A purine base and a fundamental unit of ADENINE NUCLEOTIDES.
Adenine nucleotides are molecules that consist of an adenine base attached to a ribose sugar and one, two, or three phosphate groups, including adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which play crucial roles in energy transfer and signaling processes within cells.
A subtype of mitochondrial ADP, ATP translocase found primarily in heart muscle (MYOCARDIUM) and skeletal muscle (MUSCLE, SKELETAL).
A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-diphosphate coupled to adenosine 5'-phosphate by pyrophosphate linkage. It is found widely in nature and is involved in numerous enzymatic reactions in which it serves as an electron carrier by being alternately oxidized (NAD+) and reduced (NADH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A class of nucleotide translocases found abundantly in mitochondria that function as integral components of the inner mitochondrial membrane. They facilitate the exchange of ADP and ATP between the cytosol and the mitochondria, thereby linking the subcellular compartments of ATP production to those of ATP utilization.
An enzyme responsible for producing a species-characteristic methylation pattern on adenine residues in a specific short base sequence in the host cell DNA. The enzyme catalyzes the methylation of DNA adenine in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine to form DNA containing 6-methylaminopurine and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. EC 2.1.1.72.
A subtype of mitochondrial ADP, ATP translocase found primarily in FIBROBLASTS.
Adenine nucleotide containing one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety in the 2'-, 3'-, or 5'-position.
Purine bases related to hypoxanthine, an intermediate product of uric acid synthesis and a breakdown product of adenine catabolism.
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-phosphate (NMN) coupled by pyrophosphate linkage to the 5'-phosphate adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. It serves as an electron carrier in a number of reactions, being alternately oxidized (NADP+) and reduced (NADPH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
Adenosine 5'-(trihydrogen diphosphate). An adenine nucleotide containing two phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety at the 5'-position.
An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.
A condensation product of riboflavin and adenosine diphosphate. The coenzyme of various aerobic dehydrogenases, e.g., D-amino acid oxidase and L-amino acid oxidase. (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p972)
A series of heterocyclic compounds that are variously substituted in nature and are known also as purine bases. They include ADENINE and GUANINE, constituents of nucleic acids, as well as many alkaloids such as CAFFEINE and THEOPHYLLINE. Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism.
A nucleoside that is composed of ADENINE and D-RIBOSE. Adenosine or adenosine derivatives play many important biological roles in addition to being components of DNA and RNA. Adenosine itself is a neurotransmitter.
Drugs that inhibit ADENOSINE DEAMINASE activity.
A glycoside of a kaurene type diterpene that is found in some plants including Atractylis gummifera (ATRACTYLIS); COFFEE; XANTHIUM, and CALLILEPIS. Toxicity is due to inhibition of ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE TRANSLOCASE.
A purine and a reaction intermediate in the metabolism of adenosine and in the formation of nucleic acids by the salvage pathway.
Enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of a pentose group from one compound to another.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A purine nucleoside that has hypoxanthine linked by the N9 nitrogen to the C1 carbon of ribose. It is an intermediate in the degradation of purines and purine nucleosides to uric acid and in pathways of purine salvage. It also occurs in the anticodon of certain transfer RNA molecules. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Adenosine molecules which can be substituted in any position, but are lacking one hydroxyl group in the ribose part of the molecule.
A class of enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of nitrogen-linked sugars.
A subtype of mitochondrial ADP, ATP translocase found primarily in the LIVER.
A purine that is an isomer of ADENINE (6-aminopurine).
Purines attached to a RIBOSE and a phosphate that can polymerize to form DNA and RNA.
Carbon-containing phosphonic acid compounds. Included under this heading are compounds that have carbon bound to either OXYGEN atom or the PHOSPHOROUS atom of the (P=O)O2 structure.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Purines with a RIBOSE attached that can be phosphorylated to PURINE NUCLEOTIDES.
An antibiotic produced by Pseudomonas cocovenenans. It is an inhibitor of MITOCHONDRIAL ADP, ATP TRANSLOCASES. Specifically, it blocks adenine nucleotide efflux from mitochondria by enhancing membrane binding.
Aminohydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of various nitrogenous compounds, including proteins, nucleotides, and amines, playing a crucial role in numerous biological processes such as metabolism and signaling.
A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).
The monomeric units from which DNA or RNA polymers are constructed. They consist of a purine or pyrimidine base, a pentose sugar, and a phosphate group. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Purine or pyrimidine bases attached to a ribose or deoxyribose. (From King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Inosine nucleotides are purine nucleotides that contain inosine, a nucleoside with a hypoxanthine base, which can function as a weak agonist at adenosine receptors and play a role in the salvage pathways of nucleic acid metabolism.
A pentose active in biological systems usually in its D-form.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)
A pyrimidine base that is a fundamental unit of nucleic acids.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.
A family of DNA repair enzymes that recognize damaged nucleotide bases and remove them by hydrolyzing the N-glycosidic bond that attaches them to the sugar backbone of the DNA molecule. The process called BASE EXCISION REPAIR can be completed by a DNA-(APURINIC OR APYRIMIDINIC SITE) LYASE which excises the remaining RIBOSE sugar from the DNA.
A flavoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the univalent reduction of OXYGEN using NADPH as an electron donor to create SUPEROXIDE ANION. The enzyme is dependent on a variety of CYTOCHROMES. Defects in the production of superoxide ions by enzymes such as NADPH oxidase result in GRANULOMATOUS DISEASE, CHRONIC.
Mitochondria in hepatocytes. As in all mitochondria, there are an outer membrane and an inner membrane, together creating two separate mitochondrial compartments: the internal matrix space and a much narrower intermembrane space. In the liver mitochondrion, an estimated 67% of the total mitochondrial proteins is located in the matrix. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p343-4)
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A purine nucleoside that has guanine linked by its N9 nitrogen to the C1 carbon of ribose. It is a component of ribonucleic acid and its nucleotides play important roles in metabolism. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
Inosine 5'-Monophosphate. A purine nucleotide which has hypoxanthine as the base and one phosphate group esterified to the sugar moiety.
Electron transfer through the cytochrome system liberating free energy which is transformed into high-energy phosphate bonds.
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
A fractionated cell extract that maintains a biological function. A subcellular fraction isolated by ultracentrifugation or other separation techniques must first be isolated so that a process can be studied free from all of the complex side reactions that occur in a cell. The cell-free system is therefore widely used in cell biology. (From Alberts et al., Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2d ed, p166)
An enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of AMP to IMP. EC 3.5.4.6.
Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
A group of oxidoreductases that act on NADH or NADPH. In general, enzymes using NADH or NADPH to reduce a substrate are classified according to the reverse reaction, in which NAD+ or NADP+ is formally regarded as an acceptor. This subclass includes only those enzymes in which some other redox carrier is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p100) EC 1.6.
Thymine is a pyrimidine nucleobase, one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of DNA (the other three being adenine, guanine, and cytosine), where it forms a base pair with adenine.
A coenzyme for a number of oxidative enzymes including NADH DEHYDROGENASE. It is the principal form in which RIBOFLAVIN is found in cells and tissues.
A ribonucleoside antibiotic synergist and adenosine deaminase inhibitor isolated from Nocardia interforma and Streptomyces kaniharaensis. It is proposed as an antineoplastic synergist and immunosuppressant.
A class of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of a nucleotide and water to a nucleoside and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.-.
Nutritional factor found in milk, eggs, malted barley, liver, kidney, heart, and leafy vegetables. The richest natural source is yeast. It occurs in the free form only in the retina of the eye, in whey, and in urine; its principal forms in tissues and cells are as FLAVIN MONONUCLEOTIDE and FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE.
Pyruvates, in the context of medical and biochemistry definitions, are molecules that result from the final step of glycolysis, containing a carboxylic acid group and an aldehyde group, playing a crucial role in cellular metabolism, including being converted into Acetyl-CoA to enter the Krebs cycle or lactate under anaerobic conditions.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
A class of enzymes that transfers nucleotidyl residues. EC 2.7.7.
Uracil is a nitrogenous base, specifically a pyrimidine derivative, which constitutes one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of RNA (ribonucleic acid), pairing with adenine via hydrogen bonds during base-pairing. (25 words)
The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)
An enzyme that catalyzes the reaction between a purine nucleoside and orthophosphate to form a free purine plus ribose-5-phosphate. EC 2.4.2.1.
Indophenol is a deep blue compound formed when certain phenols are treated with an oxidizing agent such as potassium permanganate in the presence of sodium hydroxide, used as a reagent in some chemical tests for the detection and estimation of reducing substances like ascorbic acid.
NAD+ Nucleosidase is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose, which plays a role in regulating NAD+ levels and modulating cellular signaling pathways.
Guanine nucleotides are cyclic or linear molecules that consist of a guanine base, a pentose sugar (ribose in the cyclic form, deoxyribose in the linear form), and one or more phosphate groups, playing crucial roles in signal transduction, protein synthesis, and regulation of enzymatic activities.
Organic compounds that contain phosphorus as an integral part of the molecule. Included under this heading is broad array of synthetic compounds that are used as PESTICIDES and DRUGS.
A nucleoside antibiotic isolated from Streptomyces antibioticus. It has some antineoplastic properties and has broad spectrum activity against DNA viruses in cell cultures and significant antiviral activity against infections caused by a variety of viruses such as the herpes viruses, the VACCINIA VIRUS and varicella zoster virus.
Proteins involved in the transport of nucleobases such as PYRIMIDINES and PURINES across membranes.
The mitochondria of the myocardium.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-glutamate and water to 2-oxoglutarate and NH3 in the presence of NAD+. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.4.1.2.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ADENOSINE to INOSINE with the elimination of AMMONIA.
A pyridine nucleotide that mobilizes CALCIUM. It is synthesized from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by ADP RIBOSE CYCLASE.
Pairing of purine and pyrimidine bases by HYDROGEN BONDING in double-stranded DNA or RNA.
2-, 3-, or 4-Pyridinecarboxylic acids. Pyridine derivatives substituted with a carboxy group at the 2-, 3-, or 4-position. The 3-carboxy derivative (NIACIN) is active as a vitamin.
Adenine nucleotides which contain deoxyribose as the sugar moiety.
N-Glycosidases that remove adenines from RIBOSOMAL RNA, depurinating the conserved alpha-sarcin loop of 28S RIBOSOMAL RNA. They often consist of a toxic A subunit and a binding lectin B subunit. They may be considered as PROTEIN SYNTHESIS INHIBITORS. They are found in many PLANTS and have cytotoxic and antiviral activity.
A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Mg, atomic number 12, and atomic weight 24.31. It is important for the activity of many enzymes, especially those involved in OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION.
The art or process of comparing photometrically the relative intensities of the light in different parts of the spectrum.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of ADP plus AMP from adenosine plus ATP. It can serve as a salvage mechanism for returning adenosine to nucleic acids. EC 2.7.1.20.
Stable carbon atoms that have the same atomic number as the element carbon, but differ in atomic weight. C-13 is a stable carbon isotope.
The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.
A glycoprotein enzyme present in various organs and in many cells. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of a 5'-ribonucleotide to a ribonucleoside and orthophosphate in the presence of water. It is cation-dependent and exists in a membrane-bound and soluble form. EC 3.1.3.5.
An adenosine monophosphate analog in which ribose is replaced by an arabinose moiety. It is the monophosphate ester of VIDARABINE with antiviral and possibly antineoplastic properties.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate and hypoxanthine, guanine, or 6-mercaptopurine to the corresponding 5'-mononucleotides and pyrophosphate. The enzyme is important in purine biosynthesis as well as central nervous system functions. Complete lack of enzyme activity is associated with the LESCH-NYHAN SYNDROME, while partial deficiency results in overproduction of uric acid. EC 2.4.2.8.
An enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of AMP to ADP in the presence of ATP or inorganic triphosphate. EC 2.7.4.3.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
3-Carbamoyl-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl pyridinium hydroxide-5'phosphate, inner salt. A nucleotide in which the nitrogenous base, nicotinamide, is in beta-N-glycosidic linkage with the C-1 position of D-ribose. Synonyms: Nicotinamide Ribonucleotide; NMN.
Physiologic methyl radical donor involved in enzymatic transmethylation reactions and present in all living organisms. It possesses anti-inflammatory activity and has been used in treatment of chronic liver disease. (From Merck, 11th ed)
An antibiotic purine ribonucleoside that readily substitutes for adenosine in the biological system, but its incorporation into DNA and RNA has an inhibitory effect on the metabolism of these nucleic acids.
Purine bases found in body tissues and fluids and in some plants.
The process by which ELECTRONS are transported from a reduced substrate to molecular OXYGEN. (From Bennington, Saunders Dictionary and Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984, p270)
A flavoprotein that reversibly oxidizes NADPH to NADP and a reduced acceptor. EC 1.6.99.1.
Polymers made up of a few (2-20) nucleotides. In molecular genetics, they refer to a short sequence synthesized to match a region where a mutation is known to occur, and then used as a probe (OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES). (Dorland, 28th ed)
Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.
Addition of methyl groups. In histo-chemistry methylation is used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.
A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).
Nucleosides in which the base moiety is substituted with one or more sulfur atoms.
An important compound functioning as a component of the coenzyme NAD. Its primary significance is in the prevention and/or cure of blacktongue and PELLAGRA. Most animals cannot manufacture this compound in amounts sufficient to prevent nutritional deficiency and it therefore must be supplemented through dietary intake.
Antibiotic substance produced by various Streptomyces species. It is an inhibitor of enzymatic activities that involve glutamine and is used as an antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent.
A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.
Derivatives of SUCCINIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain a 1,4-carboxy terminated aliphatic structure.
Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).
A purine base found in most body tissues and fluids, certain plants, and some urinary calculi. It is an intermediate in the degradation of adenosine monophosphate to uric acid, being formed by oxidation of hypoxanthine. The methylated xanthine compounds caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline and their derivatives are used in medicine for their bronchodilator effects. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Pyrimidines with a RIBOSE and phosphate attached that can polymerize to form DNA and RNA.
Small molecules that are required for the catalytic function of ENZYMES. Many VITAMINS are coenzymes.
Cell surface proteins that bind PURINES with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. The best characterized classes of purinergic receptors in mammals are the P1 receptors, which prefer ADENOSINE, and the P2 receptors, which prefer ATP or ADP.
A group of compounds which consist of a nucleotide molecule to which an additional nucleoside is attached through the phosphate molecule(s). The nucleotide can contain any number of phosphates.
An enzyme which catalyzes the catabolism of S-ADENOSYLHOMOCYSTEINE to ADENOSINE and HOMOCYSTEINE. It may play a role in regulating the concentration of intracellular adenosylhomocysteine.
The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The key substance in the biosynthesis of histidine, tryptophan, and purine and pyrimidine nucleotides.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
A group of deoxyribonucleotides (up to 12) in which the phosphate residues of each deoxyribonucleotide act as bridges in forming diester linkages between the deoxyribose moieties.
Inorganic salts of HYDROGEN CYANIDE containing the -CN radical. The concept also includes isocyanides. It is distinguished from NITRILES, which denotes organic compounds containing the -CN radical.
Derivatives of the dimethylisoalloxazine (7,8-dimethylbenzo[g]pteridine-2,4(3H,10H)-dione) skeleton. Flavin derivatives serve an electron transfer function as ENZYME COFACTORS in FLAVOPROTEINS.
The presence of an uncomplimentary base in double-stranded DNA caused by spontaneous deamination of cytosine or adenine, mismatching during homologous recombination, or errors in DNA replication. Multiple, sequential base pair mismatches lead to formation of heteroduplex DNA; (NUCLEIC ACID HETERODUPLEXES).
The removal of an amino group (NH2) from a chemical compound.
"Malate" is a term used in biochemistry to refer to a salt or ester of malic acid, a dicarboxylic acid found in many fruits and involved in the citric acid cycle, but it does not have a specific medical definition as such.
The covalent bonding of an alkyl group to an organic compound. It can occur by a simple addition reaction or by substitution of another functional group.
The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.
The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Salts or esters of LACTIC ACID containing the general formula CH3CHOHCOOR.
Derivatives of formic acids. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that are formed with a single carbon carboxy group.
Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A rather large group of enzymes comprising not only those transferring phosphate but also diphosphate, nucleotidyl residues, and others. These have also been subdivided according to the acceptor group. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 2.7.
The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.
A basic science concerned with the composition, structure, and properties of matter; and the reactions that occur between substances and the associated energy exchange.
Nucleosides in which the purine or pyrimidine base is combined with ribose. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The products of chemical reactions that result in the addition of extraneous chemical groups to DNA.
A closely related group of toxic substances elaborated by various strains of Streptomyces. They are 26-membered macrolides with lactone moieties and double bonds and inhibit various ATPases, causing uncoupling of phosphorylation from mitochondrial respiration. Used as tools in cytochemistry. Some specific oligomycins are RUTAMYCIN, peliomycin, and botrycidin (formerly venturicidin X).
The composition, conformation, and properties of atoms and molecules, and their reaction and interaction processes.
A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.
A barbiturate with hypnotic and sedative properties (but not antianxiety). Adverse effects are mainly a consequence of dose-related CNS depression and the risk of dependence with continued use is high. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p565)
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
The process of cleaving a chemical compound by the addition of a molecule of water.
Measurement of the intensity and quality of fluorescence.
Multisubunit enzymes that reversibly synthesize ADENOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE. They are coupled to the transport of protons across a membrane.
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to nicotinate and ammonia. EC 3.5.1.19.
An aminopurine factor in plant extracts that induces cell division. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dict, 5th ed)
The reconstruction of a continuous two-stranded DNA molecule without mismatch from a molecule which contained damaged regions. The major repair mechanisms are excision repair, in which defective regions in one strand are excised and resynthesized using the complementary base pairing information in the intact strand; photoreactivation repair, in which the lethal and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light are eliminated; and post-replication repair, in which the primary lesions are not repaired, but the gaps in one daughter duplex are filled in by incorporation of portions of the other (undamaged) daughter duplex. Excision repair and post-replication repair are sometimes referred to as "dark repair" because they do not require light.
The phenomenon whereby compounds whose molecules have the same number and kind of atoms and the same atomic arrangement, but differ in their spatial relationships. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
2-Amino-4-(ethylthio)butyric acid. An antimetabolite and methionine antagonist that interferes with amino acid incorporation into proteins and with cellular ATP utilization. It also produces liver neoplasms.
Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.
Molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. These reactive oxygen intermediates include SINGLET OXYGEN; SUPEROXIDES; PEROXIDES; HYDROXYL RADICAL; and HYPOCHLOROUS ACID. They contribute to the microbicidal activity of PHAGOCYTES, regulation of signal transduction and gene expression, and the oxidative damage to NUCLEIC ACIDS; PROTEINS; and LIPIDS.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate and NAD+ to yield 2-ketoglutarate, carbon dioxide, and NADH. It occurs in cell mitochondria. The enzyme requires Mg2+, Mn2+; it is activated by ADP, citrate, and Ca2+, and inhibited by NADH, NADPH, and ATP. The reaction is the key rate-limiting step of the citric acid (tricarboxylic) cycle. (From Dorland, 27th ed) (The NADP+ enzyme is EC 1.1.1.42.) EC 1.1.1.41.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
5'-S-(3-Amino-3-carboxypropyl)-5'-thioadenosine. Formed from S-adenosylmethionine after transmethylation reactions.
An ester formed between the aldehydic carbon of RIBOSE and the terminal phosphate of ADENOSINE DIPHOSPHATE. It is produced by the hydrolysis of nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD) by a variety of enzymes, some of which transfer an ADP-ribosyl group to target proteins.
The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.
Analogs of those substrates or compounds which bind naturally at the active sites of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, steroids, or physiological receptors. These analogs form a stable covalent bond at the binding site, thereby acting as inhibitors of the proteins or steroids.
Plant hormones that promote the separation of daughter cells after mitotic division of a parent cell. Frequently they are purine derivatives.
Flavoproteins are a type of protein molecule that contain noncovalently bound flavin mononucleotide or flavin adenine dinucleotide as cofactors, involved in various redox reactions and metabolic pathways, such as electron transfer, energy production, and DNA repair.
A subclass of enzymes of the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from one compound to another. (Dorland, 28th ed) EC 2.1.1.
Sulfuric acid diammonium salt. It is used in CHEMICAL FRACTIONATION of proteins.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
An increase in MITOCHONDRIAL VOLUME due to an influx of fluid; it occurs in hypotonic solutions due to osmotic pressure and in isotonic solutions as a result of altered permeability of the membranes of respiring mitochondria.
Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme that plays a critical role in the pentose phosphate pathway, catalyzing the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphoglucono-δ-lactone while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen (NADPH), thereby protecting cells from oxidative damage and maintaining redox balance.
Techniques used to separate mixtures of substances based on differences in the relative affinities of the substances for mobile and stationary phases. A mobile phase (fluid or gas) passes through a column containing a stationary phase of porous solid or liquid coated on a solid support. Usage is both analytical for small amounts and preparative for bulk amounts.
An antibiotic substance produced by Streptomyces species. It inhibits mitochondrial respiration and may deplete cellular levels of ATP. Antimycin A1 has been used as a fungicide, insecticide, and miticide. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)
Thin structures that encapsulate subcellular structures or ORGANELLES in EUKARYOTIC CELLS. They include a variety of membranes associated with the CELL NUCLEUS; the MITOCHONDRIA; the GOLGI APPARATUS; the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM; LYSOSOMES; PLASTIDS; and VACUOLES.
A metabolic process that converts GLUCOSE into two molecules of PYRUVIC ACID through a series of enzymatic reactions. Energy generated by this process is conserved in two molecules of ATP. Glycolysis is the universal catabolic pathway for glucose, free glucose, or glucose derived from complex CARBOHYDRATES, such as GLYCOGEN and STARCH.
Ribose substituted in the 1-, 3-, or 5-position by a phosphoric acid moiety.
An analytical technique for resolution of a chemical mixture into its component compounds. Compounds are separated on an adsorbent paper (stationary phase) by their varied degree of solubility/mobility in the eluting solvent (mobile phase).
A family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases that bind to CYCLOSPORINS and regulate the IMMUNE SYSTEM. EC 5.2.1.-
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.
Nucleosides containing arabinose as their sugar moiety.
A tetrameric enzyme that, along with the coenzyme NAD+, catalyzes the interconversion of LACTATE and PYRUVATE. In vertebrates, genes for three different subunits (LDH-A, LDH-B and LDH-C) exist.
Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen (specifically, hydrogen-3) that contains one proton and two neutrons in its nucleus, making it radioactive with a half-life of about 12.3 years, and is used in various applications including nuclear research, illumination, and dating techniques due to its low energy beta decay.
Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid that contain two phosphate groups.
Pentosephosphates are monosaccharides, specifically pentoses, that have a phosphate group attached, playing crucial roles in carbohydrate metabolism, such as being intermediates in the pentose phosphate pathway and serving as precursors for nucleotide synthesis.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.
Photochemistry is the study of chemical reactions induced by absorption of light, resulting in the promotion of electrons to higher energy levels and subsequent formation of radicals or excited molecules that can undergo various reaction pathways.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
Nucleotides in which the purine or pyrimidine base is combined with ribose. (Dorland, 28th ed)
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of (S)-malate and NAD+ to oxaloacetate and NADH. EC 1.1.1.37.
A disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage. Indicators of oxidative stress include damaged DNA bases, protein oxidation products, and lipid peroxidation products (Sies, Oxidative Stress, 1991, pxv-xvi).
The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.
An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the transfer of the adenylyl moiety of ATP to the phosphoryl group of NMN to form NAD+ and pyrophosphate. The enzyme is found predominantly in the nuclei and catalyzes the final reaction in the major pathway for the biosynthesis of NAD in mammals. EC 2.7.7.1.
Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.
The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).
The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.
A defect of leukocyte function in which phagocytic cells ingest but fail to digest bacteria, resulting in recurring bacterial infections with granuloma formation. When chronic granulomatous disease is caused by mutations in the CYBB gene, the condition is inherited in an X-linked recessive pattern. When chronic granulomatous disease is caused by CYBA, NCF1, NCF2, or NCF4 gene mutations, the condition is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern.
Proteins involved in the transport of NUCLEOTIDES across cellular membranes.
A genus of ascomycetous fungi, family Sordariaceae, order SORDARIALES, comprising bread molds. They are capable of converting tryptophan to nicotinic acid and are used extensively in genetic and enzyme research. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Nucleotides containing arabinose as their sugar moiety.
Catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleotides with the elimination of ammonia.
The formation of a solid in a solution as a result of a chemical reaction or the aggregation of soluble substances into complexes large enough to fall out of solution.
A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.
Part of a MESSENGER RNA molecule that undergoes a conformation change upon binding a specific metabolite or other small molecule thereby regulating the messenger RNA's transcription, post-transcriptional processing, transport, translation, or stability in response to varying levels of the metabolite or other small molecule.

Marker effects on reversion of T4rII mutants. (1/3669)

The frequencies of 2-aminopurine- and 5-bromouracil-induced A:T leads to G:C transitions were compared at nonsense sites throughout the rII region of bacteriophage T4. These frequencies are influenced both by adjacent base pairs within the nonsense codons and by extracodonic factors. Following 2AP treatment, they are high in amber (UAG) and lower in opal (UGA) codons than in allelic ochre (UAA) codons. In general, 5BU-induced transitions are more frequent in both amber and opal codons than in the allelic ochre codons. 2AP- and 5BU-induced transition frequencies in the first and third positions of opal codons are correlated with those in the corresponding positions of the allelic ochre codons. Similarly, the frequencies of 2AP-induced transition in the first and second positions of amber codons and their ochre alleles are correlated. However, there is little correlation between the frequencies of 5BU-induced transitions in the first and second positions of allelic amber and ochre codons.  (+info)

Cytokinin activation of Arabidopsis cell division through a D-type cyclin. (2/3669)

Cytokinins are plant hormones that regulate plant cell division. The D-type cyclin CycD3 was found to be elevated in a mutant of Arabidopsis with a high level of cytokinin and to be rapidly induced by cytokinin application in both cell cultures and whole plants. Constitutive expression of CycD3 in transgenic plants allowed induction and maintenance of cell division in the absence of exogenous cytokinin. Results suggest that cytokinin activates Arabidopsis cell division through induction of CycD3 at the G1-S cell cycle phase transition.  (+info)

Impact of 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine on (deoxy)ribonucleotide metabolism and nucleic acid synthesis in tumor cells. (3/3669)

Following exposure to 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine (an inhibitor of the cellular DNA polymerases alpha, delta and epsilon), human erythroleukemia K562, human T-lymphoid CEM and murine leukemia L1210 cells markedly accumulated in the S phase of the cell cycle. In contrast to DNA replication, RNA synthesis (transcription) and protein synthesis (mRNA translation) were not affected by 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)-adenine. The ribonucleoside triphosphate pools were slightly elevated, while the intracellular levels of all four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates were 1.5-4-fold increased in 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine-treated K562, CEM and L1210 cells. The effect of 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine on de novo (thymidylate synthase-mediated) and salvage (thymidine kinase-mediated) dTTP synthesis was investigated using radio-labelled nucleoside precursors. The amount of thymidylate synthase-derived dTTP in the acid soluble pool was 2-4-fold higher in PMEA-treated than in untreated K562 cells, which is in accord with the 3-4-fold expansion of the global dTTP level in the presence of 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine. Strikingly, 2-derived dTTP accumulated to a much higher extent (i.e. 16-40-fold) in the soluble dTTP pool upon 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine treatment. In keeping with this finding, a markedly increased thymidine kinase activity could be demonstrated in extracts of 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine-treated K562 cell cultures. Also, in the presence of 200 microM 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine, 14-fold less thymidylate synthase-derived but only 3-fold less thymidine kinase-derived dTTP was incorporated into the DNA of the K562 cells. These data show that thymidine incorporation may be inappropriate as a cell proliferation marker in the presence of DNA synthesis inhibitors such as 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine. Our findings indicate that 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine causes a peculiar pattern of (deoxy)ribonucleotide metabolism deregulation in drug-treated tumor cells, as a result of the metabolic block imposed by the drug on the S phase of the cell cycle.  (+info)

The major, N2-dG adduct of (+)-anti-B[a]PDE induces G-->A mutations in a 5'-AGA-3' sequence context. (4/3669)

Previously, in a random mutagenesis study, the (+)-anti diol epoxide of benzo[a]pyrene [(+)-anti-B[a]PDE] was shown to induce a complex mutational spectrum in the supF gene of an Escherichia coli plasmid, which included insertions, deletions and base substitution mutations, notably a significant fraction of GC-->TA, GC-->AT and GC-->CG mutations. At some sites, a single type of mutation dominated and to understand individual mutagenic pathways these sites were chosen for study by site-specific means to determine whether the major adduct, [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG, was responsible. [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG was shown to induce approximately 95% G-->T mutations in a 5'-TGC-3' sequence context and approximately 80% G-->A mutations in a 5'-CGT-3' sequence context. (+)-anti-B[a]PDE induced principally GC-->CG mutations in the G133 sequence context (5'-AGA-3') in studies using both SOS-uninduced or SOS-induced E. coli. Herein, [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG is shown to induce principally G-->A mutations (>90%) either without or with SOS induction in a closely related 5'-AGA-3' sequence context (identical over 7 bp). This is the first time that there has been a discrepancy between the mutagenic specificity of (+)-anti-B[a]PDE versus [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG. Eight explanations for this discordance are considered. Four are ruled out; e.g. the second most prevalent adduct [+ca]-B[a]P-N2-dG also induces a preponderance of G-->A mutations (>90%), so it also is not responsible for (+)-anti-B[a]PDE-induced G133-->C mutations. The four explanations not ruled out are discussed and include that another minor adduct might be responsible and that the 5'-AGA-3' sequence context differed slightly in the studies with [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG versus (+)-anti-B[a]PDE. In spite of the discordance, [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG induces G-->A mutations in the context studied herein and this result has proven useful in generating a hypothesis for what conformations of [+ta]-B[a]P-N2-dG are responsible for G-->T versus G-->A mutations.  (+info)

Hprt mutant frequency and molecular analysis of Hprt mutations in Fischer 344 rats treated with thiotepa. (5/3669)

Thiotepa is a bifunctional alkylating anticancer drug that is a rodent carcinogen and a suspected human carcinogen. In order to determine the sensitivity of mutant induction in the Hprt lymphocyte assay for detecting tumorigenic doses of thiotepa, Fischer 344 rats were treated for 4 weeks with thiotepa using a procedure adapted from a carcinogenesis protocol. At various times after beginning the treatment regimen, rats were killed and the lymphocyte Hprt assay was performed on splenic lymphocytes isolated from the animals. The 6-thioguanine-resistant T lymphocyte mutant frequency increased with time during the period of thiotepa exposure and declined slightly thereafter. Significant dose-dependent increases in mutant frequency were found using concentrations of thiotepa that eventually result in lymphoproliferative tumors. Hprt mRNA from mutant lymphocytes was reverse transcribed to cDNA, amplified by PCR and examined for mutations by DNA sequencing. This analysis indicated that the major type of point mutation was G:C-->T:A transversion and that 33% of the mutants contained simple or complex frameshifts. Also, a multiplex PCR performed on DNA from mutant clones that were expanded in vitro indicated that 34% of the clones had deletions in the Hprt gene. These results indicate that the induction of lymphocyte Hprt mutants is a sensitive biomarker for the carcinogenicity of thiotepa and that the types of mutations found in the lymphocyte Hprt gene reflect the kinds of DNA damage produced by thiotepa.  (+info)

In vitro reactions of butadiene monoxide with single- and double-stranded DNA: characterization and quantitation of several purine and pyrimidine adducts. (6/3669)

We have previously shown that butadiene monoxide (BM), the primary metabolite of 1,3-butadiene, reacted with nucleosides to form alkylation products that exhibited different rates of formation and different stabilities under in vitro physiological conditions. In the present study, BM was reacted with single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) calf thymus DNA and the alkylation products were characterized after enzymatic hydrolysis of the DNA. The primary products were regioisomeric N-7-guanine adducts. N-3-(2-hydroxy-3-buten-1-yl)adenine and N-3-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl)adenine, which were depurinated from the DNA more rapidly than the N-7-guanine adducts, were also formed. In addition, N6-(2-hydroxy-3-buten-1-yl)deoxyadenosine and N6-(1-hydroxy-3-buten-2-yl)deoxyadenosine were detected and evidence was obtained that these adducts were formed by Dimroth rearrangement of the corresponding N-1-deoxyadenosine adducts, not while in the DNA, but following the release of the N-1-alkylated nucleosides by enzymatic hydrolysis. N-3-(2-hydroxy-3-buten-1-yl)deoxyuridine adducts, which were apparently formed subsequent to deamination reactions of the corresponding deoxycytidine adducts, were also detected and were stable in the DNA. Adduct formation was linearly dependent upon BM concentration (10-1000 mM), with adduct ratios being similar at the various BM concentrations. At a high BM concentration (750 mM), the adducts were formed in a linear fashion for up to 8 h in both ssDNA and dsDNA. However, the rates of formation of the N-3-deoxyuridine and N6-deoxyadenosine adducts increased 10- to 20-fold in ssDNA versus dsDNA, whereas the N-7-guanine adducts increased only slightly, presumably due to differences in hydrogen bonding in ssDNA versus dsDNA. These results may contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis of both BM and its parent compound, 1,3-butadiene.  (+info)

Early short-term 9-[2-(R)-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine treatment favorably alters the subsequent disease course in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected newborn Rhesus macaques. (7/3669)

Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of newborn macaques is a useful animal model of human pediatric AIDS to study disease pathogenesis and to develop intervention strategies aimed at delaying disease. In the present study, we demonstrate that very early events of infection greatly determine the ultimate disease course, as short-term antiviral drug administration during the initial viremia stage significantly delayed the onset of AIDS. Fourteen newborn macaques were inoculated orally with uncloned, highly virulent SIVmac251. The four untreated control animals showed persistently high virus levels and poor antiviral immune responses; they developed fatal immunodeficiency within 15 weeks. In contrast, SIV-infected newborn macaques which were started on 9-[2-(R)-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]adenine (PMPA) treatment at 5 days of age and continued for either 14 or 60 days showed reduced virus levels and enhanced antiviral immune responses. This short-term PMPA treatment did not induce detectable emergence of SIV mutants with reduced in vitro susceptibility to PMPA. Although viremia increased in most animals after PMPA treatment was withdrawn, all animals remained disease-free for at least 6 months. Our data suggest that short-term treatment with a potent antiviral drug regimen during the initial viremia will significantly prolong AIDS-free survival for HIV-infected infants and adults.  (+info)

Enzyme-mononucleotide interactions: three different folds share common structural elements for ATP recognition. (8/3669)

Three ATP-dependent enzymes with different folds, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, D-Ala:D-Ala ligase and the alpha-subunit of the alpha2beta2 ribonucleotide reductase, have a similar organization of their ATP-binding sites. The most meaningful similarity was found over 23 structurally equivalent residues in each protein and includes three strands each from their beta-sheets, in addition to a connecting loop. The equivalent secondary structure elements in each of these enzymes donate four amino acids forming key hydrogen bonds responsible for the common orientation of the "AMP" moieties of their ATP-ligands. One lysine residue conserved throughout the three families binds the alpha-phosphate in each protein. The common fragments of structure also position some, but not all, of the equivalent residues involved in hydrophobic contacts with the adenine ring. These examples of convergent evolution reinforce the view that different proteins can fold in different ways to produce similar structures locally, and nature can take advantage of these features when structure and function demand it, as shown here for the common mode of ATP-binding by three unrelated proteins.  (+info)

Adenine is a purine nucleotide base that is a fundamental component of DNA and RNA, the genetic material of living organisms. In DNA, adenine pairs with thymine via double hydrogen bonds, while in RNA, it pairs with uracil. Adenine is essential for the structure and function of nucleic acids, as well as for energy transfer reactions in cells through its role in the formation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the primary energy currency of the cell.

Adenine nucleotides are molecules that consist of a nitrogenous base called adenine, which is linked to a sugar molecule (ribose in the case of adenosine monophosphate or AMP, and deoxyribose in the case of adenosine diphosphate or ADP and adenosine triphosphate or ATP) and one, two, or three phosphate groups. These molecules play a crucial role in energy transfer and metabolism within cells.

AMP contains one phosphate group, while ADP contains two phosphate groups, and ATP contains three phosphate groups. When a phosphate group is removed from ATP, energy is released, which can be used to power various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. The reverse reaction, in which a phosphate group is added back to ADP or AMP to form ATP, requires energy input and often involves the breakdown of nutrients such as glucose or fatty acids.

In addition to their role in energy metabolism, adenine nucleotides also serve as precursors for other important molecules, including DNA and RNA, coenzymes, and signaling molecules.

Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 1 (ANT1) is a protein found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of cells. It plays a crucial role in cellular energy metabolism by facilitating the exchange of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) across the mitochondrial membrane.

In simpler terms, ANT1 helps to transport ATP, which is a major source of energy for cells, out of the mitochondria and exchange it for ADP, which can be converted back into ATP through cellular respiration. This process is essential for maintaining the energy balance within the cell and supporting various physiological functions.

Mutations in the gene that encodes ANT1 have been associated with certain mitochondrial disorders, such as autosomal recessive progressive external ophthalmoplegia (arPEO) and maternally inherited diabetes and deafness (MIDD). These genetic conditions can result in a range of symptoms, including muscle weakness, exercise intolerance, and neurological problems.

NAD (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It plays an essential role in cellular metabolism, particularly in redox reactions, where it acts as an electron carrier. NAD exists in two forms: NAD+, which accepts electrons and becomes reduced to NADH. This pairing of NAD+/NADH is involved in many fundamental biological processes such as generating energy in the form of ATP during cellular respiration, and serving as a critical cofactor for various enzymes that regulate cellular functions like DNA repair, gene expression, and cell death.

Maintaining optimal levels of NAD+/NADH is crucial for overall health and longevity, as it declines with age and in certain disease states. Therefore, strategies to boost NAD+ levels are being actively researched for their potential therapeutic benefits in various conditions such as aging, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic diseases.

Mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocases, also known as adenine nucleotide translocators (ANT), are a group of proteins located in the inner mitochondrial membrane that play a crucial role in cellular energy production. These translocases facilitate the exchange of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) across the mitochondrial membrane, which is essential for oxidative phosphorylation and thus, energy homeostasis in the cell.

In more detail, during oxidative phosphorylation, ATP is produced within the mitochondria as a result of the electron transport chain's activity. This ATP must be exported to the cytosol for use by the cell's various processes. Simultaneously, the mitochondria need a continuous supply of ADP to sustain the production of ATP. The mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocases facilitate this exchange, allowing for the import of ADP into the mitochondria and the export of ATP to the cytosol.

There are multiple isoforms of the ADP/ATP translocase in humans (ANT1, ANT2, ANT3, and ANT4), encoded by different genes, with varying tissue distributions and functions. Dysfunction of these translocases has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cancer.

Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 2 (ANT2) is a protein found in the inner mitochondrial membrane of cells. It is responsible for regulating the exchange of adenine nucleotides, specifically ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and ADP (adenosine diphosphate), between the mitochondrial matrix and the cytoplasm. This process plays a crucial role in cellular energy metabolism. ANT2 has also been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Mutations in the gene that encodes ANT2 have been associated with various diseases, including mitochondrial disorders and neurodegenerative conditions.

Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a nucleotide that is the monophosphate ester of adenosine, consisting of the nitrogenous base adenine attached to the 1' carbon atom of ribose via a β-N9-glycosidic bond, which in turn is esterified to a phosphate group. It is an important molecule in biological systems as it plays a key role in cellular energy transfer and storage, serving as a precursor to other nucleotides such as ADP and ATP. AMP is also involved in various signaling pathways and can act as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system.

Hypoxanthine is not a medical condition but a purine base that is a component of many organic compounds, including nucleotides and nucleic acids, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. In the body, hypoxanthine is produced as a byproduct of normal cellular metabolism and is converted to xanthine and then uric acid, which is excreted in the urine.

However, abnormally high levels of hypoxanthine in the body can indicate tissue damage or disease. For example, during intense exercise or hypoxia (low oxygen levels), cells may break down ATP (adenosine triphosphate) rapidly, releasing large amounts of hypoxanthine. Similarly, in some genetic disorders such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, there is an accumulation of hypoxanthine due to a deficiency of the enzyme that converts it to xanthine. High levels of hypoxanthine can lead to the formation of kidney stones and other complications.

NADP (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate) is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role as an electron carrier in various redox reactions in the human body. It exists in two forms: NADP+, which functions as an oxidizing agent and accepts electrons, and NADPH, which serves as a reducing agent and donates electrons.

NADPH is particularly important in anabolic processes, such as lipid and nucleotide synthesis, where it provides the necessary reducing equivalents to drive these reactions forward. It also plays a critical role in maintaining the cellular redox balance by participating in antioxidant defense mechanisms that neutralize harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS).

In addition, NADP is involved in various metabolic pathways, including the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle in photosynthesis. Overall, NADP and its reduced form, NADPH, are essential molecules for maintaining proper cellular function and energy homeostasis.

Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a chemical compound that plays a crucial role in energy transfer within cells. It is a nucleotide, which consists of a adenosine molecule (a sugar molecule called ribose attached to a nitrogenous base called adenine) and two phosphate groups.

In the cell, ADP functions as an intermediate in the conversion of energy from one form to another. When a high-energy phosphate bond in ADP is broken, energy is released and ADP is converted to adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which serves as the main energy currency of the cell. Conversely, when ATP donates a phosphate group to another molecule, it is converted back to ADP, releasing energy for the cell to use.

ADP also plays a role in blood clotting and other physiological processes. In the coagulation cascade, ADP released from damaged red blood cells can help activate platelets and initiate the formation of a blood clot.

Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a high-energy molecule that stores and transports energy within cells. It is the main source of energy for most cellular processes, including muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and protein synthesis. ATP is composed of a base (adenine), a sugar (ribose), and three phosphate groups. The bonds between these phosphate groups contain a significant amount of energy, which can be released when the bond between the second and third phosphate group is broken, resulting in the formation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This process is known as hydrolysis and can be catalyzed by various enzymes to drive a wide range of cellular functions. ATP can also be regenerated from ADP through various metabolic pathways, such as oxidative phosphorylation or substrate-level phosphorylation, allowing for the continuous supply of energy to cells.

Flavin-Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD) is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role in various metabolic processes, particularly in the electron transport chain where it functions as an electron carrier in oxidation-reduction reactions. FAD is composed of a flavin moiety, riboflavin or vitamin B2, and adenine dinucleotide. It can exist in two forms: an oxidized form (FAD) and a reduced form (FADH2). The reduction of FAD to FADH2 involves the gain of two electrons and two protons, which is accompanied by a significant conformational change that allows FADH2 to donate its electrons to subsequent components in the electron transport chain, ultimately leading to the production of ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

Purines are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that consist of a pyrimidine ring fused to an imidazole ring. They are fundamental components of nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. In the body, purines can be synthesized endogenously or obtained through dietary sources such as meat, seafood, and certain vegetables.

Once purines are metabolized, they are broken down into uric acid, which is excreted by the kidneys. Elevated levels of uric acid in the body can lead to the formation of uric acid crystals, resulting in conditions such as gout or kidney stones. Therefore, maintaining a balanced intake of purine-rich foods and ensuring proper kidney function are essential for overall health.

Adenosine is a purine nucleoside that is composed of a sugar (ribose) and the base adenine. It plays several important roles in the body, including serving as a precursor for the synthesis of other molecules such as ATP, NAD+, and RNA.

In the medical context, adenosine is perhaps best known for its use as a pharmaceutical agent to treat certain cardiac arrhythmias. When administered intravenously, it can help restore normal sinus rhythm in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) by slowing conduction through the atrioventricular node and interrupting the reentry circuit responsible for the arrhythmia.

Adenosine can also be used as a diagnostic tool to help differentiate between narrow-complex tachycardias of supraventricular origin and those that originate from below the ventricles (such as ventricular tachycardia). This is because adenosine will typically terminate PSVT but not affect the rhythm of VT.

It's worth noting that adenosine has a very short half-life, lasting only a few seconds in the bloodstream. This means that its effects are rapidly reversible and generally well-tolerated, although some patients may experience transient symptoms such as flushing, chest pain, or shortness of breath.

Adenosine deaminase inhibitors are a class of medications that work by blocking the action of the enzyme adenosine deaminase. This enzyme is responsible for breaking down adenosine, a chemical in the body that helps regulate the immune system and is involved in the inflammatory response.

By inhibiting the activity of adenosine deaminase, these medications can increase the levels of adenosine in the body. This can be useful in certain medical conditions where reducing inflammation is important. For example, adenosine deaminase inhibitors are sometimes used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and damage to the joints.

One common adenosine deaminase inhibitor is called deoxycoformycin (also known as pentostatin). This medication is typically given intravenously and is used to treat hairy cell leukemia, a rare type of cancer that affects white blood cells.

It's important to note that adenosine deaminase inhibitors can have serious side effects, including suppression of the immune system, which can make people more susceptible to infections. They should only be used under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Atractyloside is a toxic diterpene compound that can be found in various plants, including Atractylis gummifera (commonly known as gum cistus or rabbit-ear cistus) and other members of the Asteraceae family. This toxin is known to inhibit the mitochondrial ADP/ATP translocase, which plays a crucial role in cellular energy production.

Inhibition of this translocase leads to a disruption in the balance of adenine nucleotides inside the mitochondria, resulting in a decrease in ATP synthesis and an increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This can ultimately cause cell damage and even cell death.

Atractyloside poisoning can lead to various symptoms, such as gastrointestinal distress, liver and kidney damage, neurological issues, and, in severe cases, multi-organ failure. It is essential to seek immediate medical attention if atractyloside poisoning is suspected.

Hypoxanthine is a purine derivative and an intermediate in the metabolic pathways of nucleotide degradation, specifically adenosine to uric acid in humans. It is formed from the oxidation of xanthine by the enzyme xanthine oxidase. In the body, hypoxanthine is converted to xanthine and then to uric acid, which is excreted in the urine. Increased levels of hypoxanthine in the body can be indicative of various pathological conditions, including tissue hypoxia, ischemia, and necrosis.

Pentosyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a pentose (a sugar containing five carbon atoms) molecule from one compound to another. These enzymes play important roles in various biochemical pathways, including the biosynthesis of nucleotides, glycoproteins, and other complex carbohydrates.

One example of a pentosyltransferase is the enzyme that catalyzes the addition of a ribose sugar to form a glycosidic bond with a purine or pyrimidine base during the biosynthesis of nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA.

Another example is the enzyme that adds xylose residues to proteins during the formation of glycoproteins, which are proteins that contain covalently attached carbohydrate chains. These enzymes are essential for many biological processes and have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Inosine is not a medical condition but a naturally occurring compound called a nucleoside, which is formed from the combination of hypoxanthine and ribose. It is an intermediate in the metabolic pathways of purine nucleotides, which are essential components of DNA and RNA. Inosine has been studied for its potential therapeutic benefits in various medical conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. However, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms and clinical applications.

Deoxyadenosine is a chemical compound that is a component of DNA, one of the nucleic acids that make up the genetic material of living organisms. Specifically, deoxyadenosine is a nucleoside, which is a molecule consisting of a sugar (in this case, deoxyribose) bonded to a nitrogenous base (in this case, adenine).

Deoxyribonucleosides like deoxyadenosine are the building blocks of DNA, along with phosphate groups. In DNA, deoxyadenosine pairs with thymidine via hydrogen bonds to form one of the four rungs in the twisted ladder structure of the double helix.

It is important to note that there is a similar compound called adenosine, which contains an extra oxygen atom on the sugar molecule (making it a ribonucleoside) and is a component of RNA, another nucleic acid involved in protein synthesis and other cellular processes.

N-Glycosyl hydrolases (or N-glycanases) are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond between an N-glycosyl group and an aglycon, which is typically another part of a larger molecule such as a protein or lipid. N-Glycosyl groups refer to carbohydrate moieties attached to an nitrogen atom, usually in the side chain of an amino acid such as asparagine (Asn) in proteins.

N-Glycosyl hydrolases play important roles in various biological processes, including the degradation and processing of glycoproteins, the modification of glycolipids, and the breakdown of complex carbohydrates. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have been found in many organisms, from bacteria to humans.

The classification and nomenclature of N-Glycosyl hydrolases are based on the type of glycosidic bond they cleave and the stereochemistry of the reaction they catalyze. They are grouped into different families in the Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy) database, which provides a comprehensive resource for the study of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

It is worth noting that N-Glycosyl hydrolases can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on human health. For example, they are involved in the normal turnover and degradation of glycoproteins in the body, but they can also contribute to the pathogenesis of certain diseases, such as lysosomal storage disorders, where mutations in N-Glycosyl hydrolases lead to the accumulation of undigested glycoconjugates and cellular damage.

The Adenine Nucleotide Translocator 3 (ANT3) is a protein found in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It plays a crucial role in cellular energy metabolism by facilitating the exchange of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) across the mitochondrial membrane.

More specifically, ANT3 transports ATP from the mitochondrial matrix to the cytoplasm, where it can be used for various cellular processes, while simultaneously transporting ADP in the opposite direction. This exchange is essential for maintaining the balance of adenine nucleotides and ensuring the proper functioning of the energy-producing machinery within the mitochondria.

ANT3 has also been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis or programmed cell death, as it can interact with pro-apoptotic proteins to facilitate the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, leading to caspase activation and cell death. Dysregulation of ANT3 function has been linked to various pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

2-Aminopurine is a fluorescent purine analog, which means it is a compound that is similar in structure to the naturally occurring molecule called purines, which are building blocks of DNA and RNA. 2-Aminopurine is used in research to study the structure and function of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) due to its fluorescent properties. It can be incorporated into oligonucleotides (short stretches of nucleic acids) to allow for the monitoring of interactions between nucleic acids, such as during DNA replication or transcription. The fluorescence of 2-Aminopurine changes upon excitation with light and can be used to detect structural changes in nucleic acids or to measure the distance between two fluorophores.

Purine nucleotides are fundamental units of life that play crucial roles in various biological processes. A purine nucleotide is a type of nucleotide, which is the basic building block of nucleic acids such as DNA and RNA. Nucleotides consist of a nitrogenous base, a pentose sugar, and at least one phosphate group.

In purine nucleotides, the nitrogenous bases are either adenine (A) or guanine (G). These bases are attached to a five-carbon sugar called ribose in the case of RNA or deoxyribose for DNA. The sugar and base together form the nucleoside, while the addition of one or more phosphate groups creates the nucleotide.

Purine nucleotides have several vital functions within cells:

1. Energy currency: Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a purine nucleotide that serves as the primary energy currency in cells, storing and transferring chemical energy for various cellular processes.
2. Genetic material: Both DNA and RNA contain purine nucleotides as essential components of their structures. Adenine pairs with thymine (in DNA) or uracil (in RNA), while guanine pairs with cytosine.
3. Signaling molecules: Purine nucleotides, such as adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), act as intracellular signaling molecules that regulate various cellular functions, including metabolism, gene expression, and cell growth.
4. Coenzymes: Purine nucleotides can also function as coenzymes, assisting enzymes in catalyzing biochemical reactions. For example, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a purine nucleotide that plays a critical role in redox reactions and energy metabolism.

In summary, purine nucleotides are essential biological molecules involved in various cellular functions, including energy transfer, genetic material formation, intracellular signaling, and enzyme cofactor activity.

Organophosphonates are a class of organic compounds characterized by the presence of a carbon-phosphorus bond. They contain a phosphonic acid group, which consists of a phosphorus atom bonded to four oxygen or nitrogen atoms, with one of those bonds being replaced by a carbon atom.

In a medical context, organophosphonates are commonly used as radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures, such as bone scans. These compounds have the ability to bind to hydroxyapatite, the mineral component of bones, and can be labeled with radioactive isotopes for imaging purposes. They may also be used in therapeutic settings, including as treatments for conditions such as tumor-induced hypercalcemia and Paget's disease of bone.

It is important to note that organophosphonates are distinct from organophosphates, another class of compounds that contain a phosphorus atom bonded to three oxygen or sulfur atoms and one carbon atom. Organophosphates have been widely used as pesticides and chemical warfare agents, and can pose significant health risks due to their toxicity.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Purine nucleosides are fundamental components of nucleic acids, which are the genetic materials found in all living organisms. A purine nucleoside is composed of a purine base (either adenine or guanine) linked to a sugar molecule, specifically ribose in the case of purine nucleosides.

The purine base and sugar moiety are joined together through a glycosidic bond at the 1' position of the sugar. These nucleosides play crucial roles in various biological processes, including energy transfer, signal transduction, and as precursors for the biosynthesis of DNA and RNA.

In the human body, purine nucleosides can be derived from the breakdown of endogenous nucleic acids or through the dietary intake of nucleoproteins. They are further metabolized to form uric acid, which is eventually excreted in the urine. Elevated levels of uric acid in the body can lead to the formation of uric acid crystals and contribute to the development of gout or kidney stones.

Bongkrekic acid is a toxic compound that is produced by certain strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas cocovenenans. This bacterium can contaminate foods, particularly coconut products such as tempeh, a traditional Indonesian soybean fermented food. Bongkrekic acid inhibits the function of the mitochondria, the energy-producing structures in cells, leading to cell death and potentially serious illness or death in humans. Consumption of food contaminated with bongkrekic acid can cause a severe form of food poisoning known as bongkrek fever, which is characterized by symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and neurological symptoms such as confusion, seizures, and coma. Bongkrek fever is often fatal if not treated promptly and effectively. It is important to handle and store food properly to prevent contamination with bongkrekic acid and other harmful bacteria.

Aminohydrolases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of amide bonds and the breakdown of urea, converting it into ammonia and carbon dioxide. They are also known as amidases or urease. These enzymes play an essential role in various biological processes, including nitrogen metabolism and the detoxification of xenobiotics.

Aminohydrolases can be further classified into several subclasses based on their specificity for different types of amide bonds. For example, peptidases are a type of aminohydrolase that specifically hydrolyze peptide bonds in proteins and peptides. Other examples include ureases, which hydrolyze urea, and acylamidases, which hydrolyze acylamides.

Aminohydrolases are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They have important applications in biotechnology and medicine, such as in the production of pharmaceuticals, the treatment of wastewater, and the diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the genetic material present in the cells of organisms where it is responsible for the storage and transmission of hereditary information. DNA is a long molecule that consists of two strands coiled together to form a double helix. Each strand is made up of a series of four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - that are linked together by phosphate and sugar groups. The sequence of these bases along the length of the molecule encodes genetic information, with A always pairing with T and C always pairing with G. This base-pairing allows for the replication and transcription of DNA, which are essential processes in the functioning and reproduction of all living organisms.

Nucleotides are the basic structural units of nucleic acids, such as DNA and RNA. They consist of a nitrogenous base (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine or uracil), a pentose sugar (ribose in RNA and deoxyribose in DNA) and one to three phosphate groups. Nucleotides are linked together by phosphodiester bonds between the sugar of one nucleotide and the phosphate group of another, forming long chains known as polynucleotides. The sequence of these nucleotides determines the genetic information carried in DNA and RNA, which is essential for the functioning, reproduction and survival of all living organisms.

A nucleoside is a biochemical molecule that consists of a pentose sugar (a type of simple sugar with five carbon atoms) covalently linked to a nitrogenous base. The nitrogenous base can be one of several types, including adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, or uracil. Nucleosides are important components of nucleic acids, such as DNA and RNA, which are the genetic materials found in cells. They play a crucial role in various biological processes, including cell division, protein synthesis, and gene expression.

Inosine nucleotides are chemical compounds that play a role in the metabolism of nucleic acids, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. Inosine is a purine nucleoside that is formed when adenosine (a normal component of DNA and RNA) is deaminated, or has an amino group (-NH2) removed from its structure.

Inosine nucleotides are important in the salvage pathway of nucleotide synthesis, which allows cells to recycle existing nucleotides rather than synthesizing them entirely from scratch. Inosine nucleotides can be converted back into adenosine nucleotides through a process called reversal of deamination.

Inosine nucleotides also have important functions in the regulation of gene expression and in the response to cellular stress. For example, they can act as signaling molecules that activate various enzymes and pathways involved in DNA repair, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and other cellular processes.

Inosine nucleotides have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses in a variety of conditions, including neurological disorders, cancer, and viral infections. However, more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and potential benefits.

Ribose is a simple carbohydrate, specifically a monosaccharide, which means it is a single sugar unit. It is a type of sugar known as a pentose, containing five carbon atoms. Ribose is a vital component of ribonucleic acid (RNA), one of the essential molecules in all living cells, involved in the process of transcribing and translating genetic information from DNA to proteins. The term "ribose" can also refer to any sugar alcohol derived from it, such as D-ribose or Ribitol.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

Oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions, which involve the transfer of electrons from one molecule (the reductant) to another (the oxidant). These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy production, metabolism, and detoxification.

The oxidoreductase-catalyzed reaction typically involves the donation of electrons from a reducing agent (donor) to an oxidizing agent (acceptor), often through the transfer of hydrogen atoms or hydride ions. The enzyme itself does not undergo any permanent chemical change during this process, but rather acts as a catalyst to lower the activation energy required for the reaction to occur.

Oxidoreductases are classified and named based on the type of electron donor or acceptor involved in the reaction. For example, oxidoreductases that act on the CH-OH group of donors are called dehydrogenases, while those that act on the aldehyde or ketone groups are called oxidases. Other examples include reductases, peroxidases, and catalases.

Understanding the function and regulation of oxidoreductases is important for understanding various physiological processes and developing therapeutic strategies for diseases associated with impaired redox homeostasis, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Cytosine is one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid molecules DNA and RNA, along with adenine, guanine, and thymine (in DNA) or uracil (in RNA). The single-letter abbreviation for cytosine is "C."

Cytosine base pairs specifically with guanine through hydrogen bonding, forming a base pair. In DNA, the double helix consists of two complementary strands of nucleotides held together by these base pairs, such that the sequence of one strand determines the sequence of the other. This property is critical for DNA replication and transcription, processes that are essential for life.

Cytosine residues in DNA can undergo spontaneous deamination to form uracil, which can lead to mutations if not corrected by repair mechanisms. In RNA, cytosine can be methylated at the 5-carbon position to form 5-methylcytosine, a modification that plays a role in regulating gene expression and other cellular processes.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Nucleic acid conformation refers to the three-dimensional structure that nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) adopt as a result of the bonding patterns between the atoms within the molecule. The primary structure of nucleic acids is determined by the sequence of nucleotides, while the conformation is influenced by factors such as the sugar-phosphate backbone, base stacking, and hydrogen bonding.

Two common conformations of DNA are the B-form and the A-form. The B-form is a right-handed helix with a diameter of about 20 Å and a pitch of 34 Å, while the A-form has a smaller diameter (about 18 Å) and a shorter pitch (about 25 Å). RNA typically adopts an A-form conformation.

The conformation of nucleic acids can have significant implications for their function, as it can affect their ability to interact with other molecules such as proteins or drugs. Understanding the conformational properties of nucleic acids is therefore an important area of research in molecular biology and medicine.

DNA glycosylases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the maintenance of genetic material. They are responsible for initiating the base excision repair (BER) pathway, which is one of the major DNA repair mechanisms in cells.

The function of DNA glycosylases is to remove damaged or mismatched bases from DNA molecules. These enzymes recognize and bind to specific types of damaged or incorrect bases, and then cleave the N-glycosidic bond between the base and the deoxyribose sugar in the DNA backbone. This results in the formation of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site, which is subsequently processed by other enzymes in the BER pathway.

There are several different types of DNA glycosylases that recognize and remove specific types of damaged or incorrect bases. For example, some DNA glycosylases specialize in removing oxidized bases, while others are responsible for removing mismatched bases or those that have been alkylated or methylated.

Overall, the proper functioning of DNA glycosylases is essential for maintaining genomic stability and preventing the accumulation of mutations that can lead to diseases such as cancer.

NADPH oxidase is an enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various cell types. The primary function of NADPH oxidase is to catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADPH to molecular oxygen, resulting in the formation of superoxide radicals. This enzyme complex consists of several subunits, including two membrane-bound components (gp91phox and p22phox) and several cytosolic components (p47phox, p67phox, p40phox, and rac1 or rac2). Upon activation, these subunits assemble to form a functional enzyme complex that generates ROS, which serve as important signaling molecules in various cellular processes. However, excessive or uncontrolled production of ROS by NADPH oxidase has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, such as cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer.

I'd be happy to help! However, I believe there might be a slight misunderstanding in your question. Mitochondria are organelles found in the cells of all complex living organisms, including humans, while the liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen. They don't have a medical definition together. I can certainly provide you with separate definitions for each:

1. Mitochondria: These are double-membrane-bound cellular organelles that generate most of the chemical energy needed to power the cell's biochemical reactions. Commonly known as the "powerhouse of the cell," mitochondria convert organic substrates, such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids, into adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria are dynamic structures that can change their shape, size, and number through fission (division) and fusion (merging) processes. They play essential roles in various cellular functions, including calcium signaling, apoptosis (programmed cell death), and the regulation of cellular metabolism.

2. Liver: The liver is a large, lobulated organ that lies mainly in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity, just below the diaphragm. It plays a crucial role in various physiological functions, such as detoxification, protein synthesis, metabolism, and nutrient storage. The liver is responsible for removing toxins from the bloodstream, producing bile to aid in digestion, regulating glucose levels, synthesizing plasma proteins, and storing glycogen, vitamins, and minerals. It also contributes to the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids, helping maintain energy homeostasis in the body.

I hope this clarifies any confusion! If you have any further questions or need more information, please don't hesitate to ask.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Guanosine is a nucleoside that consists of a guanine base linked to a ribose sugar molecule through a beta-N9-glycosidic bond. It plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as serving as a building block for DNA and RNA during replication and transcription. Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and guanosine diphosphate (GDP) are important energy carriers and signaling molecules involved in intracellular regulation. Additionally, guanosine has been studied for its potential role as a neuroprotective agent and possible contribution to cell-to-cell communication.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Inosine monophosphate (IMP) is a nucleotide that plays a crucial role in the metabolic pathways of energy production and purine synthesis in cells. It is an ester of the nucleoside inosine and phosphoric acid. IMP is an important intermediate in the conversion of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine nucleotide cycle, which is critical for maintaining the balance of purine nucleotides in the body. Additionally, IMP can be converted back to AMP through the action of the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase. IMP has been studied for its potential therapeutic benefits in various medical conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders and ischemia-reperfusion injury.

Oxidative phosphorylation is the metabolic process by which cells use enzymes to generate energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from the oxidation of nutrients, such as glucose or fatty acids. This process occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells and is facilitated by the electron transport chain, which consists of a series of protein complexes that transfer electrons from donor molecules to acceptor molecules. As the electrons are passed along the chain, they release energy that is used to pump protons across the membrane, creating a gradient. The ATP synthase enzyme then uses the flow of protons back across the membrane to generate ATP, which serves as the main energy currency for cellular processes.

Phosphates, in a medical context, refer to the salts or esters of phosphoric acid. Phosphates play crucial roles in various biological processes within the human body. They are essential components of bones and teeth, where they combine with calcium to form hydroxyapatite crystals. Phosphates also participate in energy transfer reactions as phosphate groups attached to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Additionally, they contribute to buffer systems that help maintain normal pH levels in the body.

Abnormal levels of phosphates in the blood can indicate certain medical conditions. High phosphate levels (hyperphosphatemia) may be associated with kidney dysfunction, hyperparathyroidism, or excessive intake of phosphate-containing products. Low phosphate levels (hypophosphatemia) might result from malnutrition, vitamin D deficiency, or certain diseases affecting the small intestine or kidneys. Both hypophosphatemia and hyperphosphatemia can have significant impacts on various organ systems and may require medical intervention.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

A cell-free system is a biochemical environment in which biological reactions can occur outside of an intact living cell. These systems are often used to study specific cellular processes or pathways, as they allow researchers to control and manipulate the conditions in which the reactions take place. In a cell-free system, the necessary enzymes, substrates, and cofactors for a particular reaction are provided in a test tube or other container, rather than within a whole cell.

Cell-free systems can be derived from various sources, including bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cells. They can be used to study a wide range of cellular processes, such as transcription, translation, protein folding, and metabolism. For example, a cell-free system might be used to express and purify a specific protein, or to investigate the regulation of a particular metabolic pathway.

One advantage of using cell-free systems is that they can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes without the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive cell culture or genetic manipulation. Additionally, because cell-free systems are not constrained by the limitations of a whole cell, they offer greater flexibility in terms of reaction conditions and the ability to study complex or transient interactions between biological molecules.

Overall, cell-free systems are an important tool in molecular biology and biochemistry, providing researchers with a versatile and powerful means of investigating the fundamental processes that underlie life at the cellular level.

AMP deaminase is an enzyme that is responsible for the conversion of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to inosine monophosphate (IMP), which is a part of the purine nucleotide cycle. This enzyme plays a crucial role in energy metabolism, particularly in muscles during exercise. A deficiency in AMP deaminase has been linked to muscle fatigue and weakness.

Mitochondria are specialized structures located inside cells that convert the energy from food into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the primary form of energy used by cells. They are often referred to as the "powerhouses" of the cell because they generate most of the cell's supply of chemical energy. Mitochondria are also involved in various other cellular processes, such as signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Mitochondria have their own DNA, known as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is inherited maternally. This means that mtDNA is passed down from the mother to her offspring through the egg cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a variety of diseases and conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and aging.

NADH, NADPH oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the redox reaction between NADH or NADPH and various electron acceptors. These enzymes play a crucial role in cellular metabolism by transferring electrons from NADH or NADPH to other molecules, which is essential for many biochemical reactions.

NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen) and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen) are coenzymes that act as electron carriers in redox reactions. They consist of a nicotinamide ring, which undergoes reduction or oxidation by accepting or donating electrons and a proton (H+).

NADH, NADPH oxidoreductases are classified based on their structure and mechanism of action. Some examples include:

1. Dehydrogenases: These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of NADH or NADPH to NAD+ or NADP+ while reducing an organic substrate. Examples include lactate dehydrogenase, alcohol dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase.
2. Oxidases: These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of NADH or NADPH to NAD+ or NADP+ while reducing molecular oxygen (O2) to water (H2O). Examples include NADH oxidase and NADPH oxidase.
3. Reductases: These enzymes catalyze the reduction of various electron acceptors using NADH or NADPH as a source of electrons. Examples include glutathione reductase, thioredoxin reductase, and nitrate reductase.

Overall, NADH, NADPH oxidoreductases are essential for maintaining the redox balance in cells and play a critical role in various metabolic pathways, including energy production, detoxification, and biosynthesis.

Thymine is a pyrimidine nucleobase that is one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid double helix of DNA (the other three being adenine, guanine, and cytosine). It is denoted by the letter T in DNA notation and pairs with adenine via two hydrogen bonds. Thymine is not typically found in RNA, where uracil takes its place pairing with adenine. The structure of thymine consists of a six-membered ring (pyrimidine) fused to a five-membered ring containing two nitrogen atoms and a ketone group.

Flavin Mononucleotide (FMN) is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role in biological oxidation-reduction reactions. It is derived from the vitamin riboflavin (also known as vitamin B2) and is composed of a flavin molecule bonded to a nucleotide. FMN functions as an electron carrier, accepting and donating electrons in various metabolic pathways, including the citric acid cycle and the electron transport chain, which are essential for energy production in cells. It also participates in the detoxification of harmful substances and contributes to the maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis. FMN can exist in two forms: the oxidized form (FMN) and the reduced form (FMNH2), depending on its involvement in redox reactions.

Coformycin is an antimetabolite antibiotic, which means it interferes with the growth of bacteria by inhibiting the synthesis of nucleic acids, the genetic material of bacteria. It is derived from Streptomyces coelicolor and is used primarily in research to study bacterial metabolism.

Coformycin is a potent inhibitor of bacterial enzyme adenosine deaminase, which is involved in purine biosynthesis. By inhibiting this enzyme, Coformycin prevents the bacteria from synthesizing the building blocks needed to make DNA and RNA, thereby inhibiting their growth.

Coformycin has not been approved for use as a therapeutic drug in humans or animals due to its narrow spectrum of activity and potential toxicity. However, it is still used in research settings to study bacterial metabolism and the mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

Nucleotidases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleotides into nucleosides and phosphate groups. Nucleotidases play important roles in various biological processes, including the regulation of nucleotide concentrations within cells, the salvage pathways for nucleotide synthesis, and the breakdown of nucleic acids during programmed cell death (apoptosis).

There are several types of nucleotidases that differ in their substrate specificity and subcellular localization. These include:

1. Nucleoside monophosphatases (NMPs): These enzymes hydrolyze nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) into nucleosides and inorganic phosphate.
2. Nucleoside diphosphatases (NDPs): These enzymes hydrolyze nucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) into nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) and inorganic phosphate.
3. Nucleoside triphosphatases (NTPs): These enzymes hydrolyze nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) into nucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) and inorganic phosphate.
4. 5'-Nucleotidase: This enzyme specifically hydrolyzes the phosphate group from the 5' position of nucleoside monophosphates, producing nucleosides.
5. Pyrophosphatases: These enzymes hydrolyze pyrophosphates into two phosphate groups and play a role in regulating nucleotide metabolism.

Nucleotidases are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various tissues, organs, and biological fluids, including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. Dysregulation of nucleotidase activity has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and infectious diseases.

Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2, is a water-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in energy production and cellular function, growth, and development. It is essential for the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, and it helps to maintain healthy skin, hair, and nails. Riboflavin is involved in the production of energy by acting as a coenzyme in various redox reactions. It also contributes to the maintenance of the mucous membranes of the digestive tract and promotes iron absorption.

Riboflavin can be found in a variety of foods, including milk, cheese, leafy green vegetables, liver, kidneys, legumes, yeast, mushrooms, and almonds. It is sensitive to light and heat, so exposure to these elements can lead to its degradation and loss of vitamin activity.

Deficiency in riboflavin is rare but can occur in individuals with poor dietary intake or malabsorption disorders. Symptoms of riboflavin deficiency include inflammation of the mouth and tongue, anemia, skin disorders, and neurological symptoms such as confusion and mood changes. Riboflavin supplements are available for those who have difficulty meeting their daily requirements through diet alone.

Pyruvate is a negatively charged ion or group of atoms, called anion, with the chemical formula C3H3O3-. It is formed from the decomposition of glucose and other sugars in the process of cellular respiration. Pyruvate plays a crucial role in the metabolic pathways that generate energy for cells.

In the cytoplasm, pyruvate is produced through glycolysis, where one molecule of glucose is broken down into two molecules of pyruvate, releasing energy and producing ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and NADH (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide).

In the mitochondria, pyruvate can be further metabolized through the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle) to produce more ATP. The process involves the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA, which then enters the citric acid cycle and undergoes a series of reactions that generate energy in the form of ATP, NADH, and FADH2 (reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide).

Overall, pyruvate is an important intermediate in cellular respiration and plays a central role in the production of energy for cells.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Nucleotidyltransferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of nucleotides to an acceptor molecule, such as RNA or DNA. These enzymes play crucial roles in various biological processes, including DNA replication, repair, and recombination, as well as RNA synthesis and modification.

The reaction catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferases typically involves the donation of a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) to an acceptor molecule, resulting in the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the nucleotides. The reaction can be represented as follows:

NTP + acceptor → NMP + pyrophosphate

where NTP is the nucleoside triphosphate donor and NMP is the nucleoside monophosphate product.

There are several subclasses of nucleotidyltransferases, including polymerases, ligases, and terminases. These enzymes have distinct functions and substrate specificities, but all share the ability to transfer nucleotides to an acceptor molecule.

Examples of nucleotidyltransferases include DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase, telomerase, and ligase. These enzymes are essential for maintaining genome stability and function, and their dysregulation has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Uracil is not a medical term, but it is a biological molecule. Medically or biologically, uracil can be defined as one of the four nucleobases in the nucleic acid of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that is linked to a ribose sugar by an N-glycosidic bond. It forms base pairs with adenine in double-stranded RNA and DNA. Uracil is a pyrimidine derivative, similar to thymine found in DNA, but it lacks the methyl group (-CH3) that thymine has at the 5 position of its ring.

Oxygen consumption, also known as oxygen uptake, is the amount of oxygen that is consumed or utilized by the body during a specific period of time, usually measured in liters per minute (L/min). It is a common measurement used in exercise physiology and critical care medicine to assess an individual's aerobic metabolism and overall health status.

In clinical settings, oxygen consumption is often measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) to evaluate cardiovascular function, pulmonary function, and exercise capacity in patients with various medical conditions such as heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other respiratory or cardiac disorders.

During exercise, oxygen is consumed by the muscles to generate energy through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. The amount of oxygen consumed during exercise can provide important information about an individual's fitness level, exercise capacity, and overall health status. Additionally, measuring oxygen consumption can help healthcare providers assess the effectiveness of treatments and rehabilitation programs in patients with various medical conditions.

Purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of purines, which are essential components of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). The medical definition of 'Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase' refers to the physiological function of this enzyme in the human body.

PNP is responsible for catalyzing the phosphorolytic cleavage of purine nucleosides, such as inosine and guanosine, into their respective purine bases (hypoxanthine and guanine) and ribose-1-phosphate. This reaction is essential for the recycling and salvage of purine bases, allowing the body to conserve energy and resources needed for de novo purine biosynthesis.

In a clinical or medical context, deficiencies in PNP activity can lead to serious consequences, particularly affecting the immune system and the nervous system. A genetic disorder called Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase Deficiency (PNP Deficiency) is characterized by significantly reduced or absent PNP enzyme activity, leading to an accumulation of toxic purine nucleosides and deoxypurine nucleosides. This accumulation can cause severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), neurological impairments, and other complications, making it a critical area of study in medical research.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Indophenol" is not a medical term. It is a term used in chemistry to describe a deep blue compound that is formed when certain phenolic compounds are treated with potassium permanganate (KMnO4) under acidic conditions and then reduced with oxalic acid or ferrous sulfate.

This reaction is sometimes used as a qualitative test for the presence of phenolic compounds in chemical analysis. If you have any questions related to the field of medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

NAD+ nucleosidase, also known as NMN hydrolase or nicotinamide mononucleotide hydrolase, is an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) to produce nicotinamide and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is a crucial coenzyme involved in various redox reactions in the body, and its biosynthesis involves several steps, one of which is the conversion of nicotinamide to NMN by the enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT).

The hydrolysis of NMN to nicotinamide and PRPP by NAD+ nucleosidase is a rate-limiting step in the salvage pathway of NAD+ biosynthesis, which recycles nicotinamide back to NMN and then to NAD+. Therefore, NAD+ nucleosidase plays an essential role in maintaining NAD+ homeostasis in the body.

Deficiencies or mutations in NAD+ nucleosidase can lead to various metabolic disorders, including neurological and cardiovascular diseases, as well as aging-related conditions associated with decreased NAD+ levels.

Guanine nucleotides are molecules that play a crucial role in intracellular signaling, cellular regulation, and various biological processes within cells. They consist of a guanine base, a sugar (ribose or deoxyribose), and one or more phosphate groups. The most common guanine nucleotides are GDP (guanosine diphosphate) and GTP (guanosine triphosphate).

GTP is hydrolyzed to GDP and inorganic phosphate by certain enzymes called GTPases, releasing energy that drives various cellular functions such as protein synthesis, signal transduction, vesicle transport, and cell division. On the other hand, GDP can be rephosphorylated back to GTP by nucleotide diphosphate kinases, allowing for the recycling of these molecules within the cell.

In addition to their role in signaling and regulation, guanine nucleotides also serve as building blocks for RNA (ribonucleic acid) synthesis during transcription, where they pair with cytosine nucleotides via hydrogen bonds to form base pairs in the resulting RNA molecule.

Organophosphorus compounds are a class of chemical substances that contain phosphorus bonded to organic compounds. They are used in various applications, including as plasticizers, flame retardants, pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and nerve gases), and solvents. In medicine, they are also used in the treatment of certain conditions such as glaucoma. However, organophosphorus compounds can be toxic to humans and animals, particularly those that affect the nervous system by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Exposure to these compounds can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness, and in severe cases, respiratory failure and death.

Vidarabine is an antiviral medication used to treat herpes simplex infections, particularly severe cases such as herpes encephalitis (inflammation of the brain caused by the herpes simplex virus). It works by interfering with the DNA replication of the virus.

In medical terms, vidarabine is a nucleoside analogue that is phosphorylated intracellularly to the active form, vidarabine triphosphate. This compound inhibits viral DNA polymerase and incorporates into viral DNA, causing termination of viral DNA synthesis.

Vidarabine was previously used as an injectable medication but has largely been replaced by more modern antiviral drugs such as acyclovir due to its greater efficacy and lower toxicity.

Nucleobase transport proteins are a type of membrane transport protein that facilitate the passive or active transport of nucleobases across biological membranes. Nucleobases, which include adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil, are fundamental components of nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and are essential for genetic information storage, replication, and expression.

These transport proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the intracellular concentration of nucleobases by enabling their movement between intracellular and extracellular compartments or between cellular organelles. They can be specific to certain nucleobases or operate as broad-specificity transporters, depending on the protein's structure and function.

The transport process may involve uniport (transport of a single type of molecule), symport (coupled transport of multiple types of molecules in the same direction), or antiport (coupled transport of multiple types of molecules in opposite directions). The precise mechanisms governing nucleobase transport protein function are still under investigation, and further research is required to fully understand their regulation and significance in various physiological and pathophysiological contexts.

I'm happy to help! However, it seems like there are two terms combined into one request: "Mitochondria" and "Heart." I will provide separate definitions for each.

Mitochondrion (singular) or Mitochondria (plural): These are specialized structures found in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells (cells with a true nucleus), including human cells. They are often referred to as the "powerhouse" of the cell because they generate energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondria contain their own DNA, which is distinct from the nuclear DNA, and are believed to have originated from ancient bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive eukaryotic cells.

Heart: In human anatomy, the heart is a muscular organ responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It is located in the thoracic cavity, slightly left of the center, and is enclosed by the pericardium, a double-walled sac that provides protection and lubrication for the heart's movement. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it to the rest of the body. The heart's pumping action is regulated by electrical signals that originate in a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells called the sinoatrial node (SA node).

Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GLDH or GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, particularly within liver and kidney tissues. It catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate, which links amino acid metabolism with the citric acid cycle and energy production. This enzyme is significant in clinical settings as its levels in blood serum can be used as a diagnostic marker for diseases that damage liver or kidney cells, since these cells release GLDH into the bloodstream upon damage.

Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the immune system by helping to regulate the levels of certain chemicals called purines within cells. Specifically, ADA helps to break down adenosine, a type of purine, into another compound called inosine. This enzyme is found in all tissues of the body, but it is especially active in the immune system's white blood cells, where it helps to support their growth, development, and function.

ADA deficiency is a rare genetic disorder that can lead to severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), a condition in which babies are born with little or no functional immune system. This makes them extremely vulnerable to infections, which can be life-threatening. ADA deficiency can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or gene therapy.

Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is a molecule that functions as a second messenger in the body, playing a role in regulating various cellular processes. It is synthesized from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) by the enzyme ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

Cyclic ADPR works by binding to and activating ryanodine receptors, a type of calcium channel found in the endoplasmic reticulum, a cellular organelle involved in calcium storage and release. This leads to an increase in intracellular calcium levels, which can trigger various downstream signaling pathways and physiological responses.

Cyclic ADPR has been implicated in a variety of biological processes, including the regulation of insulin secretion, immune cell function, and cardiovascular function. Dysregulation of cADPR signaling has been linked to several diseases, such as diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer.

Base pairing is a specific type of chemical bonding that occurs between complementary base pairs in the nucleic acid molecules DNA and RNA. In DNA, these bases are adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C). Adenine always pairs with thymine via two hydrogen bonds, while guanine always pairs with cytosine via three hydrogen bonds. This precise base pairing is crucial for the stability of the double helix structure of DNA and for the accurate replication and transcription of genetic information. In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine and pairs with adenine.

Niacin, also known as nicotinic acid, is a form of vitamin B3 (B-complex vitamin) that is used by the body to turn food into energy. It is found in various foods including meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, and cereal grains. Niacin is also available as a dietary supplement and prescription medication.

As a medication, niacin is primarily used to treat high cholesterol levels. It works by reducing the production of LDL (bad) cholesterol in the body and increasing the levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. Niacin can also help lower triglycerides, another type of fat found in the blood.

Niacin is available in immediate-release, sustained-release, and extended-release forms. The immediate-release form can cause flushing of the skin, itching, tingling, and headaches, which can be uncomfortable but are not usually serious. The sustained-release and extended-release forms may have fewer side effects, but they can also increase the risk of liver damage and other serious side effects.

It is important to note that niacin should only be taken under the supervision of a healthcare provider, as it can interact with other medications and have potentially serious side effects.

Deoxyadenine nucleotides are the chemical components that make up DNA, one of the building blocks of life. Specifically, deoxyadenine nucleotides contain a sugar molecule called deoxyribose, a phosphate group, and the nitrogenous base adenine. Adenine always pairs with thymine in DNA through hydrogen bonding. Together, these components form the building blocks of the genetic code that determines many of an organism's traits and characteristics.

Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a type of protein that can inhibit the function of ribosomes, which are the cellular structures responsible for protein synthesis. Ribosomes are made up of two subunits, and RIPs work by depurinating a specific adenine residue in the sarcin-ricin loop of the large rRNA subunit, leading to the inhibition of protein synthesis and ultimately, cell death.

RIPs can be found in various organisms, including plants, bacteria, and fungi. Some RIPs have N-glycosidase activity, while others have both N-glycosidase and RNA N-hydroxylase activities. Based on their structure and mechanism of action, RIPs are classified into two types: type 1 and type 2.

Type 1 RIPs consist of a single polypeptide chain with N-glycosidase activity, while type 2 RIPs consist of two chains - an A chain with N-glycosidase activity and a B chain that acts as a lectin, facilitating the entry of the A chain into the cell.

RIPs have been studied for their potential use in cancer therapy due to their ability to inhibit protein synthesis in cancer cells. However, their toxicity to normal cells limits their therapeutic use. Therefore, researchers are exploring ways to modify RIPs to increase their specificity towards cancer cells while minimizing their toxicity to normal cells.

Magnesium is an essential mineral that plays a crucial role in various biological processes in the human body. It is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and is involved in over 300 enzymatic reactions, including protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, blood glucose control, and blood pressure regulation. Magnesium also contributes to the structural development of bones and teeth.

In medical terms, magnesium deficiency can lead to several health issues, such as muscle cramps, weakness, heart arrhythmias, and seizures. On the other hand, excessive magnesium levels can cause symptoms like diarrhea, nausea, and muscle weakness. Magnesium supplements or magnesium-rich foods are often recommended to maintain optimal magnesium levels in the body.

Some common dietary sources of magnesium include leafy green vegetables, nuts, seeds, legumes, whole grains, and dairy products. Magnesium is also available in various forms as a dietary supplement, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, magnesium chloride, and magnesium glycinate.

Spectrophotometry is a technical analytical method used in the field of medicine and science to measure the amount of light absorbed or transmitted by a substance at specific wavelengths. This technique involves the use of a spectrophotometer, an instrument that measures the intensity of light as it passes through a sample.

In medical applications, spectrophotometry is often used in laboratory settings to analyze various biological samples such as blood, urine, and tissues. For example, it can be used to measure the concentration of specific chemicals or compounds in a sample by measuring the amount of light that is absorbed or transmitted at specific wavelengths.

In addition, spectrophotometry can also be used to assess the properties of biological tissues, such as their optical density and thickness. This information can be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions, including skin disorders, eye diseases, and cancer.

Overall, spectrophotometry is a valuable tool for medical professionals and researchers seeking to understand the composition and properties of various biological samples and tissues.

Adenosine kinase (ADK) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of adenosine levels in cells. The medical definition of adenosine kinase is:

"An enzyme (EC 2.7.1.20) that catalyzes the phosphorylation of adenosine to form adenosine monophosphate (AMP) using ATP as the phosphate donor. This reaction helps maintain the balance between adenosine and its corresponding nucleotides in cells, and it plays a significant role in purine metabolism, cell signaling, and energy homeostasis."

Adenosine kinase is widely distributed in various tissues, including the brain, heart, liver, and muscles. Dysregulation of adenosine kinase activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. Therefore, modulating adenosine kinase activity has emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for treating these diseases.

Carbon isotopes are variants of the chemical element carbon that have different numbers of neutrons in their atomic nuclei. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^{12}C), which contains six protons and six neutrons. However, carbon can also come in other forms, known as isotopes, which contain different numbers of neutrons.

Carbon-13 (^{13}C) is a stable isotope of carbon that contains seven neutrons in its nucleus. It makes up about 1.1% of all carbon found on Earth and is used in various scientific applications, such as in tracing the metabolic pathways of organisms or in studying the age of fossilized materials.

Carbon-14 (^{14}C), also known as radiocarbon, is a radioactive isotope of carbon that contains eight neutrons in its nucleus. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere through the interaction of cosmic rays with nitrogen gas. Carbon-14 has a half-life of about 5,730 years, which makes it useful for dating organic materials, such as archaeological artifacts or fossils, up to around 60,000 years old.

Carbon isotopes are important in many scientific fields, including geology, biology, and medicine, and are used in a variety of applications, from studying the Earth's climate history to diagnosing medical conditions.

A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) in the context of medicinal chemistry and pharmacology refers to the relationship between the chemical structure of a drug or molecule and its biological activity or effect on a target protein, cell, or organism. SAR studies aim to identify patterns and correlations between structural features of a compound and its ability to interact with a specific biological target, leading to a desired therapeutic response or undesired side effects.

By analyzing the SAR, researchers can optimize the chemical structure of lead compounds to enhance their potency, selectivity, safety, and pharmacokinetic properties, ultimately guiding the design and development of novel drugs with improved efficacy and reduced toxicity.

5'-Nucleotidase is an enzyme that is found on the outer surface of cell membranes, including those of liver cells and red blood cells. Its primary function is to catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleoside monophosphates, such as adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP), to their corresponding nucleosides, such as adenosine and guanosine, by removing a phosphate group from the 5' position of the nucleotide.

Abnormal levels of 5'-Nucleotidase in the blood can be indicative of liver or bone disease. For example, elevated levels of this enzyme in the blood may suggest liver damage or injury, such as that caused by hepatitis, cirrhosis, or alcohol abuse. Conversely, low levels of 5'-Nucleotidase may be associated with certain types of anemia, including aplastic anemia and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.

Medical professionals may order a 5'-Nucleotidase test to help diagnose or monitor the progression of these conditions. It is important to note that other factors, such as medication use or muscle damage, can also affect 5'-Nucleotidase levels, so results must be interpreted in conjunction with other clinical findings and diagnostic tests.

Vidarabine phosphate is a antiviral medication used to treat herpes simplex encephalitis, a severe form of brain infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. It works by inhibiting the replication of the virus in human cells. Vidarabine phosphate is the salt of vidarabine, which is a nucleoside analogue that gets incorporated into viral DNA during replication, leading to termination of the DNA chain and preventing further viral reproduction. It is administered through intravenous (IV) infusion in a hospital setting.

Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the salvage pathway of nucleotide synthesis. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine and guanine to their respective nucleotides, inosine monophosphate (IMP) and guanosine monophosphate (GMP), by transferring the phosphoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-1 pyrophosphate (PRPP) to the purine bases.

HGPRT deficiency is a genetic disorder known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, which is characterized by mental retardation, self-mutilation, spasticity, and uric acid overproduction due to the accumulation of hypoxanthine and guanine. This disorder is caused by mutations in the HPRT1 gene, leading to a decrease or absence of HGPRT enzyme activity.

Adenylate kinase is an enzyme (EC 2.7.4.3) that catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphate group between adenine nucleotides, specifically between ATP and AMP to form two ADP molecules. This reaction plays a crucial role in maintaining the energy charge of the cell by interconverting these important energy currency molecules.

The general reaction catalyzed by adenylate kinase is:

AMP + ATP ↔ 2ADP

This enzyme is widely distributed in various organisms and tissues, including mammalian cells. In humans, there are several isoforms of adenylate kinase, located in different cellular compartments such as the cytosol, mitochondria, and nucleus. These isoforms have distinct roles in maintaining energy homeostasis and protecting cells under stress conditions. Dysregulation of adenylate kinase activity has been implicated in several pathological processes, including neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and cancer.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) is a bioactive nucleotide that is found in various cells and tissues within the human body. It is a crucial intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), which is an essential coenzyme involved in numerous cellular processes, including energy metabolism, DNA repair, and gene expression.

NMN can be synthesized within the body from nicotinamide or niacin, and it can also be obtained through dietary sources such as milk, fruits, and vegetables. In recent years, NMN has gained attention in the scientific community for its potential anti-aging effects, as studies have suggested that supplementation with NMN may help to restore NAD+ levels and improve various age-related physiological declines. However, more research is needed to fully understand the therapeutic potential of NMN and its mechanisms of action in humans.

S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is a physiological compound involved in methylation reactions, transulfuration pathways, and aminopropylation processes in the body. It is formed from the coupling of methionine, an essential sulfur-containing amino acid, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through the action of methionine adenosyltransferase enzymes.

SAMe serves as a major methyl donor in various biochemical reactions, contributing to the synthesis of numerous compounds such as neurotransmitters, proteins, phospholipids, nucleic acids, and other methylated metabolites. Additionally, SAMe plays a crucial role in the detoxification process within the liver by participating in glutathione production, which is an important antioxidant and detoxifying agent.

In clinical settings, SAMe supplementation has been explored as a potential therapeutic intervention for various conditions, including depression, osteoarthritis, liver diseases, and fibromyalgia, among others. However, its efficacy remains a subject of ongoing research and debate within the medical community.

Tubercidin is not a medical term itself, but it is a type of antibiotic that belongs to the class of compounds known as nucleoside antibiotics. Specifically, tubercidin is a naturally occurring adenine analogue that is produced by several species of Streptomyces bacteria.

Tubercidin has been found to have antimicrobial and antitumor activities. It works by inhibiting the enzyme adenosine deaminase, which plays a crucial role in the metabolism of nucleotides in cells. By inhibiting this enzyme, tubercidin can interfere with DNA and RNA synthesis, leading to cell death.

While tubercidin has shown promise as an anticancer agent in preclinical studies, its clinical use is limited due to its toxicity and potential for causing mutations in normal cells. Therefore, it is primarily used for research purposes to study the mechanisms of nucleotide metabolism and the effects of nucleoside analogues on cell growth and differentiation.

Xanthines are a type of natural alkaloids that are found in various plants, including tea leaves, cocoa beans, and mate. The most common xanthines are caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. These compounds have stimulant effects on the central nervous system and are often used in medication to treat conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory issues.

Caffeine is the most widely consumed xanthine and is found in a variety of beverages like coffee, tea, and energy drinks. It works by blocking adenosine receptors in the brain, which can lead to increased alertness and reduced feelings of fatigue.

Theophylline is another xanthine that is used as a bronchodilator to treat asthma and other respiratory conditions. It works by relaxing smooth muscles in the airways, making it easier to breathe.

Theobromine is found in cocoa beans and is responsible for the stimulant effects of chocolate. While it has similar properties to caffeine and theophylline, it is less potent and has a milder effect on the body.

It's worth noting that while xanthines can have beneficial effects when used in moderation, they can also cause negative side effects such as insomnia, nervousness, and rapid heart rate if consumed in large quantities or over an extended period of time.

The Electron Transport Chain (ETC) is a series of complexes in the inner mitochondrial membrane that are involved in the process of cellular respiration. It is the final pathway for electrons derived from the oxidation of nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids to be transferred to molecular oxygen. This transfer of electrons drives the generation of a proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, which is then used by ATP synthase to produce ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

The electron transport chain consists of four complexes (I-IV) and two mobile electron carriers (ubiquinone and cytochrome c). Electrons from NADH and FADH2 are transferred to Complex I and Complex II respectively, which then pass them along to ubiquinone. Ubiquinone then transfers the electrons to Complex III, which passes them on to cytochrome c. Finally, cytochrome c transfers the electrons to Complex IV, where they combine with oxygen and protons to form water.

The transfer of electrons through the ETC is accompanied by the pumping of protons from the mitochondrial matrix to the intermembrane space, creating a proton gradient. The flow of protons back across the inner membrane through ATP synthase drives the synthesis of ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate.

Overall, the electron transport chain is a crucial process for generating energy in the form of ATP in the cell, and it plays a key role in many metabolic pathways.

NADPH Dehydrogenase (also known as Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Hydrogen Dehydrogenase) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the electron transport chain within the mitochondria of cells. It catalyzes the oxidation of NADPH to NADP+, which is a vital step in the process of cellular respiration where energy is produced in the form of ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate).

There are multiple forms of this enzyme, including both membrane-bound and soluble varieties. The membrane-bound NADPH Dehydrogenase is a complex I protein found in the inner mitochondrial membrane, while the soluble form is located in the cytosol.

Mutations in genes encoding for this enzyme can lead to various medical conditions, such as mitochondrial disorders and neurological diseases.

Oligonucleotides are short sequences of nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA. They typically contain fewer than 100 nucleotides, and can be synthesized chemically to have specific sequences. Oligonucleotides are used in a variety of applications in molecular biology, including as probes for detecting specific DNA or RNA sequences, as inhibitors of gene expression, and as components of diagnostic tests and therapies. They can also be used in the study of protein-nucleic acid interactions and in the development of new drugs.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Methylation, in the context of genetics and epigenetics, refers to the addition of a methyl group (CH3) to a molecule, usually to the nitrogenous base of DNA or to the side chain of amino acids in proteins. In DNA methylation, this process typically occurs at the 5-carbon position of cytosine residues that precede guanine residues (CpG sites) and is catalyzed by enzymes called DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs).

DNA methylation plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and suppression of repetitive elements. Hypermethylation or hypomethylation of specific genes can lead to altered gene expression patterns, which have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer.

In summary, methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that influences genomic stability, gene regulation, and cellular function by introducing methyl groups to DNA or proteins.

Hydrogen bonding is not a medical term per se, but it is a fundamental concept in chemistry and biology that is relevant to the field of medicine. Here's a general definition:

Hydrogen bonding is a type of attractive force between molecules or within a molecule, which occurs when a hydrogen atom is bonded to a highly electronegative atom (like nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine) and is then attracted to another electronegative atom. This attraction results in the formation of a partially covalent bond known as a "hydrogen bond."

In biological systems, hydrogen bonding plays a crucial role in the structure and function of many biomolecules, such as DNA, proteins, and carbohydrates. For example, the double helix structure of DNA is stabilized by hydrogen bonds between complementary base pairs (adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine). Similarly, the three-dimensional structure of proteins is maintained by a network of hydrogen bonds that help to determine their function.

In medical contexts, hydrogen bonding can be relevant in understanding drug-receptor interactions, where hydrogen bonds between a drug molecule and its target protein can enhance the binding affinity and specificity of the interaction, leading to more effective therapeutic outcomes.

Alcohol oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to NADH. These enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of alcohols and other organic compounds in living organisms.

The most well-known example of an alcohol oxidoreductase is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is responsible for the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the liver during the metabolism of alcoholic beverages. Other examples include aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH).

These enzymes are important targets for the development of drugs used to treat alcohol use disorder, as inhibiting their activity can help to reduce the rate of ethanol metabolism and the severity of its effects on the body.

Thionucleosides are a type of modified nucleoside where the oxygen atom in the sugar component (ribose or deoxyribose) is replaced by a sulfur atom. This modification can occur naturally or be introduced synthetically. The resulting compounds have been studied for their potential biological activity, including antiviral and anticancer properties. However, they are not typically used as a standard medical treatment at this time.

Niacinamide, also known as nicotinamide, is a form of vitamin B3 (niacin). It is a water-soluble vitamin that is involved in energy production and DNA repair in the body. Niacinamide can be found in various foods such as meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, and cereal grains.

As a medical definition, niacinamide is a nutritional supplement and medication used to prevent or treat pellagra, a disease caused by niacin deficiency. It can also be used to improve skin conditions such as acne, rosacea, and hyperpigmentation, and has been studied for its potential benefits in treating diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer's disease.

Niacinamide works by acting as a precursor to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), a coenzyme involved in many cellular processes such as energy metabolism, DNA repair, and gene expression. Niacinamide has anti-inflammatory properties and can help regulate the immune system, making it useful for treating inflammatory skin conditions.

It is important to note that niacinamide should not be confused with niacin (also known as nicotinic acid), which is another form of vitamin B3 that has different effects on the body. Niacin can cause flushing and other side effects at higher doses, while niacinamide does not have these effects.

Azaserine is a antineoplastic and antibiotic agent. Its chemical name is O-diazoacetyl-L-serine. It is an analog of the amino acid serine, which inhibits the enzyme necessary for the synthesis of DNA and RNA, thus preventing the growth of cancer cells. Azaserine is used in research but not in clinical medicine due to its high toxicity.

Calcium is an essential mineral that is vital for various physiological processes in the human body. The medical definition of calcium is as follows:

Calcium (Ca2+) is a crucial cation and the most abundant mineral in the human body, with approximately 99% of it found in bones and teeth. It plays a vital role in maintaining structural integrity, nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, hormonal secretion, blood coagulation, and enzyme activation.

Calcium homeostasis is tightly regulated through the interplay of several hormones, including parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, and vitamin D. Dietary calcium intake, absorption, and excretion are also critical factors in maintaining optimal calcium levels in the body.

Hypocalcemia refers to low serum calcium levels, while hypercalcemia indicates high serum calcium levels. Both conditions can have detrimental effects on various organ systems and require medical intervention to correct.

Succinates, in a medical context, most commonly refer to the salts or esters of succinic acid. Succinic acid is a dicarboxylic acid that is involved in the Krebs cycle, which is a key metabolic pathway in cells that generates energy through the oxidation of acetyl-CoA derived from carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

Succinates can also be used as a buffer in medical solutions and as a pharmaceutical intermediate in the synthesis of various drugs. In some cases, succinate may be used as a nutritional supplement or as a component of parenteral nutrition formulations to provide energy and help maintain acid-base balance in patients who are unable to eat normally.

It's worth noting that there is also a condition called "succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency" which is a genetic disorder that affects the metabolism of the amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This condition can lead to an accumulation of succinic semialdehyde and other metabolic byproducts, which can cause neurological symptoms such as developmental delay, hypotonia, and seizures.

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that provides information about the biochemical composition of tissues, including their metabolic state. It is often used in conjunction with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to analyze various metabolites within body tissues, such as the brain, heart, liver, and muscles.

During MRS, a strong magnetic field, radio waves, and a computer are used to produce detailed images and data about the concentration of specific metabolites in the targeted tissue or organ. This technique can help detect abnormalities related to energy metabolism, neurotransmitter levels, pH balance, and other biochemical processes, which can be useful for diagnosing and monitoring various medical conditions, including cancer, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases.

There are different types of MRS, such as Proton (^1^H) MRS, Phosphorus-31 (^31^P) MRS, and Carbon-13 (^13^C) MRS, each focusing on specific elements or metabolites within the body. The choice of MRS technique depends on the clinical question being addressed and the type of information needed for diagnosis or monitoring purposes.

Xanthine is a purine base, which is a naturally occurring heterocyclic aromatic organic compound. It is formed in the body during the metabolism of purines, and it's a normal intermediate in the breakdown of nucleotides to uric acid. Xanthine is also found in various foods and beverages, such as coffee, tea, and chocolate. In the medical field, xanthine may refer to a class of drugs called xanthine derivatives, which include theophylline and caffeine, that act as bronchodilators and cardiac stimulants.

Pyrimidine nucleotides are organic compounds that play crucial roles in various biological processes, particularly in the field of genetics and molecular biology. They are the building blocks of nucleic acids, which include DNA and RNA, and are essential for the storage, transmission, and expression of genetic information within cells.

Pyrimidine is a heterocyclic aromatic organic compound similar to benzene and pyridine, containing two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 3 of the six-member ring. Pyrimidine nucleotides are derivatives of pyrimidine, which contain a phosphate group, a pentose sugar (ribose or deoxyribose), and one of three pyrimidine bases: cytosine (C), thymine (T), or uracil (U).

* Cytosine is present in both DNA and RNA. It pairs with guanine via hydrogen bonding during DNA replication and transcription.
* Thymine is exclusively found in DNA, where it pairs with adenine through two hydrogen bonds.
* Uracil is a pyrimidine base that replaces thymine in RNA molecules and pairs with adenine via two hydrogen bonds during RNA transcription.

Pyrimidine nucleotides, along with purine nucleotides (adenine, guanine, and their derivatives), form the fundamental units of nucleic acids, contributing to the structure, function, and regulation of genetic material in living organisms.

Coenzymes are small organic molecules that assist enzymes in catalyzing chemical reactions within cells. They typically act as carriers of specific atoms or groups of atoms during enzymatic reactions, facilitating the conversion of substrates into products. Coenzymes often bind temporarily to enzymes at the active site, forming an enzyme-coenzyme complex.

Coenzymes are usually derived from vitamins or minerals and are essential for maintaining proper metabolic functions in the body. Examples of coenzymes include nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and coenzyme A (CoA). When a coenzyme is used up in a reaction, it must be regenerated or replaced for the enzyme to continue functioning.

In summary, coenzymes are vital organic compounds that work closely with enzymes to facilitate biochemical reactions, ensuring the smooth operation of various metabolic processes within living organisms.

Purinergic receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind and respond to purines and pyrimidines, which are nucleotides and nucleosides. These receptors are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and inflammation. There are two main types of purinergic receptors: P1 receptors, which are activated by adenosine, and P2 receptors, which are activated by ATP and other nucleotides.

P2 receptors are further divided into two subtypes: P2X and P2Y. P2X receptors are ionotropic receptors that form cation channels upon activation, allowing the flow of ions such as calcium and sodium into the cell. P2Y receptors, on the other hand, are metabotropic receptors that activate G proteins upon activation, leading to the activation or inhibition of various intracellular signaling pathways.

Purinergic receptors have been found to play a role in many diseases and conditions, including neurological disorders, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. They are also being studied as potential targets for drug development.

Dinucleoside phosphates are the chemical compounds that result from the linkage of two nucleosides through a phosphate group. Nucleosides themselves consist of a sugar molecule (ribose or deoxyribose) and a nitrogenous base (adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, or uracil). When two nucleosides are joined together by an ester bond between the phosphate group and the 5'-hydroxyl group of the sugar moiety, they form a dinucleoside phosphate.

These compounds play crucial roles in various biological processes, particularly in the context of DNA and RNA synthesis and repair. For instance, dinucleoside phosphates serve as building blocks for the formation of longer nucleic acid chains during replication and transcription. They are also involved in signaling pathways and energy transfer within cells.

It is worth noting that the term "dinucleotides" is sometimes used interchangeably with dinucleoside phosphates, although technically, dinucleotides refer to compounds formed by joining two nucleotides (nucleosides plus one or more phosphate groups) rather than just two nucleosides.

Adenosylhomocysteinase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the methionine cycle, which is a biochemical pathway involved in the synthesis and metabolism of various essential molecules in the body. The formal medical definition of adenosylhomocysteinase is:

"An enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of S-adenosylhomocysteine to homocysteine and adenosine. This reaction is the first step in the recycling of methionine, a sulfur-containing amino acid that is essential for various metabolic processes, including the synthesis of proteins, neurotransmitters, and phospholipids."

In simpler terms, adenosylhomocysteinase helps break down S-adenosylhomocysteine, a byproduct of methylation reactions in the body, into its component parts: homocysteine and adenosine. This breakdown is essential for the proper functioning of the methionine cycle and the maintenance of normal levels of homocysteine, which can be toxic at high concentrations.

Deficiencies or mutations in the adenosylhomocysteinase gene can lead to an accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine and homocysteine, which can contribute to various health issues, including neurological disorders, cardiovascular disease, and developmental abnormalities.

X-ray crystallography is a technique used in structural biology to determine the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in a crystal lattice. In this method, a beam of X-rays is directed at a crystal and diffracts, or spreads out, into a pattern of spots called reflections. The intensity and angle of each reflection are measured and used to create an electron density map, which reveals the position and type of atoms in the crystal. This information can be used to determine the molecular structure of a compound, including its shape, size, and chemical bonds. X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for understanding the structure and function of biological macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids.

Phosphoribosyl Pyrophosphate (PRPP) is defined as a key intracellular nucleotide metabolite that plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. PRPP is synthesized from ribose 5-phosphate and ATP by the enzyme PRPP synthase. It contributes a phosphoribosyl group in the conversion of purines and pyrimidines to their corresponding nucleotides, which are critical for various cellular processes such as DNA replication, repair, and gene expression. Abnormal levels of PRPP have been implicated in several genetic disorders, including Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and PRPP synthetase superactivity.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) are relatively short, synthetic single-stranded DNA molecules. They typically contain 15 to 30 nucleotides, but can range from 2 to several hundred nucleotides in length. ODNs are often used as tools in molecular biology research for various applications such as:

1. Nucleic acid detection and quantification (e.g., real-time PCR)
2. Gene regulation (antisense, RNA interference)
3. Gene editing (CRISPR-Cas systems)
4. Vaccine development
5. Diagnostic purposes

Due to their specificity and affinity towards complementary DNA or RNA sequences, ODNs can be designed to target a particular gene or sequence of interest. This makes them valuable tools in understanding gene function, regulation, and interaction with other molecules within the cell.

Cyanides are a group of chemical compounds that contain the cyano group, -CN, which consists of a carbon atom triple-bonded to a nitrogen atom. They are highly toxic and can cause rapid death due to the inhibition of cellular respiration. Cyanide ions (CN-) bind to the ferric iron in cytochrome c oxidase, a crucial enzyme in the electron transport chain, preventing the flow of electrons and the production of ATP, leading to cellular asphyxiation.

Common sources of cyanides include industrial chemicals such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and potassium cyanide (KCN), as well as natural sources like certain fruits, nuts, and plants. Exposure to high levels of cyanides can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin absorption, leading to symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, rapid heartbeat, seizures, coma, and ultimately death. Treatment for cyanide poisoning typically involves the use of antidotes that bind to cyanide ions and convert them into less toxic forms, such as thiosulfate and rhodanese.

Flavins are a group of naturally occurring organic compounds that contain a characteristic isoalloxazine ring, which is a tricyclic aromatic structure. The most common and well-known flavin is flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which plays a crucial role as a coenzyme in various biological oxidation-reduction reactions. FAD accepts electrons and hydrogens to form the reduced form, flavin adenine dinucleotide hydride (FADH2). Another important flavin is flavin mononucleotide (FMN), which is derived from FAD and functions similarly as a coenzyme. Flavins are yellow in color and can be found in various biological systems, including animals, plants, and microorganisms. They are involved in several metabolic pathways, such as the electron transport chain, where they contribute to energy production.

A base pair mismatch is a type of mutation that occurs during the replication or repair of DNA, where two incompatible nucleotides pair up instead of the usual complementary bases (adenine-thymine or cytosine-guanine). This can result in the substitution of one base pair for another and may lead to changes in the genetic code, potentially causing errors in protein synthesis and possibly contributing to genetic disorders or diseases, including cancer.

Deamination is a biochemical process that refers to the removal of an amino group (-NH2) from a molecule, especially from an amino acid. This process typically results in the formation of a new functional group and the release of ammonia (NH3). Deamination plays a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, as it helps to convert them into forms that can be excreted or used for energy production. In some cases, deamination can also lead to the formation of toxic byproducts, which must be efficiently eliminated from the body to prevent harm.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Malates" is not a recognized term in medical terminology. It's possible there may be a spelling mistake or it could be a slang term or an abbreviation that is not widely recognized. If you have more context or information, I'd be happy to try and help further.

Alkylation, in the context of medical chemistry and toxicology, refers to the process of introducing an alkyl group (a chemical moiety made up of a carbon atom bonded to one or more hydrogen atoms) into a molecule, typically a biomolecule such as a protein or DNA. This process can occur through various mechanisms, including chemical reactions with alkylating agents.

In the context of cancer therapy, alkylation is used to describe a class of chemotherapeutic drugs known as alkylating agents, which work by introducing alkyl groups onto DNA molecules in rapidly dividing cells. This can lead to cross-linking of DNA strands and other forms of DNA damage, ultimately inhibiting cell division and leading to the death of cancer cells. However, these agents can also affect normal cells, leading to side effects such as nausea, hair loss, and increased risk of infection.

It's worth noting that alkylation can also occur through non-chemical means, such as in certain types of radiation therapy where high-energy particles can transfer energy to electrons in biological molecules, leading to the formation of reactive radicals that can react with and alkylate DNA.

Base composition in genetics refers to the relative proportion of the four nucleotide bases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, so the base composition is often expressed in terms of the ratio of adenine + thymine (A-T) to guanine + cytosine (G-C). This ratio can vary between species and even between different regions of the same genome. The base composition can provide important clues about the function, evolution, and structure of genetic material.

Catalysis is the process of increasing the rate of a chemical reaction by adding a substance known as a catalyst, which remains unchanged at the end of the reaction. A catalyst lowers the activation energy required for the reaction to occur, thereby allowing the reaction to proceed more quickly and efficiently. This can be particularly important in biological systems, where enzymes act as catalysts to speed up metabolic reactions that are essential for life.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

Lactates, also known as lactic acid, are compounds that are produced by muscles during intense exercise or other conditions of low oxygen supply. They are formed from the breakdown of glucose in the absence of adequate oxygen to complete the full process of cellular respiration. This results in the production of lactate and a hydrogen ion, which can lead to a decrease in pH and muscle fatigue.

In a medical context, lactates may be measured in the blood as an indicator of tissue oxygenation and metabolic status. Elevated levels of lactate in the blood, known as lactic acidosis, can indicate poor tissue perfusion or hypoxia, and may be seen in conditions such as sepsis, cardiac arrest, and severe shock. It is important to note that lactates are not the primary cause of acidemia (low pH) in lactic acidosis, but rather a marker of the underlying process.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Formates" is not a recognized term in medical terminology. It is possible that you may be referring to "formic acid" or "formate," which are terms used in chemistry and biochemistry. Formic acid is a colorless, pungent, and corrosive liquid with the chemical formula HCOOH. Its salts are called formates.

Formate is the anion (negatively charged ion) of formic acid, with the chemical formula HCOO-. Formate can be found in various biological systems and is involved in several metabolic processes. If you could provide more context or clarify your question, I would be happy to help further.

Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet (UV-Vis) is a type of spectrophotometry that measures how much ultraviolet (UV) and visible light is absorbed or transmitted by a sample. It uses a device called a spectrophotometer to measure the intensity of light at different wavelengths as it passes through a sample. The resulting data can be used to determine the concentration of specific components within the sample, identify unknown substances, or evaluate the physical and chemical properties of materials.

UV-Vis spectroscopy is widely used in various fields such as chemistry, biology, pharmaceuticals, and environmental science. It can detect a wide range of substances including organic compounds, metal ions, proteins, nucleic acids, and dyes. The technique is non-destructive, meaning that the sample remains unchanged after the measurement.

In UV-Vis spectroscopy, the sample is placed in a cuvette or other container, and light from a source is directed through it. The light then passes through a monochromator, which separates it into its component wavelengths. The monochromatic light is then directed through the sample, and the intensity of the transmitted or absorbed light is measured by a detector.

The resulting absorption spectrum can provide information about the concentration and identity of the components in the sample. For example, if a compound has a known absorption maximum at a specific wavelength, its concentration can be determined by measuring the absorbance at that wavelength and comparing it to a standard curve.

Overall, UV-Vis spectrophotometry is a versatile and powerful analytical technique for quantitative and qualitative analysis of various samples in different fields.

Phosphotransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule. This reaction is essential for various cellular processes, including energy metabolism, signal transduction, and biosynthesis.

The systematic name for this group of enzymes is phosphotransferase, which is derived from the general reaction they catalyze: D-donor + A-acceptor = D-donor minus phosphate + A-phosphate. The donor molecule can be a variety of compounds, such as ATP or a phosphorylated protein, while the acceptor molecule is typically a compound that becomes phosphorylated during the reaction.

Phosphotransferases are classified into several subgroups based on the type of donor and acceptor molecules they act upon. For example, kinases are a subgroup of phosphotransferases that transfer a phosphate group from ATP to a protein or other organic compound. Phosphatases, another subgroup, remove phosphate groups from molecules by transferring them to water.

Overall, phosphotransferases play a critical role in regulating many cellular functions and are important targets for drug development in various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Molecular structure, in the context of biochemistry and molecular biology, refers to the arrangement and organization of atoms and chemical bonds within a molecule. It describes the three-dimensional layout of the constituent elements, including their spatial relationships, bond lengths, and angles. Understanding molecular structure is crucial for elucidating the functions and reactivities of biological macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Various experimental techniques, like X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), are employed to determine molecular structures at atomic resolution, providing valuable insights into their biological roles and potential therapeutic targets.

In the context of medicine, "chemistry" often refers to the field of study concerned with the properties, composition, and structure of elements and compounds, as well as their reactions with one another. It is a fundamental science that underlies much of modern medicine, including pharmacology (the study of drugs), toxicology (the study of poisons), and biochemistry (the study of the chemical processes that occur within living organisms).

In addition to its role as a basic science, chemistry is also used in medical testing and diagnosis. For example, clinical chemistry involves the analysis of bodily fluids such as blood and urine to detect and measure various substances, such as glucose, cholesterol, and electrolytes, that can provide important information about a person's health status.

Overall, chemistry plays a critical role in understanding the mechanisms of diseases, developing new treatments, and improving diagnostic tests and techniques.

Ribonucleosides are organic compounds that consist of a nucleoside bound to a ribose sugar. Nucleosides are formed when a nitrogenous base (such as adenine, guanine, uracil, cytosine, or thymine) is attached to a sugar molecule (either ribose or deoxyribose) via a beta-glycosidic bond. In the case of ribonucleosides, the sugar component is D-ribose. Ribonucleosides play important roles in various biological processes, particularly in the storage, transfer, and expression of genetic information within cells. When ribonucleosides are phosphorylated, they become the building blocks of RNA (ribonucleic acid), a crucial biomolecule involved in protein synthesis and other cellular functions. Examples of ribonucleosides include adenosine, guanosine, uridine, cytidine, and inosine.

DNA adducts are chemical modifications or alterations that occur when DNA molecules become attached to or bound with certain harmful substances, such as toxic chemicals or carcinogens. These attachments can disrupt the normal structure and function of the DNA, potentially leading to mutations, genetic damage, and an increased risk of cancer and other diseases.

DNA adducts are formed when a reactive molecule from a chemical agent binds covalently to a base in the DNA molecule. This process can occur either spontaneously or as a result of exposure to environmental toxins, such as those found in tobacco smoke, certain industrial chemicals, and some medications.

The formation of DNA adducts is often used as a biomarker for exposure to harmful substances, as well as an indicator of potential health risks associated with that exposure. Researchers can measure the levels of specific DNA adducts in biological samples, such as blood or urine, to assess the extent and duration of exposure to certain chemicals or toxins.

It's important to note that not all DNA adducts are necessarily harmful, and some may even play a role in normal cellular processes. However, high levels of certain DNA adducts have been linked to an increased risk of cancer and other diseases, making them a focus of ongoing research and investigation.

Oligomycins are a group of antibiotics produced by various species of Streptomyces bacteria. They are characterized by their ability to inhibit the function of ATP synthase, an enzyme that plays a crucial role in energy production within cells. By binding to the F1 component of ATP synthase, oligomycins prevent the synthesis of ATP, which is a key source of energy for cellular processes.

These antibiotics have been used in research to study the mechanisms of ATP synthase and mitochondrial function. However, their therapeutic use as antibiotics is limited due to their toxicity to mammalian cells. Oligomycin A is one of the most well-known and studied members of this group of antibiotics.

Chemical phenomena refer to the changes and interactions that occur at the molecular or atomic level when chemicals are involved. These phenomena can include chemical reactions, in which one or more substances (reactants) are converted into different substances (products), as well as physical properties that change as a result of chemical interactions, such as color, state of matter, and solubility. Chemical phenomena can be studied through various scientific disciplines, including chemistry, biochemistry, and physics.

Glucose is a simple monosaccharide (or single sugar) that serves as the primary source of energy for living organisms. It's a fundamental molecule in biology, often referred to as "dextrose" or "grape sugar." Glucose has the molecular formula C6H12O6 and is vital to the functioning of cells, especially those in the brain and nervous system.

In the body, glucose is derived from the digestion of carbohydrates in food, and it's transported around the body via the bloodstream to cells where it can be used for energy. Cells convert glucose into a usable form through a process called cellular respiration, which involves a series of metabolic reactions that generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP)—the main currency of energy in cells.

Glucose is also stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen, a polysaccharide (multiple sugar) that can be broken down back into glucose when needed for energy between meals or during physical activity. Maintaining appropriate blood glucose levels is crucial for overall health, and imbalances can lead to conditions such as diabetes mellitus.

Amobarbital is a barbiturate drug that is primarily used as a sedative and sleep aid. It works by depressing the central nervous system, which can lead to relaxation, drowsiness, and reduced anxiety. Amobarbital is also sometimes used as an anticonvulsant to help control seizures.

Like other barbiturates, amobarbital has a high potential for abuse and addiction, and it can be dangerous or even fatal when taken in large doses or mixed with alcohol or other drugs. It is typically prescribed only for short-term use due to the risk of tolerance and dependence.

It's important to note that the use of barbiturates like amobarbital has declined in recent years due to the development of safer and more effective alternatives, such as benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine sleep aids.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Hydrolysis is a chemical process, not a medical one. However, it is relevant to medicine and biology.

Hydrolysis is the breakdown of a chemical compound due to its reaction with water, often resulting in the formation of two or more simpler compounds. In the context of physiology and medicine, hydrolysis is a crucial process in various biological reactions, such as the digestion of food molecules like proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Enzymes called hydrolases catalyze these hydrolysis reactions to speed up the breakdown process in the body.

Fluorescence spectrometry is a type of analytical technique used to investigate the fluorescent properties of a sample. It involves the measurement of the intensity of light emitted by a substance when it absorbs light at a specific wavelength and then re-emits it at a longer wavelength. This process, known as fluorescence, occurs because the absorbed energy excites electrons in the molecules of the substance to higher energy states, and when these electrons return to their ground state, they release the excess energy as light.

Fluorescence spectrometry typically measures the emission spectrum of a sample, which is a plot of the intensity of emitted light versus the wavelength of emission. This technique can be used to identify and quantify the presence of specific fluorescent molecules in a sample, as well as to study their photophysical properties.

Fluorescence spectrometry has many applications in fields such as biochemistry, environmental science, and materials science. For example, it can be used to detect and measure the concentration of pollutants in water samples, to analyze the composition of complex biological mixtures, or to study the properties of fluorescent nanomaterials.

Proton-translocating ATPases are complex, multi-subunit enzymes found in the membranes of many organisms, from bacteria to humans. They play a crucial role in energy transduction processes within cells.

In simpler terms, these enzymes help convert chemical energy into a form that can be used to perform mechanical work, such as moving molecules across membranes against their concentration gradients. This is achieved through a process called chemiosmosis, where the movement of ions (in this case, protons or hydrogen ions) down their electrochemical gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, an essential energy currency for cellular functions.

Proton-translocating ATPases consist of two main domains: a catalytic domain responsible for ATP binding and hydrolysis, and a membrane domain that contains the ion transport channel. The enzyme operates in either direction depending on the energy status of the cell: it can use ATP to pump protons out of the cell when there's an excess of chemical energy or utilize the proton gradient to generate ATP during times of energy deficit.

These enzymes are essential for various biological processes, including nutrient uptake, pH regulation, and maintaining ion homeostasis across membranes. In humans, they are primarily located in the inner mitochondrial membrane (forming the F0F1-ATP synthase) and plasma membranes of certain cells (as V-type ATPases). Dysfunction of these enzymes has been linked to several diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nicotinamidase" does not have a widely accepted or specific medical definition in the context of human health and disease. The term "Nicotinamidase" is used in biochemistry to refer to an enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of nicotinamide (a form of vitamin B3) to produce nicotinic acid. However, this enzyme is not typically discussed in the context of medical diagnosis, treatment, or research.

If you have any questions about nicotinamide, nicotinamidase, or any other medical topics, I would be happy to try to help clarify or provide additional information.

Zeatin is not a medical term per se, but it is a significant compound in the field of plant biology and agriculture. It is a type of cytokinin, which is a class of hormones that play crucial roles in plant growth and development. Specifically, zeatin is involved in cell division, differentiation, and delaying senescence (aging) in plants.

In a broader biological context, understanding the functions of phytohormones like zeatin can have implications for agricultural practices and crop management, which may indirectly impact human health through improved food production and quality.

DNA repair is the process by which cells identify and correct damage to the DNA molecules that encode their genome. DNA can be damaged by a variety of internal and external factors, such as radiation, chemicals, and metabolic byproducts. If left unrepaired, this damage can lead to mutations, which may in turn lead to cancer and other diseases.

There are several different mechanisms for repairing DNA damage, including:

1. Base excision repair (BER): This process repairs damage to a single base in the DNA molecule. An enzyme called a glycosylase removes the damaged base, leaving a gap that is then filled in by other enzymes.
2. Nucleotide excision repair (NER): This process repairs more severe damage, such as bulky adducts or crosslinks between the two strands of the DNA molecule. An enzyme cuts out a section of the damaged DNA, and the gap is then filled in by other enzymes.
3. Mismatch repair (MMR): This process repairs errors that occur during DNA replication, such as mismatched bases or small insertions or deletions. Specialized enzymes recognize the error and remove a section of the newly synthesized strand, which is then replaced by new nucleotides.
4. Double-strand break repair (DSBR): This process repairs breaks in both strands of the DNA molecule. There are two main pathways for DSBR: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ directly rejoins the broken ends, while HR uses a template from a sister chromatid to repair the break.

Overall, DNA repair is a crucial process that helps maintain genome stability and prevent the development of diseases caused by genetic mutations.

Stereoisomerism is a type of isomerism (structural arrangement of atoms) in which molecules have the same molecular formula and sequence of bonded atoms, but differ in the three-dimensional orientation of their atoms in space. This occurs when the molecule contains asymmetric carbon atoms or other rigid structures that prevent free rotation, leading to distinct spatial arrangements of groups of atoms around a central point. Stereoisomers can have different chemical and physical properties, such as optical activity, boiling points, and reactivities, due to differences in their shape and the way they interact with other molecules.

There are two main types of stereoisomerism: enantiomers (mirror-image isomers) and diastereomers (non-mirror-image isomers). Enantiomers are pairs of stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other, but cannot be superimposed on one another. Diastereomers, on the other hand, are non-mirror-image stereoisomers that have different physical and chemical properties.

Stereoisomerism is an important concept in chemistry and biology, as it can affect the biological activity of molecules, such as drugs and natural products. For example, some enantiomers of a drug may be active, while others are inactive or even toxic. Therefore, understanding stereoisomerism is crucial for designing and synthesizing effective and safe drugs.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Ethionine is a toxic, synthetic analog of the amino acid methionine. It is an antimetabolite that inhibits the enzyme methionine adenosyltransferase, which plays a crucial role in methionine metabolism. Ethionine is often used in research to study the effects of methionine deficiency and to create animal models of various human diseases. It is not a natural component of human nutrition and has no known medical uses. Prolonged exposure or high levels of ethionine can lead to liver damage, growth impairment, and other harmful health effects.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are highly reactive molecules containing oxygen, including peroxides, superoxide, hydroxyl radical, and singlet oxygen. They are naturally produced as byproducts of normal cellular metabolism in the mitochondria, and can also be generated by external sources such as ionizing radiation, tobacco smoke, and air pollutants. At low or moderate concentrations, ROS play important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis, but at high concentrations, they can cause significant damage to cell structures, including lipids, proteins, and DNA, leading to oxidative stress and potential cell death.

Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the presence of NAD+ or NADP+, producing NADH or NADPH respectively. This reaction occurs in the citric acid cycle, also known as the Krebs cycle or tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is a crucial metabolic pathway in the cell's energy production and biosynthesis of various molecules. There are three isoforms of IDH found in humans: IDH1 located in the cytosol, IDH2 in the mitochondrial matrix, and IDH3 within the mitochondria. Mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 have been associated with several types of cancer, such as gliomas and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), leading to abnormal accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which can contribute to tumorigenesis.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) is a metabolic byproduct formed from the demethylation of various compounds or from the breakdown of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is a major methyl group donor in the body. SAH is rapidly hydrolyzed to homocysteine and adenosine by the enzyme S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Increased levels of SAH can inhibit many methyltransferases, leading to disturbances in cellular metabolism and potential negative health effects.

Adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR) is a molecule that plays a role in various cellular processes, including the modification of proteins and the regulation of enzyme activity. It is formed by the attachment of a diphosphate group and a ribose sugar to the adenine base of a nucleotide. ADPR is involved in the transfer of chemical energy within cells and is also a precursor in the synthesis of other important molecules, such as NAD+ (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide). It should be noted that ADPR is not a medication or a drug, but rather a naturally occurring biomolecule.

Molecular conformation, also known as spatial arrangement or configuration, refers to the specific three-dimensional shape and orientation of atoms that make up a molecule. It describes the precise manner in which bonds between atoms are arranged around a molecular framework, taking into account factors such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsional angles.

Conformational isomers, or conformers, are different spatial arrangements of the same molecule that can interconvert without breaking chemical bonds. These isomers may have varying energies, stability, and reactivity, which can significantly impact a molecule's biological activity and function. Understanding molecular conformation is crucial in fields such as drug design, where small changes in conformation can lead to substantial differences in how a drug interacts with its target.

Affinity labels are chemical probes or reagents that can selectively and covalently bind to a specific protein or biomolecule based on its biological function or activity. These labels contain a functional group that interacts with the target molecule, often through non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, or ionic bonds. Once bound, the label then forms a covalent bond with the target molecule, allowing for its isolation and further study.

Affinity labels are commonly used in biochemistry and molecular biology research to identify and characterize specific proteins, enzymes, or receptors. They can be designed to bind to specific active sites, binding pockets, or other functional regions of a protein, allowing researchers to study the structure-function relationships of these molecules.

One example of an affinity label is a substrate analogue that contains a chemically reactive group. This type of affinity label can be used to identify and characterize enzymes by binding to their active sites and forming a covalent bond with the enzyme. The labeled enzyme can then be purified and analyzed to determine its structure, function, and mechanism of action.

Overall, affinity labels are valuable tools for studying the properties and functions of biological molecules in vitro and in vivo.

Cytokinins are a type of plant growth hormone that play a crucial role in cell division, differentiation, and growth. They were first discovered in 1950s and named for their ability to promote cytokinesis, the process of cell division. Cytokinins belong to a class of compounds called adenine derivatives, which are structurally similar to nucleotides, the building blocks of DNA and RNA.

Cytokinins are produced in the roots and shoots of plants and are transported throughout the plant via the vascular system. They have been shown to regulate various aspects of plant growth and development, including shoot initiation, leaf expansion, apical dominance, and senescence. Cytokinins also interact with other hormones such as auxins, gibberellins, and abscisic acid to modulate plant responses to environmental stresses.

Cytokinins have been used in horticulture and agriculture to enhance crop yields, improve plant quality, and delay senescence. They are also being studied for their potential role in human health, particularly in the context of cancer research.

Flavoproteins are a type of protein molecule that contain noncovalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as cofactors. These flavin cofactors play a crucial role in redox reactions, acting as electron carriers in various metabolic pathways such as cellular respiration and oxidative phosphorylation. Flavoproteins are involved in several biological processes, including the breakdown of fatty acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates, as well as the synthesis of steroids and other lipids. They can also function as enzymes that catalyze various redox reactions, such as oxidases, dehydrogenases, and reductases. Flavoproteins are widely distributed in nature and found in many organisms, from bacteria to humans.

Methyltransferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group (-CH3) from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule, which is often a protein, DNA, or RNA. This transfer of a methyl group can modify the chemical and physical properties of the acceptor molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as gene expression, signal transduction, and DNA repair.

In biochemistry, methyltransferases are classified based on the type of donor molecule they use for the transfer of the methyl group. The most common methyl donor is S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a universal methyl group donor found in many organisms. Methyltransferases that utilize SAM as a cofactor are called SAM-dependent methyltransferases.

Abnormal regulation or function of methyltransferases has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the structure, function, and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these conditions.

Ammonium sulfate is a chemical compound with the formula (NH4)2SO4. It is a white crystalline solid that is highly soluble in water and is commonly used in fertilizers due to its high nitrogen content. In a medical context, it can be used as a laxative or for lowering the pH of the gastrointestinal tract in certain medical conditions. It may also be used in the treatment of metabolic alkalosis, a condition characterized by an excessively high pH in the blood. However, its use in medical treatments is less common than its use in agricultural and industrial applications.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Mitochondrial swelling is a pathological change in the structure of mitochondria, which are the energy-producing organelles found in cells. This condition is characterized by an increase in the volume of the mitochondrial matrix, which is the space inside the mitochondrion that contains enzymes and other molecules involved in energy production.

Mitochondrial swelling can occur as a result of various cellular stressors, such as oxidative damage, calcium overload, or decreased levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is the primary energy currency of the cell. This swelling can lead to disruption of the mitochondrial membrane and release of cytochrome c, a protein involved in apoptosis or programmed cell death.

Mitochondrial swelling has been implicated in several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and drug toxicity. It can be observed under an electron microscope as part of an ultrastructural analysis of tissue samples or detected through biochemical assays that measure changes in mitochondrial membrane potential or matrix volume.

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), also known as Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase, is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in cellular metabolism, particularly in the glycolytic pathway. It catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG), while also converting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to its reduced form NADH. This reaction is essential for the production of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during cellular respiration. GAPDH has been widely used as a housekeeping gene in molecular biology research due to its consistent expression across various tissues and cells, although recent studies have shown that its expression can vary under certain conditions.

Chromatography is a technique used in analytical chemistry for the separation, identification, and quantification of the components of a mixture. It is based on the differential distribution of the components of a mixture between a stationary phase and a mobile phase. The stationary phase can be a solid or liquid, while the mobile phase is a gas, liquid, or supercritical fluid that moves through the stationary phase carrying the sample components.

The interaction between the sample components and the stationary and mobile phases determines how quickly each component will move through the system. Components that interact more strongly with the stationary phase will move more slowly than those that interact more strongly with the mobile phase. This difference in migration rates allows for the separation of the components, which can then be detected and quantified.

There are many different types of chromatography, including paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography (TLC), gas chromatography (GC), liquid chromatography (LC), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Each type has its own strengths and weaknesses, and is best suited for specific applications.

In summary, chromatography is a powerful analytical technique used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture based on their differential distribution between a stationary phase and a mobile phase.

Antimycin A is an antibiotic substance produced by various species of Streptomyces bacteria. It is known to inhibit the electron transport chain in mitochondria, which can lead to cellular dysfunction and death. Antimycin A has been used in research to study the mechanisms of cellular respiration and oxidative phosphorylation.

In a medical context, antimycin A is not used as a therapeutic agent due to its toxicity to mammalian cells. However, it may be used in laboratory settings to investigate various biological processes or to develop new therapies for diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction.

Intracellular membranes refer to the membrane structures that exist within a eukaryotic cell (excluding bacteria and archaea, which are prokaryotic and do not have intracellular membranes). These membranes compartmentalize the cell, creating distinct organelles or functional regions with specific roles in various cellular processes.

Major types of intracellular membranes include:

1. Nuclear membrane (nuclear envelope): A double-membraned structure that surrounds and protects the genetic material within the nucleus. It consists of an outer and inner membrane, perforated by nuclear pores that regulate the transport of molecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm.
2. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): An extensive network of interconnected tubules and sacs that serve as a major site for protein folding, modification, and lipid synthesis. The ER has two types: rough ER (with ribosomes on its surface) and smooth ER (without ribosomes).
3. Golgi apparatus/Golgi complex: A series of stacked membrane-bound compartments that process, sort, and modify proteins and lipids before they are transported to their final destinations within the cell or secreted out of the cell.
4. Lysosomes: Membrane-bound organelles containing hydrolytic enzymes for breaking down various biomolecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids) in the process called autophagy or from outside the cell via endocytosis.
5. Peroxisomes: Single-membrane organelles involved in various metabolic processes, such as fatty acid oxidation and detoxification of harmful substances like hydrogen peroxide.
6. Vacuoles: Membrane-bound compartments that store and transport various molecules, including nutrients, waste products, and enzymes. Plant cells have a large central vacuole for maintaining turgor pressure and storing metabolites.
7. Mitochondria: Double-membraned organelles responsible for generating energy (ATP) through oxidative phosphorylation and other metabolic processes, such as the citric acid cycle and fatty acid synthesis.
8. Chloroplasts: Double-membraned organelles found in plant cells that convert light energy into chemical energy during photosynthesis, producing oxygen and organic compounds (glucose) from carbon dioxide and water.
9. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): A network of interconnected membrane-bound tubules involved in protein folding, modification, and transport; it is divided into two types: rough ER (with ribosomes on the surface) and smooth ER (without ribosomes).
10. Nucleus: Double-membraned organelle containing genetic material (DNA) and associated proteins involved in replication, transcription, RNA processing, and DNA repair. The nuclear membrane separates the nucleoplasm from the cytoplasm and contains nuclear pores for transporting molecules between the two compartments.

Glycolysis is a fundamental metabolic pathway that occurs in the cytoplasm of cells, consisting of a series of biochemical reactions. It's the process by which a six-carbon glucose molecule is broken down into two three-carbon pyruvate molecules. This process generates a net gain of two ATP molecules (the main energy currency in cells), two NADH molecules, and two water molecules.

Glycolysis can be divided into two stages: the preparatory phase (or 'energy investment' phase) and the payoff phase (or 'energy generation' phase). During the preparatory phase, glucose is phosphorylated twice to form glucose-6-phosphate and then converted to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. These reactions consume two ATP molecules but set up the subsequent breakdown of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate into triose phosphates in the payoff phase. In this second stage, each triose phosphate is further oxidized and degraded to produce one pyruvate molecule, one NADH molecule, and one ATP molecule through substrate-level phosphorylation.

Glycolysis does not require oxygen to proceed; thus, it can occur under both aerobic (with oxygen) and anaerobic (without oxygen) conditions. In the absence of oxygen, the pyruvate produced during glycolysis is further metabolized through fermentation pathways such as lactic acid fermentation or alcohol fermentation to regenerate NAD+, which is necessary for glycolysis to continue.

In summary, glycolysis is a crucial process in cellular energy metabolism, allowing cells to convert glucose into ATP and other essential molecules while also serving as a starting point for various other biochemical pathways.

Ribose monophosphates are organic compounds that play a crucial role in the metabolism of cells, particularly in energy transfer and nucleic acid synthesis. A ribose monophosphate is formed by the attachment of a phosphate group to a ribose molecule, which is a type of sugar known as a pentose.

In biochemistry, there are two important ribose monophosphates:

1. Alpha-D-Ribose 5-Phosphate (ADP-Ribose): This compound serves as an essential substrate in various cellular processes, including DNA repair, chromatin remodeling, and protein modification. The enzyme that catalyzes the formation of ADP-ribose is known as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP).
2. Ribulose 5-Phosphate: This compound is a key intermediate in the Calvin cycle, which is the process by which plants and some bacteria convert carbon dioxide into glucose during photosynthesis. Ribulose 5-phosphate is formed from ribose 5-phosphate through a series of enzymatic reactions.

Ribose monophosphates are essential for the proper functioning of cells and have implications in various physiological processes, as well as in certain disease states.

Paper chromatography is a type of chromatography technique that involves the separation and analysis of mixtures based on their components' ability to migrate differently upon capillary action on a paper medium. This simple and cost-effective method utilizes a paper, typically made of cellulose, as the stationary phase. The sample mixture is applied as a small spot near one end of the paper, and then the other end is dipped into a developing solvent or a mixture of solvents (mobile phase) in a shallow container.

As the mobile phase moves up the paper by capillary action, components within the sample mixture separate based on their partition coefficients between the stationary and mobile phases. The partition coefficient describes how much a component prefers to be in either the stationary or mobile phase. Components with higher partition coefficients in the mobile phase will move faster and further than those with lower partition coefficients.

Once separation is complete, the paper is dried and can be visualized under ultraviolet light or by using chemical reagents specific for the components of interest. The distance each component travels from the origin (point of application) and its corresponding solvent front position are measured, allowing for the calculation of Rf values (retardation factors). Rf is a dimensionless quantity calculated as the ratio of the distance traveled by the component to the distance traveled by the solvent front.

Rf = (distance traveled by component) / (distance traveled by solvent front)

Paper chromatography has been widely used in various applications, such as:

1. Identification and purity analysis of chemical compounds in pharmaceuticals, forensics, and research laboratories.
2. Separation and detection of amino acids, sugars, and other biomolecules in biological samples.
3. Educational purposes to demonstrate the principles of chromatography and separation techniques.

Despite its limitations, such as lower resolution compared to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and less compatibility with volatile or nonpolar compounds, paper chromatography remains a valuable tool for quick, qualitative analysis in various fields.

Cyclophilins are a family of proteins that have peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity, which means they help with the folding and functioning of other proteins in cells. They were first identified as binding proteins for the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine A, hence their name.

Cyclophilins are found in various organisms, including humans, and play important roles in many cellular processes such as signal transduction, protein trafficking, and gene expression. In addition to their role in normal cell function, cyclophilins have also been implicated in several diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders.

In medicine, the most well-known use of cyclophilins is as a target for immunosuppressive drugs used in organ transplantation. Cyclosporine A and its derivatives work by binding to cyclophilins, which inhibits their activity and subsequently suppresses the immune response.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

"Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a scientific name used in the field of microbiology. It refers to a species of yeast that is commonly used in various industrial processes, such as baking and brewing. It's also widely used in scientific research due to its genetic tractability and eukaryotic cellular organization.

However, it does have some relevance to medical fields like medicine and nutrition. For example, certain strains of S. cerevisiae are used as probiotics, which can provide health benefits when consumed. They may help support gut health, enhance the immune system, and even assist in the digestion of certain nutrients.

In summary, "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" is a species of yeast with various industrial and potential medical applications.

Arabinonucleosides are glycosylamines derived from arabinose, a monosaccharide (simple sugar) that is a component of certain complex carbohydrates. In an arabinonucleoside, the arabinose molecule is linked to a nitrogenous base, such as adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil, or thymine, through a glycosidic bond. These types of compounds are not typically found in nature but can be synthesized in the laboratory for research purposes. They may have potential applications in the development of new drugs, particularly in the area of antiviral and anticancer therapy.

L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme found in various tissues within the body, including the heart, liver, kidneys, muscles, and brain. It plays a crucial role in the process of energy production, particularly during anaerobic conditions when oxygen levels are low.

In the presence of the coenzyme NADH, LDH catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, generating NAD+ as a byproduct. Conversely, in the presence of NAD+, LDH can convert lactate back to pyruvate using NADH. This reversible reaction is essential for maintaining the balance between lactate and pyruvate levels within cells.

Elevated blood levels of LDH may indicate tissue damage or injury, as this enzyme can be released into the circulation following cellular breakdown. As a result, LDH is often used as a nonspecific biomarker for various medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), liver disease, muscle damage, and certain types of cancer. However, it's important to note that an isolated increase in LDH does not necessarily pinpoint the exact location or cause of tissue damage, and further diagnostic tests are usually required for confirmation.

Tritium is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of nuclear physics and chemistry. Tritium (symbol: T or 3H) is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with two neutrons and one proton in its nucleus. It is also known as heavy hydrogen or superheavy hydrogen.

Tritium has a half-life of about 12.3 years, which means that it decays by emitting a low-energy beta particle (an electron) to become helium-3. Due to its radioactive nature and relatively short half-life, tritium is used in various applications, including nuclear weapons, fusion reactors, luminous paints, and medical research.

In the context of medicine, tritium may be used as a radioactive tracer in some scientific studies or medical research, but it is not a term commonly used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Diphosphates, also known as pyrophosphates, are chemical compounds that contain two phosphate groups joined together by an oxygen atom. The general formula for a diphosphate is P~PO3~2-, where ~ represents a bond. Diphosphates play important roles in various biological processes, such as energy metabolism and cell signaling. In the context of nutrition, diphosphates can be found in some foods, including milk and certain vegetables.

Pentose phosphates are monosaccharides that contain five carbon atoms and one phosphate group. They play a crucial role in various metabolic pathways, including the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), which is a major source of NADPH and ribose-5-phosphate for the synthesis of nucleotides.

The pentose phosphate pathway involves two main phases: the oxidative phase and the non-oxidative phase. In the oxidative phase, glucose-6-phosphate is converted to ribulose-5-phosphate, producing NADPH and CO2 as byproducts. Ribulose-5-phosphate can then be further metabolized in the non-oxidative phase to produce other pentose phosphates or converted back to glucose-6-phosphate through a series of reactions.

Pentose phosphates are also important intermediates in the synthesis of nucleotides, coenzymes, and other metabolites. Abnormalities in pentose phosphate pathway enzymes can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as defects in erythrocyte function and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress.

"Pseudomonas" is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely found in soil, water, and plants. Some species of Pseudomonas can cause disease in animals and humans, with P. aeruginosa being the most clinically relevant as it's an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

P. aeruginosa is known for its remarkable ability to resist many antibiotics and disinfectants, making infections caused by this bacterium difficult to treat. It can cause a range of healthcare-associated infections, such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections, and surgical site infections. In addition, it can also cause external ear infections and eye infections.

Prompt identification and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are crucial for managing Pseudomonas infections, although the increasing antibiotic resistance poses a significant challenge in treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "photochemistry" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Photochemistry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the chemical effects of light. It involves the absorption of light by a substance, which can lead to the promotion of an electron to a higher energy state, and subsequently result in various chemical reactions.

In a medical context, photochemical processes might be discussed in relation to certain therapies or diagnostic techniques, such as photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment, where a photosensitizing agent is used that reacts with light to produce singlet oxygen or other reactive species to destroy nearby cells. However, it's not a term used to define a specific medical condition or concept in the same way that one might define "inflammation" or "metabolism."

The myocardium is the middle layer of the heart wall, composed of specialized cardiac muscle cells that are responsible for pumping blood throughout the body. It forms the thickest part of the heart wall and is divided into two sections: the left ventricle, which pumps oxygenated blood to the rest of the body, and the right ventricle, which pumps deoxygenated blood to the lungs.

The myocardium contains several types of cells, including cardiac muscle fibers, connective tissue, nerves, and blood vessels. The muscle fibers are arranged in a highly organized pattern that allows them to contract in a coordinated manner, generating the force necessary to pump blood through the heart and circulatory system.

Damage to the myocardium can occur due to various factors such as ischemia (reduced blood flow), infection, inflammation, or genetic disorders. This damage can lead to several cardiac conditions, including heart failure, arrhythmias, and cardiomyopathy.

Ribonucleotides are organic compounds that consist of a ribose sugar, a phosphate group, and a nitrogenous base. They are the building blocks of RNA (ribonucleic acid), one of the essential molecules in all living organisms. The nitrogenous bases found in ribonucleotides include adenine, uracil, guanine, and cytosine. These molecules play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as protein synthesis, gene expression, and cellular energy production. Ribonucleotides can also be involved in cell signaling pathways and serve as important cofactors for enzymatic reactions.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle or tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. It catalyzes the reversible oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate, while simultaneously reducing NAD+ to NADH. This reaction is essential for energy production in the form of ATP and NADH within the cell.

There are two main types of Malate Dehydrogenase:

1. NAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH1): Found primarily in the cytoplasm, this isoform plays a role in the malate-aspartate shuttle, which helps transfer reducing equivalents between the cytoplasm and mitochondria.
2. FAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH2): Located within the mitochondrial matrix, this isoform is involved in the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Abnormal levels of Malate Dehydrogenase enzyme can be indicative of certain medical conditions or diseases, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), muscle damage, or various types of cancer. Therefore, MDH enzyme activity is often assessed in diagnostic tests to help identify and monitor these health issues.

Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (free radicals) and the body's ability to detoxify them or repair the damage they cause. This imbalance can lead to cellular damage, oxidation of proteins, lipids, and DNA, disruption of cellular functions, and activation of inflammatory responses. Prolonged or excessive oxidative stress has been linked to various health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and aging-related diseases.

Energy metabolism is the process by which living organisms produce and consume energy to maintain life. It involves a series of chemical reactions that convert nutrients from food, such as carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, into energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

The process of energy metabolism can be divided into two main categories: catabolism and anabolism. Catabolism is the breakdown of nutrients to release energy, while anabolism is the synthesis of complex molecules from simpler ones using energy.

There are three main stages of energy metabolism: glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and oxidative phosphorylation. Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm of the cell and involves the breakdown of glucose into pyruvate, producing a small amount of ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). The citric acid cycle takes place in the mitochondria and involves the further breakdown of pyruvate to produce more ATP, NADH, and carbon dioxide. Oxidative phosphorylation is the final stage of energy metabolism and occurs in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It involves the transfer of electrons from NADH and other electron carriers to oxygen, which generates a proton gradient across the membrane. This gradient drives the synthesis of ATP, producing the majority of the cell's energy.

Overall, energy metabolism is a complex and essential process that allows organisms to grow, reproduce, and maintain their bodily functions. Disruptions in energy metabolism can lead to various diseases, including diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Nicotinamide-nucleotide adenylyltransferase (NNAT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), which is a coenzyme involved in various redox reactions in the body. NNAT catalyzes the interconversion between nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and NAD+ through the transfer of an adenylyl group.

The reaction catalyzed by NNAT is as follows:

NMN + ATP → NAD+ + PP\_i

NNAT is found in various tissues, including the brain, where it has been implicated in neuronal development and survival. Mutations in the NNAT gene have been associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy and intellectual disability. Additionally, NNAT has been identified as a potential target for the development of therapies aimed at treating neurodegenerative diseases and cancer.

Carbon radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of carbon, which is an naturally occurring chemical element with the atomic number 6. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^12C), but there are also several radioactive isotopes, including carbon-11 (^11C), carbon-14 (^14C), and carbon-13 (^13C). These radioisotopes have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, which makes them unstable and causes them to emit radiation.

Carbon-11 has a half-life of about 20 minutes and is used in medical imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It is produced by bombarding nitrogen-14 with protons in a cyclotron.

Carbon-14, also known as radiocarbon, has a half-life of about 5730 years and is used in archaeology and geology to date organic materials. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.

Carbon-13 is stable and has a natural abundance of about 1.1% in carbon. It is not radioactive, but it can be used as a tracer in medical research and in the study of metabolic processes.

Protein conformation refers to the specific three-dimensional shape that a protein molecule assumes due to the spatial arrangement of its constituent amino acid residues and their associated chemical groups. This complex structure is determined by several factors, including covalent bonds (disulfide bridges), hydrogen bonds, van der Waals forces, and ionic bonds, which help stabilize the protein's unique conformation.

Protein conformations can be broadly classified into two categories: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures. The primary structure represents the linear sequence of amino acids in a polypeptide chain. The secondary structure arises from local interactions between adjacent amino acid residues, leading to the formation of recurring motifs such as α-helices and β-sheets. Tertiary structure refers to the overall three-dimensional folding pattern of a single polypeptide chain, while quaternary structure describes the spatial arrangement of multiple folded polypeptide chains (subunits) that interact to form a functional protein complex.

Understanding protein conformation is crucial for elucidating protein function, as the specific three-dimensional shape of a protein directly influences its ability to interact with other molecules, such as ligands, nucleic acids, or other proteins. Any alterations in protein conformation due to genetic mutations, environmental factors, or chemical modifications can lead to loss of function, misfolding, aggregation, and disease states like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Biological transport refers to the movement of molecules, ions, or solutes across biological membranes or through cells in living organisms. This process is essential for maintaining homeostasis, regulating cellular functions, and enabling communication between cells. There are two main types of biological transport: passive transport and active transport.

Passive transport does not require the input of energy and includes:

1. Diffusion: The random movement of molecules from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration until equilibrium is reached.
2. Osmosis: The diffusion of solvent molecules (usually water) across a semi-permeable membrane from an area of lower solute concentration to an area of higher solute concentration.
3. Facilitated diffusion: The assisted passage of polar or charged substances through protein channels or carriers in the cell membrane, which increases the rate of diffusion without consuming energy.

Active transport requires the input of energy (in the form of ATP) and includes:

1. Primary active transport: The direct use of ATP to move molecules against their concentration gradient, often driven by specific transport proteins called pumps.
2. Secondary active transport: The coupling of the movement of one substance down its electrochemical gradient with the uphill transport of another substance, mediated by a shared transport protein. This process is also known as co-transport or counter-transport.

A chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a group of rare inherited disorders that affect the body's ability to fight off certain types of bacterial and fungal infections. It is characterized by the formation of granulomas, which are abnormal masses or nodules composed of immune cells called macrophages that cluster together in an attempt to wall off and destroy the infectious agents.

In CGD, the macrophages have a genetic defect that prevents them from producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are molecules that help kill bacteria and fungi. As a result, the immune system is unable to effectively eliminate these pathogens, leading to chronic inflammation and the formation of granulomas.

CGD is typically diagnosed in childhood and can affect various organs and systems in the body, including the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, skin, and lymph nodes. Symptoms may include recurrent infections, fever, fatigue, weight loss, cough, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Treatment typically involves antibiotics or antifungal medications to manage infections, as well as immunosuppressive therapy to control inflammation and prevent the formation of granulomas. In some cases, bone marrow transplantation may be considered as a curative treatment option.

Nucleotide transport proteins are specialized membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the passive or active transport of nucleotides, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and their precursors, across biological membranes. These proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the intracellular concentration of nucleotides, which are essential for various cellular processes, including energy metabolism, biosynthesis, and signal transduction.

There are two main types of nucleotide transport proteins: equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) and concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). ENTs facilitate the passive diffusion of nucleosides and some nucleotides down their concentration gradient, while CNTs actively transport these molecules against their concentration gradient using energy derived from sodium or proton gradients.

These proteins are vital for cellular homeostasis and have been implicated in several diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Understanding the structure, function, and regulation of nucleotide transport proteins can provide valuable insights into their role in health and disease, potentially leading to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

Neurospora is not a medical term, but a genus of fungi commonly found in the environment. It is often used in scientific research, particularly in the fields of genetics and molecular biology. The most common species used in research is Neurospora crassa, which has been studied extensively due to its haploid nature, simple genetic structure, and rapid growth rate. Research using Neurospora has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes such as gene regulation, metabolism, and circadian rhythms.

Arabinonucleotides are nucleotides that contain arabinose sugar instead of the more common ribose or deoxyribose. Nucleotides are organic molecules consisting of a nitrogenous base, a pentose sugar, and at least one phosphate group. They serve as the monomeric units of nucleic acids, which are essential biopolymers involved in genetic storage, transmission, and expression.

Arabinonucleotides have arabinose, a five-carbon sugar with a slightly different structure than ribose or deoxyribose, as their pentose component. Arabinose is a monosaccharide that can be found in various plants and microorganisms but is not typically a part of nucleic acids in higher organisms.

Arabinonucleotides may have potential applications in biochemistry, molecular biology, and medicine; however, their use and significance are not as widespread or well-studied as those of the more common ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides.

Nucleotide deaminases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the removal of an amino group (-NH2) from nucleotides, which are the building blocks of DNA and RNA. Specifically, these enzymes convert cytidine or adenosine to uridine or inosine, respectively, by removing an amino group from the corresponding nitrogenous base (cytosine or adenine).

There are several types of nucleotide deaminases that differ in their substrate specificity and cellular localization. For example, some enzymes deaminate DNA or RNA directly, while others act on free nucleotides or nucleosides. Nucleotide deaminases play important roles in various biological processes, including the regulation of gene expression, immune response, and DNA repair.

Abnormal activity or mutations in nucleotide deaminases have been associated with several human diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is crucial for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Chemical precipitation is a process in which a chemical compound becomes a solid, insoluble form, known as a precipitate, from a liquid solution. This occurs when the concentration of the compound in the solution exceeds its solubility limit and forms a separate phase. The reaction that causes the formation of the precipitate can be a result of various factors such as changes in temperature, pH, or the addition of another chemical reagent.

In the medical field, chemical precipitation is used in diagnostic tests to detect and measure the presence of certain substances in body fluids, such as blood or urine. For example, a common test for kidney function involves adding a chemical reagent to a urine sample, which causes the excess protein in the urine to precipitate out of solution. The amount of precipitate formed can then be measured and used to diagnose and monitor kidney disease.

Chemical precipitation is also used in the treatment of certain medical conditions, such as heavy metal poisoning. In this case, a chelating agent is administered to bind with the toxic metal ions in the body, forming an insoluble compound that can be excreted through the urine or feces. This process helps to reduce the amount of toxic metals in the body and alleviate symptoms associated with poisoning.

Adenosine triphosphatases (ATPases) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and inorganic phosphate. This reaction releases energy, which is used to drive various cellular processes such as muscle contraction, transport of ions across membranes, and synthesis of proteins and nucleic acids.

ATPases are classified into several types based on their structure, function, and mechanism of action. Some examples include:

1. P-type ATPases: These ATPases form a phosphorylated intermediate during the reaction cycle and are involved in the transport of ions across membranes, such as the sodium-potassium pump and calcium pumps.
2. F-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in mitochondria, chloroplasts, and bacteria, and are responsible for generating a proton gradient across the membrane, which is used to synthesize ATP.
3. V-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in vacuolar membranes and endomembranes, and are involved in acidification of intracellular compartments.
4. A-type ATPases: These ATPases are found in the plasma membrane and are involved in various functions such as cell signaling and ion transport.

Overall, ATPases play a crucial role in maintaining the energy balance of cells and regulating various physiological processes.

A riboswitch is a region of mRNA that binds to specific small molecules, often metabolites, leading to changes in the structure of the RNA that ultimately regulate gene expression. This binding can either activate or repress transcription or translation of the mRNA, depending on the type of riboswitch and the location of the switch within the mRNA.

Riboswitches are typically found in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of bacterial messenger RNAs and are involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, such as metabolism, stress response, and virulence. They function as genetic switches that allow bacteria to rapidly respond to changes in their environment by modulating gene expression in a way that is specific to the needs of the organism.

Riboswitches are important targets for the development of new antibiotics and other therapeutic agents, as they offer a unique opportunity to selectively inhibit bacterial gene expression without affecting the host organism.

Nucleoside deaminases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the removal of an amino group (-NH2) from nucleosides, converting them to nucleosides with a modified base. This modification process is called deamination. Specifically, these enzymes convert cytidine and adenosine to uridine and inosine, respectively. Nucleoside deaminases play crucial roles in various biological processes, including the regulation of gene expression, immune response, and nucleic acid metabolism. Some nucleoside deaminases are also involved in the development of certain diseases and are considered as targets for drug design and discovery.

'Escherichia coli (E. coli) proteins' refer to the various types of proteins that are produced and expressed by the bacterium Escherichia coli. These proteins play a critical role in the growth, development, and survival of the organism. They are involved in various cellular processes such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, translation, repair, and regulation.

E. coli is a gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that is commonly found in the intestines of warm-blooded organisms. It is widely used as a model organism in scientific research due to its well-studied genetics, rapid growth, and ability to be easily manipulated in the laboratory. As a result, many E. coli proteins have been identified, characterized, and studied in great detail.

Some examples of E. coli proteins include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as lactase, sucrase, and maltose; proteins involved in DNA replication such as the polymerases, single-stranded binding proteins, and helicases; proteins involved in transcription such as RNA polymerase and sigma factors; proteins involved in translation such as ribosomal proteins, tRNAs, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases; and regulatory proteins such as global regulators, two-component systems, and transcription factors.

Understanding the structure, function, and regulation of E. coli proteins is essential for understanding the basic biology of this important organism, as well as for developing new strategies for combating bacterial infections and improving industrial processes involving bacteria.

"Poly dA-dT" is not a medical term, but rather a molecular biology term that refers to a synthetic double-stranded DNA molecule. It is composed of two complementary strands: one strand consists of repeated adenine (dA) nucleotides, while the other strand consists of repeated thymine (dT) nucleotides. The "poly" prefix indicates that multiple units of these nucleotides are linked together in a chain-like structure.

This type of synthetic DNA molecule is often used as a substrate for various molecular biology techniques, such as in vitro transcription or translation assays, where it serves as a template for the production of RNA or proteins. It can also be used to study the interactions between DNA and proteins, such as transcription factors, that bind specifically to certain nucleotide sequences.

Nucleic acid denaturation is the process of separating the two strands of a double-stranded DNA molecule, or unwinding the helical structure of an RNA molecule, by disrupting the hydrogen bonds that hold the strands together. This process is typically caused by exposure to high temperatures, changes in pH, or the presence of chemicals called denaturants.

Denaturation can also cause changes in the shape and function of nucleic acids. For example, it can disrupt the secondary and tertiary structures of RNA molecules, which can affect their ability to bind to other molecules and carry out their functions within the cell.

In molecular biology, nucleic acid denaturation is often used as a tool for studying the structure and function of nucleic acids. For example, it can be used to separate the two strands of a DNA molecule for sequencing or amplification, or to study the interactions between nucleic acids and other molecules.

It's important to note that denaturation is a reversible process, and under the right conditions, the double-stranded structure of DNA can be restored through a process called renaturation or annealing.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

"Inbred strains of rats" are genetically identical rodents that have been produced through many generations of brother-sister mating. This results in a high degree of homozygosity, where the genes at any particular locus in the genome are identical in all members of the strain.

Inbred strains of rats are widely used in biomedical research because they provide a consistent and reproducible genetic background for studying various biological phenomena, including the effects of drugs, environmental factors, and genetic mutations on health and disease. Additionally, inbred strains can be used to create genetically modified models of human diseases by introducing specific mutations into their genomes.

Some commonly used inbred strains of rats include the Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Sprague-Dawley (SD), and Fischer 344 (F344) rat strains. Each strain has its own unique genetic characteristics, making them suitable for different types of research.

A plasmid is a small, circular, double-stranded DNA molecule that is separate from the chromosomal DNA of a bacterium or other organism. Plasmids are typically not essential for the survival of the organism, but they can confer beneficial traits such as antibiotic resistance or the ability to degrade certain types of pollutants.

Plasmids are capable of replicating independently of the chromosomal DNA and can be transferred between bacteria through a process called conjugation. They often contain genes that provide resistance to antibiotics, heavy metals, and other environmental stressors. Plasmids have also been engineered for use in molecular biology as cloning vectors, allowing scientists to replicate and manipulate specific DNA sequences.

Plasmids are important tools in genetic engineering and biotechnology because they can be easily manipulated and transferred between organisms. They have been used to produce vaccines, diagnostic tests, and genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for various applications, including agriculture, medicine, and industry.

An azide is a chemical compound that contains the functional group -N=N+=N-, which consists of three nitrogen atoms joined by covalent bonds. In organic chemistry, azides are often used as reagents in various chemical reactions, such as the azide-alkyne cycloaddition (also known as the "click reaction").

In medical terminology, azides may refer to a class of drugs that contain an azido group and are used for their pharmacological effects. For example, sodium nitroprusside is a vasodilator drug that contains an azido group and is used to treat hypertensive emergencies.

However, it's worth noting that azides can also be toxic and potentially explosive under certain conditions, so they must be handled with care in laboratory settings.

Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is an enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the process of cellular respiration, specifically in the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle) and the electron transport chain. It is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells.

SDH catalyzes the oxidation of succinate to fumarate, converting it into a molecule of fadaquate in the process. During this reaction, two electrons are transferred from succinate to the FAD cofactor within the SDH enzyme complex, reducing it to FADH2. These electrons are then passed on to ubiquinone (CoQ), which is a mobile electron carrier in the electron transport chain, leading to the generation of ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

SDH is also known as mitochondrial complex II because it is the second complex in the electron transport chain. Mutations in the genes encoding SDH subunits or associated proteins have been linked to various human diseases, including hereditary paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and some forms of neurodegenerative disorders.

Acetaldehyde is a colorless, volatile, and flammable liquid with a pungent odor. It is the simplest aldehyde, with the formula CH3CHO. Acetaldehyde is an important intermediate in the metabolism of alcohol and is produced by the oxidation of ethanol by alcohol dehydrogenase. It is also a naturally occurring compound that is found in small amounts in various foods and beverages, such as fruits, vegetables, and coffee.

Acetaldehyde is a toxic substance that can cause a range of adverse health effects, including irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, nausea, vomiting, and headaches. It has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Long-term exposure to acetaldehyde has been linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer, including cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus, and liver.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "thermodynamics" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a branch of physics that deals with the relationships between heat and other forms of energy. However, the principles of thermodynamics can be applied to biological systems, including those in the human body, such as in the study of metabolism or muscle function. But in a medical context, "thermodynamics" would not be a term used independently as a diagnosis, treatment, or any medical condition.

Ricin is defined as a highly toxic protein that is derived from the seeds of the castor oil plant (Ricinus communis). It can be produced as a white, powdery substance or a mistable aerosol. Ricin works by getting inside cells and preventing them from making the proteins they need. Without protein, cells die. Eventually, this can cause organ failure and death.

It is not easily inhaled or absorbed through the skin, but if ingested or injected, it can be lethal in very small amounts. There is no antidote for ricin poisoning - treatment consists of supportive care. Ricin has been used as a bioterrorism agent in the past and continues to be a concern due to its relative ease of production and potential high toxicity.

Enzyme inhibitors are substances that bind to an enzyme and decrease its activity, preventing it from catalyzing a chemical reaction in the body. They can work by several mechanisms, including blocking the active site where the substrate binds, or binding to another site on the enzyme to change its shape and prevent substrate binding. Enzyme inhibitors are often used as drugs to treat various medical conditions, such as high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, and bacterial infections. They can also be found naturally in some foods and plants, and can be used in research to understand enzyme function and regulation.

Uncoupling agents are chemicals that interfere with the normal process of oxidative phosphorylation in cells. In this process, the energy from food is converted into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the main source of energy for cellular functions. Uncouplers disrupt this process by preventing the transfer of high-energy electrons to oxygen, which normally drives the production of ATP.

Instead, the energy from these electrons is released as heat, leading to an increase in body temperature. This effect is similar to what happens during shivering or exercise, when the body generates heat to maintain its core temperature. Uncoupling agents are therefore also known as "mitochondrial protonophores" because they allow protons to leak across the inner mitochondrial membrane, bypassing the ATP synthase enzyme that would normally use the energy from this proton gradient to produce ATP.

Uncoupling agents have been studied for their potential therapeutic uses, such as in weight loss and the treatment of metabolic disorders. However, they can also be toxic at high doses, and their long-term effects on health are not well understood.

Superoxides are partially reduced derivatives of oxygen that contain one extra electron, giving them an overall charge of -1. They are highly reactive and unstable, with the most common superoxide being the hydroxyl radical (•OH-) and the superoxide anion (O2-). Superoxides are produced naturally in the body during metabolic processes, particularly within the mitochondria during cellular respiration. They play a role in various physiological processes, but when produced in excess or not properly neutralized, they can contribute to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, potentially leading to the development of various diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative disorders.

... bind with adenine to form the essential cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD ... The shape of adenine is complementary to either thymine in DNA or uracil in RNA. The adjacent image shows pure adenine, as an ... Adenosine is adenine reacted with ribose, as used in RNA and ATP; deoxyadenosine is adenine attached to deoxyribose, as used to ... To extract the adenine from the charcoal-adsorbed adenine, ammonia gas dissolved in water (aqua ammonia) is poured onto the ...
In enzymology, an adenine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.2) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction adenine + H2O ⇌ {\ ... The systematic name of this enzyme class is adenine aminohydrolase. Other names in common use include adenase, adenine aminase ... Heppel LA, Hurwitz J, Horecker BL (1957). "Adenine deaminase of Azotobacter vinelandii". J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79 (3): 630-633. doi ... displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } hypoxanthine + NH3 Thus, the two substrates of this enzyme are adenine and H2O, whereas its ...
"Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase isoforms of Arabidopsis and their potential contributions to adenine and cytokinin metabolism ... Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRTase) is an enzyme encoded by the APRT gene, found in humans on chromosome 16. It is part ... It can salvage adenine from the polyamine biosynthetic pathway or from dietary sources of purines. Although APRTase is ... Adenine+phosphoribosyltransferase at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Human APRT genome ...
Adenine+Nucleotide+Translocator+1 at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Adenine+Nucleotide+ ... Adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), also known as the ADP/ATP translocase (ANT), ADP/ATP carrier protein (AAC) or ... Bruni A, Luciani S, Contessa AR (March 1964). "Inhibition by atractyloside of the binding of adenine-nucleotides to rat-liver ... In 1955, Siekevitz and Potter demonstrated that adenine nucleotides were distributed in cells in two pools located in the ...
... , (Dam) (also site-specific DNA-methyltransferase (adenine-specific), EC 2.1.1.72, modification methylase ... For N6-adenine methylases the sequential order for these motifs is as such: N-terminal - X - I - II - III - TRD - IV - V - VI ... Motif II is highly conserved among N4 and N6-adenine methylases and contains a negatively charged amino acid followed by a ... Wu H, Lippmann JE, Oza JP, Zeng M, Fives-Taylor P, Reich NO (August 2006). "Inactivation of DNA adenine methyltransferase ...
... is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder associated with a mutation in the ... Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency at NIH's Office of Rare Diseases (Articles with short description, Short ... Terai, C; Hakoda, M; Yamanaka, H; Kamatani, N; Okai, M; Takahashi, F; Kashiwazaki, S (November 1995). "Adenine ... Patients with the disease deficiency lack the enzyme adenine phosphoribosyltransferase and therefore have difficulties breaking ...
... consists of two portions: the adenine nucleotide (adenosine monophosphate) and the flavin ... Adenine is bound to a cyclic ribose at the 1' carbon, while phosphate is bound to the ribose at the 5' carbon to form the ... In biochemistry, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a redox-active coenzyme associated with various proteins, which is ... Kuppuraj G, Kruise D, Yura K (Nov 2014). "Conformational behavior of flavin adenine dinucleotide: conserved stereochemistry in ...
... (NAD) is a coenzyme central to metabolism. Found in all living cells, NAD is called a ... Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide has several essential roles in metabolism. It acts as a coenzyme in redox reactions, as a ... "Nicotinamide-Adenine-Dinucleotide". pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Nelson, David L.; Cox, Michael M. (2005). Principles of ... Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide consists of two nucleosides joined by pyrophosphate. The nucleosides each contain a ribose ...
... adenine methylation is catalyzed by the adenine methyltransferase Dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase), which catalyses adenine ... Adenine methylation does not occur naturally in eukaryotes and therefore adenine methylation in any region can be concluded to ... DNA adenine methyltransferase identification, often abbreviated DamID, is a molecular biology protocol used to map the binding ... N6-methyladenine (m6A) is the product of the addition of a methyl group (CH3) at position 6 of the adenine. This modified ...
... ribonucleic acid-adenine (N6) methylase, ErmC 23S rRNA methyltransferase, and S-adenosyl-L-methionine:rRNA (adenine-6-N-)- ... The systematic name of this enzyme class is S-adenosyl-L-methionine:rRNA (adenine-N6-)-methyltransferase. Other names in common ... In enzymology, a rRNA (adenine-N6-)-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.48) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction S- ... Sipe JE, Anderson WM, Remy CN, Love SH (1972). "Characterization of S-adenosylmethionine: ribosomal ribonucleic acid-adenine (N ...
The systematic name of this enzyme class is S-adenosyl-L-methionine:tRNA (adenine-N6-)-methyltransferase. This enzyme is also ... In enzymology, a tRNA (adenine-N6-)-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.55) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction S- ... called S-adenosyl-L-methionine:tRNA (adenine-6-N-)-methyltransferase. Mandel LR, Hacker B, Maag TA (1971). "Altered transfer ...
... , abbreviated NADP+ or, in older notation, TPN (triphosphopyridine nucleotide), is a ... position of the ribose ring that carries the adenine moiety. This extra phosphate is added by NAD+ kinase and removed by NADP+ ...
Other names in common use include transfer ribonucleate adenine 1-methyltransferase, transfer RNA (adenine-1) methyltransferase ... 1-methyladenine transfer RNA methyltransferase, adenine-1-methylase, and S-adenosyl-L-methionine:tRNA (adenine-1-N-)- ... In enzymology, a tRNA (adenine-N1-)-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.36) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction S- ... Glick JM, Leboy PS (1977). "Purification and properties of tRNA(adenine-1)-methyltransferase from rat liver". J. Biol. Chem. ...
... may stand for NAD(P)+ transhydrogenase (Re/Si-specific) NAD(P)+ ...
... is a protein that in humans is encoded by the FLAD1 gene. This gene encodes the enzyme ... "Entrez Gene: Flavin adenine dinucleotide synthetase 1". Retrieved 2016-03-04. This article incorporates text from the United ... that catalyzes adenylation of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) to form flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) coenzyme. Alternatively ...
... , (NAADP), is a Ca2+-mobilizing second messenger synthesised in response to ... Chini, EN; Dousa, TP (1996-06-15). "Nicotinate-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced Ca2+-release does not behave as a Ca2+- ... Aley, PK; Mikolajczyk, AM; Munz, B; Churchill, GC; Galione, A; Berger, F (2010-11-16). "Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide ... Wilson, HL; Galione, A (1998-05-01). "Differential regulation of nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and cADP-ribose ...
... may refer to: NADH dehydrogenase NADH:ubiquinone reductase (non- ...
... may stand for NADH dehydrogenase NADH:ubiquinone reductase (non- ... electrogenic) This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- ...
Adenine). HCN has been detected in the interstellar medium and in the atmospheres of carbon stars. Since then, extensive ...
Adenine Pr. ISBN 0-940030-78-0. "(IUCr) G. N. Ramachandran". www.iucr.org. Retrieved 21 October 2020. Vijayan, M.; Johnson, L. ...
Adenine Pr. p. 386. ISBN 978-0940030350. {{cite book}}: ,author= has generic name (help) D. P. Burma (2011). From Physiology ...
... adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. It is also used to treat kidney stones caused by deficient activity of adenine ...
7a Adenine; 7b Thymine; 7 Adenine/thymine WC; 8a Methane; 8 Methane dimer; 9a Ethene; 9 Ethene dimer; 10 Benzene/methane; 11a ... Benzene; 11 Benzene dimer; 12a Pyrazine; 12 Pyrazine dimer; 13 Uracil dimer; 14a Indole; 14 Indole/benzene; 15 Adenine/thymine ...
Adeniji, Ade. "Nine Questions for Clarisse Machanguana, Former WNBA Player". Inside Philanthropy. Retrieved 13 May 2022. " ...
... adenine and 9-(2,3-epimino-2,3-dideoxy-.beta.-D-lyxofuranosyl)adenine". The Journal of Organic Chemistry. 44 (8): 1317-22. doi: ...
Determination of Adenine Compounds". Journal of Biological Chemistry. 167 (2): 445-459. doi:10.1016/S0021-9258(17)30998-5. PMID ...
... adenine + epoxyqueuosine34 in tRNA The reaction is a combined transfer and isomerization of the ribose moiety of S-adenosyl-L- ... adenine releasing). This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction S-adenosyl-L-methionine + 7-aminomethyl-7- ...
People affected by adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency may produce 2,8-dihydroxyadenine stones, alkaptonurics produce ... Kamatani N (December 1996). "[Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase(APRT) deficiency]". Nihon Rinsho. Japanese Journal of Clinical ...
For example, adenine + PRPP --> AMP + PPi. This reaction requires the enzyme adenine phosphoribosyltransferase. Free guanine is ... Adenine and guanine are the two nucleotides classified as purines. In purine synthesis, PRPP is turned into inosine ...
I. Adenine from hydrogen cyanide". Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics. 94 (2): 217-227. doi:10.1016/0003-9861(61)90033-9. ... One of his most important contributions was the prebiotic synthesis of the nucleobase adenine (a key component of nucleic acids ... Oró, J. (1961). "Mechanism of Synthesis of Adenine from Hydrogen Cyanide under Possible Primitive Earth Conditions". Nature. ...
... bind with adenine to form the essential cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD ... The shape of adenine is complementary to either thymine in DNA or uracil in RNA. The adjacent image shows pure adenine, as an ... Adenosine is adenine reacted with ribose, as used in RNA and ATP; deoxyadenosine is adenine attached to deoxyribose, as used to ... To extract the adenine from the charcoal-adsorbed adenine, ammonia gas dissolved in water (aqua ammonia) is poured onto the ...
Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is an inherited condition that affects the kidneys and urinary tract. ... A lack of functional enzyme impairs the conversion of adenine to AMP. As a result, adenine is converted to another molecule ... Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is an inherited condition that affects the kidneys and urinary tract. The ... Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency in children. Pediatr Nephrol. 2012 Apr;27(4):571-9. doi: 10.1007/s00467-011-2037-0 ...
ADENINE OR ANHYDROUS CITRIC ACID OR ANHYDROUS DEXTROSE OR PHOSPHA... (23086) ADENINE OR ANHYDROUS CITRIC ACID OR ANHYDROUS ... "adenine"[MeSH Terms] OR "adenine"[All Fields]) OR (("citric"[All Fields] AND "acid"[All Fields]) OR "citric acid"[All Fields] ... Search: ADENINE OR ANHYDROUS CITRIC ACID OR ANHYDROUS DEXTROSE OR PHOSPHATE ION ... Search: ADENINE OR ANHYDROUS CITRIC ACID OR ANHYDROUS DEXTROSE OR PHOSPHATE ION ...
Among these, adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) is an ADP/ATP carrier but its role in controlling extracellular ADP levels ... Ectopic adenine nucleotide translocase activity controls extracellular ADP levels and regulates the F1-ATPase-mediated HDL ...
... nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, NADP,sup,+/,/sup,NADPH) are involved in various biological processes in mammalian ... p,Coenzyme I (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, NAD,sup,+,/sup,/NADH) and coenzyme II ( ... Pharmacology and Potential Implications of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Precursors. {{javascript:window.custom_author_en_ ...
Adenine Arabinoside Effect on Experimental Idoxuridine-Resistant Herpes Simplex Infection. Comparative Study of Macular ... W J OBrien, H F Edelhauser; The corneal penetration of trifluorothymidine, adenine arabinoside, and idoxuridine: a comparative ... The corneal penetration of trifluorothymidine, adenine arabinoside, and idoxuridine: a comparative study. ... The corneal penetration of trifluorothymidine, adenine arabinoside, and idoxuridine: a comparative study. ...
Adenine Grants and funding * 1K12 CA133250/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States ...
Abbreviations: A = adenine; C = cytosine; T = thymine; G = guanine; WT = wild type; NA = not available. ...
Barbour, R. L., & Chan, S. H. P. (1979). Regulation of palmitoyl-CoA inhibition of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport ... Regulation of palmitoyl-CoA inhibition of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport by cytosolic fatty acid binding protein. ... Barbour, Randall L. ; Chan, Samuel H.P. / Regulation of palmitoyl-CoA inhibition of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport ... N2 - Defatted liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP) reverses the inhibitory effect of palmitoyl-CoA on adenine nucleotide ...
enables flavin adenine dinucleotide binding IBA Inferred from Biological aspect of Ancestor. more info ... enables flavin adenine dinucleotide binding ISO Inferred from Sequence Orthology. more info ...
FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE. C27 H33 N9 O15 P2. VWWQXMAJTJZDQX-UYBVJOGSSA-N. Interactions *Focus chain I [auth A] ...
Reduction of adenine nucleotides at the mercury electrode KLUKANOVÁ Hana STUDNIČKOVÁ Marie KOVÁŘ Jan TURÁNEK Jaroslav KAHLE ...
Experience modern luxury when you come home to The Adenine. Our apartments offer sophisticated interiors with stunning finishes ...
In contrast, little is known about Ca2+ mobilization by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate, a pyridine nucleotide ... We show here that intracellular dialysis of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) induces spatially restricted ... Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate mediates Ca2+ signals and contraction in arterial smooth muscle via a two-pool ... Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate mediates Ca2+ signals and contraction in arterial smooth muscle via a two-pool ...
Due to its smaller size, the B. subtilis pbuE adenine-responsive riboswitch has been the focus of many previous studies that ... Genetic Screen of the B. subtilis pbuE Adenine-Responsive Riboswitch Expression Platform Reveals Preferences for Base Pairing ...
MG2+ COMPLEX WITH 1-N6-ETHENO-ADENINE - 5HT2 , canSARS ...
One of the Most Efficient Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD+) Boosters Available, to Consumers Nationwide ... ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ:CDXC), a global authority on Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD+) research and healthy aging, ... The ChromaDex team, which includes world-renowned scientists, is pioneering research on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ ... One of the Most Efficient Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD+) Boosters Available, to Consumers Nationwide. By: ChromaDex ...
A, adenine; aa, amino acids; C, cytosine; G, guanine; NC, no changes; nt seq, nucleotide sequence; U, uracil †Nucleotide ...
We developed a dispersion system to investigate the bio-inspired interactions between an adenine (A)-terminated poly(3- ... U can form strong base pairs with several other bases-adenine (A), cytosine, and guanine in DNA, while T assembles only with A ... We developed a dispersion system to investigate the bio-inspired interactions between an adenine (A)-terminated poly(3- ...
DA, dopaminergic neurons; HR, histamine receptor; IL, interleukin; NADPH, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate; NO, ... the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) system is responsible for producing ROS that are ...
ALKBH1; DNA adenine methylation (6mA); H3K27me3; Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2); R-loop ... A DNA adenine demethylase impairs PRC2-mediated repression of genes marked by a specific chromatin signature. ... AlkB homolog1 (ALKBH1) is shown to demethylate DNA adenine methylation (6mA) preferentially from single-stranded or unpaired ... A DNA adenine demethylase impairs PRC2-mediated repression of genes marked by a specific c ...
CO,sub,2 ,/sub, = carbon dioxide; NAD+ = oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide; NADH = reduced nicotinamide adenine ... CO,sub,2 ,/sub, = carbon dioxide; NAD+ = oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide; NADH = reduced nicotinamide adenine ...
M00049 Adenine ribonucleotide biosynthesis, IMP => ADP,ATP [PATH:pdic00230 pdic01232 pdic01240 pdic01100]. M00050 Guanine ... M00958 Adenine ribonucleotide degradation, AMP => Urate [PATH:pdic00230 pdic01232 pdic01100]. M00959 Guanine ribonucleotide ...
From Metabolism to Epigenetics: Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotides Diverse Influence. By Savannah July 11, 2023 ... 05From Metabolism to Epigenetics: Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotides Diverse Influence. 06Exploring Cultural Immersion: The ...
HEME C; FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE. Polypeptides. FLAVOCYTOCHROME C FUMARATE REDUCTASE. Oligo-state. monomer. ... SULFATE ION; HEME C; FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE. Polypeptides. FLAVOCYTOCHROME C FUMARATE REDUCTASE. Oligo-state. monomer. ... SULFATE ION; HEME C; FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE. Polypeptides. FLAVOCYTOCHROME C FUMARATE REDUCTASE. Oligo-state. monomer. ... SULFATE ION; HEME C; FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE. Polypeptides. FLAVOCYTOCHROME C FUMARATE REDUCTASE. Oligo-state. monomer. ...
The researchers detailed how a particular nucleic acid included in their MOFs - a molecule called adenine, one of the four ... DNA-Mimicking Metal-Organic Frameworks with Accessible Adenine Faces for Complementary Base Pairing ...
Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) is a substance made by our bodies that are converted into nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ( ... Pharmacology and Potential Implications of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Precursors. * Clinical and Experimental ... A Narrative Review of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD)+ Intermediates Nicotinamide Riboside and Nicotinamide ...
The bases of DNA are adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C).. (more). ...
  • Adenine is one of the two purine nucleobases (the other being guanine) used in forming nucleotides of the nucleic acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Effects of adenine guanine and inosine nucleotides on procaine induced" by B J Kraynack, J Gintautas et al. (lvhn.org)
  • Effects of adenine guanine and inosine nucleotides on procaine induced nerve blockade in vivo. (lvhn.org)
  • However, two B vitamins, niacin and riboflavin, bind with adenine to form the essential cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. (jneurosci.org)
  • Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide prevents neuroaxonal degeneration induced by manganese in cochlear organotypic cultures. (cdc.gov)
  • Purine metabolism involves the formation of adenine and guanine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both adenine and guanine are derived from the nucleotide inosine monophosphate (IMP), which in turn is synthesized from a pre-existing ribose phosphate through a complex pathway using atoms from the amino acids glycine, glutamine, and aspartic acid, as well as the coenzyme tetrahydrofolate. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are four nitrogenous bases found in DNA: guanine (G), cytosine (C), thymine (T), and adenine (A). The purines A and G are composed of two rings, whereas the pyrimidines C and T are composed of one ring. (wikibooks.org)
  • Nursing Central , nursing.unboundmedicine.com/nursingcentral/view/Tabers-Dictionary/752950/0/flavin_adenine_dinucleotide. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • The shape of adenine is complementary to either thymine in DNA or uracil in RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • In DNA, adenine binds to thymine via two hydrogen bonds to assist in stabilizing the nucleic acid structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adenine and thymine each have one hydrogen bond donor and one hydrogen bond receptor, so two hydrogen bonds form between them. (wikibooks.org)
  • Adenine forms adenosine, a nucleoside, when attached to ribose, and deoxyadenosine when attached to deoxyribose. (wikipedia.org)
  • ATP is thus a derivative of adenine, adenosine, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, and adenosine diphosphate. (wikipedia.org)
  • This gene provides instructions for making APRT, an enzyme that helps to convert a DNA building block (nucleotide) called adenine to a molecule called adenosine monophosphate (AMP). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Adenine (/ˈædɪnɪn/) (symbol A or Ade) is a purine nucleobase. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder that results in the inability to salvage adenine for purine synthesis. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Twenty-two heterosexuals and 21 homosexuals with chronic active hepatitis B and who had HBsAg, HBeAg and hepatitis B virus DNA in serum were randomized separately to receive adenine arabinoside monophosphate or placebo. (eurekamag.com)
  • When results were pooled, there was a significant effect of adenine arabinoside monophosphate on hepatitis B virus replication. (eurekamag.com)
  • None of the 19 patients who received placebo but 50% of the 24 patients who received adenine arabinoside monophosphate were negative for serum hepatitis B virus DNA at 10 months after treatment (p less than 0.001) and none of the 19 patients who received placebo and 33% of the 24 patients who received adenine arabinoside monophosphate were negative for HBeAg in serum (p less than 0.005). (eurekamag.com)
  • The corneal penetration of trifluorothymidine, adenine arabinoside, and idoxuridine: a comparative study. (arvojournals.org)
  • Trifluorothymidine (F3TdR) and idoxuridine (IDU) were observed to penetrate through the cornea from the epithelial side at a greater rate than adenine arabinoside (ARA-A) during in vitro corneal perfusions. (arvojournals.org)
  • Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate mediates Ca2+ signals and contraction in arterial smooth muscle via a two-pool mechanism. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In contrast, little is known about Ca2+ mobilization by nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate, a pyridine nucleotide derived from beta-NADP+. (ox.ac.uk)
  • We show here that intracellular dialysis of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) induces spatially restricted "bursts" of Ca2+ release that initiate a global Ca2+ wave and contraction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is an inherited condition that affects the kidneys and urinary tract. (medlineplus.gov)
  • AlkB homolog1 (ALKBH1) is shown to demethylate DNA adenine methylation (6mA) preferentially from single-stranded or unpaired DNA , while its demethylase activity and function in the chromatin context are unclear. (bvsalud.org)
  • A lack of functional enzyme impairs the conversion of adenine to AMP. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A DNA adenine demethylase impairs PRC2-mediated repression of genes marked by a specific chromatin signature. (bvsalud.org)
  • The adjacent image shows pure adenine, as an independent molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • The remaining structure is called an adenine residue, as part of a larger molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, adenine is converted to another molecule called 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Barbour, RL & Chan, SHP 1979, ' Regulation of palmitoyl-CoA inhibition of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide transport by cytosolic fatty acid binding protein ', Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications , vol. 89, no. 4, pp. 1168-1177. (syr.edu)
  • Accumulated adenine is oxidized to 2,8-dihyroxyadenine, which precipitates in the urinary tract, causing problems similar to those of uric acid nephropathy (eg, renal colic, frequent infections, and, if diagnosed late, renal failure). (msdmanuals.com)
  • deoxyadenosine is adenine attached to deoxyribose, as used to form DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patented Aug. 20, 1968, the current recognized method of industrial-scale production of adenine is a modified form of the formamide method. (wikipedia.org)
  • This method heats up formamide under 120 degree Celsius conditions within a sealed flask for 5 hours to form adenine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking DNA adenine (Dam) methylase show reduced secretion of invasion effectors encoded in the Salmonella -pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • However, in isolated conditions, i.e. in an inert gas matrix and in the gas phase, mainly the 9H-adenine tautomer is found. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inspired by this natural phenomenon, we tiled the highly homologous HBG proximal promoters using adenine and cytosine base editors that avoid the generation of large deletions and identified novel regulatory regions including a cluster at the -123 region. (nih.gov)
  • DNA stores biological information in sequences of four roughly 30,000 genes, discrete chunks of DNA that are translated bases of nucleic acid -- adenine (A), thymine (T), cytosine (C) into individual proteins. (nih.gov)
  • Adenine (A) is one of the four nucleotide bases in DNA, with the other three being cytosine (C), guanine (G) and thymine (T). Within a double-stranded DNA molecule, adenine bases on one strand pair with thymine bases on the opposite strand. (genome.gov)
  • Acute inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in the commissural nucleus of the solitary tract reduces arterial pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity in renovascular hypertension. (bvsalud.org)
  • After six weeks, these rats were anesthetized and instrumented for recording mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal blood flow (RBF), renal vascular resistance (RVR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) during baseline and after injection of apocynin ( nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase inhibitor), NSC 23766 (RAC inhibitor) or saline into the commNTS. (bvsalud.org)
  • Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is an inherited condition that affects the kidneys and urinary tract. (medlineplus.gov)
  • This gene provides instructions for making APRT, an enzyme that helps to convert a DNA building block (nucleotide) called adenine to a molecule called adenosine monophosphate (AMP). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency is characterized by excessive production and renal excretion of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine (DHA), which leads to kidney stone formation and crystal-induced kidney damage (i.e. (nih.gov)
  • What is the average price at Adenine? (aptamigo.com)
  • The average price of a studio apartment at Adenine is $1,488 per month, the average price of a 1-bedroom apartment at Adenine is $1,766 per month, and the average price of a 2-bedroom apartment at Adenine is $2,433 per month (Average price is calculated using the latest three months of rates). (aptamigo.com)
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  • Using a no-choice membrane feeding assay (papers II, III, and IV) and a spectrophotometric analysis (paper II), the feeding response of the two vectors to blood-derived adenine nucleotide diets, as proxies, and a reliable signal, for blood, was examined. (slu.se)
  • Prices & availability for Adenine were updated 1 hour ago. (aptamigo.com)