A contagious, neoplastic, pulmonary disease of sheep characterized by hyperplasia and hypertrophy of pneumocytes and epithelial cells of the lung. It is caused by JAAGSIEKTE SHEEP RETROVIRUS.
A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.
A genus of the family RETROVIRIDAE consisting of viruses with either type B or type D morphology. This includes a few exogenous, vertically transmitted and endogenous viruses of mice (type B) and some primate and sheep viruses (type D). MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS, MOUSE is the type species.
A group of autosomal dominant diseases characterized by the combined occurrence of tumors involving two or more ENDOCRINE GLANDS that secrete PEPTIDE HORMONES or AMINES. These neoplasias are often benign but can be malignant. They are classified by the endocrine glands involved and the degree of aggressiveness. The two major forms are MEN1 and MEN2 with gene mutations on CHROMOSOME 11 and CHROMOSOME 10, respectively.
The growth of INTESTINAL POLYPS. Growth processes include neoplastic (ADENOMA and CARCINOMA) and non-neoplastic (hyperplastic, mucosal, inflammatory, and other polyps).
A synthetic progestational hormone used often in mixtures with estrogens as an oral contraceptive.
Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.
A neoplastic disease in which the alveoli and distal bronchi are filled with mucus and mucus-secreting columnar epithelial cells. It is characterized by abundant, extremely tenacious sputum, chills, fever, cough, dyspnea, and pleuritic pain. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A polyposis syndrome due to an autosomal dominant mutation of the APC genes (GENES, APC) on CHROMOSOME 5. The syndrome is characterized by the development of hundreds of ADENOMATOUS POLYPS in the COLON and RECTUM of affected individuals by early adulthood.
Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the INTESTINE. A polyp is attached to the intestinal wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.
A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.

The association between atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and primary lung cancer. (1/11)

Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) has been suggested as the adenoma in an adenoma-carcinoma sequence in the lung periphery. From 1989-1998, we undertook a systematic, prospective search for AAH in lungs resected for cancer. AAH was found in 67 of 554 patients (12. 1%) with primary lung carcinoma (9.2% in male patients and 19.0% in females). AAH was found in lungs bearing adenocarcinoma (23.2%) more frequently than with large cell undifferentiated carcinoma (12.5%) or squamous carcinoma (3.3%). A greater percentage of females with adenocarcinoma had AAH (30.2%) than did males with adenocarcinoma (18.8%). Numbers of AAH ranged from 1-42 per patient and more patients had small numbers of AAH, although 12 patients had 6 or more AAH foci. Larger numbers of AAH tended to be found in adenocarcinoma-bearing lungs. Ten of the 67 patients with AAH and primary lung carcinoma (15%) had multiple primary cancers (range 2-6), all of which were adenocarcinoma. Synchronous cancers were rare in lung tumour-bearing resections without AAH. Patients with AAH show no difference in post-operative survival to those without, for all stages of carcinoma and for Stage I disease alone. This study provides evidence for a strong association between atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and primary lung adenocarcinoma and lends weight to the AAH/adenoma-carcinoma hypothesis.  (+info)

Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung: a probable forerunner in the development of adenocarcinoma of the lung. (2/11)

An increasingly large body of work suggests that atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of the lung may be a forerunner of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Recognizing this fact, the World Health Organization now acknowledges the existence of AAH while noting difficulties that may be encountered in distinguishing AAH from the nonmucinous variant of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. Regrettably, a universally acceptable definition of morphologic criteria for the diagnosis of AAH has not been achieved. This review of the literature examines the epidemiology, gross appearance, light microscopic findings, morphometry, immunohistochemistry, and molecular features of AAH and suggests a set of histopathologic features that may help the practicing pathologist identify this intriguing lesion. These features include the following: irregularly bordered focal proliferations of atypical cells spreading along the preexisting alveolar framework; prominent cuboidal to low columnar alveolar epithelial cells with variable degree of atypia but less than that seen in adenocarcinoma; increased cell size and nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio with hyperchromasia and prominent nucleoli, generally intact intercellular attachment of atypical cells with occasional empty-looking spaces between them without high cellularity and without tufting or papillary structures; and slight thickening of the alveolar walls on which the AAH cells have spread, with some fibrosis but without scar formation or significant chronic inflammation of the surrounding lung tissue. Several lines of evidence indicate that AAH is a lesion closely associated with adenocarcinoma of the lung, suggesting AAH may be involved in the early stage of a complex multistep carcinogenesis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma.  (+info)

Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung: a clinicopathological study of 118 cases including cases with multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. (3/11)

BACKGROUND: Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of the lung is a putative precursor lesion of adenocarcinoma, according to many immunohistochemical and genetical studies, but few clinicopathological studies on a large number of cases have been reported. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinicopathological characteristics of lung cancer patients with AAH lesions. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out on 508 consecutive primary lung cancer patients operated on at National Cancer Center Hospital East. The relationship between the number and location of AAH lesions and the clinicopathological features of the lung cancer patients was analysed statistically. RESULTS: A total of 311 AAH lesions were found in 118 (23.2%) of the 508 cases. AAH lesions were detected in 121 of 572 lobes examined, usually in both upper lobes, and occurred most frequently in patients with adenocarcinoma (OR 2.97; 95% CI 1.82 to 4.85). AAH lesions were more frequently detected in patients with multiple primary carcinomas than in those with a single carcinoma (OR 3.06; 95% CI 1.56 to 6.00). The presence of AAH lesions was not significantly correlated with sex, age, smoking status, familial history of malignancy, or preceding malignancy. Patients with multiple AAH lesions were found to have a significantly higher frequency of preceding malignancies. CONCLUSIONS: The present study highlights the clinicopathological characteristics of AAH lesions, showing them to be significantly associated with both adenocarcinoma and multiple primary carcinoma of the lung and suggesting common factors in the histogenesis of multiple AAH lesions and preceding malignancy.  (+info)

Fine chromosomal localization of the mouse Par2 gene that confers resistance against urethane-induction of pulmonary adenomas. (4/11)

BALB/cByJ mice are 14 times more resistant to urethane-induction of pulmonary adenomas than the susceptible A/J strain. Our previous linkage analysis of (A/J x BALB/cByJ)F1 x A/J backcross mice provided statistical evidence that a major resistance locus of BALB/cByJ with a dominant effect, designated Par2 (Pulmonary adenoma resistance 2), exists within an approximately 25 cM section of distal chromosome 18. To facilitate molecular identification of the Par2 locus, the present study was conducted to finely localize its chromosomal position utilizing Par2-congenic mice. Male BALB/cByJ mice were mated with female C57BL/6J mice carrying recessive Par2 alleles and their male F1 progeny were backcrossed to female BALB/cByJ mice. A male backcross mouse heterozygous within the Par2 interval of 25 cM was randomly selected and again backcrossed to female BALB/cByJ mice. This backcross-selection cycle was simply repeated to produce semi-congenic mice with a general BALB/cByJ genetic background except for the Par2 interval, where the mice were heterozygous with paternal C57BL/6J alleles and maternal BALB/cByJ alleles. After the 6th or 7th backcross, nine male mice possessing a recombination within the paternal Par2 interval were retained and crossed to female A/J mice. Resultant progeny were treated with urethane and examined for lung tumor development in order to deduce the Par2 genotypes of the recombinants through linkage analysis. By comparing the deduced Par2 genotype of each recombinant with its recombinational breakpoint, the Par2 locus was confined to an approximately 0.5 cM region flanked by D18Mit103 and D18Mit188 loci. Our results indicate that fully congenic mice conventionally established by at least nine simple backcrosses or by the speed congenic method are not necessarily required for fine mapping of quantitative trait loci. In the case of the Par2 locus, we found that semi-congenic mice after as few as four simple backcrosses were useful for this purpose. The map information obtained in this study should enable subsequent positional cloning of the Par2 gene.  (+info)

A case of multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung detected by computed tomography. (5/11)

Multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of both lungs in a 72-year-old male, detected by computed tomography, is reported. The lesions of the right lung were resected for diagnosis via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The resected specimen had 22 AAH lesions up to 10 mm in size. For nine of these lesions, the expressions of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), c-erbB-2 oncoprotein and p53 gene product were examined by immunohistochemistry and the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosomes was investigated by polymerase chain reaction analysis. These lesions showed a variety of expressions for CEA, c-erbB-2 and p53 oncoprotein. Three of the nine lesions showed LOH on chromosome 13q, although this was not exhibited in the largest one. These results indicate that each AAH in this case has independent genetic abnormalities and is multicentric.  (+info)

Multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia with synchronous multiple primary bronchioloalveolar carcinomas. (6/11)

We report a case of multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) associated with synchronous multiple primary bronchioloalveolar carcinomas (BACs). A 58-year-old man was visited for bronchial asthma. A chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed small, multiple nodules with ground glass attenuation (GGA) throughout both lungs, predominantly in the upper lobes. A high resolution CT (HRCT) scan disclosed well-defined nodules with uniform GGA. Thoracoscopic wedge lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and had stable disease for two years. It is important to recognize that multiple AAH associated with multiple BACs can present as diffuse, well-defined nodules with uniform GGA on HRCT.  (+info)

Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 does not induce lymphoma in transgenic FVB mice. (7/11)

The lymphoma-inducing potential of Ig heavy-chain enhancer- and promoter-regulated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) was evaluated in three transgenic FVB mouse lineages. EBNA1 was expressed at a higher level in transgenic B220(+) splenocytes than in EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. EBNA1 was also expressed in B220(-) transgenic splenocytes and thymocytes. Before killing and assessments at 18-26 months, EBNA1-transgenic mice did not differ from control mice in mortality. At 18-26 months EBNA1-transgenic mice did not differ from littermate control in ultimate body weight, in spleen size or weight, in lymph node, kidney, liver, or spleen histology, in splenocyte fractions positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)3epsilon, CD4, CD8, CD62L, B220, CD5, IgM, IgD, MHC class II, CD11b, or CD25, or in serum IgM, IgG, or total Ig levels. Lymphomas were not found in spleens or other organs of 18- to 26-month-old EBNA1-transgenic (n=86) or control (n=45) FVB mice. EBNA1-transgenic lineages had a higher pulmonary adenoma prevalence than did littermate controls (39% versus 7%). However, the adenoma prevalence was not higher in EBNA1-transgenic mice than has been described for FVB mice, and EBNA1 was not expressed in normal pulmonary epithelia or adenomas.  (+info)

Epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in atypical adenomatous hyperplasias of the lung. (8/11)

Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations are frequently detected in lung adenocarcinomas, especially adenocarcinomas with a nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component. EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinomas respond well to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We previously found that most (88%) pure nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas (adenocarcinoma in situ) already harbor EGFR mutations, indicating that the mutations are an early genetic event in the pathogenesis. We examined 54 atypical adenomatous hyperplasias, precursor lesions of lung adenocarcinomas, obtained from 28 Japanese patients for the hotspot mutations of EGFR exons 19 and 21 and K-ras codon 12. EGFR mutations were observed in 17 of the 54 (32%) atypical adenomatous hyperplasias examined: Ten and seven atypical adenomatous hyperplasias had deletion mutations at exon 19 or point mutations (L858R) at exon 21, respectively. We did not observe apparent histological differences between atypical adenomatous hyperplasias with and without EGFR mutations. K-ras mutation (G12S) was detected in only one atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. As EGFR mutational frequency of atypical adenomatous hyperplasias was much lower than that of nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, we surmise that EGFR-mutated atypical adenomatous hyperplasias, but not atypical adenomatous hyperplasias with wild-type EGFR, are likely to progress to nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas.  (+info)

Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine, also known as Jaagsiekte or ovine pulmonary carcinoma, is a contagious and fatal disease that affects the lungs of sheep. It is caused by a retrovirus called jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). The virus infects the cells in the lung tissue leading to the formation of tumors known as adenomatosis.

The disease is characterized by progressive respiratory distress, weight loss, and eventual death. It is transmitted through the respiratory route, and infected animals can shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces. The disease has a long incubation period, which can range from several months to years, making it difficult to control.

There is no effective treatment for pulmonary adenomatosis, ovine, and infected animals are usually euthanized to prevent the spread of the virus. Prevention measures include quarantine and testing of new sheep before introducing them into a flock, as well as reducing stress and maintaining good nutrition and overall health in the flock.

A liver cell adenoma is a benign tumor that develops in the liver and is composed of cells similar to those normally found in the liver (hepatocytes). These tumors are usually solitary, but multiple adenomas can occur, especially in women who have taken oral contraceptives for many years. Liver cell adenomas are typically asymptomatic and are often discovered incidentally during imaging studies performed for other reasons. In rare cases, they may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain or discomfort, or complications such as bleeding or rupture. Treatment options include monitoring with periodic imaging studies or surgical removal of the tumor.

A betaretrovirus is a type of retrovirus, which is a group of viruses that are characterized by their ability to integrate their genetic material into the DNA of the host cell. Betaretroviruses are further classified based on their specific genetic and biological properties. They are enveloped viruses with a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome.

Betaretroviruses include several veterinary pathogens, such as mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) and jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). These viruses are associated with various types of cancer in their respective host species. For example, MMTV is associated with mammary tumors in mice, while JSRV is associated with a type of lung cancer in sheep.

It's important to note that betaretroviruses are not known to infect humans and there are no human diseases associated with this group of viruses.

Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) is a group of inherited disorders characterized by the development of tumors in various endocrine glands, which can lead to overproduction of hormones. There are two main types: MEN type 1 and MEN type 2.

MEN type 1, also known as Wermer's syndrome, is caused by mutations in the MEN1 gene. It typically involves tumors in the parathyroid glands (leading to hyperparathyroidism), pancreas (often gastrinomas or insulinomas), and pituitary gland. Some individuals may also develop tumors in other organs, such as the adrenal glands, lungs, or thyroid gland.

MEN type 2, which includes MEN type 2A and MEN type 2B, is caused by mutations in the RET gene. MEN type 2A involves medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytomas (tumors of the adrenal glands), and parathyroid tumors. MEN type 2B includes MTC, pheochromocytomas, neuromas (nerve tissue tumors), and distinctive physical features such as a marfanoid habitus and mucosal neuromas.

Early detection and management of these tumors are crucial to prevent complications from hormone excess or tumor invasion. Regular screening and monitoring are recommended for individuals with MEN, even if they do not have symptoms. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the affected glands or tumors, along with medications to manage hormonal imbalances.

Intestinal polyposis is a condition characterized by the presence of multiple polyps in the inner lining (mucosa) of the intestines. These polyps are abnormal growths that protrude from the intestinal wall and can vary in size, number, and type. Some common types of polyps include adenomatous, hyperplastic, and inflammatory polyps.

Intestinal polyposis can occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract, including the stomach, small intestine, and large intestine (colon). The condition can be inherited or acquired, and it is often associated with various genetic syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, and Lynch syndrome.

Depending on the type, size, and number of polyps, intestinal polyposis can increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Regular surveillance, monitoring, and removal of polyps are essential for managing this condition and preventing complications.

Lynestrenol is a synthetic form of progestogen, which is a female sex hormone. It is used in various medications for different purposes, such as treating abnormal menstrual bleeding, endometriosis, and preventing premature labor. Lynestrenol works by mimicking the effects of natural progesterone in the body, helping to regulate the menstrual cycle and reduce inflammation associated with endometriosis. It is important to note that lynestrenol should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as it can have side effects and interact with other medications.

Duodenal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine that receives digestive secretions from the pancreas and bile duct. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms include adenomas, leiomyomas, lipomas, and hamartomas. They are usually slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding, or obstruction of the intestine.

Malignant neoplasms include adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids), lymphomas, and sarcomas. They are more aggressive and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, weight loss, jaundice, anemia, or bowel obstruction.

The diagnosis of duodenal neoplasms is usually made through imaging tests such as CT scans, MRI, or endoscopy with biopsy. Treatment depends on the type and stage of the tumor and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these modalities.

Pulmonary adenomatosis is a rare condition that is characterized by the abnormal growth of benign tumors (adenomas) in the lungs. These tumors are made up of glands and can cause thickening and enlargement of the lung tissue, which can lead to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing. In some cases, pulmonary adenomatosis may also be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. It is important to note that this condition is different from adenocarcinoma, which is a type of lung cancer that can also arise in the glands of the lungs.

Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous adenomatous polyps in the colon and rectum. APC is caused by mutations in the APC gene, which is a tumor suppressor gene that helps regulate cell growth and division. When the APC gene is mutated, it can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and the development of polyps, which can eventually become cancerous.

Individuals with APC typically develop hundreds to thousands of polyps in their colon and rectum, usually beginning in adolescence or early adulthood. If left untreated, APC can lead to colorectal cancer in nearly all affected individuals by the age of 40.

APC is an autosomal dominant disorder, which means that a person has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutated gene from an affected parent. However, some cases of APC may also occur spontaneously due to new mutations in the APC gene. Treatment for APC typically involves surgical removal of the colon and rectum (colectomy) to prevent the development of colorectal cancer. Regular surveillance with colonoscopy is also recommended to monitor for the development of new polyps.

Intestinal polyps are abnormal growths that protrude from the lining of the intestines. They can occur in any part of the digestive tract, including the colon and rectum (colorectal polyps), small intestine, or stomach. These growths vary in size, shape, and number. Most intestinal polyps are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. However, some types of polyps, such as adenomatous polyps, can become cancerous over time if left untreated.

Intestinal polyps can be asymptomatic or cause symptoms like rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, or anemia (in cases where there is chronic, slow bleeding). The exact cause of intestinal polyps is not fully understood, but factors such as age, family history, and certain genetic conditions can increase the risk of developing them. Regular screening exams, like colonoscopies, are essential for early detection and removal of polyps to prevent potential complications, including colorectal cancer.

An adenoma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor that develops from glandular epithelial cells. These types of cells are responsible for producing and releasing fluids, such as hormones or digestive enzymes, into the surrounding tissues. Adenomas can occur in various organs and glands throughout the body, including the thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, and digestive systems.

Depending on their location, adenomas may cause different symptoms or remain asymptomatic. Some common examples of adenomas include:

1. Colorectal adenoma (also known as a polyp): These growths occur in the lining of the colon or rectum and can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated. Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, are essential for early detection and removal of these polyps.
2. Thyroid adenoma: This type of adenoma affects the thyroid gland and may result in an overproduction or underproduction of hormones, leading to conditions like hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid).
3. Pituitary adenoma: These growths occur in the pituitary gland, which is located at the base of the brain and controls various hormonal functions. Depending on their size and location, pituitary adenomas can cause vision problems, headaches, or hormonal imbalances that affect growth, reproduction, and metabolism.
4. Liver adenoma: These rare benign tumors develop in the liver and may not cause any symptoms unless they become large enough to press on surrounding organs or structures. In some cases, liver adenomas can rupture and cause internal bleeding.
5. Adrenal adenoma: These growths occur in the adrenal glands, which are located above the kidneys and produce hormones that regulate stress responses, metabolism, and blood pressure. Most adrenal adenomas are nonfunctioning, meaning they do not secrete excess hormones. However, functioning adrenal adenomas can lead to conditions like Cushing's syndrome or Conn's syndrome, depending on the type of hormone being overproduced.

It is essential to monitor and manage benign tumors like adenomas to prevent potential complications, such as rupture, bleeding, or hormonal imbalances. Treatment options may include surveillance with imaging studies, medication to manage hormonal issues, or surgical removal of the tumor in certain cases.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the liver that can be benign or malignant. Benign liver neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors that do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant liver neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissue and spread to other organs.

Liver neoplasms can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or secondary, meaning they have metastasized (spread) to the liver from another part of the body. Primary liver neoplasms can be further classified into different types based on their cell of origin and behavior, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and hepatic hemangioma.

The diagnosis of liver neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and biopsy to confirm the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type and extent of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or liver transplantation.

... (OPA), also known as ovine pulmonary adenomatosis, or jaagsiekte, is a chronic and contagious ... It has also been known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis and ovine pulmonary carcinoma. OPA has been used as an animal model for ... De Las Heras, M; González, L; Sharp, JM (2003). "Pathology of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma". In Fan, Hung (ed.). Jaagsiekte ... York, DF; Querat, G (2002). "Chapter 1: A history of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma jaagsiekte and experiments leading to the ...
Primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma M8248/1 Apudoma M8249/3 Atypical carcinoid tumor M8250/1 Pulmonary adenomatosis (C34 ... Familial polyposis coli Adenomatosis, NOS M8220/3 Adenocarcinoma in adenomatous polyposis M8221/0 Multiple adenomatous polyps ... benign Nesidioblastoma Islet cell adenomatosis M8150/1 Islet cell tumor, NOS (C25._) M8150/3 Islet cell carcinoma (C25._) Islet ... diffuse sclerosing M8360/1 Multiple endocrine adenomas Endocrine adenomatosis M8361/0 Juxtaglomerular tumor (C64.9) Reninoma ...
... of Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus in sheep and goats naturally affected by enzootic nasal tumour or sheep pulmonary adenomatosis ... JSRV Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma Enzootic nasal adenocarcinoma Yu DL, Linnerth-Petrik NM, Halbert CL, Walsh SR, Miller AD, ...
... adenomatosis, pulmonary MeSH C04.557.470.035.215 - adenomatous polyps MeSH C04.557.470.035.215.100 - adenomatous polyposis coli ... pulmonary adenomatosis, ovine MeSH C04.557.470.200.150 - carcinoma, adenosquamous MeSH C04.557.470.200.165 - carcinoma, basal ... pulmonary MeSH C04.588.894.797.520.734 - pancoast's syndrome MeSH C04.588.894.797.520.867 - pulmonary blastoma MeSH C04.588. ... pulmonary blastoma MeSH C04.557.435.710 - rhabdoid tumor MeSH C04.557.435.775 - sarcoma, endometrial stromal MeSH C04.557. ...
... pulmonary adenomatosis, ovine MeSH C22.836.799 - scrapie MeSH C22.836.886 - swayback MeSH C22.836.900 - visna MeSH C22.905.072 ...
... pulmonary adenomatosis, ovine MeSH C02.782.815.800 - sarcoma, avian MeSH C02.782.930.100 - alphavirus infections MeSH C02.782. ... hantavirus pulmonary syndrome MeSH C02.782.147.420.400 - hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome MeSH C02.782.147.444 - ...
In the short term, diazoxide may cause life threatening pulmonary hypertension but this happens only in a minority of cases. ... Congenital hyperinsulinism (HI) has been referred to by a variety of names; nesidioblastosis and islet cell adenomatosis were ... induced pulmonary hypertension in hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia: Recommendations from a multicentre study in the United ...
... multiple endocrine adenomatosis - multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome - multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome - ... pulmonary sulcus tumor - PV701 - pyrazine diazohydroxide - pyrazoloacridine - pyroxamide Q10 - QS21 - quadrantectomy R- ...
Pulmonary adenomatosis or alveolar adeno-carcinoma].. Leménager J; Rousselot P; Boulier MJ; Porin J. Cah Coll Med Hop Paris; ... Frozen section diagnoses of small pulmonary nodules: accuracy and clinical implications.. Marchevsky AM; Changsri C; Gupta I; ...
Pulmonary adenomatosis (C34._). 8250/3. Bronchiolo-alveolar adenocarcinoma, NOS (C34._). 8251/0. Alveolar adenoma (C34._). ...
Adenomatosis, Pulmonary / epidemiology Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ... End-of-life necropsies suggested that glycine-treated mice were less likely than controls to die of pulmonary adenocarcinoma (p ...
Pulmonary_Adenomatosis,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C16960,Patient,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C21089,Patient_Self-Report, ... Pulmonary_Artery_Choriocarcinoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C39986,Ovarian_Primitive_Germ_Cell_Tumor,modify,28-JUN-07,(null ...
Pulmonary adenomatosis (morphologic abnormality). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Pulmonary adenomatosis (morphologic ...
ADENOMATOSIS PULM. Entry Term(s). Pulmonary Adenomatosis Public MeSH Note. 94. History Note. 94. Date Established. 1994/01/01. ... Adenomatosis, Pulmonary Preferred Term Term UI T054544. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Pulmonary Adenomatosis Term UI T054543. Date03/29/1993. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Adenomatosis, Pulmonary Preferred Concept UI. M0027484. Scope Note. A neoplastic disease in which the alveoli and distal ...
ADENOMATOSIS PULM. Entry Term(s). Pulmonary Adenomatosis Public MeSH Note. 94. History Note. 94. Date Established. 1994/01/01. ... Adenomatosis, Pulmonary Preferred Term Term UI T054544. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Pulmonary Adenomatosis Term UI T054543. Date03/29/1993. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1994). ... Adenomatosis, Pulmonary Preferred Concept UI. M0027484. Scope Note. A neoplastic disease in which the alveoli and distal ...
Adenomatosis, Pulmonary - Preferred Concept UI. M0027484. Scope note. A neoplastic disease in which the alveoli and distal ... adenomatosis pulmonar. Scope note:. Enfermedad neoplásica en la cual los alvéolos y los bronquios distales están llenos de moco ... Adenomatoses, Pulmonary. Pulmonary Adenomatoses. Pulmonary Adenomatosis. Tree number(s):. C04.557.470.035.210. ...
Some of the genes thought to be involved can be targeted by fecal DNA testing, for example, p53, K-ras, and the adenomatosis ... deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism). Warfarin continues to be the most common outpatient anticoagulant therapy. ... of indefinite treatment in patients with a low risk of bleeding and venous thromboembolism manifested by pulmonary embolus. ...
Jaagsiekte use Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus Jaborandi Jacaranda caroba Jacaranda gualandai use ...
Pulmonary Hypertension in Neonates and Infants There have been postmarketing reports of pulmonary hypertension occurring in ... or adenomatosis. PROGLYCEM may be used preoperatively as a temporary measure, and postoperatively, if hypoglycemia persists. ... Pulmonary hypertension has been reported in neonates and young infants treated with diazoxide. (see WARNINGS) ... Pulmonary hypertension has been reported in neonates and young infants (see WARNINGS). ...
Sheep pulmonary adenomatosis: Demonstration of a protein which crossreacts with the major core proteins of mason-pfizer monkey ...
... adenomatosis, bovine (TUM) pulmonary X PULM ADENOMATOSIS, BOVINE adenomatosis, cancerous (TUM) pulmonary X CARCINOMA, ... pulmonary adenomatosis (TUM) X CARCINOMA, BRONCHIOLAR pulmonary adenomatosis, (TOfl) bovine X PULM ADENOMATOSIS, BOVINE ... Thus, in epizootic adenomatosis X PULM ADENOMATOSIS, OVINE the Indexer must use the heading as given instead of typi PULMONARY ... bovine pulmonary adenomatosis (TUK) X PULM ADENOMATOSIS, BOVINE bovine respiratory synctial (VIR) virus X RESPIRATORY SYNCTIAL ...
D26.674.500.720 Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine C2.928.740 Pulmonary Emphysema C8.381.495.632 C8.381.495.389.750 Purine- ... Replaced for 2002 by Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma virus) Jaundice, Chronic Idiopathic C16.320.565.499 Juniper B6.388.400.400 ...
Pulmonary hemorrhage following anabolic agent abuse: Two cases. Hvid-Jensen HS, Rasmussen F, Bendstrup E. Hvid-Jensen HS, et al ... Ruptured hepatic adenoma in liver adenomatosis: a case report of emergency surgical management. Chiappa A, Zbar A, Audisio R, ...
Adenomatosis, Pulmonary. *Adenomatous Polyps. *Adrenal Rest Tumor. *Apudoma. *Cystadenoma. *Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary ...
Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease , Niemann-Pick Disease, Type B , Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy , Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, ... Hepatic Adenomatosis. About the Disease. Liver Adenomatosis, also known as hepatic adenomatosis, is related to adenoma and ... Note: If youd like to get a target analysis report for Hepatic Adenomatosis, or if you are interested to learn how our AI- ... above against the disease of Hepatic Adenomatosis at a cost 90% lower than traditional approaches, please feel free to contact ...
Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine. publications Timeline , Most Recent This graph shows the total number of publications written ...
Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine [C22.836.715] * Scrapie [C22.836.799] * Swayback [C22.836.886] * Visna [C22.836.900] ...
Adenomatosis, familial endocrine, see Multiple endocrine neoplasia. *Adenomatous familial polyposis, see Familial adenomatous ... ACD, see Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins. *ACD/MPV, see Alveolar capillary dysplasia with ... Alveolar capillary dysplasia, see Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins ...
Adenomatosis, familial endocrine, see Multiple endocrine neoplasia. *Adenomatous familial polyposis, see Familial adenomatous ... ACD, see Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins. *ACD/MPV, see Alveolar capillary dysplasia with ... Alveolar capillary dysplasia, see Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins ...
Adenomatosis, Pulmonary Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein Adenomatous Polyps Adenomyoepithelioma ... Pulmonary Echinococcus Echinococcus granulosus Echinococcus multilocularis Echinodermata Echinomycin Echinops Plant Echinostoma ...
CT may be useful in distinguishing bronchopulmonary neuroendocrine tumors from benign pulmonary nodules and in identifying ... Multiple Endocrine Adenomatosis, Type 4). By Lawrence S. Kirschner , MD, PhD, The Ohio State University; ...
... prob pulmonary disease other,,pulmonary disease other,prob pulmonary abnormality other,,pulmonary abnormality other,prob three ... prob adenomatosis mult endo,,adenomatosis mult endo,prob ventilation defect,,ventilation defect,prob mesangial proliferative gn ... prob pulmonary artery large,,pulmonary artery large,prob left ventricular diam incr,,left ventricular diam incr,prob adactyly- ... prob nodular pulmonary densities,,nodular pulmonary densities,prob hand/arm surgery,,hand/arm surgery,prob rule out myocardial ...
... prob pulmonary disease other,,pulmonary disease other,prob pulmonary abnormality other,,pulmonary abnormality other,prob three ... prob adenomatosis mult endo,,adenomatosis mult endo,prob ventilation defect,,ventilation defect,prob mesangial proliferative gn ... prob pulmonary artery large,,pulmonary artery large,prob left ventricular diam incr,,left ventricular diam incr,prob adactyly- ... prob nodular pulmonary densities,,nodular pulmonary densities,prob hand/arm surgery,,hand/arm surgery,prob rule out myocardial ...
... and adenomatosis polyposis coli) are known for their antiangiogenic functions which include the promotion of cell apoptosis and ... OPN-KI mice engineered with a thrombin cleavage-resistant OPN had reduced B16 melanoma growth and fewer pulmonary metastases ... Similarly proCPB-deficient mice displayed enhanced pulmonary inflammation in a C5a-induced alveolitis model and E229K thrombin ...
Hypoplasia of pulmonary artery Anomaly of pulmonary artery Stenosis of pulmonary artery Atresia of pulmonary artery Pulmonary ... adenomatosis. See note at beginning of Chapter III. 258.1 Other combinations of endocrine dysfunction Lloyds syndrome ... Aneurysm of pulmonary artery 417.8 Other Rupture of pulmonary vessel Stricture of pulmonary vessel 417.9 Unspecified OTHER ... DISEASES OF PULMONARY CIRCULATION (415-417) 415 Acute pulmonary heart disease 415.0 Acute cor pulmonale 415.1 Pulmonary ...
Pulmonary granular cells tumors (CGT) are rare tumors, that derive from Schwann cells. In the tracheobronchial and pulmonary ... Multicentric tubulopapillary carcinoma of the kidney associated with renal adenomatosis]. / Carcinome tubulopapillaire ... Pulmonary blastomycosis: a case from Africa. Cheikh Rouhou, Sana; Racil, Hajer; Ismail, Olfa; Trabelsi, Sonia; Zarrouk, Mourad ... Pulmonary blastomycosis is an uncommon pathologic condition that is quite rare in Africa compared to endemic regions of Canada ...
This does not include the rarer hereditary adenomatosis coli, in which the whole colon is studded with multiple adenomas.) The ... This does not include the rarerhereditary adenomatosis coli, in which the whole colonis studded with multiple adenomas.) The ...
  • Introduction: Sheep pulmonary adenomatosis (ovine pulmonary adenomatosis, OPA, Jaagsiekte) is a chronic contagious bronchoalveolar carcinoma caused by the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus. (yyu.edu.tr)
  • Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA), also known as ovine pulmonary adenomatosis, or jaagsiekte, is a chronic and contagious disease of the lungs of sheep and goats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Enzootic nasal adenocarcinoma Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus Enzootic nasal tumor virus "2.7.9 Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (adenomatosis)" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • It has also been known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis and ovine pulmonary carcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Familial pulmonary carcinoid tumors. (ne.jp)
  • Ruptured hepatic adenoma in liver adenomatosis: a case report of emergency surgical management. (nih.gov)
  • Liver Adenomatosis, also known as hepatic adenomatosis, is related to adenoma and maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 3. (silexon.tech)
  • Thus, in epizootic adenomatosis X PULM ADENOMATOSIS, OVINE the Indexer must use the heading as given instead of typi PULMONARY ADENOMATOSIS, OVINE in full. (nih.gov)
  • 20. [Pulmonary adenomatosis or alveolar adeno-carcinoma]. (nih.gov)
  • Note: If you'd like to get a target analysis report for Hepatic Adenomatosis , or if you are interested to learn how our AI-powered BDE-Chem can design therapeutic molecules to interact with the target(s) above against the disease of Hepatic Adenomatosis at a cost 90% lower than traditional approaches, please feel free to contact us at [email protected]. (silexon.tech)
  • In the tracheobronchial and pulmonary tree, they remain a diagnostic challenge. (bvsalud.org)
  • We aim to highlight the frequency of all clinicopathological characteristics of this rare tumor in the tracheobronchial and pulmonary tree location based on our cases and the available literature in a large systematic review. (bvsalud.org)