope note. A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP ...
Adenosine Triphosphatase 14% * Cognitive Disorders 14% * Rapid early progression (REP) of glioblastoma is an independent ...
... to increase production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The alpha subunit contains intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase ... to increase production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The alpha subunit contains intrinsic guanosine triphosphatase ... The result is elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and continual stimulation of downstream cAMP ... The result is elevation of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and continual stimulation of downstream cAMP ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases 62% * Small Molecule Libraries 44% * Protein Aggregates 39% * Luciferases 29% ...
MeSH headings : Adenosine Triphosphatases / genetics; Chloroplasts / enzymology; Genes; Macromolecular Substances; Plants / ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases 73% * Renal Tubular Acidosis 69% * A Pitfall of Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita. Abe, J., Tsubaki, J., ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases 48% * Emotions 38% * Retraction: HSP90 Inhibitors Suppress Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Mediated ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases. Ca(2+)-Transporting ATPase. Calcium-Transporting ATPases. Gelatinase A. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2. ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases. Ca(2+)-Transporting ATPase. Calcium-Transporting ATPases. Gelatinase A. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2. ...
Adenosine Triphosphatases 80% * Metabolic 64% * Is protease activity involved in fast axonal transport?. EDSTRÖM, A., EKSTRÖM, ...
Adenosine Triphosphatase, Calcium Term UI T000762. Date04/10/1992. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1993). ... Adenosine Triphosphatase (1966-1978). Calcium (1966-1978). See Also. Ca(2+) Mg(2+)-ATPase. Calcium Channels. Public MeSH Note. ... Adenosine Triphosphatases [D08.811.277.040.025] * P-type ATPases [D08.811.277.040.025.314] * Calcium-Transporting ATPases [ ... Adenosine Triphosphatase, Calcium Adenosinetriphosphatase, Calcium Ca(2+)-Transporting ATPase Ca2+ ATPase Calcium ATPase ...
Powered by Pure, Scopus & Elsevier Fingerprint Engine™ All content on this site: Copyright © 2024 Elsevier B.V. or its licensors and contributors. All rights are reserved, including those for text and data mining, AI training, and similar technologies. For all open access content, the Creative Commons licensing terms apply We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content. By continuing you agree to the use of cookies. ...
Adenosine Triphosphatase Neuroscience 100% * Endoplasmic reticulum Neuroscience 100% * ATPase Biochemistry, Genetics and ...
  • The membrane-bound copper transporting adenosine triphosphatase (Cu-ATPase), which selectively binds copper ions, transports copper ions into and out of cells (Harris et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • K)-Adenosine Triphosphatase and Active Na,K Transport, Amer. zool. (harvard.edu)
  • adenosine-5ˊ-triphosphate - adenozin 5ˊ trifosfatas statusas T sritis chemija apibrėžtis Ribonukleotidas. (en-academic.com)
  • adenosine 5ˊ triphosphate rus. (en-academic.com)
  • adenosine triphosphate - adenosine 5 triphosphate Abbreviation: ATP A nucleotide of fundamental importance as the major carrier of chemical energy in all living organisms. (en-academic.com)
  • Adenosine triphosphate - For the Japanese rock band, see Adenosine Tri Phosphate (band). (en-academic.com)
  • Adenosine triphosphate - Adénosine triphosphate Pour les articles homonymes, voir ATP. (en-academic.com)
  • In the current study, the authors investigated the distinct role and relative order of protein kinase C (PKC)-delta, adenosine triphosphate-sensitive mitochondrial K+ (mito K+(ATP)) channels, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the signal transduction of sevoflurane-induced cardioprotection and specifically addressed their mechanistic link. (silverchair.com)
  • 4,5 We and others have shown that protein kinase C (PKC), adenosine triphosphate-sensitive mitochondrial K + (mito K + ATP ) channels, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are necessary in the signal transduction of volatile anesthetic-induced cardioprotection. (silverchair.com)
  • 1 Exogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stimulates the short circuit current (SCC) in a cultured renal-derived epithelium (MDCK). (docslib.org)
  • Introduction Exogenous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has po- Methods tent effects upon cellular function in a wide variety of cell types (Aiton & Lamb, 1980) which may be Cell culture important in terms of physiological regulatory mechanisms (see Burnstock, 1978). (docslib.org)
  • 1. Intracellular Na + concentration [Na + ] i and Na + extrusion catalysed by sodium, potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase (Na + , K + -pump) were evaluated in erythrocytes from 21 obese children and 20 normal weight- and age-matched controls. (portlandpress.com)
  • Effects of lead and natriuretic hormone on kinetics of sodium-potassium-activated adenosine triphosphatase: possible relevance to hypertension. (nih.gov)
  • Alternative relay regulates the adenosine triphosphatase activity of Locusta migratoria striated muscle myosin. (bvsalud.org)