A benign tumor of the anterior pituitary in which the cells do not stain with acidic or basic dyes.
A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.
Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.
A heterogeneous group of sporadic or hereditary carcinoma derived from cells of the KIDNEYS. There are several subtypes including the clear cells, the papillary, the chromophobe, the collecting duct, the spindle cells (sarcomatoid), or mixed cell-type carcinoma.
Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.
A type II keratin found associated with KERATIN-19 in ductal epithelia and gastrointestinal epithelia.
A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)
An adenoma of the large intestine. It is usually a solitary, sessile, often large, tumor of colonic mucosa composed of mucinous epithelium covering delicate vascular projections. Hypersecretion and malignant changes occur frequently. (Stedman, 25th ed)
An adenocarcinoma characterized by the presence of varying combinations of clear and hobnail-shaped tumor cells. There are three predominant patterns described as tubulocystic, solid, and papillary. These tumors, usually located in the female reproductive organs, have been seen more frequently in young women since 1970 as a result of the association with intrauterine exposure to diethylstilbestrol. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed)
A calcium-binding protein that mediates calcium HOMEOSTASIS in KIDNEYS, BRAIN, and other tissues. It is found in well-defined populations of NEURONS and is involved in CALCIUM SIGNALING and NEURONAL PLASTICITY. It is regulated in some tissues by VITAMIN D.
A malignant neoplasm characterized by the formation of numerous, irregular, finger-like projections of fibrous stroma that is covered with a surface layer of neoplastic epithelial cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A family of MARVEL domain-containing proteolipid proteins involved in vesicular trafficking cycling between the GOLGI COMPLEX and the apical PLASMA MEMBRANE.
A benign neoplasm of the ADRENAL CORTEX. It is characterized by a well-defined nodular lesion, usually less than 2.5 cm. Most adrenocortical adenomas are nonfunctional. The functional ones are yellow and contain LIPIDS. Depending on the cell type or cortical zone involved, they may produce ALDOSTERONE; HYDROCORTISONE; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE; and/or ANDROSTENEDIONE.
A benign epithelial tumor of the LIVER.
Autosomal dominant neoplastic syndrome characterised by genodermatosis, lung cysts, spontaneous and recurrent PNEUMOTHORAX; and RENAL CANCER. It is associated with mutations in the folliculin protein gene (FLCN protein).
Low molecular weight, calcium binding muscle proteins. Their physiological function is possibly related to the contractile process.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Excision of kidney.
A specific pair of GROUP C CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.
A family of medium adaptin protein subunits of approximately 45 KDa in size. They have been primarily found as components of ADAPTOR PROTEIN COMPLEX 3 and ADAPTOR PROTEIN COMPLEX 4.
A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.
The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.
A specific pair of human chromosomes in group A (CHROMOSOMES, HUMAN, 1-3) of the human chromosome classification.
A pituitary tumor that secretes GROWTH HORMONE. In humans, excess HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE leads to ACROMEGALY.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.
Discrete tissue masses that protrude into the lumen of the COLON. These POLYPS are connected to the wall of the colon either by a stalk, pedunculus, or by a broad base.
A pituitary adenoma which secretes ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN, leading to CUSHING DISEASE.
A clathrin adaptor protein complex primarily involved in clathrin-related transport at the TRANS-GOLGI NETWORK.
A type I keratin expressed predominately in gastrointestinal epithelia, MERKEL CELLS, and the TASTE BUDS of the oral mucosa.
A type of IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION in which target sequences are stained with fluorescent dye so their location and size can be determined using fluorescence microscopy. This staining is sufficiently distinct that the hybridization signal can be seen both in metaphase spreads and in interphase nuclei.
A specific pair GROUP C CHROMSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
Enzyme that is a major constituent of kidney brush-border membranes and is also present to a lesser degree in the brain and other tissues. It preferentially catalyzes cleavage at the amino group of hydrophobic residues of the B-chain of insulin as well as opioid peptides and other biologically active peptides. The enzyme is inhibited primarily by EDTA, phosphoramidon, and thiorphan and is reactivated by zinc. Neprilysin is identical to common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA Antigen), an important marker in the diagnosis of human acute lymphocytic leukemia. There is no relationship with CALLA PLANT.
The simultaneous analysis of multiple samples of TISSUES or CELLS from BIOPSY or in vitro culture that have been arranged in an array format on slides or microchips.
A benign tumor, usually found in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland, whose cells stain with acid dyes. Such pituitary tumors may give rise to excessive secretion of growth hormone, resulting in gigantism or acromegaly. A specific type of acidophil adenoma may give rise to nonpuerperal galactorrhea. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the luminal surface of the colon.
Benign neoplasms derived from glandular epithelium. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Calcium-binding proteins that are found in DISTAL KIDNEY TUBULES, INTESTINES, BRAIN, and other tissues where they bind, buffer and transport cytoplasmic calcium. Calbindins possess a variable number of EF-HAND MOTIFS which contain calcium-binding sites. Some isoforms are regulated by VITAMIN D.
A pituitary adenoma which secretes PROLACTIN, leading to HYPERPROLACTINEMIA. Clinical manifestations include AMENORRHEA; GALACTORRHEA; IMPOTENCE; HEADACHE; visual disturbances; and CEREBROSPINAL FLUID RHINORRHEA.
Body organ that filters blood for the secretion of URINE and that regulates ion concentrations.
A specific pair of GROUP E CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.
A small tumor of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland whose cells stain with basic dyes. It may give rise to excessive secretion of ACTH, resulting in CUSHING SYNDROME. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Abnormal number or structure of chromosomes. Chromosome aberrations may result in CHROMOSOME DISORDERS.
Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.
A class of fibrous proteins or scleroproteins that represents the principal constituent of EPIDERMIS; HAIR; NAILS; horny tissues, and the organic matrix of tooth ENAMEL. Two major conformational groups have been characterized, alpha-keratin, whose peptide backbone forms a coiled-coil alpha helical structure consisting of TYPE I KERATIN and a TYPE II KERATIN, and beta-keratin, whose backbone forms a zigzag or pleated sheet structure. alpha-Keratins have been classified into at least 20 subtypes. In addition multiple isoforms of subtypes have been found which may be due to GENE DUPLICATION.
Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
DNA present in neoplastic tissue.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.
A polyposis syndrome due to an autosomal dominant mutation of the APC genes (GENES, APC) on CHROMOSOME 5. The syndrome is characterized by the development of hundreds of ADENOMATOUS POLYPS in the COLON and RECTUM of affected individuals by early adulthood.
Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.
A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excessive HUMAN GROWTH HORMONE in adults. It is characterized by bony enlargement of the FACE; lower jaw (PROGNATHISM); hands; FEET; HEAD; and THORAX. The most common etiology is a GROWTH HORMONE-SECRETING PITUITARY ADENOMA. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch36, pp79-80)
A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excess levels of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) or other GLUCOCORTICOIDS from endogenous or exogenous sources. It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. Endogenous Cushing syndrome or spontaneous hypercortisolism is divided into two groups, those due to an excess of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN and those that are ACTH-independent.
Tumor suppressor genes located in the 5q21 region on the long arm of human chromosome 5. The mutation of these genes is associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (ADENOMATOUS POLYPOSIS COLI) and GARDNER SYNDROME, as well as some sporadic colorectal cancers.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.
Tumors or cancer of the COLON.
Tumors or cancer of the INTESTINES.
An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.
Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.
Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.
A disease of the PITUITARY GLAND characterized by the excess amount of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secreted. This leads to hypersecretion of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) by the ADRENAL GLANDS resulting in CUSHING SYNDROME.
Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.
A malignant neoplasm made up of epithelial cells tending to infiltrate the surrounding tissues and give rise to metastases. It is a histological type of neoplasm but is often wrongly used as a synonym for "cancer." (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A condition caused by the overproduction of ALDOSTERONE. It is characterized by sodium retention and potassium excretion with resultant HYPERTENSION and HYPOKALEMIA.
An irregular unpaired bone situated at the SKULL BASE and wedged between the frontal, temporal, and occipital bones (FRONTAL BONE; TEMPORAL BONE; OCCIPITAL BONE). Sphenoid bone consists of a median body and three pairs of processes resembling a bat with spread wings. The body is hollowed out in its inferior to form two large cavities (SPHENOID SINUS).
Tumors or cancer of the DUODENUM.
An anterior pituitary hormone that stimulates the ADRENAL CORTEX and its production of CORTICOSTEROIDS. ACTH is a 39-amino acid polypeptide of which the N-terminal 24-amino acid segment is identical in all species and contains the adrenocorticotrophic activity. Upon further tissue-specific processing, ACTH can yield ALPHA-MSH and corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP).
A small, unpaired gland situated in the SELLA TURCICA. It is connected to the HYPOTHALAMUS by a short stalk which is called the INFUNDIBULUM.
A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.
A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE due to parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. It is characterized by the combination of HYPERCALCEMIA, phosphaturia, elevated renal 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 synthesis, and increased BONE RESORPTION.
Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.
Pathological processes that tend eventually to become malignant. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
A bony prominence situated on the upper surface of the body of the sphenoid bone. It houses the PITUITARY GLAND.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the sigmoid flexure.

Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: confirmation of diagnosis with in vitro methods. (1/47)

Profound thrombocytopenia developed in a patient during treatment with heparin for venous thrombosis. The platelet count increased toward normal when heparin administration was stopped, but fell abruptly when the drug was again given. Platelet aggregation occurred when heparin was added to the patient's platelet-rich plasma, or to normal platelets plus the patient's serum. This serum also effected release of 3H-serotonin from normal platelets. This pattern of aggregation was clearly different from that occasionally caused by heparin in a control population. The data is consistent with an effect of heparin on platelets, possibly mediated by on immune mechanism.  (+info)

Visual failure from pituitary and parasellar tumours occurring with favourable outcome in pregnant women. (2/47)

Very few cases have been reported of a successful outcome after relief by operation of severe visual failure from a pituitary or other parasellar tumour during the late stages of pregnancy. Two such cases are recorded here together with the obstetric features and follow-up studies of more than three years. Usually the deterioration of vi sion occurs in the latter half of the pregnancy and recovers rapidly after delivery, whether the onset of labour has occurred spontaneously or after induction. In subsequent pregnancies vision deteriorates at an earlier stage and becomes even more marked. Some cases are now occurring even in pregnancies induced by modern fertility drugs. The treatment of choice whenever vision is seriously threatened at any stage of pregnancy is a surgical attack on the pituitary, followed by suitable replacement therapy to ensure that the pregnancy continues.  (+info)

Subclinical Cushing's disease accompanied by malignant hypertension and diabetes mellitus. (3/47)

A 53-year-old woman was admitted because of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Elevated diastolic blood pressure, hypertensive retinopathy and renal dysfunction indicated malignant hypertension. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels were high although there were no Cushingoid features. One mg dexamethasone administration decreased neither ACTH nor cortisol levels. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a left pituitary tumor (7 mm x 6 mm). Upon removal, the tumor showed positive ACTH staining by immnohistochemistry, and was diagnosed as pituitary ACTH-secreting adenoma (Cushing's disease). Her blood pressure, renal function, blood glucose and hormone levels subsequently improved. Malignant hypertension and deteriorated diabetes mellitus may have been due to subclinical Cushing's disease.  (+info)

Sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma with foci of chromophobe carcinoma. (4/47)

Both chromophobe carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the kidney are rare. The former is characterized by a relatively good prognosis, while the latter is a highly aggressive tumor. Coexistence of the two components in one renal tumor, which has been reported only rarely, is therefore paradoxical. Both sarcomatoid and chromophobe renal carcinoma were diagnosed in a 52-year-old woman following nephrectomy and resection of metastases in the right lobe of the liver. She died of the disease two months after the first operation; only the sarcomatoid component of her tumor was seen in the liver metastasis and the recurrent carcinoma. Differences in phenotype, immunophenotype and DNA-ploidy patterns of the two components are reported. The intensive p53 staining observed only in the sarcomatoid area supports the role of the TP53 gene in the transformation of chromophobe renal carcinoma to sarcomatoid carcinoma.  (+info)

Moyamoya disease associated with pituitary adenoma--report of two cases. (5/47)

Moyamoya disease associated with prolactin (PRL)-producing pituitary adenomas occurred in two females with elevated blood PRL levels (285 and 120 ng/ml). Computed tomography revealed cystic tumors extending from the sella turcica to the suprasellar cistern. Carotid angiography demonstrated stenoses or obstructions of the bilateral internal carotid arteries at their end point and development of bilateral basal moyamoya vessels. Histological diagnosis in one case was PRL-producing chromophobe adenoma. No stigmata of neurofibromatosis or any history of irradiation was found. Compression of carotid arteries by the tumor was unlikely. These cases should therefore be classified as moyamoya disease accompanied by brain tumor, a very rare occurrence. The hypothalamic disturbance caused by moyamoya disease may have induced the hyperprolactinemia, resulting in secondary prolactinoma.  (+info)

Hypopituitarism caused by a melanoma of the pituitary gland. (6/47)

A clinical and pathological description is given of a case of panhypopituitarism caused by a melanoma of the pituitary gland. The possible origins of a melanoma in this site are discussed.  (+info)

Stroke after pituitary irradiation. (7/47)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cranial irradiation may lead to accelerated atherosclerosis over several years. Stroke has been described after cranial irradiation administered for a number of conditions. However, pituitary irradiation has only rarely been associated with stroke. CASE DESCRIPTIONS: Two patients, 39 and 46 years of age, suffered strokes 13 and 20 years, respectively, after irradiation for pituitary tumors. Strokes were in the territories of small perforating arteries, but large vessels such as the carotid siphon and anterior cerebral arteries were also abnormal. Other risk factors for stroke were absent. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that pituitary irradiation increases the risk of subsequent stroke due to the known effects of ionizing radiation on vascular walls.  (+info)

Histologic coagulative tumor necrosis as a prognostic indicator of renal cell carcinoma aggressiveness. (8/47)

BACKGROUND: Prognostic markers for renal cell carcinoma (RCC), such as patient symptoms, tumor stage, tumor size, and tumor grade, are useful for determining appropriate follow-up and selecting patients for adjuvant therapy. Histologic coagulative tumor necrosis, also reported to be a prognostic marker for RCC, has not previously been extensively described or investigated. Hence, the objective of the current study was to characterize tumor necrosis as a prognostic feature of RCC. METHODS: The authors of the current study identified 3009 patients treated surgically for RCC between 1970 and 2002 from the Mayo Clinic Nephrectomy Registry (Rochester, MN). Associations of tumor necrosis with clinical, laboratory, and pathologic features were examined with chi-square, Fisher exact test, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Cancer-specific survival was estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method, and associations with outcome were assessed with Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Tumor necrosis was present in 690 of 2445 (28%) clear cell, 196 of 421 (47%) papillary, and 28 of 143 (20%) chromophobe RCCs. The risk ratio for death from RCC in patients with necrotic compared with non-necrotic tumors was 5.27 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.56-6.09; P < 0.001) for clear cell, 4.20 (CI: 1.65-10.68; P < 0.001) for chromophobe, and 1.49 (CI: 0.81-2.74; P = 0.199) for papillary RCC. The survival difference for clear cell RCC persisted even after multivariate adjustment for tumor stage, size, and grade (risk ratio 1.90; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Histologic coagulative tumor necrosis is an independent predictor of outcome for clear cell and chromophobe RCC, and it should be routinely reported and used in clinical assessment.  (+info)

A chromophobe adenoma is a type of benign (non-cancerous) tumor that typically arises in the pituitary gland, which is a small endocrine gland located at the base of the brain. The term "chromophobe" refers to the appearance of the cells under a microscope - they lack pigment and have a characteristic appearance with abundant clear or lightly stained cytoplasm.

Chromophobe adenomas are slow-growing tumors that can vary in size, and they may cause symptoms due to pressure on surrounding structures or by producing excess hormones. The most common hormone produced by chromophobe adenomas is prolactin, leading to symptoms such as menstrual irregularities, milk production (galactorrhea), and decreased sexual function in women, and decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and infertility in men.

Treatment for chromophobe adenomas typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, often through a transsphenoidal approach (through the nose and sphenoid sinus). In some cases, radiation therapy or medical management with hormone-blocking drugs may also be necessary. Regular follow-up with an endocrinologist is important to monitor for any recurrence or hormonal imbalances.

An adenoma is a benign (noncancerous) tumor that develops from glandular epithelial cells. These types of cells are responsible for producing and releasing fluids, such as hormones or digestive enzymes, into the surrounding tissues. Adenomas can occur in various organs and glands throughout the body, including the thyroid, pituitary, adrenal, and digestive systems.

Depending on their location, adenomas may cause different symptoms or remain asymptomatic. Some common examples of adenomas include:

1. Colorectal adenoma (also known as a polyp): These growths occur in the lining of the colon or rectum and can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated. Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, are essential for early detection and removal of these polyps.
2. Thyroid adenoma: This type of adenoma affects the thyroid gland and may result in an overproduction or underproduction of hormones, leading to conditions like hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid).
3. Pituitary adenoma: These growths occur in the pituitary gland, which is located at the base of the brain and controls various hormonal functions. Depending on their size and location, pituitary adenomas can cause vision problems, headaches, or hormonal imbalances that affect growth, reproduction, and metabolism.
4. Liver adenoma: These rare benign tumors develop in the liver and may not cause any symptoms unless they become large enough to press on surrounding organs or structures. In some cases, liver adenomas can rupture and cause internal bleeding.
5. Adrenal adenoma: These growths occur in the adrenal glands, which are located above the kidneys and produce hormones that regulate stress responses, metabolism, and blood pressure. Most adrenal adenomas are nonfunctioning, meaning they do not secrete excess hormones. However, functioning adrenal adenomas can lead to conditions like Cushing's syndrome or Conn's syndrome, depending on the type of hormone being overproduced.

It is essential to monitor and manage benign tumors like adenomas to prevent potential complications, such as rupture, bleeding, or hormonal imbalances. Treatment options may include surveillance with imaging studies, medication to manage hormonal issues, or surgical removal of the tumor in certain cases.

An oxyphilic adenoma is a type of benign tumor that develops in the endocrine glands, specifically in the parathyroid gland. This type of adenoma is characterized by the presence of cells called oxyphils, which have an abundance of mitochondria and appear pink on histological examination due to their high oxidative enzyme activity. Oxyphilic adenomas are a common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism, a condition in which the parathyroid glands produce too much parathyroid hormone (PTH), leading to an imbalance of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. Symptoms of primary hyperparathyroidism may include fatigue, weakness, bone pain, kidney stones, and psychological disturbances. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the affected parathyroid gland.

Kidney neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the kidney tissues that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can originate from various types of kidney cells, including the renal tubules, glomeruli, and the renal pelvis.

Malignant kidney neoplasms are also known as kidney cancers, with renal cell carcinoma being the most common type. Benign kidney neoplasms include renal adenomas, oncocytomas, and angiomyolipomas. While benign neoplasms are generally not life-threatening, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to compromise kidney function or if they undergo malignant transformation.

Early detection and appropriate management of kidney neoplasms are crucial for improving patient outcomes and overall prognosis. Regular medical check-ups, imaging studies, and urinalysis can help in the early identification of these growths, allowing for timely intervention and treatment.

Carcinoma, renal cell (also known as renal cell carcinoma or RCC) is a type of cancer that originates in the lining of the tubules of the kidney. These tubules are small structures within the kidney that help filter waste and fluids from the blood to form urine.

Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults, accounting for about 80-85% of all cases. It can affect people of any age, but it is more commonly diagnosed in those over the age of 50.

There are several subtypes of renal cell carcinoma, including clear cell, papillary, chromophobe, and collecting duct carcinomas, among others. Each subtype has a different appearance under the microscope and may have a different prognosis and response to treatment.

Symptoms of renal cell carcinoma can vary but may include blood in the urine, flank pain, a lump or mass in the abdomen, unexplained weight loss, fatigue, and fever. Treatment options for renal cell carcinoma depend on the stage and grade of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and preferences. Treatment may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or targeted therapy.

Pituitary neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the pituitary gland, a small endocrine gland located at the base of the brain. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous), with most being benign. They can vary in size and may cause various symptoms depending on their location, size, and hormonal activity.

Pituitary neoplasms can produce and secrete excess hormones, leading to a variety of endocrine disorders such as Cushing's disease (caused by excessive ACTH production), acromegaly (caused by excessive GH production), or prolactinoma (caused by excessive PRL production). They can also cause local compression symptoms due to their size, leading to headaches, vision problems, and cranial nerve palsies.

The exact causes of pituitary neoplasms are not fully understood, but genetic factors, radiation exposure, and certain inherited conditions may increase the risk of developing these tumors. Treatment options for pituitary neoplasms include surgical removal, radiation therapy, and medical management with drugs that can help control hormonal imbalances.

Keratin-7 is not a medical term itself, but it is a specific type of keratin protein that is often used in pathology as a marker for certain types of carcinomas. Keratins are a family of fibrous proteins that make up the structural framework of epithelial cells, which line the surfaces and glands of the body.

Keratin-7 is typically expressed in simple epithelia, such as those found in the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, bile ducts, and respiratory and genitourinary tracts. It can be used as a marker to help identify carcinomas that arise from these tissues, such as adenocarcinomas of the pancreas or biliary system.

In medical terminology, keratin-7 positivity is often reported in the pathology report of a biopsy or surgical specimen to indicate the presence of this protein in cancer cells. This information can be helpful in determining the origin and behavior of the tumor, as well as guiding treatment decisions.

A pleomorphic adenoma is a type of benign (non-cancerous) tumor that typically develops in the salivary glands, although they can also occur in other areas such as the nasopharynx and skin. "Pleomorphic" refers to the diverse appearance of the cells within the tumor, which can vary in size, shape, and arrangement.

Pleomorphic adenomas are composed of a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal cells, which can form glandular structures, squamous (scale-like) cells, and areas that resemble cartilage or bone. These tumors tend to grow slowly and usually do not spread to other parts of the body.

While pleomorphic adenomas are generally not dangerous, they can cause problems if they become large enough to press on surrounding tissues or structures. In some cases, these tumors may also undergo malignant transformation, leading to a cancerous growth known as carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma. Surgical removal is the standard treatment for pleomorphic adenomas, and the prognosis is generally good with proper management.

A villous adenoma is a type of polyp (a growth that protrudes from the lining of an organ) found in the colon or rectum. It is named for its appearance under a microscope, which reveals finger-like projections called "villi" on the surface of the polyp.

Villous adenomas are typically larger than other types of polyps and can be several centimeters in size. They are also more likely to be cancerous or precancerous, meaning that they have the potential to develop into colon or rectal cancer over time.

Because of this increased risk, it is important for villous adenomas to be removed surgically if they are found during a colonoscopy or other diagnostic procedure. Regular follow-up colonoscopies may also be recommended to monitor for the development of new polyps or recurrence of previous ones.

Adenocarcinoma, clear cell is a type of cancer that begins in the glandular cells lining various organs and appears "clear" under the microscope due to its characteristic appearance. These cells produce and release mucus or other fluids. This type of cancer can occur in several parts of the body including the lungs, breasts, ovaries, prostate, and kidneys. Clear cell adenocarcinoma is most commonly found in the ovary and accounts for around 5-10% of all ovarian cancers. It is also associated with endometriosis, a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows outside the uterine cavity.

Clear cell adenocarcinoma has unique features that distinguish it from other types of cancer. The cells are often large and have distinct borders, giving them a "clear" appearance under the microscope due to their high lipid or glycogen content. This type of cancer tends to be more aggressive than some other forms of adenocarcinoma and may have a poorer prognosis, particularly if it has spread beyond its original site.

Treatment for clear cell adenocarcinoma typically involves surgery to remove the tumor, followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy to kill any remaining cancer cells. The specific treatment plan will depend on several factors, including the location and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and medical history.

Calbindin 1 is a calcium-binding protein that belongs to the family of EF-hand proteins. It is also known as calbindin D-28k, due to its molecular weight of approximately 28 kilodaltons. This protein is widely distributed in various tissues and organisms but is particularly abundant in the nervous system, where it plays crucial roles in calcium homeostasis, neuroprotection, and signal transduction.

In neurons, calbindin 1 is primarily located in the cytoplasm and dendrites, with lower concentrations found in the axons and nerve terminals. It helps regulate intracellular calcium levels by binding to calcium ions (Ca2+) with high affinity and capacity, thereby preventing rapid fluctuations in Ca2+ concentration that could trigger cellular damage or dysfunction.

Calbindin 1 has been implicated in several neuronal processes, including neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal excitability. Additionally, it is believed to provide neuroprotection against various insults, such as oxidative stress, glutamate excitotoxicity, and calcium overload, which are associated with neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy.

In summary, calbindin 1 is a calcium-binding protein that plays essential roles in maintaining calcium homeostasis, neuroprotection, and neuronal signaling within the nervous system.

Carcinoma, papillary is a type of cancer that begins in the cells that line the glandular structures or the lining of organs. In a papillary carcinoma, the cancerous cells grow and form small finger-like projections, called papillae, within the tumor. This type of cancer most commonly occurs in the thyroid gland, but can also be found in other organs such as the lung, breast, and kidney. Papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland is usually slow-growing and has a good prognosis, especially when it is diagnosed at an early stage.

Myelin and lymphocyte-associated proteolipid proteins (MAL/PLP) are a family of proteolipid proteins that play crucial roles in the formation and maintenance of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS). The myelin sheath is a multilayered membrane that surrounds nerve cell axons, allowing for efficient and rapid electrical impulse transmission.

The MAL/PLP family includes two major proteins:

1. Myelin and lymphocyte protein (MAL): This protein is primarily expressed in the plasma membrane of oligodendrocytes, the CNS glial cells responsible for myelination. MAL is involved in the organization and maintenance of the lipid rafts, which are specialized microdomains within the plasma membrane that facilitate signal transduction and membrane trafficking.

2. Proteolipid protein (PLP) or proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1): This is the most abundant protein in the CNS myelin sheath, constituting approximately 50% of its total protein content. PLP is primarily located within the intracellular leaflets of the multilayered myelin membrane and plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity and compaction of the myelin sheath.

Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins can lead to various demyelinating disorders, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) and spastic paraplegia type 2 (SPG2), which are characterized by abnormalities in the myelin sheath and neurological dysfunction.

An adrenocortical adenoma is a benign tumor that arises from the cells of the adrenal cortex, which is the outer layer of the adrenal gland. These tumors can produce and release various hormones, such as cortisol, aldosterone, or androgens, depending on the type of cells they originate from.

Most adrenocortical adenomas are nonfunctioning, meaning that they do not secrete excess hormones and may not cause any symptoms. However, some functioning adenomas can produce excessive amounts of hormones, leading to a variety of clinical manifestations. For example:

* Cortisol-secreting adenomas can result in Cushing's syndrome, characterized by weight gain, muscle wasting, thin skin, easy bruising, and mood changes.
* Aldosterone-producing adenomas can cause Conn's syndrome, marked by hypertension (high blood pressure), hypokalemia (low potassium levels), and metabolic alkalosis.
* Androgen-secreting adenomas may lead to hirsutism (excessive hair growth) or virilization (development of male secondary sexual characteristics) in women.

The diagnosis of an adrenocortical adenoma typically involves imaging tests, such as CT or MRI scans, and hormonal evaluations to determine if the tumor is functioning or not. Treatment usually consists of surgical removal of the tumor, especially if it is causing hormonal imbalances or growing in size.

A liver cell adenoma is a benign tumor that develops in the liver and is composed of cells similar to those normally found in the liver (hepatocytes). These tumors are usually solitary, but multiple adenomas can occur, especially in women who have taken oral contraceptives for many years. Liver cell adenomas are typically asymptomatic and are often discovered incidentally during imaging studies performed for other reasons. In rare cases, they may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain or discomfort, or complications such as bleeding or rupture. Treatment options include monitoring with periodic imaging studies or surgical removal of the tumor.

Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the development of multiple benign hair follicle tumors called fibrofolliculomas, as well as an increased risk of developing certain types of kidney cancer and lung cysts or pneumothorax (collapsed lung). The syndrome is caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene.

Individuals with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome may also have skin abnormalities such as trichodiscomas and acrochordons (skin tags), and some may experience spontaneous pneumothorax (collapsed lung) due to the development of lung cysts.

The kidney cancer that is associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is typically a type called renal cell carcinoma, which can be aggressive and life-threatening if not detected and treated early. Regular monitoring and screening for kidney cancer and lung abnormalities are recommended for individuals with this syndrome.

Parvalbumins are a group of calcium-binding proteins that are primarily found in muscle and nerve tissues. They belong to the EF-hand superfamily, which is characterized by a specific structure containing helix-loop-helix motifs that bind calcium ions. Parvalbumins have a high affinity for calcium and play an essential role in regulating intracellular calcium concentrations during muscle contraction and nerve impulse transmission.

In muscle tissue, parvalbumins are found in fast-twitch fibers and help to facilitate rapid relaxation after muscle contraction by binding calcium ions and removing them from the cytoplasm. In nerve tissue, parvalbumins are expressed in inhibitory interneurons and modulate neuronal excitability by regulating intracellular calcium concentrations during synaptic transmission.

Parvalbumins have also been identified as potential allergens in certain foods, such as fish and shellfish, and may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Nephrectomy is a surgical procedure in which all or part of a kidney is removed. It may be performed due to various reasons such as severe kidney damage, kidney cancer, or living donor transplantation. The type of nephrectomy depends on the reason for the surgery - a simple nephrectomy involves removing only the affected portion of the kidney, while a radical nephrectomy includes removal of the whole kidney along with its surrounding tissues like the adrenal gland and lymph nodes.

Human chromosome pair 10 refers to a group of genetic materials that are present in every cell of the human body. Chromosomes are thread-like structures that carry our genes and are located in the nucleus of most cells. They come in pairs, with one set inherited from each parent.

Chromosome pair 10 is one of the 22 autosomal chromosome pairs, meaning they contain genes that are not related to sex determination. Each member of chromosome pair 10 is a single, long DNA molecule that contains thousands of genes and other genetic material.

Chromosome pair 10 is responsible for carrying genetic information that influences various traits and functions in the human body. Some of the genes located on chromosome pair 10 are associated with certain medical conditions, such as hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, neurofibromatosis type 1, and Waardenburg syndrome type 2A.

It's important to note that while chromosomes carry genetic information, not all variations in the DNA sequence will result in a change in phenotype or function. Some variations may have no effect at all, while others may lead to changes in how proteins are made and function, potentially leading to disease or other health issues.

Tumor markers are substances that can be found in the body and their presence can indicate the presence of certain types of cancer or other conditions. Biological tumor markers refer to those substances that are produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to cancer or certain benign (non-cancerous) conditions. These markers can be found in various bodily fluids such as blood, urine, or tissue samples.

Examples of biological tumor markers include:

1. Proteins: Some tumor markers are proteins that are produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to the presence of cancer. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a protein produced by normal prostate cells and in higher amounts by prostate cancer cells.
2. Genetic material: Tumor markers can also include genetic material such as DNA, RNA, or microRNA that are shed by cancer cells into bodily fluids. For example, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is genetic material from cancer cells that can be found in the bloodstream.
3. Metabolites: Tumor markers can also include metabolic products produced by cancer cells or by other cells in response to cancer. For example, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme that is released into the bloodstream when cancer cells break down glucose for energy.

It's important to note that tumor markers are not specific to cancer and can be elevated in non-cancerous conditions as well. Therefore, they should not be used alone to diagnose cancer but rather as a tool in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical evaluations.

The adaptor protein complex mu (AP-μ or AP-2) is a heterotetrameric complex that plays a crucial role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, a process by which cells internalize various molecules from their external environment. The subunits of the AP-μ complex are:

1. AP2M1 (Adaptin-μ1): This is the μ subunit, which binds to the clathrin heavy chain and helps recruit it to the membrane during vesicle formation. It also plays a role in cargo recognition by interacting with sorting signals on transmembrane proteins.
2. AP2B1 (Adaptin-β1): This is the β subunit, which interacts with the μ and σ subunits to form the core of the complex. It also binds to accessory proteins that regulate endocytosis.
3. AP2S1 (Adaptin-σ1): This is the σ subunit, which helps stabilize the interaction between the μ and β subunits and contributes to cargo recognition by binding to specific sorting signals on transmembrane proteins.
4. AP2L1 (Adaptin-λ1): This is the λ subunit, which interacts with the α subunit of adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) and helps coordinate the trafficking of proteins between different endocytic compartments.

Together, these subunits form a complex that plays a central role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis by regulating the recruitment of clathrin and other accessory proteins to the membrane, as well as the recognition and sorting of cargo molecules for internalization.

Human chromosome pair 1 refers to the first pair of chromosomes in a set of 23 pairs found in the cells of the human body, excluding sex cells (sperm and eggs). Each cell in the human body, except for the gametes, contains 46 chromosomes arranged in 23 pairs. These chromosomes are rod-shaped structures that contain genetic information in the form of DNA.

Chromosome pair 1 is the largest pair, making up about 8% of the total DNA in a cell. Each chromosome in the pair consists of two arms - a shorter p arm and a longer q arm - connected at a centromere. Chromosome 1 carries an estimated 2,000-2,500 genes, which are segments of DNA that contain instructions for making proteins or regulating gene expression.

Defects or mutations in the genes located on chromosome 1 can lead to various genetic disorders and diseases, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A, Huntington's disease, and certain types of cancer.

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a medical condition where bone tissue forms outside the skeleton, in locations where it does not typically exist. This process can occur in various soft tissues, such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, or even inside joint capsules. The abnormal bone growth can lead to pain, stiffness, limited range of motion, and, in some cases, loss of function in the affected area.

There are several types of heterotopic ossification, including:

1. Myositis ossificans - This form is often associated with trauma or injury, such as muscle damage from a fracture, surgery, or direct blow. It typically affects young, active individuals and usually resolves on its own within months to a few years.
2. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) - Also known as "traumatic heterotopic ossification," this form is often linked to spinal cord injuries, brain injuries, or central nervous system damage. NHO can cause significant impairment and may require surgical intervention in some cases.
3. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) - This rare, genetic disorder causes progressive heterotopic ossification throughout the body, starting in early childhood. The condition significantly impacts mobility and quality of life, with no known cure.

The exact mechanisms behind heterotopic ossification are not fully understood, but it is believed that a combination of factors, including inflammation, tissue injury, and genetic predisposition, contribute to its development. Treatment options may include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), radiation therapy, physical therapy, or surgical removal of the abnormal bone growth, depending on the severity and location of the HO.

Human chromosome pair 2 consists of two rod-shaped structures present in the nucleus of each cell of the human body. Each member of the pair contains thousands of genes and other genetic material, encoded in the form of DNA molecules. Chromosomes are the physical carriers of inheritance, and human cells typically contain 23 pairs of chromosomes for a total of 46 chromosomes.

Chromosome pair 2 is one of the autosomal pairs, meaning that it is not a sex chromosome (X or Y). Each member of chromosome pair 2 is approximately 247 million base pairs in length and contains an estimated 1,000-1,300 genes. These genes play crucial roles in various biological processes, including development, metabolism, and response to environmental stimuli.

Abnormalities in chromosome pair 2 can lead to genetic disorders, such as cat-eye syndrome (CES), which is characterized by iris abnormalities, anal atresia, hearing loss, and intellectual disability. This disorder arises from the presence of an extra copy of a small region on chromosome 2, resulting in partial trisomy of this region. Other genetic conditions associated with chromosome pair 2 include proximal 2q13.3 microdeletion syndrome and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS).

A Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma (GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, or GHoma) is a type of benign tumor that develops in the pituitary gland and results in excessive production of growth hormone (GH). This leads to a condition known as acromegaly if it occurs in adults, or gigantism if it occurs in children before the closure of the growth plates.

Symptoms of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma may include:

1. Coarsening of facial features
2. Enlargement of hands and feet
3. Deepened voice due to thickening of vocal cords
4. Increased sweating and body odor
5. Joint pain and stiffness
6. Sleep apnea
7. Fatigue, weakness, or muscle wasting
8. Headaches
9. Vision problems
10. Irregular menstrual periods in women
11. Erectile dysfunction in men

Diagnosis typically involves measuring the levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in the blood, along with imaging tests like MRI or CT scans to locate and characterize the tumor. Treatment options include surgical removal of the tumor, radiation therapy, and medication to control GH production. Regular follow-ups are necessary to monitor for potential recurrence.

Colorectal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the colon or rectum, which can be benign or malignant. These growths can arise from the inner lining (mucosa) of the colon or rectum and can take various forms such as polyps, adenomas, or carcinomas.

Benign neoplasms, such as hyperplastic polyps and inflammatory polyps, are not cancerous but may need to be removed to prevent the development of malignant tumors. Adenomas, on the other hand, are precancerous lesions that can develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated.

Colorectal cancer is a malignant neoplasm that arises from the uncontrolled growth and division of cells in the colon or rectum. It is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide and can spread to other parts of the body through the bloodstream or lymphatic system.

Regular screening for colorectal neoplasms is recommended for individuals over the age of 50, as early detection and removal of precancerous lesions can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Colonic polyps are abnormal growths that protrude from the inner wall of the colon (large intestine). They can vary in size, shape, and number. Most colonic polyps are benign, meaning they are not cancerous. However, some types of polyps, such as adenomas, have a higher risk of becoming cancerous over time if left untreated.

Colonic polyps often do not cause any symptoms, especially if they are small. Larger polyps may lead to symptoms like rectal bleeding, changes in bowel habits, abdominal pain, or iron deficiency anemia. The exact cause of colonic polyps is not known, but factors such as age, family history, and certain medical conditions (like inflammatory bowel disease) can increase the risk of developing them.

Regular screening exams, such as colonoscopies, are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 to detect and remove polyps before they become cancerous. If you have a family history of colonic polyps or colorectal cancer, your doctor may recommend earlier or more frequent screenings.

An ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma is a type of tumor that develops in the pituitary gland, a small gland located at the base of the brain. This type of tumor is also known as Cushing's disease.

ACTH stands for adrenocorticotropic hormone, which is a hormone produced and released by the pituitary gland. ACTH stimulates the adrenal glands (small glands located on top of the kidneys) to produce cortisol, a steroid hormone that helps regulate metabolism, helps the body respond to stress, and suppresses inflammation.

In an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, the tumor cells produce and release excessive amounts of ACTH, leading to overproduction of cortisol by the adrenal glands. This can result in a constellation of symptoms known as Cushing's syndrome, which may include weight gain (especially around the trunk), fatigue, muscle weakness, mood changes, thinning of the skin, easy bruising, and increased susceptibility to infections.

Treatment for an ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by medications to manage cortisol levels if necessary. Radiation therapy may also be used in some cases.

Adaptor Protein Complex 1 (AP-1) is a group of proteins that function as a complex to play a crucial role in the intracellular transport of various molecules, particularly in the formation of vesicles that transport cargo from one compartment of the cell to another. The AP-1 complex is composed of four subunits: γ, β1, μ1, and σ1. It is primarily associated with the trans-Golgi network and early endosomes, where it facilitates the sorting and packaging of cargo into vesicles for transport to various destinations within the cell. The AP-1 complex recognizes specific sorting signals on the membrane proteins and adaptor proteins, thereby ensuring the accurate delivery of cargo to the correct location. Defects in the AP-1 complex have been implicated in several human diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer.

Keratin 20 is a type of keratin protein that is specifically expressed in the differentiated cells of the upper layer of the epidermis, particularly in the small intestine and colon. It is often used as a marker for the identification and study of these cell types. Mutations in the gene that encodes keratin 20 have been associated with certain diseases, such as benign and malignant tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

In situ hybridization, fluorescence (FISH) is a type of molecular cytogenetic technique used to detect and localize the presence or absence of specific DNA sequences on chromosomes through the use of fluorescent probes. This technique allows for the direct visualization of genetic material at a cellular level, making it possible to identify chromosomal abnormalities such as deletions, duplications, translocations, and other rearrangements.

The process involves denaturing the DNA in the sample to separate the double-stranded molecules into single strands, then adding fluorescently labeled probes that are complementary to the target DNA sequence. The probe hybridizes to the complementary sequence in the sample, and the location of the probe is detected by fluorescence microscopy.

FISH has a wide range of applications in both clinical and research settings, including prenatal diagnosis, cancer diagnosis and monitoring, and the study of gene expression and regulation. It is a powerful tool for identifying genetic abnormalities and understanding their role in human disease.

Human chromosome pair 6 consists of two rod-shaped structures present in the nucleus of each human cell. They are identical in size and shape and contain genetic material, made up of DNA and proteins, that is essential for the development and function of the human body.

Chromosome pair 6 is one of the 23 pairs of chromosomes found in humans, with one chromosome inherited from each parent. Each chromosome contains thousands of genes that provide instructions for the production of proteins and regulate various cellular processes.

Chromosome pair 6 contains several important genes, including those involved in the development and function of the immune system, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. It also contains genes associated with certain genetic disorders, such as hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), a condition that affects the nerves, and Waardenburg syndrome, a disorder that affects pigmentation and hearing.

Abnormalities in chromosome pair 6 can lead to various genetic disorders, including numerical abnormalities such as trisomy 6 (three copies of chromosome 6) or monosomy 6 (only one copy of chromosome 6), as well as structural abnormalities such as deletions, duplications, or translocations of parts of the chromosome.

Neprilysin (NEP), also known as membrane metallo-endopeptidase or CD10, is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein that functions as a zinc-dependent metalloprotease. It is widely expressed in various tissues, including the kidney, brain, heart, and vasculature. Neprilysin plays a crucial role in the breakdown and regulation of several endogenous bioactive peptides, such as natriuretic peptides, bradykinin, substance P, and angiotensin II. By degrading these peptides, neprilysin helps maintain cardiovascular homeostasis, modulate inflammation, and regulate neurotransmission. In the context of heart failure, neprilysin inhibitors have been developed to increase natriuretic peptide levels, promoting diuresis and vasodilation, ultimately improving cardiac function.

Tissue Microarray (TMA) analysis is a surgical pathology technique that allows for the simultaneous analysis of multiple tissue samples (known as "cores") from different patients or even different regions of the same tumor, on a single microscope slide. This technique involves the extraction of small cylindrical samples of tissue, which are then arrayed in a grid-like pattern on a recipient paraffin block. Once the TMA is created, sections can be cut and stained with various histochemical or immunohistochemical stains to evaluate the expression of specific proteins or other molecules of interest.

Tissue Array Analysis has become an important tool in biomedical research, enabling high-throughput analysis of tissue samples for molecular markers, gene expression patterns, and other features that can help inform clinical decision making, drug development, and our understanding of disease processes. It's widely used in cancer research to study the heterogeneity of tumors, identify new therapeutic targets, and evaluate patient prognosis.

An adenoma is a benign tumor that forms in glandular tissue. When referring to "acidophil," it describes the appearance of the cells under a microscope. Acidophils are cells that take up acidic dyes, giving them a distinct appearance. In the context of an adenoma, an acidophil adenoma would be a benign tumor composed of acidophil cells.

Acidophil adenomas are most commonly found in the pituitary gland and are also known as lactotroph or mammosomatotroph adenomas. These tumors can produce and release prolactin, growth hormone, or both, leading to various endocrine disorders such as hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, or gigantism. Treatment options typically include surgical removal of the tumor or medical management with dopamine agonists or somatostatin analogs.

A colonoscopy is a medical procedure used to examine the large intestine, also known as the colon and rectum. It is performed using a flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end, called a colonoscope, which is inserted into the rectum and gently guided through the entire length of the colon.

The procedure allows doctors to visually inspect the lining of the colon for any abnormalities such as polyps, ulcers, inflammation, or cancer. If any polyps are found during the procedure, they can be removed immediately using special tools passed through the colonoscope. Colonoscopy is an important tool in the prevention and early detection of colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide.

Patients are usually given a sedative to help them relax during the procedure, which is typically performed on an outpatient basis in a hospital or clinic setting. The entire procedure usually takes about 30-60 minutes to complete, although patients should plan to spend several hours at the medical facility for preparation and recovery.

Adenomatous polyps, also known as adenomas, are benign (noncancerous) growths that develop in the lining of the glandular tissue of certain organs, most commonly occurring in the colon and rectum. These polyps are composed of abnormal glandular cells that can grow excessively and form a mass.

Adenomatous polyps can vary in size, ranging from a few millimeters to several centimeters in diameter. They may be flat or have a stalk (pedunculated). While adenomas are generally benign, they can potentially undergo malignant transformation and develop into colorectal cancer over time if left untreated. The risk of malignancy increases with the size of the polyp and the presence of certain histological features, such as dysplasia (abnormal cell growth).

Regular screening for adenomatous polyps is essential to detect and remove them early, reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Screening methods include colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, and stool-based tests.

Calbindins are a family of calcium-binding proteins that are widely distributed in various tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, brain, and kidney. They play important roles in regulating intracellular calcium levels and modulating calcium-dependent signaling pathways. Calbindin D28k, one of the major isoforms, is particularly abundant in the central nervous system and has been implicated in neuroprotection, neuronal plasticity, and regulation of neurotransmitter release. Deficiencies or alterations in calbindins have been associated with various pathological conditions, including neurological disorders and cancer.

A prolactinoma is a type of pituitary tumor that produces an excess amount of the hormone prolactin, leading to various symptoms. The pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, is responsible for producing and releasing several hormones that regulate different bodily functions. Prolactin is one such hormone, primarily known for its role in stimulating milk production in women during lactation (breastfeeding).

Prolactinoma tumors can be classified into two types: microprolactinomas and macroprolactinomas. Microprolactinomas are smaller tumors, typically less than 10 millimeters in size, while macroprolactinomas are larger tumors, generally greater than 10 millimeters in size.

The overproduction of prolactin caused by these tumors can lead to several clinical manifestations, including:

1. Galactorrhea: Unusual and often spontaneous milk production or leakage from the nipples, which can occur in both men and women who do not have a recent history of pregnancy or breastfeeding.
2. Menstrual irregularities: In women, high prolactin levels can interfere with the normal functioning of other hormones, leading to menstrual irregularities such as infrequent periods (oligomenorrhea) or absent periods (amenorrhea), and sometimes infertility.
3. Sexual dysfunction: In both men and women, high prolactin levels can cause decreased libido and sexual desire. Men may also experience erectile dysfunction and reduced sperm production.
4. Bone loss: Over time, high prolactin levels can lead to decreased bone density and an increased risk of osteoporosis due to the disruption of other hormones that regulate bone health.
5. Headaches and visual disturbances: As the tumor grows, it may put pressure on surrounding structures in the brain, leading to headaches and potential vision problems such as blurred vision or decreased peripheral vision.

Diagnosis typically involves measuring prolactin levels in the blood and performing imaging tests like an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan to assess the size of the tumor. Treatment usually consists of medication to lower prolactin levels, such as dopamine agonists (e.g., bromocriptine or cabergoline), which can also help shrink the tumor. In some cases, surgery may be necessary if medication is ineffective or if the tumor is large and causing severe symptoms.

A kidney, in medical terms, is one of two bean-shaped organs located in the lower back region of the body. They are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the body by performing several crucial functions such as:

1. Regulation of water and electrolyte balance: Kidneys help regulate the amount of water and various electrolytes like sodium, potassium, and calcium in the bloodstream to maintain a stable internal environment.

2. Excretion of waste products: They filter waste products from the blood, including urea (a byproduct of protein metabolism), creatinine (a breakdown product of muscle tissue), and other harmful substances that result from normal cellular functions or external sources like medications and toxins.

3. Endocrine function: Kidneys produce several hormones with important roles in the body, such as erythropoietin (stimulates red blood cell production), renin (regulates blood pressure), and calcitriol (activated form of vitamin D that helps regulate calcium homeostasis).

4. pH balance regulation: Kidneys maintain the proper acid-base balance in the body by excreting either hydrogen ions or bicarbonate ions, depending on whether the blood is too acidic or too alkaline.

5. Blood pressure control: The kidneys play a significant role in regulating blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), which constricts blood vessels and promotes sodium and water retention to increase blood volume and, consequently, blood pressure.

Anatomically, each kidney is approximately 10-12 cm long, 5-7 cm wide, and 3 cm thick, with a weight of about 120-170 grams. They are surrounded by a protective layer of fat and connected to the urinary system through the renal pelvis, ureters, bladder, and urethra.

Human chromosome pair 17 consists of two rod-shaped structures present in the nucleus of each human cell. Each chromosome is made up of DNA tightly coiled around histone proteins, forming a complex called chromatin. Chromosomes carry genetic information in the form of genes, which are segments of DNA that contain instructions for the development and function of an organism.

Human cells typically have 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46 chromosomes. Pair 17 is one of the autosomal pairs, meaning it is not a sex chromosome (X or Y). Chromosome 17 is a medium-sized chromosome and contains an estimated 800 million base pairs of DNA. It contains approximately 1,500 genes that provide instructions for making proteins and regulating various cellular processes.

Chromosome 17 is associated with several genetic disorders, including inherited cancer syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Mutations in genes located on chromosome 17 can increase the risk of developing various types of cancer, including breast, ovarian, colon, and pancreatic cancer.

A basophilic adenoma is a rare type of benign tumor that arises from the glandular cells of an endocrine gland, specifically the cells that produce and store hormones. The term "basophilic" refers to the appearance of the tumor cells under a microscope, which have a high affinity for basic dyes due to their rich content of ribonucleic acid (RNA).

Basophilic adenomas are most commonly found in the pituitary gland, a small endocrine gland located at the base of the brain. These tumors can produce and secrete excessive amounts of hormones, leading to various clinical symptoms depending on the type of hormone involved. The most common types of basophilic adenomas are prolactinomas, which secrete high levels of the hormone prolactin, and growth hormone-secreting adenomas, which produce excessive amounts of growth hormone.

Treatment for basophilic adenomas typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by radiation therapy or medical management with drugs that suppress hormone production. The prognosis for patients with basophilic adenomas is generally good, with most individuals experiencing a significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life following treatment. However, regular follow-up care is necessary to monitor for recurrence and manage any residual hormonal imbalances.

Chromosome aberrations refer to structural and numerical changes in the chromosomes that can occur spontaneously or as a result of exposure to mutagenic agents. These changes can affect the genetic material encoded in the chromosomes, leading to various consequences such as developmental abnormalities, cancer, or infertility.

Structural aberrations include deletions, duplications, inversions, translocations, and rings, which result from breaks and rearrangements of chromosome segments. Numerical aberrations involve changes in the number of chromosomes, such as aneuploidy (extra or missing chromosomes) or polyploidy (multiples of a complete set of chromosomes).

Chromosome aberrations can be detected and analyzed using various cytogenetic techniques, including karyotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). These methods allow for the identification and characterization of chromosomal changes at the molecular level, providing valuable information for genetic counseling, diagnosis, and research.

Adrenal cortex neoplasms refer to abnormal growths (tumors) in the adrenal gland's outer layer, known as the adrenal cortex. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant (cancerous). Benign tumors are called adrenal adenomas, while cancerous tumors are called adrenocortical carcinomas.

Adrenal cortex neoplasms can produce various hormones, leading to different clinical presentations. For instance, they may cause Cushing's syndrome (characterized by excessive cortisol production), Conn's syndrome (caused by aldosterone excess), or virilization (due to androgen excess). Some tumors may not produce any hormones and are discovered incidentally during imaging studies for unrelated conditions.

The diagnosis of adrenal cortex neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging techniques, such as CT or MRI scans, and hormonal assessments to determine if the tumor is functional or non-functional. In some cases, a biopsy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis and differentiate between benign and malignant tumors. Treatment options depend on the type, size, location, and hormonal activity of the neoplasm and may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Keratins are a type of fibrous structural proteins that constitute the main component of the integumentary system, which includes the hair, nails, and skin of vertebrates. They are also found in other tissues such as horns, hooves, feathers, and reptilian scales. Keratins are insoluble proteins that provide strength, rigidity, and protection to these structures.

Keratins are classified into two types: soft keratins (Type I) and hard keratins (Type II). Soft keratins are found in the skin and simple epithelial tissues, while hard keratins are present in structures like hair, nails, horns, and hooves.

Keratin proteins have a complex structure consisting of several domains, including an alpha-helical domain, beta-pleated sheet domain, and a non-repetitive domain. These domains provide keratin with its unique properties, such as resistance to heat, chemicals, and mechanical stress.

In summary, keratins are fibrous structural proteins that play a crucial role in providing strength, rigidity, and protection to various tissues in the body.

Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis is a type of microarray analysis that allows for the simultaneous measurement of the expression levels of thousands of genes in a single sample. In this technique, oligonucleotides (short DNA sequences) are attached to a solid support, such as a glass slide, in a specific pattern. These oligonucleotides are designed to be complementary to specific target mRNA sequences from the sample being analyzed.

During the analysis, labeled RNA or cDNA from the sample is hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The level of hybridization is then measured and used to determine the relative abundance of each target sequence in the sample. This information can be used to identify differences in gene expression between samples, which can help researchers understand the underlying biological processes involved in various diseases or developmental stages.

It's important to note that this technique requires specialized equipment and bioinformatics tools for data analysis, as well as careful experimental design and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

The term "DNA, neoplasm" is not a standard medical term or concept. DNA refers to deoxyribonucleic acid, which is the genetic material present in the cells of living organisms. A neoplasm, on the other hand, is a tumor or growth of abnormal tissue that can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

In some contexts, "DNA, neoplasm" may refer to genetic alterations found in cancer cells. These genetic changes can include mutations, amplifications, deletions, or rearrangements of DNA sequences that contribute to the development and progression of cancer. Identifying these genetic abnormalities can help doctors diagnose and treat certain types of cancer more effectively.

However, it's important to note that "DNA, neoplasm" is not a term that would typically be used in medical reports or research papers without further clarification. If you have any specific questions about DNA changes in cancer cells or neoplasms, I would recommend consulting with a healthcare professional or conducting further research on the topic.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the production of proteins and other molecules from genes in neoplastic cells, or cells that are part of a tumor or cancer. In a normal cell, gene expression is tightly regulated to ensure that the right genes are turned on or off at the right time. However, in cancer cells, this regulation can be disrupted, leading to the overexpression or underexpression of certain genes.

Neoplastic gene expression regulation can be affected by a variety of factors, including genetic mutations, epigenetic changes, and signals from the tumor microenvironment. These changes can lead to the activation of oncogenes (genes that promote cancer growth and development) or the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (genes that prevent cancer).

Understanding neoplastic gene expression regulation is important for developing new therapies for cancer, as targeting specific genes or pathways involved in this process can help to inhibit cancer growth and progression.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Immunoenzyme techniques are a group of laboratory methods used in immunology and clinical chemistry that combine the specificity of antibody-antigen reactions with the sensitivity and amplification capabilities of enzyme reactions. These techniques are primarily used for the detection, quantitation, or identification of various analytes (such as proteins, hormones, drugs, viruses, or bacteria) in biological samples.

In immunoenzyme techniques, an enzyme is linked to an antibody or antigen, creating a conjugate. This conjugate then interacts with the target analyte in the sample, forming an immune complex. The presence and amount of this immune complex can be visualized or measured by detecting the enzymatic activity associated with it.

There are several types of immunoenzyme techniques, including:

1. Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA): A widely used method for detecting and quantifying various analytes in a sample. In ELISA, an enzyme is attached to either the capture antibody or the detection antibody. After the immune complex formation, a substrate is added that reacts with the enzyme, producing a colored product that can be measured spectrophotometrically.
2. Immunoblotting (Western blot): A method used for detecting specific proteins in a complex mixture, such as a protein extract from cells or tissues. In this technique, proteins are separated by gel electrophoresis and transferred to a membrane, where they are probed with an enzyme-conjugated antibody directed against the target protein.
3. Immunohistochemistry (IHC): A method used for detecting specific antigens in tissue sections or cells. In IHC, an enzyme-conjugated primary or secondary antibody is applied to the sample, and the presence of the antigen is visualized using a chromogenic substrate that produces a colored product at the site of the antigen-antibody interaction.
4. Immunofluorescence (IF): A method used for detecting specific antigens in cells or tissues by employing fluorophore-conjugated antibodies. The presence of the antigen is visualized using a fluorescence microscope.
5. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA): A method used for detecting and quantifying specific antigens or antibodies in liquid samples, such as serum or culture supernatants. In ELISA, an enzyme-conjugated detection antibody is added after the immune complex formation, and a substrate is added that reacts with the enzyme to produce a colored product that can be measured spectrophotometrically.

These techniques are widely used in research and diagnostic laboratories for various applications, including protein characterization, disease diagnosis, and monitoring treatment responses.

Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) is a genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous adenomatous polyps in the colon and rectum. APC is caused by mutations in the APC gene, which is a tumor suppressor gene that helps regulate cell growth and division. When the APC gene is mutated, it can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and the development of polyps, which can eventually become cancerous.

Individuals with APC typically develop hundreds to thousands of polyps in their colon and rectum, usually beginning in adolescence or early adulthood. If left untreated, APC can lead to colorectal cancer in nearly all affected individuals by the age of 40.

APC is an autosomal dominant disorder, which means that a person has a 50% chance of inheriting the mutated gene from an affected parent. However, some cases of APC may also occur spontaneously due to new mutations in the APC gene. Treatment for APC typically involves surgical removal of the colon and rectum (colectomy) to prevent the development of colorectal cancer. Regular surveillance with colonoscopy is also recommended to monitor for the development of new polyps.

A neoplasm is a tumor or growth that is formed by an abnormal and excessive proliferation of cells, which can be benign or malignant. Neoplasm proteins are therefore any proteins that are expressed or produced in these neoplastic cells. These proteins can play various roles in the development, progression, and maintenance of neoplasms.

Some neoplasm proteins may contribute to the uncontrolled cell growth and division seen in cancer, such as oncogenic proteins that promote cell cycle progression or inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). Others may help the neoplastic cells evade the immune system, allowing them to proliferate undetected. Still others may be involved in angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nutrients and oxygen.

Neoplasm proteins can also serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment response. For example, the presence or level of certain neoplasm proteins in biological samples such as blood or tissue may indicate the presence of a specific type of cancer, help predict the likelihood of cancer recurrence, or suggest whether a particular therapy will be effective.

Overall, understanding the roles and behaviors of neoplasm proteins can provide valuable insights into the biology of cancer and inform the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

Acromegaly is a rare hormonal disorder that typically occurs in middle-aged adults. It results from the pituitary gland producing too much growth hormone (GH) during adulthood. The excessive production of GH leads to abnormal growth of body tissues, particularly in the hands, feet, and face.

The term "acromegaly" is derived from two Greek words: "akros," meaning extremities, and "megaly," meaning enlargement. In most cases, acromegaly is caused by a benign tumor (adenoma) of the pituitary gland, which results in overproduction of GH.

Common symptoms include enlarged hands and feet, coarse facial features, deepened voice, joint pain, and sweating. If left untreated, acromegaly can lead to serious complications such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, and arthritis. Treatment usually involves surgical removal of the tumor, radiation therapy, or medication to control GH production.

Cushing syndrome is a hormonal disorder that occurs when your body is exposed to high levels of the hormone cortisol for a long time. This can happen due to various reasons such as taking high doses of corticosteroid medications or tumors that produce cortisol or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).

The symptoms of Cushing syndrome may include:

* Obesity, particularly around the trunk and upper body
* Thinning of the skin, easy bruising, and purple or red stretch marks on the abdomen, thighs, breasts, and arms
* Weakened bones, leading to fractures
* High blood pressure
* High blood sugar
* Mental changes such as depression, anxiety, and irritability
* Increased fatigue and weakness
* Menstrual irregularities in women
* Decreased fertility in men

Cushing syndrome can be diagnosed through various tests, including urine and blood tests to measure cortisol levels, saliva tests, and imaging tests to locate any tumors. Treatment depends on the cause of the condition but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or adjusting medication dosages.

APC (Adenomatous Polyposis Coli) gene is a tumor suppressor gene that provides instructions for making a protein called adenomatous polyposis coli. This protein plays a crucial role in regulating the growth and division of cells in the colon and rectum. Specifically, it helps to maintain the stability of the cell's genetic material (DNA) by controlling the process of beta-catenin degradation.

When the APC gene is mutated or altered, it can lead to an accumulation of beta-catenin in the cell, which can result in uncontrolled cell growth and division. This can ultimately lead to the development of colon polyps, which are benign growths that can become cancerous over time if left untreated.

Mutations in the APC gene are associated with several inherited cancer syndromes, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and attenuated FAP (AFAP). These conditions are characterized by the development of numerous colon polyps at a young age, which can increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Prognosis is a medical term that refers to the prediction of the likely outcome or course of a disease, including the chances of recovery or recurrence, based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests. It is an important aspect of clinical decision-making and patient communication, as it helps doctors and patients make informed decisions about treatment options, set realistic expectations, and plan for future care.

Prognosis can be expressed in various ways, such as percentages, categories (e.g., good, fair, poor), or survival rates, depending on the nature of the disease and the available evidence. However, it is important to note that prognosis is not an exact science and may vary depending on individual factors, such as age, overall health status, and response to treatment. Therefore, it should be used as a guide rather than a definitive forecast.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

Hyperparathyroidism is a condition in which the parathyroid glands produce excessive amounts of parathyroid hormone (PTH). There are four small parathyroid glands located in the neck, near or within the thyroid gland. They release PTH into the bloodstream to help regulate the levels of calcium and phosphorus in the body.

In hyperparathyroidism, overproduction of PTH can lead to an imbalance in these minerals, causing high blood calcium levels (hypercalcemia) and low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia). This can result in various symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, bone pain, kidney stones, and cognitive issues.

There are two types of hyperparathyroidism: primary and secondary. Primary hyperparathyroidism occurs when there is a problem with one or more of the parathyroid glands, causing them to become overactive and produce too much PTH. Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops as a response to low calcium levels in the body due to conditions like vitamin D deficiency, chronic kidney disease, or malabsorption syndromes.

Treatment for hyperparathyroidism depends on the underlying cause and severity of symptoms. In primary hyperparathyroidism, surgery to remove the overactive parathyroid gland(s) is often recommended. For secondary hyperparathyroidism, treating the underlying condition and managing calcium levels with medications or dietary changes may be sufficient.

Salivary gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the salivary glands. These glands are responsible for producing saliva, which helps in digestion, lubrication of food and maintaining oral health. Salivary gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms are slow-growing and typically do not spread to other parts of the body. They may cause symptoms such as swelling, painless lumps, or difficulty swallowing if they grow large enough to put pressure on surrounding tissues.

Malignant neoplasms, on the other hand, can be aggressive and have the potential to invade nearby structures and metastasize (spread) to distant organs. Symptoms of malignant salivary gland neoplasms may include rapid growth, pain, numbness, or paralysis of facial nerves.

Salivary gland neoplasms can occur in any of the major salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands) or in the minor salivary glands located throughout the mouth and throat. The exact cause of these neoplasms is not fully understood, but risk factors may include exposure to radiation, certain viral infections, and genetic predisposition.

Colonic neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the large intestine, also known as the colon. These growths can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The two most common types of colonic neoplasms are adenomas and carcinomas.

Adenomas are benign tumors that can develop into cancer over time if left untreated. They are often found during routine colonoscopies and can be removed during the procedure.

Carcinomas, on the other hand, are malignant tumors that invade surrounding tissues and can spread to other parts of the body. Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and colonic neoplasms are a significant risk factor for developing this type of cancer.

Regular screenings for colonic neoplasms are recommended for individuals over the age of 50 or those with a family history of colorectal cancer or other risk factors. Early detection and removal of colonic neoplasms can significantly reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

Intestinal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the tissues of the intestines, which can be benign or malignant. These growths are called neoplasms and they result from uncontrolled cell division. In the case of intestinal neoplasms, these growths occur in the small intestine, large intestine (colon), rectum, or appendix.

Benign intestinal neoplasms are not cancerous and often do not invade surrounding tissues or spread to other parts of the body. However, they can still cause problems if they grow large enough to obstruct the intestines or cause bleeding. Common types of benign intestinal neoplasms include polyps, leiomyomas, and lipomas.

Malignant intestinal neoplasms, on the other hand, are cancerous and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. The most common type of malignant intestinal neoplasm is adenocarcinoma, which arises from the glandular cells lining the inside of the intestines. Other types of malignant intestinal neoplasms include lymphomas, sarcomas, and carcinoid tumors.

Symptoms of intestinal neoplasms can vary depending on their size, location, and type. Common symptoms include abdominal pain, bloating, changes in bowel habits, rectal bleeding, weight loss, and fatigue. If you experience any of these symptoms, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

Hyperplasia is a medical term that refers to an abnormal increase in the number of cells in an organ or tissue, leading to an enlargement of the affected area. It's a response to various stimuli such as hormones, chronic irritation, or inflammation. Hyperplasia can be physiological, like the growth of breast tissue during pregnancy, or pathological, like in the case of benign or malignant tumors. The process is generally reversible if the stimulus is removed. It's important to note that hyperplasia itself is not cancerous, but some forms of hyperplasia can increase the risk of developing cancer over time.

Multiple primary neoplasms refer to the occurrence of more than one primary malignant tumor in an individual, where each tumor is unrelated to the other and originates from separate cells or organs. This differs from metastatic cancer, where a single malignancy spreads to multiple sites in the body. Multiple primary neoplasms can be synchronous (occurring at the same time) or metachronous (occurring at different times). The risk of developing multiple primary neoplasms increases with age and is associated with certain genetic predispositions, environmental factors, and lifestyle choices such as smoking and alcohol consumption.

Adrenal gland neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the adrenal glands. These glands are located on top of each kidney and are responsible for producing hormones that regulate various bodily functions such as metabolism, blood pressure, and stress response. Adrenal gland neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign adrenal tumors are called adenomas and are usually small and asymptomatic. However, some adenomas may produce excessive amounts of hormones, leading to symptoms such as high blood pressure, weight gain, and mood changes.

Malignant adrenal tumors are called adrenocortical carcinomas and are rare but aggressive cancers that can spread to other parts of the body. Symptoms of adrenocortical carcinoma may include abdominal pain, weight loss, and hormonal imbalances.

It is important to diagnose and treat adrenal gland neoplasms early to prevent complications and improve outcomes. Diagnostic tests may include imaging studies such as CT scans or MRIs, as well as hormone level testing and biopsy. Treatment options may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these approaches.

Pituitary ACTH hypersecretion, also known as Cushing's disease, is a condition characterized by the excessive production of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland. This results in an overproduction of cortisol, a steroid hormone produced by the adrenal glands, leading to a constellation of symptoms known as Cushing's syndrome.

In Cushing's disease, a benign tumor called an adenoma develops on the pituitary gland, causing it to release excess ACTH. This in turn stimulates the adrenal glands to produce more cortisol than necessary. The resulting high levels of cortisol can cause various symptoms such as weight gain, particularly around the trunk and face (central obesity), thinning of the skin, bruising, weakness, fatigue, mood changes, high blood pressure, and an increased risk of infections.

It is important to distinguish Cushing's disease from other causes of Cushing's syndrome, such as cortisol-producing adrenal tumors or exogenous sources of corticosteroid use, as the treatment approach may differ. Treatment for Cushing's disease typically involves surgical removal of the pituitary tumor, with additional medical management and/or radiation therapy in some cases.

Parotid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the parotid gland, which is the largest of the salivary glands and is located in front of the ear and extends down the neck. These neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Benign parotid neoplasms are typically slow-growing, painless masses that may cause facial asymmetry or difficulty in chewing or swallowing if they become large enough to compress surrounding structures. The most common type of benign parotid tumor is a pleomorphic adenoma.

Malignant parotid neoplasms, on the other hand, are more aggressive and can invade nearby tissues and spread to other parts of the body. They may present as rapidly growing masses that are firm or fixed to surrounding structures. Common types of malignant parotid tumors include mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma.

The diagnosis of parotid neoplasms typically involves a thorough clinical evaluation, imaging studies such as CT or MRI scans, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) to determine the nature of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type, size, and location of the neoplasm but may include surgical excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy.

Carcinoma is a type of cancer that develops from epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body. These cells cover organs, glands, and other structures within the body. Carcinomas can occur in various parts of the body, including the skin, lungs, breasts, prostate, colon, and pancreas. They are often characterized by the uncontrolled growth and division of abnormal cells that can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body through a process called metastasis. Carcinomas can be further classified based on their appearance under a microscope, such as adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma.

Hyperaldosteronism is a medical condition characterized by the overproduction of aldosterone, a hormone produced by the adrenal glands. Aldosterone helps regulate sodium and potassium balance and blood pressure by promoting sodium retention and potassium excretion in the kidneys.

There are two types of hyperaldosteronism: primary and secondary. Primary hyperaldosteronism is caused by an overproduction of aldosterone from an abnormality within the adrenal gland, such as a tumor (Conn's syndrome) or hyperplasia. Secondary hyperaldosteronism occurs when there is an excess production of renin, a hormone produced by the kidneys, which then stimulates the adrenal glands to produce more aldosterone. This can be caused by various conditions that affect kidney function, such as renal artery stenosis or heart failure.

Symptoms of hyperaldosteronism may include high blood pressure, low potassium levels (hypokalemia), muscle weakness, and frequent urination. Diagnosis typically involves measuring aldosterone and renin levels in the blood, as well as other tests to determine the underlying cause. Treatment depends on the type and cause of hyperaldosteronism but may include medications, surgery, or lifestyle changes.

The sphenoid bone is a complex, irregularly shaped bone located in the middle cranial fossa and forms part of the base of the skull. It articulates with several other bones, including the frontal, parietal, temporal, ethmoid, palatine, and zygomatic bones. The sphenoid bone has two main parts: the body and the wings.

The body of the sphenoid bone is roughly cuboid in shape and contains several important structures, such as the sella turcica, which houses the pituitary gland, and the sphenoid sinuses, which are air-filled cavities within the bone. The greater wings of the sphenoid bone extend laterally from the body and form part of the skull's lateral walls. They contain the superior orbital fissure, through which important nerves and blood vessels pass between the cranial cavity and the orbit of the eye.

The lesser wings of the sphenoid bone are thin, blade-like structures that extend anteriorly from the body and form part of the floor of the anterior cranial fossa. They contain the optic canal, which transmits the optic nerve and ophthalmic artery between the brain and the orbit of the eye.

Overall, the sphenoid bone plays a crucial role in protecting several important structures within the skull, including the pituitary gland, optic nerves, and ophthalmic arteries.

Duodenal neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the duodenum, which is the first part of the small intestine that receives digestive secretions from the pancreas and bile duct. These growths can be benign or malignant (cancerous).

Benign neoplasms include adenomas, leiomyomas, lipomas, and hamartomas. They are usually slow-growing and do not spread to other parts of the body. However, they may cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding, or obstruction of the intestine.

Malignant neoplasms include adenocarcinomas, neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids), lymphomas, and sarcomas. They are more aggressive and can invade surrounding tissues and spread to other parts of the body. Symptoms may include abdominal pain, weight loss, jaundice, anemia, or bowel obstruction.

The diagnosis of duodenal neoplasms is usually made through imaging tests such as CT scans, MRI, or endoscopy with biopsy. Treatment depends on the type and stage of the tumor and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these modalities.

Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) is a hormone produced and released by the anterior pituitary gland, a small endocrine gland located at the base of the brain. ACTH plays a crucial role in the regulation of the body's stress response and has significant effects on various physiological processes.

The primary function of ACTH is to stimulate the adrenal glands, which are triangular-shaped glands situated on top of the kidneys. The adrenal glands consist of two parts: the outer cortex and the inner medulla. ACTH specifically targets the adrenal cortex, where it binds to specific receptors and initiates a series of biochemical reactions leading to the production and release of steroid hormones, primarily cortisol (a glucocorticoid) and aldosterone (a mineralocorticoid).

Cortisol is involved in various metabolic processes, such as regulating blood sugar levels, modulating the immune response, and helping the body respond to stress. Aldosterone plays a vital role in maintaining electrolyte and fluid balance by promoting sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys.

ACTH release is controlled by the hypothalamus, another part of the brain, which produces corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). CRH stimulates the anterior pituitary gland to secrete ACTH, which in turn triggers cortisol production in the adrenal glands. This complex feedback system helps maintain homeostasis and ensures that appropriate amounts of cortisol are released in response to various physiological and psychological stressors.

Disorders related to ACTH can lead to hormonal imbalances, resulting in conditions such as Cushing's syndrome (excessive cortisol production) or Addison's disease (insufficient cortisol production). Proper diagnosis and management of these disorders typically involve assessing the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and addressing any underlying issues affecting ACTH secretion.

The pituitary gland is a small, endocrine gland located at the base of the brain, in the sella turcica of the sphenoid bone. It is often called the "master gland" because it controls other glands and makes the hormones that trigger many body functions. The pituitary gland measures about 0.5 cm in height and 1 cm in width, and it weighs approximately 0.5 grams.

The pituitary gland is divided into two main parts: the anterior lobe (adenohypophysis) and the posterior lobe (neurohypophysis). The anterior lobe is further divided into three zones: the pars distalis, pars intermedia, and pars tuberalis. Each part of the pituitary gland has distinct functions and produces different hormones.

The anterior pituitary gland produces and releases several important hormones, including:

* Growth hormone (GH), which regulates growth and development in children and helps maintain muscle mass and bone strength in adults.
* Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which controls the production of thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland.
* Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which stimulates the adrenal glands to produce cortisol and other steroid hormones.
* Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), which regulate reproductive function in both males and females.
* Prolactin, which stimulates milk production in pregnant and lactating women.

The posterior pituitary gland stores and releases two hormones that are produced by the hypothalamus:

* Antidiuretic hormone (ADH), which helps regulate water balance in the body by controlling urine production.
* Oxytocin, which stimulates uterine contractions during childbirth and milk release during breastfeeding.

Overall, the pituitary gland plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis and regulating various bodily functions, including growth, development, metabolism, and reproductive function.

Adenocarcinoma is a type of cancer that arises from glandular epithelial cells. These cells line the inside of many internal organs, including the breasts, prostate, colon, and lungs. Adenocarcinomas can occur in any of these organs, as well as in other locations where glands are present.

The term "adenocarcinoma" is used to describe a cancer that has features of glandular tissue, such as mucus-secreting cells or cells that produce hormones. These cancers often form glandular structures within the tumor mass and may produce mucus or other substances.

Adenocarcinomas are typically slow-growing and tend to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. They can be treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or a combination of these treatments. The prognosis for adenocarcinoma depends on several factors, including the location and stage of the cancer, as well as the patient's overall health and age.

Primary hyperparathyroidism is a medical condition characterized by excessive secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) from one or more of the parathyroid glands in the neck. These glands are normally responsible for regulating calcium levels in the body by releasing PTH, which helps to maintain an appropriate balance of calcium and phosphate in the bloodstream.

In primary hyperparathyroidism, the parathyroid gland(s) become overactive and produce too much PTH, leading to elevated calcium levels (hypercalcemia) in the blood. This can result in a variety of symptoms, such as fatigue, weakness, bone pain, kidney stones, and cognitive impairment, although some individuals may not experience any symptoms at all.

The most common cause of primary hyperparathyroidism is a benign tumor called an adenoma that develops in one or more of the parathyroid glands. In rare cases, primary hyperparathyroidism can be caused by cancer of the parathyroid gland(s) or by enlargement of all four glands (four-gland hyperplasia). Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the affected parathyroid gland(s), which is usually curative.

Thyroid neoplasms refer to abnormal growths or tumors in the thyroid gland, which can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). These growths can vary in size and may cause a noticeable lump or nodule in the neck. Thyroid neoplasms can also affect the function of the thyroid gland, leading to hormonal imbalances and related symptoms. The exact causes of thyroid neoplasms are not fully understood, but risk factors include radiation exposure, family history, and certain genetic conditions. It is important to note that most thyroid nodules are benign, but a proper medical evaluation is necessary to determine the nature of the growth and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

A precancerous condition, also known as a premalignant condition, is a state of abnormal cellular growth and development that has a higher-than-normal potential to progress into cancer. These conditions are characterized by the presence of certain anomalies in the cells, such as dysplasia (abnormal changes in cell shape or size), which can indicate an increased risk for malignant transformation.

It is important to note that not all precancerous conditions will eventually develop into cancer, and some may even regress on their own. However, individuals with precancerous conditions are often at a higher risk of developing cancer compared to the general population. Regular monitoring and appropriate medical interventions, if necessary, can help manage this risk and potentially prevent or detect cancer at an early stage when it is more treatable.

Examples of precancerous conditions include:

1. Dysplasia in the cervix (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or CIN)
2. Atypical ductal hyperplasia or lobular hyperplasia in the breast
3. Actinic keratosis on the skin
4. Leukoplakia in the mouth
5. Barrett's esophagus in the digestive tract

Regular medical check-ups, screenings, and lifestyle modifications are crucial for individuals with precancerous conditions to monitor their health and reduce the risk of cancer development.

The Sella Turcica, also known as the Turkish saddle, is a depression or fossa in the sphenoid bone located at the base of the skull. It forms a housing for the pituitary gland, which is a small endocrine gland often referred to as the "master gland" because it controls other glands and makes several essential hormones. The Sella Turcica has a saddle-like shape, with its anterior and posterior clinoids forming the front and back of the saddle, respectively. This region is of significant interest in neuroimaging and clinical settings, as various conditions such as pituitary tumors or other abnormalities may affect the size, shape, and integrity of the Sella Turcica.

Sigmoidoscopy is a medical procedure that involves the insertion of a sigmoidoscope, a flexible tube with a light and camera at the end, into the rectum and lower colon (sigmoid colon) to examine these areas for any abnormalities such as inflammation, ulcers, polyps, or cancer. The procedure typically allows for the detection of issues in the sigmoid colon and rectum, and can help diagnose conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, diverticulosis, or colorectal cancer.

There are two types of sigmoidoscopy: flexible sigmoidoscopy and rigid sigmoidoscopy. Flexible sigmoidoscopy is more commonly performed because it provides a better view of the lower colon and is less uncomfortable for the patient. Rigid sigmoidoscopy, on the other hand, uses a solid, inflexible tube and is typically used in specific situations such as the removal of foreign objects or certain types of polyps.

During the procedure, patients are usually positioned on their left side with their knees drawn up to their chest. The sigmoidoscope is gently inserted into the rectum and advanced through the lower colon while the doctor examines the lining for any abnormalities. Air may be introduced through the scope to help expand the colon and provide a better view. If polyps or other abnormal tissues are found, they can often be removed during the procedure for further examination and testing.

Sigmoidoscopy is generally considered a safe and well-tolerated procedure. Some patients may experience mild discomfort, bloating, or cramping during or after the exam, but these symptoms typically resolve on their own within a few hours.

... adenoma, bile duct MeSH C04.557.470.035.095 - adenoma, chromophobe MeSH C04.557.470.035.100 - adenoma, islet cell MeSH C04.557. ... adenoma, acidophil MeSH C04.557.465.625.650.075 - adenoma, basophil MeSH C04.557.465.625.650.095 - adenoma, chromophobe MeSH ... adenoma, acidophil MeSH C04.557.580.625.650.075 - adenoma, basophil MeSH C04.557.580.625.650.095 - adenoma, chromophobe MeSH ... adenoma MeSH C04.557.470.035.012 - acth-secreting pituitary adenoma MeSH C04.557.470.035.025 - adenoma, acidophil MeSH C04.557. ...
M8270/0 Chromophobe adenoma (C75.1) M8270/3 Chromophobe carcinoma (C75.1) Chromophobe adenocarcinoma (M8271/0) Prolactinoma ( ... Black adenoma Pigmented adenoma M8373/0 Adrenal cortical adenoma, clear cell (C74.0) M8374/0 Adrenal cortical adenoma, ... Oxyphilic adenoma Oncocytic adenoma Oncocytoma Hurthle cell adenoma (C73.9) Hurthle cell tumor Follicular adenoma, oxyphilic ... NOS Pick tubular adenoma Sertoli cell adenoma Tubular androblastoma, NOS Testicular adenoma M8640/3 Sertoli cell carcinoma (C62 ...
... and renal adenoma. People with suspected kidney cancer should also have their kidney function evaluated to help determine ... Clear cell RCC Multilocular clear cell RCC Papillary RCC Chromophobe RCC Carcinoma of the collecting ducts of Bellini Renal ...
Tumors with increased risk in this disorder are colorectal cancer, gastric adenomas and duodenal adenomas. Nevoid basal cell ... renal cell carcinoma of chromophobe, hybrid oncocytic, or oncocytoma histology; sebaceous carcinoma; and sex cord tumors with ... An individual with this disease will have hundreds to thousands of benign adenomas throughout their colon, which will in most ... Other tumors increased in frequency include; osteomas, adrenal adenomas and carcinomas, thyroid tumors and desmoid tumors. The ...
Hybrid oncocytoma/chromophobe carcinoma, found in 50% of cases, is the most commonly found cancer, followed by chromophobe ... parathyroid adenomas, flecked chorioretinopathy, neurothekeoma, meningiomas, angiofibromas of the face, trichoblastomas, ... People over 20 years of age with BHD have an increased risk of developing slow-growing kidney tumors (chromophobe renal ... Renal tumors can manifest as multiple types of renal cell carcinoma, but certain pathological subtypes (including chromophobe, ...
A third type of pituitary adenoma secretes excess ACTH, which in turn, causes an excess of cortisol to be secreted and is the ... The pars distalis contains two types of cells, including chromophobe cells and chromophil cells. The chromophils can be further ... This hypersecretion often results in the formation of a pituitary adenoma (tumour), which are benign apart from a tiny fraction ... For example, acromegaly results from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH) often being released by a pituitary adenoma. ...
TCF4 Pituitary adenoma, ACTH-secreting; 219090; AIP Pituitary adenoma, growth hormone-secreting; 102200; AIP Pituitary adenoma ... chromophobe, somatic; 144700; FLCN Renal cell carcinoma; 144700; DIRC2 Renal cell carcinoma; 144700; HNF1A Renal cell carcinoma ... PRKN Adenomas, multiple colorectal; 608456; MUTYH Adenomas, salivary gland pleomorphic; 181030; PLAG1 Adenomatous polyposis ... EIF2B4 Leydig cell adenoma, somatic, with precocious puberty; 176410; LHCGR Leydig cell hypoplasia with hypergonadotropic ...
Head and neck anatomy Chromophobe cell Melanotroph Chromophil Acidophil cell Basophil cell Oxyphil cell (parathyroid) ... pituitary gland Panhypopituitarism a decreased secretion of most of the pituitary hormones Pituitary tumours Pituitary adenomas ...
March 2020). "Acute kidney injury promotes development of papillary renal cell adenoma and carcinoma from renal progenitor ... PRCC is generally heterogeneous with areas of necrosis and hemorrhage compared to chromophobe RCC. Solid, small PRCC tumors (. ...
Spontaneous CSF rhinorrhea may occur in patients with pituitary adenoma. What clinical factors are most commonly associated ... A = ACTH-secreting adenoma; Br = bromocriptine; C = chromophobe adenoma; Ca = cabergoline; GH = GH-secreting adenoma; LP = ... growth hormone-secreting adenoma (2 patients), mammosomatotroph cell adenoma (1 patient), and ACTH-secreting adenoma (1 patient ... Additional cases have been reported as the presenting symptom of a pituitary adenoma and are likely to be related to decreased ...
Adenoma, Oxyphilic / genetics Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ... Overexpression of KIT (CD117) in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and renal oncocytoma. Pan CC, Chen PC, Chiang H. Pan CC, et ... C-kit overexpression is not associated with KIT gene mutations in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma or renal oncocytoma Annette ... C-kit overexpression is not associated with KIT gene mutations in chromophobe renal cell carcinoma or renal oncocytoma Annette ...
... see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, ... The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing ... Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties ( ... see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, ...
Tandem lesions: chromophobe adenoma and meningioma.. Brennan TG; Rao CV; Robinson W; Itani A. J Comput Assist Tomogr; 1977 Oct ... 7. Coincidental pituitary adenoma and parasellar meningioma: case report.. Yamada K; Hatayama T; Ohta M; Sakoda K; Uozumi T. ... Association of suprasellar meningioma with pituitary adenoma.. Jaskolski DJ; Jakubowski J. Zentralbl Neurochir; 1990; 51(4):229 ...
... and decreased pituitary chromophobe adenoma and endometrial stromal polyps in females.. Hepatocellular adenomas occurred in ... Alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas occurred in high-dose male mice at an incidence significantly (P%lt;0.05) higher than that in the ... Thus, the incidence of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas among males is not considered to be related to treatment with C.I. ... adenoma, and mucinous adenocarcinoma. The incidence of these tumors was not significantly greater than that in controls; thus, ...
Papillary renal tumors - Renal papillary adenoma, papillary RCC * Oncocytic and chromophobe renal tumors - Oncocytoma of the ... H and E, high power of a chromophobe RCC composed of cells with clear, reticular cytoplasm and some with eosinophilic cytoplasm ...
... adenoma, bile duct MeSH C04.557.470.035.095 - adenoma, chromophobe MeSH C04.557.470.035.100 - adenoma, islet cell MeSH C04.557. ... adenoma, acidophil MeSH C04.557.465.625.650.075 - adenoma, basophil MeSH C04.557.465.625.650.095 - adenoma, chromophobe MeSH ... adenoma, acidophil MeSH C04.557.580.625.650.075 - adenoma, basophil MeSH C04.557.580.625.650.095 - adenoma, chromophobe MeSH ... adenoma MeSH C04.557.470.035.012 - acth-secreting pituitary adenoma MeSH C04.557.470.035.025 - adenoma, acidophil MeSH C04.557. ...
Adenoma, Chromophobe 1 0 Adenosarcoma 1 0 Atherosclerosis 1 1 Diabetes, Gestational 1 0 ...
In another patient with a chromophobe adenoma of the hypophysis, it reduced the excessively elevated prolactin levels. On ...
It can be used as a diagnostic aid in such conditions as panhypopituitarism, pituitary dwarfism, chromophobe adenoma, ...
Increased incidences of pituitary chromophobe adenomas and carcinomas were observed in females at the low dose (43% and 3%, ...
Chromophobe_Adenoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C68668,ICH_Unit_of_Measure_Terminology,create,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C8373, ... Adenoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C2856,Basophilic_Adenoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C8184,Tonsillar_Undifferentiated ... Adenoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C40300,Bartholin_s_Gland_Adenomyoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C40296,Bartholin_s_ ... Adenoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C4286,Immature_Teratoma,modify,28-JUN-07,(null),(null) C4294,Benign_Mesonephroma,modify, ...
Secretory adenomas can be classified by histologic staining characteristics (eg, acidophilic, basophilic, chromophobe [ ... Adenomas may be secretory or nonsecretory. Secretory adenomas produce pituitary hormones; many secretory adenomas are , 10 mm ... Adenomas that produce prolactin are treated with dopaminergic agonists (eg, bromocriptine, pergolide, cabergoline), which lower ... Secretory adenomas may cause diabetes insipidus, galactorrhea, Cushing syndrome, or gigantism or acromegaly. ...
Adenoma, Chromophobe Preferred Term Term UI T000715. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1966). ... Adenoma, Chromophobe Preferred Concept UI. M0000375. Scope Note. A benign tumor of the anterior pituitary in which the cells do ... Adenoma, Chromophobe. Tree Number(s). C04.557.465.625.650.095. C04.557.470.035.095. C04.557.580.625.650.095. Unique ID. D000238 ... Adenoma, Chromophobe [C04.557.470.035.095] * Adenoma, Islet Cell [C04.557.470.035.100] * Adenoma, Liver Cell [C04.557.470.035. ...
Adenoma, Chromophobe Preferred Term Term UI T000715. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1966). ... Adenoma, Chromophobe Preferred Concept UI. M0000375. Scope Note. A benign tumor of the anterior pituitary in which the cells do ... Adenoma, Chromophobe. Tree Number(s). C04.557.465.625.650.095. C04.557.470.035.095. C04.557.580.625.650.095. Unique ID. D000238 ... Adenoma, Chromophobe [C04.557.470.035.095] * Adenoma, Islet Cell [C04.557.470.035.100] * Adenoma, Liver Cell [C04.557.470.035. ...
Chromophobe adenoma (morphologic abnormality) Code System Concept Status. Published. Code System Preferred Concept Name. ...
... chromophobe adenoma, postsurgical craniopharyngioma, hypophysectomy, pituitary trauma, acromegaly, gigantism, and problems of ... chromophobe adenoma, postsurgical craniopharyngioma, hypophysectomy, pituitary trauma, acromegaly, gigantism, and problems of ...
Adenomas, Chromophobe. Chromophobe Adenoma. Chromophobe Adenomas. Tree number(s):. C04.557.465.625.650.095. C04.557.470.035.095 ... Adenoma, Chromophobe - Preferred Concept UI. M0000375. Scope note. A benign tumor of the anterior pituitary in which the cells ... adenoma cromófobo. Scope note:. Tumor benigno del lóbulo anterior de la hipófisis en el que las células no se tiñen con ...
chromophobe adenoma DOID:3828 * spinal accessory nerve neoplasm DOID:337 * optic nerve sheath meningioma ...
Conditions mentioned include: visual difficulties; hemianopia; optic atrophy; and pituitary chromophobe adenoma. Surgical ...
See also Adenoma, Acidophil See also Adenoma, Chromophobe Pituitary Stalk See Pituitary Gland ...
Lastly, we feel it is critical to image a larger number of chromophobe RCCs so as to better understand the performance of this ... sestamibi is a widely available mitochondrial imaging agent that is commonly used for the localization of parathyroid adenomas ... Lastly, we feel it is critical to image a larger number of chromophobe RCCs so as to better understand the performance of this ... Prospective Evaluation of 99mTc-sestamibi SPECT/CT for the Diagnosis of Renal Oncocytomas and Hybrid Oncocytic/Chromophobe ...
CHROMOPHOBE ADENOMA OF THE HYPOPHYSIS Hematoxylin and Eosin Stain CLINICAL NOTE: Not available. PATHOLOGY: The adenoma occupies ... CHROMOPHOBE ADENOMA OF THE HYPOPHYSIS >o> "*■> X% ^^wff^v^l - f<^ *>^ ***Nfc*3LVft."O^-V^Sl "• I;; r ^ 0 »*V3V* ,ft^j, % -B ... Chromophobe adenoma of the hypophysis 68. Peripheral neuritis 69. Craniopharyngioma 70. Meningioma (meningothelial type) 71. ... Adenoma sebaceum was prominent. Death follow- ed bronchopneumonia. (A 3111) PATHOLOGY: At autopsy the kidneys were found to ...
... and decreased pituitary chromophobe adenoma and endometrial stromal polyps in females.. Hepatocellular adenomas occurred in ... Alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas occurred in high-dose male mice at an incidence significantly (P%lt;0.05) higher than that in the ... Thus, the incidence of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas among males is not considered to be related to treatment with C.I. ... adenoma, and mucinous adenocarcinoma. The incidence of these tumors was not significantly greater than that in controls; thus, ...
Tumors resembling chromophobe adenomas of the pituitary gland with eosinophilic granulation on tetrachrome staining. ... Type III: Forbes-Albright Syndrome: AGS caused by chromophobe prolactin-producing adenoma of the pituitary. ...
  • Biopsies, however, are also unreliable because oncocytoma-like areas can be found in chromophobe renal cell carcinomas. (pediagenosis.com)
  • Such features are seen in eosinophilic chromophobe carcinoma, a malignant tumor that can mimic oncocytoma. (promisekit.org)
  • Morphologically, they exhibit overlapping features with oncocytoma and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. (elsevierpure.com)
  • Last but not least, while these DCT derived tumors are genetically distinct, BHDS derived tumors, sporadic renal oncocytoma, and chromophobe RCC share their histological and mitochondrial OXHPOS gene expres sion qualities. (mirnamimics.com)
  • Deregulation of mitochondrial proteins has just lately been recognized in sporadic oncocytoma pop over to this website and chromophobe RCC, Long term scientific studies will for that reason help to clarify the position of FLCN in mitochondrial perform. (mirnamimics.com)
  • Villwock et al noted that pituitary tumors constitute 10-15% of all diagnosed intracranial tumors, 90% of which are adenomas. (medscape.com)
  • G-protein abnormalities, ras gene mutations, p53 gene deletions, mutations, and rearrangements, and the association of pituitary tumors with the syndrome of multiple endocrine neoplasia have been described and are involved in the development of adenomas in the pituitary gland. (medscape.com)
  • [ 4 ] Nonfunctioning adenomas are associated with hypermethylation of p16 prolactinomas, and corticotropin-secreting tumors express galectin-3 (Gal-3), a gene involved in cell growth and apoptosis. (medscape.com)
  • Most pituitary tumors are adenomas. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Most tumors of the pituitary and suprasellar region are pituitary adenomas. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Multiple or bilateral renal carcinomas have been reported in association with this syndrome, most commonly hybrid oncocytic tumors with features of chromophobe renal carcinoma (50%), followed by chromophobe renal cancer, clear cell renal carcinoma, and renal oncocytoma. (medscape.com)
  • Other histological cell types of RCC include papillary tumors (~15%-20%) that may arise from the epithelium of the proximal tubule, and chromophobe tumors (~5%) that may arise from the distal nephron. (fibonaccimd.com)
  • Case report: ACTH-secreting pituitary carcinoma metastatic to the liver in a patient with a history of atypical pituitary adenoma and Cushing's disease. (uams.edu)
  • Multiple or bilateral renal carcinomas, commonly chromophobe renal carcinoma and renal oncocytomas, and rarely, clear cell renal carcinomas have been reported in association with this syndrome. (medscape.com)
  • Pituitary adenomas, with a few exceptions, are not under the control of hypothalamic releasing factors. (medscape.com)
  • The incidence of pituitary apoplexy ranges from 1 to 20% in surgically verified pituitary adenomas, with a slight male predominance. (symptoma.com)
  • The current guideline of the European Society of Endocrinology defines aggressive pituitary adenomas as radiologically invasive tumours with an unusually rapid growth rate and frequent relapses despite the optimal use of standard therapies. (bvsalud.org)
  • Orbital invasion by ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. (uams.edu)
  • Pituitary apoplexy occurs when a pituitary adenoma either spontaneously hemorrhages or grows in such a way as to compress and cut off its own blood supply, resulting in tumor cell death, bleeding, and acute swelling . (symptoma.com)
  • These are defined as papillary adenomas by the World Health Organization Classification of Tumours when they possess papillary or tubular architecture of low nuclear grade and are 5 mm or smaller in diameter. (pediagenosis.com)
  • eg, acidophilic adenomas overproduce growth hormone, and basophilic adenomas overproduce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). (merckmanuals.com)
  • Headache may result from an enlarging pituitary adenoma, even when intracranial pressure is not increased. (merckmanuals.com)
  • ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (uams.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma" by people in UAMS Profiles by year, and whether "ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma" was a major or minor topic of these publications. (uams.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma" by people in Profiles over the past ten years. (uams.edu)
  • Schnitker MT, Lehnert HB : Apoplexy in a pituitary chromophobe adenoma producing the syndrome of middle cerebral artery thrombosis. (zulnab.com)
  • Introduction: Prolactinomas are the most frequent type of pituitary adenoma encountered in clinical practice. (bvsalud.org)
  • 1:10 - Peterson space internal hernia from Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy 5:08 - hx of cervical cancer s/p remote radiation with radiatio. (abdominalrad.com)
  • Gigantism and Acromegaly Gigantism and acromegaly are syndromes of excessive secretion of growth hormone (hypersomatotropism) that are nearly always due to a pituitary adenoma. (merckmanuals.com)
  • In this report, we present a 42-year-old man who had been diagnosed of pituitary adenoma presented with a sudden onset of unconsciousness , left hemiplegia and right ptosis. (symptoma.com)
  • In this case report, we describe an unusual case of two bilateral synchronous chromophobe renal cell carcinomas accompanied by an oncocytoma and an angiomyolipoma, that were all treated by open partial nephrectomy. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on the synchronous occurrence of bilateral chromophobe renal cell carcinomas associated with an oncocytoma and an angiomyolipoma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Renal adenomas resemble renal cell carcinomas. (uci.edu)
  • A specific type of acidophil adenoma may give rise to nonpuerperal galactorrhea. (nih.gov)
  • It is a conventional RC, papillary RC, chromophobe RC, RC from the collecting ducts and unclassified type of RC. (biopticka.cz)
  • Benign epithelial tumors are then papillary renal adenoma, renal oncocytoma and metanephric adenoma and related lesions. (biopticka.cz)
  • The most common subtypes of RCC are clear cell RCC (ccRCC), papillary RCC (PRCC), and chromophobe RCC (CRR). (manuscriptscientific.com)
  • It can be used as a diagnostic aid in such conditions as panhypopituitarism, pituitary dwarfism, chromophobe adenoma, postsurgical craniopharyngioma, hypophysectomy, pituitary trauma, acromegaly, gigantism and problems of growth and stature. (nih.gov)
  • Gigantism and Acromegaly Gigantism and acromegaly are syndromes of excessive secretion of growth hormone (hypersomatotropism) that are nearly always due to a pituitary adenoma. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Tumors resembling chromophobe adenomas of the pituitary gland with eosinophilic granulation on tetrachrome staining. (mhmedical.com)
  • and decreased pituitary chromophobe adenoma and endometrial stromal polyps in females. (nih.gov)
  • eg, acidophilic adenomas overproduce growth hormone, and basophilic adenomas overproduce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). (msdmanuals.com)
  • Stomach tumors, rare in F344 rats (10/2960, 0.3%), were found in the dosed male rats: one adenocarcinoma and a sarcoma in a high-dose male and in the low-dose group a squamous cell papilloma, fibrosarcoma, adenoma, and mucinous adenocarcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • Tandem lesions: chromophobe adenoma and meningioma. (nih.gov)
  • 7. Coincidental pituitary adenoma and parasellar meningioma: case report. (nih.gov)
  • 18. Association of suprasellar meningioma with pituitary adenoma. (nih.gov)
  • Most tumors of the pituitary and suprasellar region are pituitary adenomas. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Conclusions Nonsurgical development of CSF rhinorrhea may occur in the setting of pituitary adenomas, especially following favorable response of invasive prolactinomas to initiation of dopamine agonist therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Pituitary apoplexy (PA) is a possible complication of pituitary adenoma but is rarely followed by cerebral infarction. (bvsalud.org)
  • Forty-two patients (81%) had a prolactinoma, with the remaining patients having the following tumors: nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (6 patients), growth hormone-secreting adenoma (2 patients), mammosomatotroph cell adenoma (1 patient), and ACTH-secreting adenoma (1 patient). (medscape.com)
  • In another patient with a chromophobe adenoma of the hypophysis, it reduced the excessively elevated prolactin levels. (nih.gov)
  • One (2.6%) patient with chromophobe adenoma had a significant second episode of PA requiring repeat surgery. (bvsalud.org)
  • Chromophobes are pale as well, but are larger. (uci.edu)
  • [ 22 , 29 ] There have also been several reports of development of CSF rhinorrhea following the initiation of medical treatment for pituitary adenomas. (medscape.com)
  • Background: Polymorphic adenoma-like protein 2 (PLAGL2), a zinc finger protein, has been linked to the advancement of serval-type malignancies. (researchsquare.com)
  • Results Fifty-two patients with spontaneous or medically induced CSF leaks in the setting of a pituitary adenoma were identified from 29 articles published from 1980 through 2011. (medscape.com)
  • Twenty-three (59.0%) patients had a known pituitary adenoma. (bvsalud.org)
  • Following PA, 34 (87.2%) patients were noted to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma (either pre-existing or new), while 5 (12.8%) patients had a pre-existing functional macroadenoma. (bvsalud.org)
  • CONCLUSION: PA often occurs in patients with undiagnosed adenoma. (bvsalud.org)
  • Histological staining techniques classify the cells of the pituitary as acidophils, basophils, or chromophobes. (oncohemakey.com)
  • The remaining chromophobe cells do not stain immunocytochemically. (oncohemakey.com)
  • Methods A review of the literature was conducted to identify all cases of nonsurgical CSF leaks associated with pituitary adenomas. (medscape.com)
  • In this report, we present a man in his 80s with known pituitary adenoma with a sudden onset of left central facial palsy, left hemiparesis, paresis of the VI left pair and previously unrecognised atrial fibrillation in the ECG. (bvsalud.org)