Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine: A contagious, neoplastic, pulmonary disease of sheep characterized by hyperplasia and hypertrophy of pneumocytes and epithelial cells of the lung. It is caused by JAAGSIEKTE SHEEP RETROVIRUS.Adenoma, Liver Cell: A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.Betaretrovirus: A genus of the family RETROVIRIDAE consisting of viruses with either type B or type D morphology. This includes a few exogenous, vertically transmitted and endogenous viruses of mice (type B) and some primate and sheep viruses (type D). MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS, MOUSE is the type species.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia: A group of autosomal dominant diseases characterized by the combined occurrence of tumors involving two or more ENDOCRINE GLANDS that secrete PEPTIDE HORMONES or AMINES. These neoplasias are often benign but can be malignant. They are classified by the endocrine glands involved and the degree of aggressiveness. The two major forms are MEN1 and MEN2 with gene mutations on CHROMOSOME 11 and CHROMOSOME 10, respectively.Intestinal Polyposis: The growth of INTESTINAL POLYPS. Growth processes include neoplastic (ADENOMA and CARCINOMA) and non-neoplastic (hyperplastic, mucosal, inflammatory, and other polyps).Lynestrenol: A synthetic progestational hormone used often in mixtures with estrogens as an oral contraceptive.Duodenal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.Adenomatosis, Pulmonary: A neoplastic disease in which the alveoli and distal bronchi are filled with mucus and mucus-secreting columnar epithelial cells. It is characterized by abundant, extremely tenacious sputum, chills, fever, cough, dyspnea, and pleuritic pain. (Stedman, 25th ed)Adenomatous Polyposis Coli: A polyposis syndrome due to an autosomal dominant mutation of the APC genes (GENES, APC) on CHROMOSOME 5. The syndrome is characterized by the development of hundreds of ADENOMATOUS POLYPS in the COLON and RECTUM of affected individuals by early adulthood.Intestinal Polyps: Discrete abnormal tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the INTESTINE. A polyp is attached to the intestinal wall either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
(1/11) The association between atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and primary lung cancer.

Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) has been suggested as the adenoma in an adenoma-carcinoma sequence in the lung periphery. From 1989-1998, we undertook a systematic, prospective search for AAH in lungs resected for cancer. AAH was found in 67 of 554 patients (12. 1%) with primary lung carcinoma (9.2% in male patients and 19.0% in females). AAH was found in lungs bearing adenocarcinoma (23.2%) more frequently than with large cell undifferentiated carcinoma (12.5%) or squamous carcinoma (3.3%). A greater percentage of females with adenocarcinoma had AAH (30.2%) than did males with adenocarcinoma (18.8%). Numbers of AAH ranged from 1-42 per patient and more patients had small numbers of AAH, although 12 patients had 6 or more AAH foci. Larger numbers of AAH tended to be found in adenocarcinoma-bearing lungs. Ten of the 67 patients with AAH and primary lung carcinoma (15%) had multiple primary cancers (range 2-6), all of which were adenocarcinoma. Synchronous cancers were rare in lung tumour-bearing resections without AAH. Patients with AAH show no difference in post-operative survival to those without, for all stages of carcinoma and for Stage I disease alone. This study provides evidence for a strong association between atypical adenomatous hyperplasia and primary lung adenocarcinoma and lends weight to the AAH/adenoma-carcinoma hypothesis.  (+info)

(2/11) Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung: a probable forerunner in the development of adenocarcinoma of the lung.

An increasingly large body of work suggests that atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of the lung may be a forerunner of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Recognizing this fact, the World Health Organization now acknowledges the existence of AAH while noting difficulties that may be encountered in distinguishing AAH from the nonmucinous variant of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. Regrettably, a universally acceptable definition of morphologic criteria for the diagnosis of AAH has not been achieved. This review of the literature examines the epidemiology, gross appearance, light microscopic findings, morphometry, immunohistochemistry, and molecular features of AAH and suggests a set of histopathologic features that may help the practicing pathologist identify this intriguing lesion. These features include the following: irregularly bordered focal proliferations of atypical cells spreading along the preexisting alveolar framework; prominent cuboidal to low columnar alveolar epithelial cells with variable degree of atypia but less than that seen in adenocarcinoma; increased cell size and nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio with hyperchromasia and prominent nucleoli, generally intact intercellular attachment of atypical cells with occasional empty-looking spaces between them without high cellularity and without tufting or papillary structures; and slight thickening of the alveolar walls on which the AAH cells have spread, with some fibrosis but without scar formation or significant chronic inflammation of the surrounding lung tissue. Several lines of evidence indicate that AAH is a lesion closely associated with adenocarcinoma of the lung, suggesting AAH may be involved in the early stage of a complex multistep carcinogenesis of pulmonary adenocarcinoma.  (+info)

(3/11) Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung: a clinicopathological study of 118 cases including cases with multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia.

BACKGROUND: Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of the lung is a putative precursor lesion of adenocarcinoma, according to many immunohistochemical and genetical studies, but few clinicopathological studies on a large number of cases have been reported. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinicopathological characteristics of lung cancer patients with AAH lesions. METHODS: A retrospective study was carried out on 508 consecutive primary lung cancer patients operated on at National Cancer Center Hospital East. The relationship between the number and location of AAH lesions and the clinicopathological features of the lung cancer patients was analysed statistically. RESULTS: A total of 311 AAH lesions were found in 118 (23.2%) of the 508 cases. AAH lesions were detected in 121 of 572 lobes examined, usually in both upper lobes, and occurred most frequently in patients with adenocarcinoma (OR 2.97; 95% CI 1.82 to 4.85). AAH lesions were more frequently detected in patients with multiple primary carcinomas than in those with a single carcinoma (OR 3.06; 95% CI 1.56 to 6.00). The presence of AAH lesions was not significantly correlated with sex, age, smoking status, familial history of malignancy, or preceding malignancy. Patients with multiple AAH lesions were found to have a significantly higher frequency of preceding malignancies. CONCLUSIONS: The present study highlights the clinicopathological characteristics of AAH lesions, showing them to be significantly associated with both adenocarcinoma and multiple primary carcinoma of the lung and suggesting common factors in the histogenesis of multiple AAH lesions and preceding malignancy.  (+info)

(4/11) Fine chromosomal localization of the mouse Par2 gene that confers resistance against urethane-induction of pulmonary adenomas.

BALB/cByJ mice are 14 times more resistant to urethane-induction of pulmonary adenomas than the susceptible A/J strain. Our previous linkage analysis of (A/J x BALB/cByJ)F1 x A/J backcross mice provided statistical evidence that a major resistance locus of BALB/cByJ with a dominant effect, designated Par2 (Pulmonary adenoma resistance 2), exists within an approximately 25 cM section of distal chromosome 18. To facilitate molecular identification of the Par2 locus, the present study was conducted to finely localize its chromosomal position utilizing Par2-congenic mice. Male BALB/cByJ mice were mated with female C57BL/6J mice carrying recessive Par2 alleles and their male F1 progeny were backcrossed to female BALB/cByJ mice. A male backcross mouse heterozygous within the Par2 interval of 25 cM was randomly selected and again backcrossed to female BALB/cByJ mice. This backcross-selection cycle was simply repeated to produce semi-congenic mice with a general BALB/cByJ genetic background except for the Par2 interval, where the mice were heterozygous with paternal C57BL/6J alleles and maternal BALB/cByJ alleles. After the 6th or 7th backcross, nine male mice possessing a recombination within the paternal Par2 interval were retained and crossed to female A/J mice. Resultant progeny were treated with urethane and examined for lung tumor development in order to deduce the Par2 genotypes of the recombinants through linkage analysis. By comparing the deduced Par2 genotype of each recombinant with its recombinational breakpoint, the Par2 locus was confined to an approximately 0.5 cM region flanked by D18Mit103 and D18Mit188 loci. Our results indicate that fully congenic mice conventionally established by at least nine simple backcrosses or by the speed congenic method are not necessarily required for fine mapping of quantitative trait loci. In the case of the Par2 locus, we found that semi-congenic mice after as few as four simple backcrosses were useful for this purpose. The map information obtained in this study should enable subsequent positional cloning of the Par2 gene.  (+info)

(5/11) A case of multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia of the lung detected by computed tomography.

Multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) of both lungs in a 72-year-old male, detected by computed tomography, is reported. The lesions of the right lung were resected for diagnosis via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The resected specimen had 22 AAH lesions up to 10 mm in size. For nine of these lesions, the expressions of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), c-erbB-2 oncoprotein and p53 gene product were examined by immunohistochemistry and the loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosomes was investigated by polymerase chain reaction analysis. These lesions showed a variety of expressions for CEA, c-erbB-2 and p53 oncoprotein. Three of the nine lesions showed LOH on chromosome 13q, although this was not exhibited in the largest one. These results indicate that each AAH in this case has independent genetic abnormalities and is multicentric.  (+info)

(6/11) Multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia with synchronous multiple primary bronchioloalveolar carcinomas.

We report a case of multiple atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) associated with synchronous multiple primary bronchioloalveolar carcinomas (BACs). A 58-year-old man was visited for bronchial asthma. A chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed small, multiple nodules with ground glass attenuation (GGA) throughout both lungs, predominantly in the upper lobes. A high resolution CT (HRCT) scan disclosed well-defined nodules with uniform GGA. Thoracoscopic wedge lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and had stable disease for two years. It is important to recognize that multiple AAH associated with multiple BACs can present as diffuse, well-defined nodules with uniform GGA on HRCT.  (+info)

(7/11) Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 does not induce lymphoma in transgenic FVB mice.

The lymphoma-inducing potential of Ig heavy-chain enhancer- and promoter-regulated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) was evaluated in three transgenic FVB mouse lineages. EBNA1 was expressed at a higher level in transgenic B220(+) splenocytes than in EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. EBNA1 was also expressed in B220(-) transgenic splenocytes and thymocytes. Before killing and assessments at 18-26 months, EBNA1-transgenic mice did not differ from control mice in mortality. At 18-26 months EBNA1-transgenic mice did not differ from littermate control in ultimate body weight, in spleen size or weight, in lymph node, kidney, liver, or spleen histology, in splenocyte fractions positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)3epsilon, CD4, CD8, CD62L, B220, CD5, IgM, IgD, MHC class II, CD11b, or CD25, or in serum IgM, IgG, or total Ig levels. Lymphomas were not found in spleens or other organs of 18- to 26-month-old EBNA1-transgenic (n=86) or control (n=45) FVB mice. EBNA1-transgenic lineages had a higher pulmonary adenoma prevalence than did littermate controls (39% versus 7%). However, the adenoma prevalence was not higher in EBNA1-transgenic mice than has been described for FVB mice, and EBNA1 was not expressed in normal pulmonary epithelia or adenomas.  (+info)

(8/11) Epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in atypical adenomatous hyperplasias of the lung.

Activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations are frequently detected in lung adenocarcinomas, especially adenocarcinomas with a nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinoma component. EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinomas respond well to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We previously found that most (88%) pure nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas (adenocarcinoma in situ) already harbor EGFR mutations, indicating that the mutations are an early genetic event in the pathogenesis. We examined 54 atypical adenomatous hyperplasias, precursor lesions of lung adenocarcinomas, obtained from 28 Japanese patients for the hotspot mutations of EGFR exons 19 and 21 and K-ras codon 12. EGFR mutations were observed in 17 of the 54 (32%) atypical adenomatous hyperplasias examined: Ten and seven atypical adenomatous hyperplasias had deletion mutations at exon 19 or point mutations (L858R) at exon 21, respectively. We did not observe apparent histological differences between atypical adenomatous hyperplasias with and without EGFR mutations. K-ras mutation (G12S) was detected in only one atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. As EGFR mutational frequency of atypical adenomatous hyperplasias was much lower than that of nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas, we surmise that EGFR-mutated atypical adenomatous hyperplasias, but not atypical adenomatous hyperplasias with wild-type EGFR, are likely to progress to nonmucinous bronchioloalveolar carcinomas.  (+info)

*  Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma
... (OPA), also known as ovine pulmonary adenomatosis, or jaagsiekte, is a chronic and contagious ... It has also been known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis and ovine pulmonary carcinoma. OPA has been used as an animal model for ... "2.7.9 Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (adenomatosis)". Manual of diagnostic tests and vaccines for terrestrial animals 2016 (PDF ... De Las Heras, M; González, L; Sharp, JM (2003). "Pathology of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma". In Fan, Hung. Jaagsiekte Sheep ...
*  International Classification of Diseases for Oncology
Primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma M8248/1 Apudoma M8249/3 Atypical carcinoid tumor M8250/1 Pulmonary adenomatosis (C34 ... Familial polyposis coli Adenomatosis, NOS M8220/3 Adenocarcinoma in adenomatous polyposis M8221/0 Multiple adenomatous polyps ... diffuse sclerosing M8360/1 Multiple endocrine adenomas Endocrine adenomatosis M8361/0 Juxtaglomerular tumor (C64.9) Reninoma ... fibroma M8967/0 Ossifying renal tumor M8970/3 Hepatoblastoma Embryonal hepatoma M8971/3 Pancreatoblastoma M8972/3 Pulmonary ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C04)
... adenomatosis, pulmonary MeSH C04.557.470.035.215 --- adenomatous polyps MeSH C04.557.470.035.215.100 --- adenomatous polyposis ... pulmonary adenomatosis, ovine MeSH C04.557.470.200.150 --- carcinoma, adenosquamous MeSH C04.557.470.200.165 --- carcinoma, ... pulmonary MeSH C04.588.894.797.520.734 --- pancoast's syndrome MeSH C04.588.894.797.520.867 --- pulmonary blastoma MeSH C04.588 ... pulmonary blastoma MeSH C04.557.435.710 --- rhabdoid tumor MeSH C04.557.435.775 --- sarcoma, endometrial stromal MeSH C04.557. ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C22)
... pulmonary adenomatosis, ovine MeSH C22.836.799 --- scrapie MeSH C22.836.886 --- swayback MeSH C22.836.900 --- visna MeSH ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C02)
... pulmonary adenomatosis, ovine MeSH C02.782.815.800 --- sarcoma, avian MeSH C02.782.930.100 --- alphavirus infections MeSH ... hantavirus pulmonary syndrome MeSH C02.782.147.420.400 --- hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome MeSH C02.782.147.444 --- ...
*  Index of oncology articles
... multiple endocrine adenomatosis - multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome - multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome - ... pulmonary sulcus tumor - PV701 - pyrazine diazohydroxide - pyrazoloacridine - pyroxamide Q10 - QS21 - quadrantectomy R- ...
American English  American English
Pulmonary There are two neoplastic conditions which result in contagious respiratory tumours (or contagious lung cancer) in ... small ruminants: Ovine Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma (also known as ODA, She... ... Ovine Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma (also known as ODA, Sheep Pulmonary Adenomatosis, SPA, Jaagsiekte, pulmonary carcinoma) ... Enzootic Nasal Adenomatosis. In ENA, tumors can arise in the nose bilaterally, or unilaterally. ENA is contagious and spread ...
more infohttp://www.farmhealthonline.com/US/disease-management/sheep-diseases/jaagsiekte/
Ovine Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma by Iowa State University Center for Food Security and Public Health  "Ovine Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma" by Iowa State University Center for Food Security and Public Health
Currently, ovine pulmonary adenomatosis exists in most sheep-raising areas of the world, with the exception of New Zealand and ... Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma is a contagious viral disease of sheep that results in pulmonary neoplasia in some animals. The ... Currently, ovine pulmonary adenomatosis exists in most sheep-raising areas of the world, with the exception of New Zealand and ... Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma is a contagious viral disease of sheep that results in pulmonary neoplasia in some animals. The ...
more infohttp://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cfsph_factsheets/98/
Advances in Internal Medicine. Volume 21. | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians  Advances in Internal Medicine. Volume 21. | Annals of Internal Medicine | American College of Physicians
To select a number for mention is not to slight the remainder: transient cerebral ischemic attacks, pulmonary biopsy, ... multiple endocrine adenomatosis, obesity, erythrocytosis with normal blood-gas values, angina without coronaryartery disease, ...
more infohttp://annals.org/aim/article-abstract/690728/advances-internal-medicine-volume-21
Morphological Resemblance of Pulmonary Adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) in Sheep and Certain Cases of Cancer of the Lung in Man |...  Morphological Resemblance of Pulmonary Adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) in Sheep and Certain Cases of Cancer of the Lung in Man |...
Morphological Resemblance of Pulmonary Adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) in Sheep and Certain Cases of Cancer of the Lung in Man. C. ... Morphological Resemblance of Pulmonary Adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) in Sheep and Certain Cases of Cancer of the Lung in Man ... Morphological Resemblance of Pulmonary Adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) in Sheep and Certain Cases of Cancer of the Lung in Man ... Morphological Resemblance of Pulmonary Adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte) in Sheep and Certain Cases of Cancer of the Lung in Man ...
more infohttp://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/35/4/491
adenomatoses pulmonary 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine  adenomatoses pulmonary 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine
Pulmonary Adenomatosis, Ovine / metabolism. Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A / metabolism. Pulmonary Surfactant- ... Woldemeskel M, Tibbo M: Pulmonary adenomatosis and maedi-visna in Ethiopian central highland sheep: a microscopic study. Trop ... 1 adenomatoses pulmonary 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 2 results Searchbox Export PDF RSS Email Delete Email this search result ... detection of pulmonary surfactant proteins and retroviral antigens in the lungs of sheep with pulmonary adenomatosis. J Comp ...
more infohttp://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=adenomatoses+pulmonary+2005:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b0
Presence of Herpesvirus ovis DNA sequences in cellular DNA from sheep lungs affected with jaagsiekte (pulmonary adenomatosis)  Presence of Herpesvirus ovis DNA sequences in cellular DNA from sheep lungs affected with jaagsiekte (pulmonary adenomatosis)
... ... Presence of Herpesvirus ovis DNA sequences in cellular DNA from sheep lungs affected with jaagsiekte (pulmonary adenomatosis). ...
more infohttps://repository.up.ac.za/handle/2263/54112
Motif #1 Essay - 1677 Words - BrightKite  Motif #1 Essay - 1677 Words - BrightKite
Ovine Pulmonary Adenomatosis 1687 words - 7 pages oncogene. JSRV env is a type-1 transmembrane protein composed of surface (SU ...
more infohttps://brightkite.com/essay-on/motif-1
Respiratory lobule | definition of respiratory lobule by Medical dictionary  Respiratory lobule | definition of respiratory lobule by Medical dictionary
ovine pulmonary adenomatosis. a very chronic progressive pneumonia of sheep and goats caused by a retrovirus. Dyspnea, ... pulmonary malformation. includes accessory lungs, pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary agenesis, congenital pulmonary cysts, ... pulmonary congestion. caused by engorgement of the pulmonary vascular bed and it may precede pulmonary edema when the ... pulmonary edema. an effusion of serous fluid into the pulmonary interstitial tissues and alveoli. Preceded by pulmonary ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/respiratory+lobule
Pulmonary wedge pressure | definition of pulmonary wedge pressure by Medical dictionary  Pulmonary wedge pressure | definition of pulmonary wedge pressure by Medical dictionary
What is pulmonary wedge pressure? Meaning of pulmonary wedge pressure medical term. What does pulmonary wedge pressure mean? ... Looking for online definition of pulmonary wedge pressure in the Medical Dictionary? pulmonary wedge pressure explanation free ... ovine pulmonary adenomatosis. a very chronic progressive pneumonia of sheep and goats caused by a retrovirus. Dyspnea, ... pulmonary malformation. includes accessory lungs, pulmonary hypoplasia, pulmonary agenesis, congenital pulmonary cysts, ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/pulmonary+wedge+pressure
Dolly the sheep  Dolly the sheep
The post mortem revealed that Cedric had died of sheep pulmonary adenomatosis (SPA). This disease is caused by a virus that ...
more infohttps://www.nms.ac.uk/explore-our-collections/stories/natural-world/dolly-the-sheep
Reportable animal diseases - Western Australia | Agriculture and Food  Reportable animal diseases - Western Australia | Agriculture and Food
Pulmonary adenomatosis (Jaagsiekte). Exotic. Prohibited organism. Salmonellosis (Salmonella abortus ovis). Not exotic ...
more infohttps://www.agric.wa.gov.au/livestock-biosecurity/reportable-animal-diseases-western-australia?page=0%2C2
The Long Terminal Repeat of Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Is Preferentially Active in Differentiated Epithelial Cells of the...  The Long Terminal Repeat of Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus Is Preferentially Active in Differentiated Epithelial Cells of the...
1988) The etiology and pathogenesis of ovine pulmonary carcinoma (sheep pulmonary adenomatosis). Vet. Microbiol. 17:219-236. ... is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer of sheep known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis (SPA; also ovine pulmonary ... 1997) Sheep pulmonary adenomatosis: a unique model of retrovirus-associated lung cancer. Trends Microbiol. 5:478-483. ... 1995) Epithelial tumour cells in the lungs of sheep with pulmonary adenomatosis are major sites of replication for Jaagsiekte ...
more infohttps://jvi.asm.org/content/74/13/5776?ijkey=88e72a65dcda8d735af6e0fb944a48b51bba38cf&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
Endogenous Retroviruses and Cancer | Springer for Research & Development  Endogenous Retroviruses and Cancer | Springer for Research & Development
Epithelial tumour cells in the lungs of sheep with pulmonary adenomatosis are major sites of replication for Jaagsiekte ... Jaagsiekte retrovirus establishes a disseminated infection of the lymphoid tissues of sheep affected by pulmonary adenomatosis ... of Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus in sheep and goats naturally affected by enzootic nasal tumour or sheep pulmonary adenomatosis. ...
more infohttps://rd.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-0-387-09581-3_5
Expression of VEGF-C and VEGF-D as Significant Markers for Assessment of Lymphangiogenesis and Lymph Node Metastasis in Non...  Expression of VEGF-C and VEGF-D as Significant Markers for Assessment of Lymphangiogenesis and Lymph Node Metastasis in Non...
M. Sozmen, E. Beytut, An Investigation of Growth Factors and Lactoferrin in Naturally Occurring Ovine Pulmonary Adenomatosis, ...
more infohttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.21096/abstract
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... sheep pulmonary adenomatosis ?? ???????? shipment advice װ ֪ͨ shipping advice װ??֪ͨ short address ̵?? short adductor muscle ??ռ ... pulmonary adenomatosis ???? ???? pulse advancing ?? ???ǰ pulse bucking adder ?? 岹 ӷ ?? pulse response adaptive ?? ???Ӧ????Ӧ ... sclerosing adenomatosis Ӳ ?????? screen slope adjusting shaft ɸ????б ???? screw adjusting double caliper ?? ??????⿨ screw ...
more infohttp://www.acmetranslation.com/dictionary/1276.htm
Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma - Wikipedia  Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma - Wikipedia
Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA), also known as ovine pulmonary adenomatosis, or jaagsiekte, is a chronic and contagious ... It has also been known as sheep pulmonary adenomatosis and ovine pulmonary carcinoma. OPA has been used as an animal model for ... "2.7.9 Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (adenomatosis)". Manual of diagnostic tests and vaccines for terrestrial animals 2016 (PDF ... De Las Heras, M; González, L; Sharp, JM (2003). "Pathology of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma". In Fan, Hung. Jaagsiekte Sheep ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovine_pulmonary_adenocarcinoma
Pathology and polymerase chain reaction detection of ovine progressive pneumonia (maedi) cases in slaughtered sheep in India  Pathology and polymerase chain reaction detection of ovine progressive pneumonia (maedi) cases in slaughtered sheep in India
Woldemeskel, M. and Tibbo, M. (2010) Pulmonary adenomatosis and maedi-visna in Ethiopian central highland sheep: A microscopic ...
more infohttp://www.veterinaryworld.org/Vol.10/November-2017/20.html
International Classification of Diseases for Oncology - Wikipedia  International Classification of Diseases for Oncology - Wikipedia
Primary cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma M8248/1 Apudoma M8249/3 Atypical carcinoid tumor M8250/1 Pulmonary adenomatosis (C34 ... Familial polyposis coli Adenomatosis, NOS M8220/3 Adenocarcinoma in adenomatous polyposis M8221/0 Multiple adenomatous polyps ... diffuse sclerosing M8360/1 Multiple endocrine adenomas Endocrine adenomatosis M8361/0 Juxtaglomerular tumor (C64.9) Reninoma ... fibroma M8967/0 Ossifying renal tumor M8970/3 Hepatoblastoma Embryonal hepatoma M8971/3 Pancreatoblastoma M8972/3 Pulmonary ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Classification_of_Diseases_for_Oncology
  • Lung cancer is the main cause of mortality among cancer patients ( 32 ), and the characteristics BAC and SPA have in common suggest that the latter could offer novel insights into pulmonary carcinogenesis. (asm.org)