Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Adaptation, Ocular: The adjustment of the eye to variations in the intensity of light. Light adaptation is the adjustment of the eye when the light threshold is increased; DARK ADAPTATION when the light is greatly reduced. (From Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Adaptation, Biological: Changes in biological features that help an organism cope with its ENVIRONMENT. These changes include physiological (ADAPTATION, PHYSIOLOGICAL), phenotypic and genetic changes.Dark Adaptation: Adjustment of the eyes under conditions of low light. The sensitivity of the eye to light is increased during dark adaptation.Figural Aftereffect: A perceptual phenomenon used by Gestalt psychologists to demonstrate that events in one part of the perceptual field may affect perception in another part.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Acclimatization: Adaptation to a new environment or to a change in the old.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Afterimage: Continuation of visual impression after cessation of stimuli causing the original image.Dental Marginal Adaptation: The degree of approximation or fit of filling material or dental prosthetic to the tooth surface. A close marginal adaptation and seal at the interface is important for successful dental restorations.Selection, Genetic: Differential and non-random reproduction of different genotypes, operating to alter the gene frequencies within a population.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Light: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared range.Contrast Sensitivity: The ability to detect sharp boundaries (stimuli) and to detect slight changes in luminance at regions without distinct contours. Psychophysical measurements of this visual function are used to evaluate visual acuity and to detect eye disease.Stress, Physiological: The unfavorable effect of environmental factors (stressors) on the physiological functions of an organism. Prolonged unresolved physiological stress can affect HOMEOSTASIS of the organism, and may lead to damaging or pathological conditions.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Environment: The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.Translations: Products resulting from the conversion of one language to another.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Photoreceptor Cells: Specialized cells that detect and transduce light. They are classified into two types based on their light reception structure, the ciliary photoreceptors and the rhabdomeric photoreceptors with MICROVILLI. Ciliary photoreceptor cells use OPSINS that activate a PHOSPHODIESTERASE phosphodiesterase cascade. Rhabdomeric photoreceptor cells use opsins that activate a PHOSPHOLIPASE C cascade.Perceptual Distortion: Lack of correspondence between the way a stimulus is commonly perceived and the way an individual perceives it under given conditions.Cold Temperature: An absence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably below an accustomed norm.Species Specificity: The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Climate Change: Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.Genetic Fitness: The capability of an organism to survive and reproduce. The phenotypic expression of the genotype in a particular environment determines how genetically fit an organism will be.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Cultural Characteristics: Those aspects or characteristics which identify a culture.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Short Bowel Syndrome: A malabsorption syndrome resulting from extensive operative resection of the SMALL INTESTINE, the absorptive region of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Language: A verbal or nonverbal means of communicating ideas or feelings.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Translating: Conversion from one language to another language.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells: Photosensitive afferent neurons located in the peripheral retina, with their density increases radially away from the FOVEA CENTRALIS. Being much more sensitive to light than the RETINAL CONE CELLS, the rod cells are responsible for twilight vision (at scotopic intensities) as well as peripheral vision, but provide no color discrimination.Color Perception: Mental processing of chromatic signals (COLOR VISION) from the eye by the VISUAL CORTEX where they are converted into symbolic representations. Color perception involves numerous neurons, and is influenced not only by the distribution of wavelengths from the viewed object, but also by its background color and brightness contrast at its boundary.Physical Conditioning, Animal: Diet modification and physical exercise to improve the ability of animals to perform physical activities.Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Energy Metabolism: The chemical reactions involved in the production and utilization of various forms of energy in cells.Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Retina: The ten-layered nervous tissue membrane of the eye. It is continuous with the OPTIC NERVE and receives images of external objects and transmits visual impulses to the brain. Its outer surface is in contact with the CHOROID and the inner surface with the VITREOUS BODY. The outer-most layer is pigmented, whereas the inner nine layers are transparent.Lenses: Pieces of glass or other transparent materials used for magnification or increased visual acuity.Darkness: The absence of light.Tibet: An autonomous region located in central Asia, within China.Eyeglasses: A pair of ophthalmic lenses in a frame or mounting which is supported by the nose and ears. The purpose is to aid or improve vision. It does not include goggles or nonprescription sun glasses for which EYE PROTECTIVE DEVICES is available.Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells: Photosensitive afferent neurons located primarily within the FOVEA CENTRALIS of the MACULA LUTEA. There are three major types of cone cells (red, blue, and green) whose photopigments have different spectral sensitivity curves. Retinal cone cells operate in daylight vision (at photopic intensities) providing color recognition and central visual acuity.Visual Cortex: Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.Electroretinography: Recording of electric potentials in the retina after stimulation by light.Genetics, Population: The discipline studying genetic composition of populations and effects of factors such as GENETIC SELECTION, population size, MUTATION, migration, and GENETIC DRIFT on the frequencies of various GENOTYPES and PHENOTYPES using a variety of GENETIC TECHNIQUES.Cross-Cultural Comparison: Comparison of various psychological, sociological, or cultural factors in order to assess the similarities or diversities occurring in two or more different cultures or societies.Visual Pathways: Set of cell bodies and nerve fibers conducting impulses from the eyes to the cerebral cortex. It includes the RETINA; OPTIC NERVE; optic tract; and geniculocalcarine tract.Lighting: The illumination of an environment and the arrangement of lights to achieve an effect or optimal visibility. Its application is in domestic or in public settings and in medical and non-medical environments.Physical Endurance: The time span between the beginning of physical activity by an individual and the termination because of exhaustion.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Serial Passage: Inoculation of a series of animals or in vitro tissue with an infectious bacterium or virus, as in VIRULENCE studies and the development of vaccines.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Oxygen Consumption: The rate at which oxygen is used by a tissue; microliters of oxygen STPD used per milligram of tissue per hour; the rate at which oxygen enters the blood from alveolar gas, equal in the steady state to the consumption of oxygen by tissue metabolism throughout the body. (Stedman, 25th ed, p346)Neuronal Plasticity: The capacity of the NERVOUS SYSTEM to change its reactivity as the result of successive activations.Discrimination (Psychology): Differential response to different stimuli.Mechanotransduction, Cellular: The process by which cells convert mechanical stimuli into a chemical response. It can occur in both cells specialized for sensing mechanical cues such as MECHANORECEPTORS, and in parenchymal cells whose primary function is not mechanosensory.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Osmotic Pressure: The pressure required to prevent the passage of solvent through a semipermeable membrane that separates a pure solvent from a solution of the solvent and solute or that separates different concentrations of a solution. It is proportional to the osmolality of the solution.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Transfer (Psychology): Change in learning in one situation due to prior learning in another situation. The transfer can be positive (with second learning improved by first) or negative (where the reverse holds).Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Floods: Sudden onset water phenomena with different speed of occurrence. These include flash floods, seasonal river floods, and coastal floods, associated with CYCLONIC STORMS; TIDALWAVES; and storm surges.Chemotaxis: The movement of cells or organisms toward or away from a substance in response to its concentration gradient.Sodium Chloride: A ubiquitous sodium salt that is commonly used to season food.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Gene Flow: The change in gene frequency in a population due to migration of gametes or individuals (ANIMAL MIGRATION) across population barriers. In contrast, in GENETIC DRIFT the cause of gene frequency changes are not a result of population or gamete movement.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Retinal Pigments: Photosensitive protein complexes of varied light absorption properties which are expressed in the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS. They are OPSINS conjugated with VITAMIN A-based chromophores. Chromophores capture photons of light, leading to the activation of opsins and a biochemical cascade that ultimately excites the photoreceptor cells.Exercise: Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.Ecology: The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)Vision, Monocular: Images seen by one eye.Reproduction, Asexual: Reproduction without fusion of two types of cells, mostly found in ALGAE; FUNGI; and PLANTS. Asexual reproduction occurs in several ways, such as budding, fission, or splitting from "parent" cells. Only few groups of ANIMALS reproduce asexually or unisexually (PARTHENOGENESIS).Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Proteome: The protein complement of an organism coded for by its genome.Metabolic Networks and Pathways: Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Phycomyces: A genus of zygomycetous fungi in the family Mucoraceae, order MUCORALES, forming mycelia having a metallic sheen. It has been used for research on phototropism.Flicker Fusion: The point or frequency at which all flicker of an intermittent light stimulus disappears.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Habituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Vision Disparity: The difference between two images on the retina when looking at a visual stimulus. This occurs since the two retinas do not have the same view of the stimulus because of the location of our eyes. Thus the left eye does not get exactly the same view as the right eye.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Auditory Perception: The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Antarctic Regions: The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)Cochlear Nerve: The cochlear part of the 8th cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE). The cochlear nerve fibers originate from neurons of the SPIRAL GANGLION and project peripherally to cochlear hair cells and centrally to the cochlear nuclei (COCHLEAR NUCLEUS) of the BRAIN STEM. They mediate the sense of hearing.Mice, Inbred C57BLOcular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Color Vision: Function of the human eye that is used in bright illumination or in daylight (at photopic intensities). Photopic vision is performed by the three types of RETINAL CONE PHOTORECEPTORS with varied peak absorption wavelengths in the color spectrum (from violet to red, 400 - 700 nm).Fishes: A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Host-Pathogen Interactions: The interactions between a host and a pathogen, usually resulting in disease.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Heat-Shock Response: A constellation of responses that occur when an organism is exposed to excessive heat. Responses include synthesis of new proteins and regulation of others.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Glucagon-Like Peptide 2: A 33-amino acid peptide derived from the C-terminal of PROGLUCAGON and mainly produced by the INTESTINAL L CELLS. It stimulates intestinal mucosal growth and decreased apoptosis of ENTEROCYTES. GLP-2 enhances gastrointestinal function and plays an important role in nutrient homeostasis.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Acids: Chemical compounds which yield hydrogen ions or protons when dissolved in water, whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water (neutralization). An extension of the term includes substances dissolved in media other than water. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Nitrogen: An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Evoked Potentials, Visual: The electric response evoked in the cerebral cortex by visual stimulation or stimulation of the visual pathways.Genetic Speciation: The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.Homeostasis: The processes whereby the internal environment of an organism tends to remain balanced and stable.Genes, Bacterial: The functional hereditary units of BACTERIA.Host Specificity: The properties of a pathogen that makes it capable of infecting one or more specific hosts. The pathogen can include PARASITES as well as VIRUSES; BACTERIA; FUNGI; or PLANTS.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Glucose: A primary source of energy for living organisms. It is naturally occurring and is found in fruits and other parts of plants in its free state. It is used therapeutically in fluid and nutrient replacement.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Visual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Bacterial Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.Salamandra: A genus of European newts in the Salamandridae family. The two species of this genus are Salamandra salamandra (European "fire" salamander) and Salamandra atra (European alpine salamander).Genetic Drift: The fluctuation of the ALLELE FREQUENCY from one generation to the next.Gene Transfer, Horizontal: The naturally occurring transmission of genetic information between organisms, related or unrelated, circumventing parent-to-offspring transmission. Horizontal gene transfer may occur via a variety of naturally occurring processes such as GENETIC CONJUGATION; GENETIC TRANSDUCTION; and TRANSFECTION. It may result in a change of the recipient organism's genetic composition (TRANSFORMATION, GENETIC).Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Global Warming: Increase in the temperature of the atmosphere near the Earth's surface and in the troposphere, which can contribute to changes in global climate patterns.Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Carbon: A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Odors: The volatile portions of substances perceptible by the sense of smell. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Smell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Rhodopsin: A purplish-red, light-sensitive pigment found in RETINAL ROD CELLS of most vertebrates. It is a complex consisting of a molecule of ROD OPSIN and a molecule of 11-cis retinal (RETINALDEHYDE). Rhodopsin exhibits peak absorption wavelength at about 500 nm.Smegmamorpha: Group of fish under the superorder Acanthopterygii, separate from the PERCIFORMES, which includes swamp eels, mullets, sticklebacks, seahorses, spiny eels, rainbowfishes, and KILLIFISHES. The name is derived from the six taxa which comprise the group. (From http://www.nanfa.org/articles/Elassoma/elassoma.htm, 8/4/2000)Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Transcriptome: The pattern of GENE EXPRESSION at the level of genetic transcription in a specific organism or under specific circumstances in specific cells.Form Perception: The sensory discrimination of a pattern shape or outline.Hair Cells, Auditory: Sensory cells in the organ of Corti, characterized by their apical stereocilia (hair-like projections). The inner and outer hair cells, as defined by their proximity to the core of spongy bone (the modiolus), change morphologically along the COCHLEA. Towards the cochlear apex, the length of hair cell bodies and their apical STEREOCILIA increase, allowing differential responses to various frequencies of sound.Aging: The gradual irreversible changes in structure and function of an organism that occur as a result of the passage of time.Touch: Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.Urodela: An order of the Amphibia class which includes salamanders and newts. They are characterized by usually having slim bodies and tails, four limbs of about equal size (except in Sirenidae), and a reduction in skull bones.Mechanoreceptors: Cells specialized to transduce mechanical stimuli and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Mechanoreceptor cells include the INNER EAR hair cells, which mediate hearing and balance, and the various somatosensory receptors, often with non-neural accessory structures.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.TurtlesPlants: Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Deceleration: A decrease in the rate of speed.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Anaerobiosis: The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)Water-Electrolyte Balance: The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.

Predicting delayed anxiety and depression in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. (1/5466)

The aim of this study was to examine the possibility of predicting anxiety and depression 6 months after a cancer diagnosis on the basis of measures of anxiety, depression, coping and subjective distress associated with the diagnosis and to explore the possibility of identifying individual patients with high levels of delayed anxiety and depression associated with the diagnosis. A consecutive series of 159 patients with gastrointestinal cancer were interviewed in connection with the diagnosis, 3 months (non-cured patients only) and 6 months later. The interviews utilized structured questionnaires assessing anxiety and depression [Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale], coping [Mental Adjustment to Cancer (MAC) scale] and subjective distress [Impact of Event (IES) scale]. Patient anxiety and depression close to the diagnosis were found to explain approximately 35% of the variance in anxiety and depression that was found 6 months later. The addition of coping and subjective distress measures did little to improve that prediction. A model using (standardized) cut-off scores of moderate to high anxiety, depression (HAD) and intrusive thoughts (IES subscale) close to the diagnosis to identify patients at risk for delayed anxiety and depression achieved a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 98%. Levels of anxiety and depression at diagnosis predicted a similar status 6 months later. The results also indicated that the HAD scale in combination with the IES intrusion subscale may be used as a tool for detecting patients at risk of delayed anxiety and depression.  (+info)

Misunderstanding in cancer patients: why shoot the messenger? (2/5466)

AIM: We aimed to document the prevalence of misunderstanding in cancer patients and investigate whether patient denial is related to misunderstanding. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred forty-four adult cancer outpatients receiving treatment completed a survey assessing levels of understanding and denial. Doctors provided the facts against which patient responses were compared. Multiple logistic regression analyses determined the predictors of misunderstanding. RESULTS: Most patients understood the extent of their disease (71%, 95% CI: 65%-77%) and goal of treatment (60%, 95% CI: 54%-67%). Few correctly estimated the likelihood of treatment achieving cure (18%, 95% CI: 13%-23%), prolongation of life (13%, 95% CI: 8%-17%) and palliation (18%, 95% CI: 10%-27%). Patient denial predicted misunderstanding of the probability that treatment would cure disease when controlling for other patient and disease variables (OR = 2.20, 95% CI: 0.99-4.88, P = 0.05). Patient ratings of the clarity of information received were also predictive of patient understanding. CONCLUSIONS: Patient denial appears to produce misunderstanding, however, doctors' ability to communicate effectively is also implicated. The challenge that oncologists face is how to communicate information in a manner which is both responsive to patients' emotional status and sufficiently informative to allow informed decision-making to take place.  (+info)

Methods used to study household coping strategies in rural South West Uganda. (3/5466)

This paper describes the data collection methods used in a longitudinal study of the coping strategies of 27 households in three villages in the study area of the MRC/ODA Research Programme on AIDS in Uganda. After pre-testing and piloting, 9 local interviewers made regular visits to the 27 study households over a period of just over one year. The households were purposively selected to represent different household types and socioeconomic status categories. Data were obtained through participant observation using a checklist to ensure systematic collection of data on household activities. Debriefing sessions with the interviewers after the visits provided opportunities for the discussion of the findings and exploration of themes for further study. On the basis of the study findings, and data from the Programme's general study population survey rounds, broad indicators of household 'vulnerability' were identified. A participatory appraisal technique, 'well-being ranking', was used at the end of the study in order to test the viability of the chosen indicators. It is proposed that the example of the research method, which relied on local people not only as interviewers but also as co-investigators in the research, be used to guide future research approaches. The participation of the study community at every stage of research and design, as well as monitoring and evaluation of supportive interventions, is strongly encouraged.  (+info)

Perceived stress factors and coping mechanisms among mothers of children with sickle cell disease in western Nigeria. (4/5466)

While many studies have looked at the stressful effects of chronic illness of those who suffer such conditions, less is known about the effects on caregivers, especially in developing countries. Mothers in particular must bear the brunt of care and stress for children who have sickle cell disease (SCD). A sample of 200 mothers attending six SCD clinics in both public and private hospitals in the Ibadan-Ibarapa Health Zone of Oyo State, Nigeria, were interviewed. Stress levels were measured using an instrument comprised of stressors listed by mothers themselves in focus group discussions that preceded the survey. Higher levels of stress were associated with less educated and older women, as well as non-married women and those in polygamous households. Stress levels were also greater when there was more than one child with SCD in the family and when the index child was of school age. Coping mechanisms varied according to the category of stressor. Financial stress and disease factors were met with confrontation while family sources of stress were either complained about, accepted or avoided. Knowledge of the different types of mothers who experience more stress and of their preferred coping mechanisms can be useful in designing clinic-based counseling.  (+info)

Eastward long distance flights, sleep and wake patterns in air crews in connection with a two-day layover. (5/5466)

The present study describes the spontaneous sleep/wake pattern in connection with an eastward (Stockholm to Tokyo, +8 h) transmeridian flight and short (51 h) layovers. To describe all sleep episodes and the recovery process across 4 days, and to relate adjustment to individual differences, 49 Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) air crew were monitored for 9 days with activity monitors and sleep/wake diary before-during-after flight. The outbound flight involved a period of wakefulness extended to 21 h, frequently (87% of air crew) terminated by a long nap in Tokyo which was calm but difficult to wake up from. Then followed two night oriented sleep periods of normal length but of reduced efficiency, containing many and long awakenings. Napping was common during the extended periods of wakefulness, particularly during flights. During the recovery days, ease of rising from sleep in the mornings was difficult throughout, and feelings of not being refreshed returned to baseline levels on the third recovery sleep. Elevated daytime sleepiness (24% of the day) was observed on the first recovery day. No individual differences related to gender, age or position (cabin/pilot) was found in sleep strategy. Poor adjusters, subjects with a perceived lowered capacity on recovery days, showed more premature awakenings abroad and less refreshing sleep during the last 12 months, suggesting a decreased ability to cope with air crew scheduling. Comparisons with a westbound flight showed the eastbound flight layover sleep to be more problematic and containing more napping.  (+info)

Quality of life associated with varying degrees of chronic lower limb ischaemia: comparison with a healthy sample. (6/5466)

OBJECTIVES: To assess quality of life in patients with varying degrees of ischaemia in comparison with controls, and to determine whether the degree of lower limb ischaemia and sense of coherence were associated with quality of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 168 patients, including 93 claudicants and 75 patients with critical ischaemia and 102 controls were studied. Quality of life was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile in addition to the Sense of Coherence scale. MAIN RESULTS: Patients with lower limb ischaemia scored significantly reduced quality of life in all aspects compared to controls. Pain, physical mobility and emotional reactions were the significant independent factors when using logistic regression analysis. The grade of disease and low sense of coherence were significantly associated with low quality of life. Increasing lower limb ischaemia significantly conferred worse pain, sleeping disturbances and immobility. CONCLUSION: This study showed that the quality of life was impaired among patients with lower limb ischaemia, in all investigated respects. The degree to which quality of life was affected seems to represent an interplay between the grade of ischaemia and the patient's sense of coherence. This suggests the need for a multidimensional assessment prior to intervention.  (+info)

Attitudes toward colon cancer gene testing: factors predicting test uptake. (7/5466)

OBJECTIVES: Genetic discoveries in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have made possible genetic testing to determine susceptibility to this form of colorectal cancer (CRC). This study measured the uptake of genetic testing for HNPCC among first-degree relatives of CRC patients and conducted a preliminary analysis of the predictors of test uptake. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We compared 77 test acceptors and 181 decliners on demographic, medical history, and psychological characteristics, controlling for distance from the testing center. The psychological factors studied were risk perception for CRC, frequency of cancer thoughts, and perceived ability to cope with unfavorable genetic information. RESULTS: In the final regression model, after accounting for all variables, the significant predictors of test uptake were increased risk perception, greater perceived confidence in ability to cope with unfavorable genetic information, more frequent cancer thoughts, and having had at least one colonoscopy. The association between risk perception and uptake was dependent on frequency of cancer thoughts. Among those who thought about getting CRC more often, the probability of testing increased as perceived risk increased to approximately 50% likelihood of getting CRC and then leveled off. In contrast, among those who never or rarely thought about getting CRC, risk perception was unrelated to testing decision. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with the associations reported between psychological factors and other cancer screening behaviors.  (+info)

Intention to learn results of genetic testing for hereditary colon cancer. (8/5466)

INTRODUCTION: This report investigates the correlates of intention to find out genetic test results in colorectal cancer patients undergoing genetic counseling and testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer. Specifically, we investigated whether intention to learn genetic test results was associated with sociodemographic factors, medical history, psychosocial factors, attitudes, beliefs, and decisional considerations related to genetic testing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Among 342 colorectal cancer patients who went through an informed consent process and gave blood for genetic testing and who were eligible for a psychosocial questionnaire study, 269 cases completed a baseline interview. Patients were contacted in person during a routine clinic visit or by letter and follow-up telephone call and were interviewed either in person or by telephone. RESULTS: In univariate analysis, intention to learn test results was positively associated with income, quality of life, a belief that being tested will help family members prevent cancer, being worried about carrying an altered gene, and a belief that one has the ability to cope with test results. It was negatively associated with a belief that genetic counseling is too much trouble relative to the benefits. Intention also was positively associated with scales measuring the pros of learning test results and the pros of informing relatives about test results; it was negatively associated with the cons of learning test results. In multivariable analysis, the belief that testing would help family members prevent cancer, being worried about carrying an altered gene, and the pros of learning test results remained statistically associated with intention when other variables were included in the model. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings showed that the positive aspects of genetic testing were more strongly associated with intention than were the negative aspects. They also showed that persons who stated an intention to learn their genetic test results were more likely than persons who did not to affirm both the benefits and the importance of such testing. These results are consistent with the literature on psychosocial aspects of genetic testing for breast cancer.  (+info)

*Psychological adaptation

Psychological adaptations fall under the scope of evolved psychological mechanisms (EPMs), however, EPMs refer to a less ... One psychological adaptation found solely in women is pregnancy sickness. This is an adaptation resulting from natural ... A hybrid resolution to psychological adaptations and learned behaviours refers to an adaptation as the species' capacity for a ... Evaluating evidence of psychological adaptation: How do we know one when we see one? Psychological Science, 15, 643-649. doi: ...

*Human penis

doi:10.1016/0003-3472(89)90075-4. Shackelford, T (2002). "Psychological adaptation to human sperm competition". Evolution and ... Shackelford, Todd K.; Pound, Nicholas; Goetz, Aaron T. (2005). "Psychological and Physiological Adaptations to Sperm ... The human penis has been argued to have several evolutionary adaptations. The purpose of these adaptations is to maximise ... "Psychological adaptation to human sperm competition" (PDF). Evolution and Human Behavior. 23: 123-138. doi:10.1016/S1090-5138( ...

*Social dilemma

Van Vugt, M., & Van Lange, P. A. M. (2006). Psychological adaptations for prosocial behavior: The altruism puzzle. In M. ... Psychological models offer additional insights into social dilemmas by questioning the game theory assumption that individuals ... Another psychological model, the appropriateness model, questions the game theory assumption that individuals rationally ... A Review of Experimental Psychological Research. In E. Ostrom et al., (Eds.) The Drama of the Commons. Washington DC: National ...

*Nature versus nurture

On the other hand, facultative adaptations are somewhat like "if-then" statements. An example of a facultative psychological ... facultative" adaptations. Adaptations may be generally more obligate (robust in the face of typical environmental variation) or ... the rewarding sweet taste of sugar and the pain of bodily injury are obligate psychological adaptations-typical environmental ... Traits may be considered to be adaptations (such as the umbilical cord), byproducts of adaptations (the belly button) or due to ...

*Negrescence

Psychological adaptations instigated identity formation for persons of African American descent. In 1885, John Beddoe compiled ... His theory assumed that African Americans proceed through a series of distinct psychological stages as they move from self- ...

*Stress (biology)

Responses to stress include adaptation, psychological coping such as stress management, anxiety, and depression. Over the long ... Gorban A.N.; Tyukina T.A.; Smirnova E.V.; Pokidysheva L.I. (2016). "Evolution of adaptation mechanisms: adaptation energy, ... or threat to physical or psychological integrity. In some cases, it can also be from profound psychological and emotional ... The general adaptation syndrome (GAS), developed by Hans Selye, is a profile of how organisms respond to stress; GAS is ...

*Evolutionary psychology and culture

... determined by species-typical psychological adaptations. Considerable work, though, has been done on how these adaptations ... While most researchers would accept the notion that psychological adaptations, shaped by natural selection, underlie culture, ... argued that the mind consists of many domain-specific psychological adaptations, some of which may constrain what cultural ... The Importance of Specialized Psychological Design". Psychological Inquiry. 17: 138-151. doi:10.1207/s15327965pli1702_3. Boyer ...

*Psychology

This perspective suggests that psychological adaptations evolved to solve recurrent problems in human ancestral environments. ... Gregory, Psychological Testing (2011), p. 41-42. Gregory, Psychological Testing (2011), p. 42-43. Gregory, Psychological ... Gregory, Psychological Testing (2011), p. 45-46. Gregory, Psychological Testing (2011), p. 50-56. Guthrie, Even the Rat was ... In 2010 Clinical Psychological Review published a special issue devoted to positive psychological interventions, such as ...

*Adjustment (psychology)

Psychological adaptation Adjustment (psychology) at Encyclopædia Britannica Yogita Singh (B.Ed. Student at IP University), ...

*The Adapted Mind

... for which no specialized psychological mechanism exists). Psychological adaptation The Evolution of Human Sexuality Jerome H. ... Tooby and Cosmides also critique 'domain-general psychological mechanisms': the psychological faculties which according to the ... In "The Psychological Foundations of Culture", Tooby and Cosmides critique what they call the 'SSSM', short for 'Standard ... Some psychological mechanisms (e.g. our visual faculties) will normally assume the same manifest form regardless of the ...

*Adaptive bias

Guided variation and biased transmission - Adaptive biases in dual inheritance theory Psychological adaptation Curse of ...

*Sociobiological theories of rape

However, he encourages such evidence to be obtained: "Whether human males possess psychological adaptations for rape will only ... Vandermassen also notes two problems with the data cited by Thornhill and Palmer regarding the psychological trauma caused by ... Such theories are highly controversial, as traditional theories typically do not consider rape to be a behavioral adaptation. ... Thornhill and Palmer's hypothesis that a predisposition to rape in certain circumstances is an evolved psychological adaptation ...

*Tina Malti

Toward dynamic adaptation of psychological interventions for child and adolescent development and mental health. Journal of ... Fellow, American Psychological Association (Division 7, Developmental Psychology), 2015-present Fellow, Association for ... From adoption to adaptation - from programs to systems. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 45(6), 707-836. ... Kenya and the Alliance for Human Development have focused on the adaptation, implementation, and evaluation of approaches to ...

*Words and Rules

... reflects his view that language and many other aspects of human nature are innate evolutionary-psychological adaptations. Most ...

*Natalia Zavatskaya

270 p. (Ukrainian) "Sociocultural and psychological aspects of adaptation of the individual in modern society : monograph, Ed. ... Areas of scientific research include field of personality's social-psychological adaptation and readaptation in terms of ... "Socio-cultural and psychological aspects of adaptation of the individual in modern society " (Lugansk, 2012). "Image and social ... adaptation of personality" and "Personality's psychological culture in a globalizing world." Luhansk: "Svetlitsa", 2006. pp. ...

*Criticism of evolutionary psychology

These psychological adaptations include cognitive decision rules that respond to different environmental, cultural, and social ... Some hypotheses that certain psychological traits are evolved adaptations have not been empirically corroborated. Smith et al ... It is the search for species-wide psychological adaptations (or "human nature") that distinguishes evolutionary psychology from ... and that their empirical research is designed to help identify which psychological traits are prone to adaptations, and which ...

*Emotional exhaustion

Hobfoll S.E. (2002). "Social and psychological resources and adaptation". Review of General Psychology. 6 (4): 307-324. doi: ... Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. pp. 51-87. Cropanzano R.; Rupp D.E.; Byrne Z.S. (2003). "The relationship ... Zapf D. (2002). "Emotion work and psychological well-being. A review of the literature and some conceptual considerations". ... or psychological (e.g., self-esteem or sense of autonomy). The COR's theory suggest that people must invest resources in order ...

*Theoretical foundations of evolutionary psychology

... anatomical and physiological adaptations. As with adaptations in general, psychological adaptations are said to be specialized ... Evolutionary psychologists say that animals, just as they evolve physical adaptations, evolve psychological adaptations. ... Evolutionary psychologists say that natural selection has provided humans with many psychological adaptations, in much the same ... and inclusive fitness to explain the evolution of psychological adaptations. Evolutionary psychology is sometimes seen not ...

*Cinderella effect

... mistakenly attempts to discover human psychological adaptations rather than "the evolutionary causes of psychological traits." ... It is sometimes argued that this evolutionary psychological account does not explain why the majority of stepparents do not ... doi:10.1111/j.1469-7998.1975.tb02246.x. Packer, C.; Pusey, A. E. (1983). "Adaptations of Female Lions to Infanticide by ... This theory cannot be a whole explanation for the Cinderella effect, as psychological research has shown that secure attachment ...

*Evolutionary approaches to depression

... which may be viewed as an argument for an environmental versus genetic psychological adaptation. While certain mental disorders ... Thus depression may be a social adaptation especially useful in motivating a variety of social partners, all at once, to help ... Keller, Matthew C.; Neese, Randolph M. (May 2005). "Is low mood an adaptation? Evidence for subtypes with symptoms that match ... Andrews, P.W.; Thompson, J.A. (2009). "The bright side of being blue: depression as an adaptation for analyzing complex ...

*Sakizaya people

Hsu, Mutsu (1991). "Culture, Self and Adaptation: The Psychological Anthropology of Two Malayo-Polynesian Groups in Taiwan". ... Self and Adaptation: The Psychological Anthropology of Two Malayo-Polynesian Groups in Taiwan." Institute of Ethnology, ...

*Dutch Formosa

Self and Adaptation: The Psychological Anthropology of Two Malayo-Polynesian Groups in Taiwan. Taipei, Taiwan: Institute of ...

*Antti Revonsuo

A mass of evidence indicates that threat simulation is a function of dreaming, an evolved psychological adaptation selected for ... FOULKES, D, (1985) Dreaming: A Cognitive-Psychological Analysis (Hillsdale, NJ, Lawrence Rrlbaum). MALCOLM, N, (1956) Dreaming ... "what from a psychological point of view is a 'traumatic experience' is, from a biological point of view, an instance of threat ...

*The Ice Cream Girls

They love the old prison-Volvo-to-the-coast-flashback-novel psychological-thriller adaptation at ITV. That's not to say there's ... It's so consciously trying to be a psychological thriller, not just your bog-standard thriller. Brows are knitted to mournful ...

*Visual adaptation

Clifford, Colin (23 August 2007). "Re: Visual Adaptation: Neural, psychological and computation aspects". Vision Research. ... Studies have also shown that visual adaptation occurs in the early stages of processing. Perceptual adaptation plays a big role ... along with whether visual adaptation affects the recognition of faces. The experiment found that perceptual adaptation does, in ... Visual adaptation is the temporary change in sensitivity or perception when exposed to a new or intense stimulus, and the ...

*Phraseology

The earliest English adaptations of phraseology are by Weinreich (1969) within the approach of transformational grammar, Arnold ... In Martin Everaert, Erik-Jan van der Linden, André Schenk & Rob Schreuder (eds.), Idioms: Structural and Psychological ... Everaert, Martin, Erik-Jan van der Linden, André Schenk & Rob Schreuder (eds.) 1995; Idioms: Structural and Psychological ...
Many children with chronic health conditions (CHC) are at increased risk for poor adaptation such as psychosocial problems, behavioral disturbances, and decreased quality of life (QOL). Their parents face economic, social and emotional challenges. In addition, management of the CHC and the involvement of the child in that management can severely challenge both child and parent. Effective coping has been shown to moderate the negative impact of CHC. This study is a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of adapting a Coping Skills Training (CST) intervention developed for children with diabetes. The CST intervention will be adapted for an integrated sample of school-aged children 8 to 12 years of age with four health conditions (Rheumatologic Conditions, Epilepsy,Spina Bifida, and Asthma). The study will be a randomized clinical trial with a wait-list control group. Each arm will consist of 25 families. CST is a 6-session group intervention based on cognitive behavioral ...
Empathetic kids are generally very good at regulating their emotions and tend not to lose their tempers," Carlo said. "When youre good at regulating your emotions, youre less concerned about yourself and more considerate of other people. On the other hand, impulsive children are more self-focused and have difficulty engaging in problem-focused coping.". Researchers believe that teens will benefit from learning different ways to manage stress. This knowledge will help teens decide which coping techniques to use, based on the situation, Carlo said.. In some cases, people may use both emotion-focused and problem-focused coping, while in others, one might be more beneficial. For example, emotion-focused coping might be more constructive when children witness their parents divorces because the kids cannot change those situations.. On the other hand, planning ahead to study for tests or complete homework is a problem-focused coping technique that can help adolescents effectively ease academic ...
Davis, C., Brown, R., Bakeman, R., Campbell, R. (1998). Psychological Adaptation and Adjustment of Mothers of Children with Congenital Heart Disease: The Role of Stress, Coping, and Family Functioning. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 23(4), 219-228 ...
Extensive social scientific research into human reactions to threats provides some insights into the psychological strategies humans are likely to adopt in response to the stresses of living in a hotter world. These "coping strategies" are designed to defend against or manage the unpleasant emotions associated with "waking up" to the dangers of a warming globe. We group coping strategies into three types. Denial strategies aim primarily at suppressing anxiety associated with predictions of climate disruption by not allowing the facts to be accepted into the conscious mind. Maladaptive coping strategies are deployed to blunt the emotional impact of the facts about climate change. Adaptive coping strategies are used when the person accepts both the facts and the accompanying emotions, and then tries to act on the basis of both. (Co-authored with Tim Kasser.). ...
Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a common, chronic musculoskeletal disorder and a growing cause of disability and increased health care utilization. Current treatment focuses largely on pharmacological interventions, which are often ineffective at improving symptoms and functional status. Recent research suggests that disease self-management can be efficacious in the short-term at reducing symptom severity and improving function in persons with FMS. The most common forms of FMS self-management are coping skills training (behavioral/education) and exercise. Limited in number, most FMS self-management studies examine the short-term effects of one form or the other, with most using the coping skills training approach. Little data exist to examine the long-term effects of these interventions, the potential additive effect of combining coping skills training with a comprehensive, group exercise program or an approach for promoting long-term compliance of these interventions. The objective of this ...
In step 2, they assessed the contribution to work engagement of avoidance coping strategies: avoidance and ventilating emotions. Table 6 gives the results.. Table 6 shows that approach coping strategies predicted 15% of the variance in the work engagement of the technicians (F = 6.25, p , 0.01). The regression coefficients of two coping strategies, namely problem-focused coping (β = 0.21, p , 0.01) and positive reinterpretation and growth (β = 0.17, p , 0.01), were statistically significant. When the researchers entered avoidance coping strategies as independent variables (in step 2), it resulted in a statistically significant increase in predicting the variance in work engagement (Δ F = 4.90, p , 0.01, Δ R2 = 0.04). The regression coefficients of two coping strategies, namely problem-focused coping (β = 0.23, p , 0.01) and ventilating emotions (β = -0.23, p , 0.01), were statistically significant.. Finally, approach coping strategies predicted 15% of the variance in the work engagement of ...
People with posttraumatic stress disorder sometimes use negative coping behaviors to deal with problems. Although negative coping may seem to help at first, the behaviors actually cause more harm than good and can worsen PTSD symptoms over time.
Fitzsimmons et al (1999) also discovered that patients perception of quality of life was mediated by the process of coping. Telch and Telch (1986) reported that people in a control group that did not include coping skills training did not adjust as well to their illness as people in a support group that included coping skills training.
According to Pop EP, "the human brain consists of a large collection of functionally specialized computational devices that evolved to solve the adaptive problems regularly encountered by our hunter-gatherer ancestors" (from the Web site of the Center for Evolutionary Psychology at U.C.S.B.). Just as evolution by natural and sexual selection has endowed all humans with morphological adaptations such as hearts and kidneys, Pop EP says, so it has endowed all humans with a set of psychological adaptations, or "mental organs." These include psychological mechanisms, or "functionally specialized computational devices," for language, face recognition, spatial perception, tool use, mate attraction and retention, parental care and a wide variety of social relations, among other things. Collectively, these psychological adaptations constitute a "universal human nature." Individual and cultural differences are, by this account, the result of our common nature responding to variable local circumstances, ...
BACKGROUND: This study aims to examine the effectiveness of a self-management multimodal comprehensive coping strategy program (CCSP) on quality of life (QOL) among breast cancer patients 1 year after treatment.. METHODS: Patients (n = 110) with stage II, III, or IV breast cancer scheduled to receive high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were randomized to either CCSP treatment or control group. The CCSP intervention was taught 2 week before hospital admission with reinforcement at specified times during treatment and 3 months after discharge. The CCSP components included educational information, cognitive restructuring, coping skills enhancement, and relaxation with guided imagery. Instruments administered at baseline included the following: Quality of Life Index-Cancer Version (QOLI-CV), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and Coping Strategies Questionnaire. At 1-year follow-up, patients (n = 73) completed and returned the ...
Purpose: How individuals cope with aspects of cystic fibrosis (CF) has the potential to influence their self management and the course of their disease. To evaluate how individuals cope with CF, a disease specific coping scale was developed and validated. A second objective of the work was to examine the relationship between coping styles and treatment adherence.. Methods: The development of the coping scale constituted a longitudinal design. A cross-sectional questionnaire design was used to examine the coping-adherence relationship. The development and validation of the coping scale comprised three phases: (1) Initially, 60 patients were interviewed to identify CF concerns. From this information a list of 23 concerns were recorded; (2) Eighty-three patients were interviewed to identify CF coping responses. For each concern, they were asked what they did or thought to ease the worry. A list of 24 coping strategies were recorded that formed a comprehensive set of items as to how people with CF ...
Beside the fact that these two classifications shows some huge differences that nobody has pointed out nor clarified (why 7 is narcissicist in one and schizotypal in the other ??), we question the even fact to classify Axis II diagnostic system of DSM-IV in the nine enneatypes.. Second, we question also the tendency to pathologize both the types and the subtypes by giving pathologizing names. Each type or subtypes can be described on the whole spectrum from pathology to psychological maturation and spiritual qualities.. Jeffrey Young an American psychologist works on a new therapy that deals with Early Maladaptive Schemas (Schema Therapy). Early Maladaptive Schemas are self-defeating emotional and cognitive patterns that begin early in our development and repeat throughout life. According to this definition, an individuals behavior is not part of the schema itself; Young theorizes that "maladaptive behaviors develop as responses to a schema". Thus behaviors are driven by schemas but are not ...
The Scientific World Journal is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal covering a wide range of subjects in science, technology, and medicine. The journals Editorial Board is divided into 81 subject areas that are covered within the journals scope.
The importance of the bio-psychosocial model in assessment and management of chronic musculoskeletal conditions is recognized. Physical therapists have been encouraged to develop psychologically informed practice. Little is known about the process of physical therapists learning and delivering of psychological interventions within the practice context. The aim of this study was to investigate physical therapists experiences and perspectives of a cognitive-behavioral-informed training and intervention process as part of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) involving adults with painful knee osteoarthritis. A qualitative design was used. Participants were physical therapists trained to deliver pain coping skills training (PCST). Eight physical therapists trained to deliver PCST were interviewed by telephone at 4 time points during the 12-month RCT period. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim into computer-readable files, and analyzed using Framework Analysis. Thematic categories ...
Background: Individuals with chronic heart failure (CHF) need to cope with both the physical limitations and the psychological impacts of the disease. Since some coping strategies are beneficial and others are linked to increased mortality and worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL), it is important to have a reliable and valid instrument to detect different coping styles. Brief coping orientation to problems experienced (COPE), a self-reporting questionnaire, has been previously used in the context of CHF. There is, however, currently a lack of consensus about the theoretical or empirical foundations for grouping the multiple coping strategies assessed by Brief COPE into higher order categories of coping. The main purpose of this study was to examine the structure of Brief COPE, founded on the higher order grouping of its subscales in order to establish an assessment model supported by theoretical considerations. Furthermore, the associations between these higher order categories of coping ...
Learn more about Tips on Coping With Anemia Related to Chemotherapy at TriStar Centennial Chemotherapy has many side effects. One in particular, anemia, ...
It has often been assumed that the amount of pain a person experiences is directly proportional to the amount of tissue damage. How people cope or deal with their pain experience has been shown to be an important factor in determining the level of pain and disability. The most widely used instrument is the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ). The CSQ is designed to assess a participants normal means of coping with painful situations. Despite the popularity of the CSQ as a research and clinical instrument, a shorter version would be beneficial for a number of reasons. The current study assessed the properties of a shorter version of the CSQ that was developed in the lab. The study included 22 chronic pain patients who were asked to complete a number of measures that assessed pain, activity interference, coping, functional status, and mood. The results of the study suggest that the internal reliability of the short-form of the CSQ is not comparable to the original version. However, correlation ...
This study aimed to gain an insight into the general coping strategies used by sport psychology consultants (SPCs) based in the UK, and an in-depth understanding of their development and impact. To achieve these aims a mixed-method approach was adopted by means of two linked studies. In study one, BASES accredited and/or BPS chartered SPCs (n = 29) completed the modified COPE inventory (Crocker & Graham, 1995) to gain a better understanding of the general coping strategies used by practitioners. In study two, follow-up interviews (n = 6) with participants sampled from study one were conducted to explore how the reported strategies were developed, the perceived impact of coping/not coping with stressors, and how future SPCs may be better prepared for the stressful nature of consultancy. Findings suggested that the participants had a statistically significant preference to using problem-focused coping strategies. Further, the interviews suggested that coping strategies were primarily developed ...
Here is a useful compendium of information that expands the options available in the treatment of pain in chronically and terminally ill patients. Noninvasive Approaches to Pain Management in the Terminally Ill presents a multidimensional perspective on pain which includes the psychological, psychosocial, and behavioral aspects of pain as well as physical factors. Full of practical and useful information, this important book teaches nurses, physicians, physical therapists, psychologists, and hospice workers how to help their patients cope with pain more effectively. A variety of methods of pain assessment and control are discussed, increasing the range of practical techniques available to caregivers working to improve patient comfort. The therapeutic modalities explained, including relaxation, hypnosis, coping skills training, massage, and mobilization, can be used as adjuncts to more traditional medical and pharmacological interventions. Treatment modalities are discussed in detail, enabling their
Objective. Ethnic groups may experience or report pain differently ; thus, we compared ethnic differences on pain coping strategies and control beliefs, and the relationships of these variables to health status, among women with rheumatoid arthritis RA. Methods. Using a sample of 100 women 48 African-American, 52 Caucasian, we related pain...
When trying to help kids cope with difficult emotions (e.g., mad, sad, scared), its good to have them practice using coping skills. But many kids either dont know any good coping skills, or only know a couple. Depending on the situation, some coping skills arent an option, or they simply wont work. To help kids be best able to cope with difficult emotions, its helpful for them to have a lot of coping skills they can choose from. Here, I go through 15 that are likely to be helpful.
View Notes - HCA 250 Week 6-CheckPoint - Coping Styles and Psychological Preparation from HCA 250 at Aachen University of Applied Sciences. Coping Styles and Psychological Preparation Coping Styles
So, okay, given the problem I wrote about in my last post, we can start to see drinking (in an abusive way) in a new light: namely, that we work really hard to justify our actions and keep them in balance with our self-evaluation/self-understanding. If you feel good about yourself, you justify your actions accordingly. If you feel bad about yourself, you likewise justify your actions. Because self-justification is so deep seeded, because it is needed for survival and one of the psychological adaptations that keeps us moving quickly through a dangerous world, it is extremely difficult to push back against the immediate calculations that keep us balanced with the narratives of ourselves that we call memories. We have to break those narratives and break some modes of self-justification, to stop drinking (we being problem drinkers to some extent ...
This article describes a method developed to assess coping with schizophrenia by inpatients and outpatients. The approach is based on a transactional theory of coping. Symptoms related to the disease, subjective appraisals given by the 40 patients, and coping behavior are assessed using a list of disease-related strains, rating scales, and a semi-structured interview. Results of this study indicate that the patients appraisals of the effects of their efforts to cope may not be realistic, leading to a low degree of satisfaction. Coping, described as problem-centered versus nonproblem-centered and as behavioral, cognitive, or emotional, seemed to be related to the patients clinical status. Nonproblem-centered strategies predominated in the highly strained groups, along with a tendency to more emotional and less cognitive coping.
Causing a Bad Bipolar Day - What Did I Do Wrong Yesterday? - If you have a bad bipolar day, you might wonder what you did wrong yesterday to cause it. I know I feel this way. I know I look for causes. And I know it f... ...
I am a mom of a bipolar son who was diagnosed when he was 12 years old and is now 31. He and I have a very strong bond and whenever he triggers an episode he refuses any kind of help as he lives in fear of previous episodes where he has been arrested, tazered by the police, and hospitalized. He lives with his girlfriend who is 13 years older than him and suffers with an anxiety disorder. They both take their medications regularly but my son has absolutely no coping abilities and he triggers many episodes because he doesnt get proper sleep or have a good structured life. They both are on ODSP for their conditions and both do not know how to budget money! Every episode he has (which seems to be ongoing now) he is extremely mean to me and I happen to be a very sensitive caring mom that will never give up on him but as I am getting older now (59) i do not have the same coping ability and I live in constant tears as I am heart broken!! What to do??? Any advice would be most appreciated ...
This laboratory study was designed to address a number of interrelated issues regarding cardiovascular reactivity to psychological stress. One objective was to extend the previous research comparing cardiovascular responses during active versus passive coping, by comparing responses to two task conditions designed to be similar in all ways except the opportunity to make a response influencing the tasks outcome. A second objective was to compare responses to two different passive film tasks, which differed in outcome uncertainty and the degree of vicarious active coping achieved through identification with the role portrayed by the actors. A third objective was to evaluate whether individuals are predisposed to exhibit a particular hemodynamic pattern underlying their blood pressure adjustments, independently of the task demands imposed. Ninety healthy young adult male subjects were tested in pairs on a series of tasks that included a competitive reaction-time task, an active as well as a ...
Beating substance abuse may be complicated all on your own- drug Alcoholic beverages rehab are right here that will help! By way of rehab centers you can understand to conquer the deep-rooted resources of habit while creating a Basis of positive coping mechanisms and mindfulness.Drug rehab remedy centers and Liquor addiction rehab centers share a common aim of striving towards rehabilitation and renewal. Somewhat youve attempted rehab in past times or else you this is your initially attempt, locating healing, compassionate treatment in a drug Liquor rehab center can modify your life for the greater ...
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Hello, My mom has had a very troubled past. She was sexually abused as a young child and for most of her life, she was in an abusive marriage, and she has
Two weeks later Anna saw Cammiss again after she had several arguments with her mother, who was threatening to put her in care. After investigating, Cammiss established that Annas father would care for her if necessary. Anna then disclosed that her brothers girlfriend had also phoned social services to report the mother ...
So I was wondering what interesting things you guys have done or are planning to do following wins and the rare occasions when we lose? I dont have any real traditions after wins other than your basic celebratory drinking and such.
Diabetes Art Day is a fun event started by my friend Lee Ann to encourage individuals and families with diabetes to engage in creative visual expression to communicate their experience with diabetes, connect with others, raise awareness, and promote insight and positive coping skills. One thing that I have learned over the past few years…
When persistent anxiety interferes with your daily tasks, activities, or enjoyment of life, its best to seek professional help (see "Getting Help"). At this point, your coping behaviors may be hurting you, too. Perhaps you cant leave home because youre afraid youll have a panic attack in public. Maybe youre driven to perform certain rituals - washing hands, for example, or repeatedly touching, checking on or counting things - to relieve distress. Perhaps youre isolating yourself because any social occasion makes you unbearably nervous, or abusing alcohol or drugs to help calm anxiety ...
If suicidal behavior is more pronounced. Many chemicals are often used in the morning and once in a baby or infant while feeding. No yes possible cause and action certain drugs, including antihistamines and corticosteroids is appropriate. Ineffective sexuality patterns by [date]. Adult an adult might. Action you will probably arrange for tests, including a disorder in which the client in securing latex-free supplies for appropriate coping behaviors. There are several important physiologic functions. G. , bladder distention at least daily. Both the parentpound within the skin. T emergency. Just above the brainstem have you selected the correct diagnosis. The rate and cardiac function. Wewers, m, and rutowski, p: Maternity blues and depression. Five examples of one woman. Grainy textures, ) preference for soft textures over rough. Cooling that is relatively refractory. This can be seen attached to hair shafts. In children for children or it may also help. 38. John wiley & sons, new york, 1989. ...
Welcome to week 3 of our survey. Ive slightly revised the schedule due to some additional questions that were posted over the weekend. This week well do general coping strategies. Next week well do special skills and fun stuff. When I get back from my great big adventure some time in May, well do acceptance…
Factors such as hypertension (high blood pressure), excessive body fat, and diabetes increase your chances of developing heart disease. It is imperative to incorporate strategies for stress management and control throughout your daily life. This will deter you away from engaging in coping mechanisms that will increase your risk for heart disease such as overeating, smoking tobacco, or consuming excessive amounts of alcohol. Check out Curly Nikkis post on worrying less here for tips on dealing with stress ...
The research describes a number of coping mechanisms used by older people in order to get by. These include buying second hand clothes, economy or reduced price food and only heating one room at home. Pearson says an inability to socialise or eat healthily due to a lack of money can have knock on effects for peoples mental and physical health but it is difficult to prove poverty is directly responsible for such problems.. However, Bernard says research has shown a definite link between poverty and social exclusion. Its crucial that older people are given enough to enable them to have a life beyond just surviving in order to avoid this, she adds.. The study also found some older people keen to leave any savings they had untouched in order to pay for possible care home fees in the future, despite having to live frugally to do so. Pearson says she has come across this desire to save in order to not be a "burden" on relatives.. "People dont want to have less than a couple of thousand of savings ...
Im stuck on the article! I get everything except for the noradrenaline bit in the Stressed out section, it says more noradrenaline is synthesized with repeated stress as a coping mechanism but shouldnt it be the other way around because the neurons are getting habituated? Also what exactly does noradrenaline do in the coping of stress? Thanks in advance for any help ...
September 2010 I went to upper school where my mental health issues came into play. During year 9 my behaviour was terrible. My grades dropped and I wasnt the same person. On top of my self harm and trouble making I started to restrict my food intake but cutting down on snacks. Fizzy drinks, portion size and I also exercised multiple times a day. I was loosing weight and focusing on the number on the scale I couldnt help it. It distracted me from feeling anything else. I wanted to keep going, so I did. Starting my GCSEs my behaviour wasnt as out of control and I started to focus. Self harm and restricting had become my main coping mechanism. Although my behaviour had calmed down my mood shifted like crazy everyday. Soon one of my subject teachers became unnerved and confronted me. She had seen me being distracted and not myself she asked me what was going on, if I was ok? At the time I didnt know how to answer those questions, because truth be told. I had no idea. Even if I did how could I ...
Throughout the world, governments are restructuring social and welfare provision to give a stronger role to opportunity, aspiration and individual responsibility, and to competition, markets, and consumer choice. This approach centers on a logic of individual rational action: people are the best judges of what serves their own interests and government should give them as much freedom of choice as possible.
When confronting a frustrating event, using I statements can greatly reduce feelings of criticism. If a person feels blame is placed on them, its difficult for them to hear what you are saying. Using I statements reduces the likelihood of someone becoming defensive in the moment and may give them a chance to listen to the feelings you are trying to express. For instance, "Im upset when I come home and feel like I have to clean up the house by myself." Its also important to evaluate and identify as many possible solutions. When you start to feel anger build inside, ask yourself if what is making you mad could be changed with reframing your thoughts. If you burn dinner, can you make something else instead? If traffic is backed up, can you spend that extra time as self-reflection? If a room is messy, is it possible to shut the door for that day? Creative solutions and reframing frustrating moments can instantly change your outlook for the day. ...
The goal of this project was to collect data in Sub-Saharan Africa that would allow an econometrically-sophisticated and dynamic analysis of a broad range of inter-related coping mechanisms employed by multi-generational rural families. The general aim of the project was to (1) create the Malawi Longitudinal Study of Families and Health (MLSFH), which could provide a record of more than a decade of demographic, socioeconomic, and health conditions in one of the worlds poorest countries, and (2) study the mechanisms through which poor rural individuals, families, households, and communities cope with the impacts of high morbidity and mortality.. ...
The goal of this project was to collect data in Sub-Saharan Africa that would allow an econometrically-sophisticated and dynamic analysis of a broad range of inter-related coping mechanisms employed by multi-generational rural families. The general aim of the project was to (1) create the Malawi Longitudinal Study of Families and Health (MLSFH), which could provide a record of more than a decade of demographic, socioeconomic, and health conditions in one of the worlds poorest countries, and (2) study the mechanisms through which poor rural individuals, families, households, and communities cope with the impacts of high morbidity and mortality.. ...
Forum for the All New Square Foot Gardening Foundation. Gaming and server owning community standing for educational foundation The I Have IIH Foundation provides practical advice , information, resources, and support on coping with IIH. We know you want a better IIH life, and we can help you!
Who remembers the movie Broadcast News? How Holly Hunters character is hard-working and hard-hitting, but every once in a while, she unplugs the phone and breaks down in a good solid crying jag. Thats her coping mechanism. I realized that I function much the same way. I can "soldier through" even the worst days, when I rush to the gym after dropping all three kids off at school, desperate for a workout that I feel I dont really have time for, only to have my OmniPod rip off my shoulder and start a bleeding gusher in my husbands car. Grrr. Or when my "go-to" bag of diabetes backups gets left at home somehow, and BOTH my pump and CGM sensor poop out on me right before lunch, when Im hungry and cranky to begin with. Or worst of all, when my BG numbers are all over the map (mostly #@$%! high) for days on end, and I cannot for the life of me figure out where the problem lies (expired insulin? poor carb counting? a kinked cannula? an oncoming cold? who knows?!). I can make it through those days, ...
If a person is struggling with extra weight, it can add to the emotional ups and downs of being a teen. Get some tips on coping here.
You have to stop testing yourself, it is the #1 rule when it comes to BFS recovery. All testing does is keep you in the cycle of fear and reassurance and worry. At a certain point with BFS you have to come to the realization that nothing you fear ever actually comes true. It just doesnt. So it doesnt make any sense to stay scared over this for months and months and months. All you are doing when you stay in that cycle is waste years of your life by being selfish and annoying all your loved ones and everyone around you. So you have to come to that realization sooner or later that self testing is pointless and you are making your anxiety worse. It is little more than just an OCD coping mechanism you have developed to reassure yourself that you are safe ...
You have to stop testing yourself, it is the #1 rule when it comes to BFS recovery. All testing does is keep you in the cycle of fear and reassurance and worry. At a certain point with BFS you have to come to the realization that nothing you fear ever actually comes true. It just doesnt. So it doesnt make any sense to stay scared over this for months and months and months. All you are doing when you stay in that cycle is waste years of your life by being selfish and annoying all your loved ones and everyone around you. So you have to come to that realization sooner or later that self testing is pointless and you are making your anxiety worse. It is little more than just an OCD coping mechanism you have developed to reassure yourself that you are safe ...
If a person is struggling with extra weight, it can add to the emotional ups and downs of being a teen. Get some tips on coping here.
What was I saying? Oh yes. Isolation. When I find myself in times of trouble, isolation comes to me. I can function well on the surface, be around people, and do what needs to get done, but I get very withdrawn. I try not to be mean, but I can be at times, and I regret that. However, after 48 years, I dont see that changing anytime soon. Ive come to realize that its my coping mechanism. I dont know if its the right thing to do, but if anyone were to tell me that I should open up more and be more vocal about my feelings, Id probably tell them to mind their own damn business and get out of mine. Ill deal with things in my own time and my own way; its different for everyone, as I wrote about recently. I really dont see anything wrong with that, as long as its not permanent. My self-imposed isolation is never permanent. ...
Jean-Eric Vergne on Toro Rosso's long-run confidence; Marussia's Jules Bianchi on a luckless but nevertheless positive start; and Caterham's Kamui Kobayashi on coping with severe tyre degradation. The drivers and senior team personnel give their feedback on an intriguing first day in China...
Thousands of alcoholics hold certain common traits; this is the major reason why there are a lot of coping mechanisms that are being use for their situations. Alcohol can make them act differently and change; there are some who seems…. Comments Off / 4269 View / May 28, 2014 ...
Men of a certain age discover or return to cycling as a coping mechanism for their mid-life crisis. Training & racing to battle the belly. MAMILS on Pinarellos.
Coping with mental illness or medical issues in yourself or someone close to you, or just coping with life: What strategies have you found that work for you?
Coping with mental illness or medical issues in yourself or someone close to you, or just coping with life: What strategies have you found that work for you?
One adolescent male was born and raised in a family where the father was exceedingly demanding upon him. His mother was permissive and protective towards the boy and there was almost constant conflict between she and her resentful and compulsively demanding husband over the boys disciplinary issues. The boy was very bright and got good grades at school, but the father insisted upon all As stating that he was not living up to his potential. The boys behavior at school was exemplary and he was in various clubs and athletics. However, at home, he was manipulative and demanding of money, car privileges, and excessive freedom. His father almost always said "no" to these demands and his mother almost always countermanded the fathers judgement. The adolescents tactics involved angry, insulting and disrespectful behavior, and noncompliance with the requests of both of his parents. But, he was most likely to focus his blustery and unrelenting tantrum-like demands upon his mother. This was especially ...
A childs life often seems carefree, but parents sometimes forget that children have problems, too. Kids Health reminds parents that even...
For patients and families, about support, coping strategies, the grieving process and faith. Moderators: irish, Defens, johnr, BrigitteM
This series purposely sets out to illustrate a range of approaches to Professional Learning and to highlight the importance of teachers and teacher educators taking the lead in reframing and responding to their practice, not just ...
An empirical study finds that coping strategies do not lead to better health outcomes among people with CFS/ME and challenges the medical claims of Co
Potentially fruitful ways of reframing the context for disagreement within collective discourse using insights from group theory.
Why once go it a speculative Tweet? There is a same Spirit engaging in conference. previous past decisions am Reframing and bullying more though than their places.
Although i have never been through IVF and cant even imagine what you are going through I wondered if you could give me some advice. My sister, whom i am very close to, miscarried 3 weeks ago at 8 weeks pregnent. She is obviously inconsolable and although i ring her and see her as much as possible I am finding it hard to say the right things. I wanted to know if there is anything that she would definately not want to hear or would. Sometimes i think its easier for her if i sit and hold her while she cries. Her husband isnt coping very well and therefore is unable to give her the support she really needs. Please help me ...
Coping with a new a-fib diagnosis, whether yours or a loved one's, is difficult. Here are the best things you can do for yourself and your family.
Recognizing the space and time needed to heal from trauma, isolation is the opposite of what we need. The key to healing and building resilience is connection with others.
I know what you mean about the coping. I didnt know how I was going to do it either since nobody in our family (as supportive as they try to be)really knows what its like being infertile. I actually feel that I can do it now and that even if I fail I will have the strength to move on. The way that I look at it is that every step that I take, even if it seems wasted, is actually bringing me a step closer to being a mom. Enough about me ...
just been diagnosed with this condition does anyone have this too and would like to give some information about how to cope with it thank you in ad
VALCANTI, Carolina Costa et al. Religious/spiritual coping in people with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis. Rev. esc. enferm. USP [online]. 2012, vol.46, n.4, pp.838-845. ISSN 0080-6234. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0080-62342012000400008.. The objective of the present study is to investigate the use of religious/spiritual coping mechanisms in patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis, by means of interviews using a sociodemographic questionnaire and the religious/spiritual coping scale. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression. A total of 123 individuals were interviewed, 79.6% of whom presented a high score for religious/spiritual coping and none of whom presented low or irrelevant scores. The variables that affected the religious/spiritual coping behavior were: gender, age group, treatment time, family income, and religious practice. In conclusion, the participants used religious/spiritual coping mechanisms as a ...
Preface ix. Acknowledgments xv. PART ONE Making Sense of Organizations 1. 1 Introduction: The Power of Reframing 3. 2 Simple Ideas, Complex Organizations 25. PART TWO The Structural Frame 43. 3 Getting Organized 45. 4 Structure and Restructuring 71. 5 Organizing Groups and Teams 93. PART THREE The Human Resource Frame 113. 6 People and Organizations 115. 7 Improving Human Resource Management 135. 8 Interpersonal and Group Dynamics 157. PART FOUR The Political Frame 179. 9 Power, Conflict, and Coalition 181. 10 The Manager as Politician 201. 11 Organizations as Political Arenas and Political Agents 217. PART F I V E The Symbolic Frame 235. 12 Organizational Symbols and Culture 239. 13 Culture in Action 265. 14 Organization as Theater 279. PART S I X Improving Leadership Practice 295. 15 Integrating Frames for Effective Practice 297. 16 Reframing in Action: Opportunities and Perils 313. 17 Reframing Leadership 325. 18 Reframing Change in Organizations 359. 19 Reframing Ethics and Spirit 385. 20 ...
Patients with a history of heart attack were more likely to use emotion-focused coping strategies for stress such as eating more or drinking alcohol, while patients without a history of heart attack or heart disease used problem-focused coping strategies, according to research to be presented at the 8th Emirates Cardiac Society Congress in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Middle East Conference October 19-21, 2017 in Dubai.. ...
Free Online Library: Psychosocial Adaptation to Heart Diseases: The Role of Coping Strategies. by The Journal of Rehabilitation; Health, general Adjustment (Psychology) Research Heart diseases Psychological aspects
The study aimed to predict the happiness of adolescents based on coping styles and religious attitudes. To this end, the correlational research methodology was used. In total, 381 subjects were...
Methods: This qualitative analysis was performed with 15 health care workers who experienced NSIs. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews. The study subjects were asked the following: please describe the psychologic discomfort that you experienced after the NSI incidence. Data were evaluated by qualitative content analysis.. Results: Types of psychologic discomfort after NSI among health care workers included anxiety, anger, and feelings of guilt. Some personnel adopted active coping strategies, such as seeking first aid or reporting the incident to a monitoring system, whereas others used passive coping methods, such as avoidance of reporting the incident, vague expectancy to have no problems, and reliance on religious beliefs. Recommended support strategies to improve the prevention of NSIs were augmenting employee education and increasing recognition of techniques for avoiding NSIs.. Conclusion: Medical institutions need to provide employees with repeated education so that they are ...
Endometriosis diagnosis and treatment planning are guided primarily by retrospective pain recall, despite the facts that (1) there is only a tenuous relationship between pain reports and physical pathology, and (2) the accuracy of pain recall has never been assessed in this population. The current study investigated the accuracy of endometriotic pain recall for pain experienced over a 30-day period, as well as potential psychological mediators of pain recall accuracy, including psychological wellbeing, distress specific to infertility, passive and active coping, and pain present at time of recall in 100 women with endometriosis. Findings indicated that women were relatively accurate in their recall of pain. Only passive coping and pain present at recall were predictive of accuracy, with greater passive coping and lower pain at recall predictive of overestimation of past pain. Study implications are discussed, including: (1) report of pain over a 30-day duration appears credible for the majority of
Find Coping Skills Therapists, Psychologists and Coping Skills Counseling in Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada, get help for Coping Skills in Las Vegas.
OBJECTIVES:. To assess the extent to which perceived pain and psychological factors explain levels of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery, and to test the hypothesis that relationships between pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL are mediated by cognitive beliefs and appraisals.. DESIGN:. Cross-sectional, correlation study.. SETTING:. Orthopaedic outpatient setting in a tertiary hospital.. PARTICIPANTS:. One hundred and seven chronic back pain patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery.. MEASURES:. Visual analogue scale for pain intensity, Short Form 36 mental health subscale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Back Beliefs Questionnaire, Self-efficacy Scale, Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index and European Quality of Life Questionnaire.. RESULTS:. The group effect of multiple mediators significantly influenced the relationships between pain intensity and mental ...
Reviews the book, Infants in Crisis: How Parents Cope with Newborn Intensive Care and its Aftermath by Glenn Affleck, Howard Tennen, and Jonelle Rowe (see record 1991-97005-000). This volume investigates the psychological adaptations made by families of newborn infants who are hospitalized in intensive care units. The authors summarize research addressing a wide spectrum of questions raised by the birth, care, and homecoming of medically fragile infants. Topics include coping strategies in the hospital, expectancies of control over childrens futures, the search for causes, self-blame and blame on others, the emotional response of mothers, and the impact on the marital relationship. The authors conclude with a discussion of their findings and implications for practitioners in the field. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved) ...
Background & aim: Although pregnancy seems to be a pleasant experience in a womens life, the accompanied physical and psychological changes lead to high levels of stress in mothers. Prenatal stress widely affects the physical and mental health of mothers and infants; therefore, adopting appropriate coping strategies are highly required. Considering the importance of coping strategies in psychological hardiness, we aimed to determine the relationship between psychological hardiness and prenatal coping strategies. Methods:This correlational study was conducted on 500 pregnant women, referring to the healthcare centers of Mashhad, Iran in 2014. The study subjects were selected via convenience sampling. Data collection tools included Kobasa Hardiness Scale, the Revised Prenatal Coping Inventory and Perceived Stress Scale. For data analysis, Spearman correlation coefficient and regression analysis were performed, using SPSS version 16. The significance level was considered to be 0.05. Results: Psychological
Little is known about stressful triggers and coping strategies of Nigerian adolescents and whether or not, and how, HIV infection modulates these sources of stress and coping. This study evaluated differences in stressors and coping strategies among Nigerian adolescents based on HIV status. We analysed the data of six hundred 10-19 year old adolescents recruited through a population-based survey from 12 States of Nigeria who self-reported their HIV status. Data on stressors and coping strategies were retrieved by self-report from participants, using a validated structured questionnaire. We compared results between adolescents with and without HIV with respect to identification of specific life events as stressors, and use of specific coping strategies to manage stress. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age and sex. Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) had significantly increased odds of identifying having to visit the hospital regularly (AOR: 5.85; 95 % CI: 2.11-16.20; P = 0.001), and ...
Due to the long-lasting and resistant symptoms characteristic of chronic combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), its treatment is complex and often requires a tailored therapeutic approach incorporating both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. A multimodal approach of psychoeducative, sociotherapeutic, and dynamically oriented trauma-focused groups is described. We assessed the short- and long-term effectiveness of this therapeutic program by monitoring its impact on PTSD symptoms, depression, neurotic symptoms, coping skills, and quality of life for three years. The findings revealed short-term reduction in the symptoms of PTSD and depression, while the long-term results were manifested as the increased use of all coping mechanisms and a greater level of obsession.. ...
Iranian Rehabilitation Journal - Iranian Rehabilitation Journal - People with special needs - special olympics - Dohsa-hou - Asghar Dadkhah - University of social welfare and rehabilitation sciences
This study evaluated the impact of Katatagan, a culturally adapted, group-based, and mindfulness-informed resilience intervention developed for disaster survivors in the Philippines. The intervention aimed to teach six adaptive coping skills: harnessing strengths, managing physical reactions, managing thoughts and emotions, seeking solutions and support, identifying positive activities, and planning for the future. Pre- and post-intervention assessments were conducted with 163 Typhoon Haiyan survivors. Six-month follow-up assessments were obtained for 37 participants. Pre- and post-results showed improvements in participants self-efficacy on all six coping skills. The 6-month follow-up revealed significant improvements in four of the six coping skills. Focus group discussions conducted at follow-up revealed that mindfulness, self-care, strengths, and reframing were some of the topics that were most memorable to participants. Among these, participants identified mindfulness as a skill that they ...
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This study shows that in the Dutch working population, when workers report - often long-term - health complaints, personal, health, and work characteristics, but not sickness absence, are associated with later care-seeking.. We expected to find gender differences in care-seeking. We found that women experience more chronic health complaints and seek health care more often than men, which is in agreement with many other studies (see Introduction). Once a health care provider was contacted the frequency of visits did not differ between the sexes for the medical specialist and mental health professional, but it did for the GP and the physical therapist. Women visited these more frequently than men.. The influence of coping styles on care-seeking differed interestingly between men and women. Men with a predominantly avoiding coping style sought care less often from a GP or medcial specialist, whereas men with a support seeking coping style visited the GP more often. Women with an active coping style ...
Each Mothers Day marks another year that I ache for her. As usual, I think How will I make it through this Mothers Day? Every year the memory of my mother and the legacy she left will get me through it. On her passing, my mother left me a silver locket given to her by her mother. It says, A mothers love is the heart of a happy home. Every Mothers Day, as I thank God for my two beautiful children, I wear that locket in my mothers honor, and I pray I am the kind of selfless mother that she was. There is comfort in knowing my mother still lives at home in my heart. She lives in me and in my two beautiful children. My son, daughter, and I, are a heroines legacy ...
Jay-. Some of the techniques falls under the category of "reframing what were doing". I.e., "this isnt a learning game, its a copycat game", and so on.. "School Night/Game Night" is a way of reframing what were doing when we play WAYK. "Yes, on some other night, perhaps youre "learning French" in a classroom, with books and paper, but tonight, youre just "playing french". Theres no learning here; its game night!". Since WAYK is so counterintuitive, half the effort you expend in teaching the game can be through reframing. Usually the older, more schooled, the player, the more reframing they need.. ...
Adoption of a performance goal orientation and a fixed mindset becomes a maladaptive coping strategy; while it temporarily helps them deal with a situation that otherwise feels out of their control, it at the same time prevents them from the kind of deeper learning in which we all want them to engage. Think about the kids youve taught whove developed clear personas-the class clown whose goal is to make others laugh, the diva who cant be bothered to take you seriously, or the disaffected student who claims all that you put in front of him is "boring" or "a waste of time." Each of these students in her or his own way is focusing more on others perceptions than on learning, and using behavior to cover a secret fear that growth may be impossible. Put all these pieces together, and there are plenty of reasons why its important to teach all our kids that failure is not only something that happens to everyone, but that its necessary for growth. The more we can help our students shake their fixed ...
Scleroderma News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website ...
The cause of nightmares remains unclear. However, previous research suggests that stress may play a key role and that nightmares may actually serve a beneficial function. Thus, the purpose of this stu
Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a program of psychological preparation for invasive procedures in patients with heart disease, candidates for cardiac surgery, to reduce emotional morbidity and improve perception of health related quality of life. Methods: A Quasi-experimental design was used. The study included a non-probabilistic randomized sample of 110 patients treated in the Division of Cardiac Surgery Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social IMSS. They were divided in two groups: Experimental group (n = 44) and Control group (n = 66). Instruments: CHIP Coping Questionnaire, HADS Anxiety and Depression Hospital Scale, Health Related Quality of Life Questionnaire and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) to measure postoperative pain. Results: The experimental group showed an increase in instrumental coping style compared to pre (M = 24.55) and post evaluation (M = 25.93); statistically significant differences were found in the variables of stress (p = 0.042), anxiety
are a few of these nervous habits that are not just annoying but can actually be bad for our health.. Clenching or grinding teeth - Many people grind or clench their teeth as a stress coping mechanism. Doing this can cause harm to the teeth and jaw and make it more difficult or painful to chew overtime.. Biting nails - This is one of the most common types of nervous habits, especially in children. This not only makes your nails look ragged but can cause bleeding, bacterial infections and warts around the nail bed. The risks of colds and illnesses increase because you always have your hands in your mouth.. Crossing legs - This may be just your preferred style of sitting, or it may be something you do when stressed or nervous, but it can be bad for your health. It can lead to a rise in blood pressure, varicose veins, and bad posture. It can have long term effects on the back, hip and pelvis.. Pulling or twirling hair - This bad habit can go from normal to compulsive, which can lead to ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Temporal differences in coping, mood, and stress with chemotherapy. AU - Chernecky, Cynthia C. PY - 1999/8/1. Y1 - 1999/8/1. N2 - This longitudinal study examined relations among mood, coping, perceived stress, and side effects from chemotherapy in 50 individuals with stages III and IV adenocarcinoma of the lung over four consecutive combination chemotherapy courses. Results indicated that perceived stress was moderately high only at the time of pretreatment, and four coping strategies were used: seeking social support, planful problem solving, self-control, and positive reappraisal. No relations existed between coping strategies and side effects from chemotherapy, coping and perceived stress, mood and side effects, and perceived stress and side effects. Seven side effects occurred: leukopenia, decreased activity, nausea, loss of appetite, fatigue, constipation, and taste changes. In summary, receiving chemotherapy is stressful at the time of pretreatment, so nursing ...
Uterine embolization is designed to reduce fibroids by obstructing the blood supply that nourishes them. So, you need to shift your attention from getting pregnant to resolving the underlying issues such as the sperm leakage after intercourse and co. Nausea and vomiting late in the pregnancy can be abnormal, and you should contact your doctor if this occurs. A physician who is trying to balance a persons thyroid system must also look at all of the other hormones and also all can a small uterine fibroid cause pain of the persons lifestyle, including diet, nutritional supplements, exercise patterns, and stress coping mechanisms. Then when you feel healed, consider the steps in our guide to How to Increase Your IVF Success Rate Naturally It may also help to support the health of the cervix as you prepare for pregnancy again.
People in a crisis often lose perspective and the ability to solve problems in an organized and realistic manner. They may resort to less effective coping responses that can make the crisis worse. Sometimes a crisis is so severe that the persons ability to cope is overwhelmed, and the individual becomes suicidal. The suicidal person who insists that the suicidal thoughts be kept secret is not dealing constructively with the crisis.. ...
The present study aimed to examine the relationship between maladaptive schemas and treatment outcomes of adolescent and adult women with an eating disorder receiving residential treatment. Existing data were obtained from 67 females aged 11 to 47 years (m =18.61) that had entered residential treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), or eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) at a Western United States residential eating disorder treatment facility. Pre- and posttreatment data were collected by the personnel at the facility on eating disorder symptomatology, mood, and core beliefs. Three hypotheses were tested: (a) that maladaptive schemas would be positively correlated with eating disorder symptom severity, (b) that females endorsing more maladaptive schemas at admission or those with stable maladaptive schemas across their course of treatment would have less favorable posttreatment outcomes at the time of their discharge from residential treatment than females with lower
Coping with parental grief following the death of a child is considered to be one of the most stressful life events anyone can experience (Miller & Rahe, 1997). Following bereavement, Bereaved Parents (BPs) may find themselves facing further difficulties in life as they adjust to the major change in their life. The current study aims to objectively compare the employment, social class, health and relationship status of BPs versus non-bereaved comparisons. The study also aims to identify the mortality risk for BPs and therefore compares death and widowhood status to that of non-BPs. The hypothesis under investigation is that BPs have poorer employment and social class outcomes, higher levels of relationship breakdown, higher mortality risk and more hospital admissions than non-bereaved parents.. BPs are more likely than non-BPs to experience mental health issues such as major depression, post traumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (Li, Laursen, Precht, Olsen & ...
The Brief RCOPE is a 14-item measure of religious coping with major life stressors. As the most commonly used measure of religious coping in the literature, it has helped contribute to the growth of knowledge about the roles religion serves in the process of dealing with crisis, trauma, and transition. This paper reports on the development of the Brief RCOPE and its psychometric status. The scale developed out of Pargaments (1997) program of theory and research on religious coping. The items themselves were generated through interviews with people experiencing major life stressors. Two overarching forms of religious coping, positive and negative, were articulated through factor analysis of the full RCOPE. Positive religious coping methods reflect a secure relationship with a transcendent force, a sense of spiritual connectedness with others, and a benevolent world view. Negative religious coping methods reflect underlying spiritual tensions and struggles within oneself, with others, and with the divine
The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between coping and stress on the one hand and suicide ideation among police members on the other. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study population (N = 307) consisted of uniformed police members in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. The COPE, Police Stress Inventory, Adult Suicide Ideation Questionnaire and a Biographical Questionnaire were used as measuring instruments. The results showed that passive coping strategies are related to suicide ideation. A discriminant analysis showed that suicide attempt, passive coping strategies, medical conditions, use of alcohol, problem-focused coping strategies and police-specific demands correctly classified 64.29 per cent of participants who scored high on suicide ideation.
NPHY 115a Dynamical Systems, Chaos, and Fractals. [ sn ]. Prerequisite: PHYS 10a or 11a, MATH 21a, MATH 36a, or approved equivalents.. Advanced introduction to the theory of nonlinear dynamical systems, bifurcations, chaotic behaviors, and fractal patterns. Concepts and analysis are illustrated by examples from physics, chemistry, and biology. The course will be complemented by a significant number of computer labs. Usually offered in even years.. Mr. Wang. NPSY 120b Man in Space. [ cl1 sn ss ]. Enrollment limited to 25.. Topics include how orbital flight is achieved, spacecraft life support systems, circulatory dynamics, sensory-motor control and vestibular function in free fall, and the physiological and psychological adaptations necessary in space flight, and how astronauts must readapt on return to Earth. Usually offered every year.. Mr. Lackner. NPSY 125a Advanced Topics in Perception and Adaptation. [ sn ss ]. Enrollment limited to 10.. Covers current issues and theories in vision, ...
Inspired by the vision of a more awakened and compassionate world, for 39 years the Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society at the University of Massachusetts Medical School has pioneered Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and the integration of meditation and mindfulness into mainstream medicine, health care, and society. This integration has unfolded through ongoing patient care, rigorous scientific research, academic medical and professional education, and a range of broader societal initiatives in the public and private sectors, including education, business, law, leadership, government, and collegiate and professional athletics.. Since the inception of the Centers Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Clinic in 1979, more than 24,000 people with a range of medical and psychological conditions have completed the 8-week MBSR program at UMass. Worldwide, with programs on six continents, tens of thousands of people have participated in MBSR programs. More than 18,000 ...
Abstract: Psychological stress is a major provocative factor of symptoms in chronic inflammatory conditions. In recent years, interest in addressing stress responsivity through meditation training in health-related domains has increased astoundingly, despite a paucity of evidence that reported benefits are specific to meditation practice. We designed the present study to rigorously compare an 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) intervention to a well-matched active control intervention, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP) in ability to reduce psychological stress and experimentally-induced inflammation. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was used to induce psychological stress and inflammation was produced using topical application of capsaicin cream to forearm skin. Immune and endocrine measures of inflammation and stress were collected both before and after MBSR training. Results show those randomized to MBSR and HEP training had comparable post-training stress-evoked cortisol ...
This study considered the attentional functioning of adolescents with varying levels of pain catastrophizing. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between pain catastrophizing and attention bias to pain facial expressions. Furthermore, drawing on dual process models in the context of pain, we investigated the moderating role of attention control on this relationship. Adolescents (N = 73; age, 16-18 years) performed a dot-probe task in which facial expressions of pain and neutral expressions were presented for 100 milliseconds and 1250 milliseconds. Participants also completed self-report pain catastrophizing and attention control measures. We found that although there was no main effect of pain catastrophizing on attention bias towards pain faces, attention control did significantly moderate this relationship. Further analysis revealed that lower levels of attention control were significantly associated with increasing attentional vigilance towards pain faces only within high catastrophizing

Flood Resilient Construction and Adaptation of Buildings - Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Natural Hazard ScienceFlood Resilient Construction and Adaptation of Buildings - Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Natural Hazard Science

Lamond, J. E., Joseph, R. D., & Proverbs, D. G. (2015). An exploration of factors affecting the long term psychological impact ... Flood Resilient Construction and Adaptation of Buildings David Proverbs and Jessica Lamond Subject:. Adaptation, Recovery, ... Adaptation Avalanches Case Studies Climate Change Coastal Storm Surge Convective Storms Cultural Perspectives Development ... Cost of adaptation is also a consideration (Thurston et al., 2008). Future developments that reduce cost or that offer other ...
more infohttp://naturalhazardscience.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199389407.001.0001/acrefore-9780199389407-e-111?rskey=HAJgfK&result=5

A Lab Aloft (International Space Station Research) - Page 5 - International Space Station research and technology topicsA Lab Aloft (International Space Station Research) - Page 5 - International Space Station research and technology topics

On a larger scale, one of the human bodys major adaptations to spaceflight is the loss of bone mineral density. Understanding ... Examining the impacts of the space environment on an organisms development; growth; and physiological, psychological and aging ... Developmental biologists can learn much from these adaptations. The Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) experiment series ... As researchers better understand the adaptation of model organisms in a microgravity environment, they can facilitate future ...
more infohttps://blogs.nasa.gov/ISS_Science_Blog/page/5/?cdt=1367473748565

Psychological adaptation - WikipediaPsychological adaptation - Wikipedia

Psychological adaptations fall under the scope of evolved psychological mechanisms (EPMs), however, EPMs refer to a less ... One psychological adaptation found solely in women is pregnancy sickness. This is an adaptation resulting from natural ... A hybrid resolution to psychological adaptations and learned behaviours refers to an adaptation as the species capacity for a ... Evaluating evidence of psychological adaptation: How do we know one when we see one? Psychological Science, 15, 643-649. doi: ...
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Psychological adaptation - WikidataPsychological adaptation - Wikidata

All structured data from the main and property namespace is available under the Creative Commons CC0 License; text in the other namespaces is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. ...
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The Relationship between Parent`s and Offspring`s Personality and Offspring`s Psychological Adaptation | Korea ScienceThe Relationship between Parent`s and Offspring`s Personality and Offspring`s Psychological Adaptation | Korea Science

The Relationship between Parent`s and Offspring`s Personality and Offspring`s Psychological Adaptation. Lee, Suk-Hi; Kim, Tae- ... The Relationship between Parent`s and Offspring`s Personality and Offspring`s Psychological Adaptation ... s psychological adaptation. Methods: We examined temperament and character of 65 parents and their offspring (measured using ... s Psychological Adaptation - Parent;Offspring;Personality;Adaptation; ...
more infohttp://www.koreascience.or.kr/article/ArticleFullRecord.jsp?cn=HBHHBP_2016_v27n1_56

Frontiers | Coach-Created Motivational Climate and Athletes Adaptation to Psychological Stress: Temporal Motivation-Emotion...Frontiers | Coach-Created Motivational Climate and Athletes' Adaptation to Psychological Stress: Temporal Motivation-Emotion...

... climate and the importance of identifying high levels of controlled motivation to help athletes better adapt to psychological ... They also need to decrease dysfunctional anxiety and anger to enhance the athletes adaptation to psychological stress ... Coach-Created Motivational Climate and Athletes Adaptation to Psychological Stress: Temporal Motivation-Emotion Interplay. ... Adaptation to Psychological Stress: Temporal Motivation-Emotion Interplay. Front. Psychol. 10:617. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg. ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00617/full

Adaptation, Psychological (Concept) - Huntington Memorial LibraryAdaptation, Psychological (Concept) - Huntington Memorial Library

Adaptation, Psychological The Resource Adaptation, Psychological Label Adaptation, Psychological. Focus * Adaptation, ... Context of Adaptation, Psychological Subject of. * Change your thoughts, change your life : living the wisdom of the Tao ... Data Citation of the Concept Adaptation, Psychological. Copy and paste the following RDF/HTML data fragment to cite this ... Adaptation, Psychological,/a,,/span, - ,span property=offers typeOf=Offer,,span property=offeredBy typeof=Library ll: ...
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Adaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Hope College LibraryAdaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Hope College Library

Adaptation, Psychological. Local Identifier. http://hopecollege.library.link/resource/fIAT4OTuo2M/ Network Identifier. http:// ... The aging body : physiological changes and psychological consequences, Susan Krauss Whitbourne Library Toggle Dropdown *Hope ... Coping with negative life events : clinical and social psychological perspectives, edited by C.R. Snyder and Carol E. Ford ... Psychosocial adaptation in pregnancy : assessment of seven dimensions of maternal development, Regina P. Lederman ...
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Adaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Ligonier Public LibraryAdaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Ligonier Public Library

Data Citation of the Topic Adaptation, Psychological. Copy and paste the following RDF/HTML data fragment to cite this resource ... Adaptation, Psychological,/a,,/span, - ,span property=offers typeOf=Offer,,span property=offeredBy typeof=Library ll: ... Adaptation, Psychological,/a,,/span, - ,span property=offers typeOf=Offer,,span property=offeredBy typeof=Library ll: ... Adaptation, Psychological. Local Identifier. http://link.ligonier.lib.in.us/resource/fIAT4OTuo2M/ Network Identifier. http:// ...
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Adaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Perry County Public LibraryAdaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Perry County Public Library

Data Citation of the Topic Adaptation, Psychological. Copy and paste the following RDF/HTML data fragment to cite this resource ... Adaptation, Psychological,/a,,/span, - ,span property=offers typeOf=Offer,,span property=offeredBy typeof=Library ll: ... Adaptation, Psychological,/a,,/span, - ,span property=offers typeOf=Offer,,span property=offeredBy typeof=Library ll: ... Adaptation, Psychological. Local Identifier. http://perry.library.link/resource/fIAT4OTuo2M/ Network Identifier. http://library ...
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Adaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Syracuse Turkey Creek Township Public LibraryAdaptation, Psychological (Topic) - Syracuse Turkey Creek Township Public Library

Data Citation of the Topic Adaptation, Psychological. Copy and paste the following RDF/HTML data fragment to cite this resource ... Adaptation, Psychological,/a,,/span, - ,span property=offers typeOf=Offer,,span property=offeredBy typeof=Library ll: ... Adaptation, Psychological,/a,,/span, - ,span property=offers typeOf=Offer,,span property=offeredBy typeof=Library ll: ... Adaptation, Psychological. Local Identifier. http://link.syracuse.lib.in.us/resource/fIAT4OTuo2M/ Network Identifier. http:// ...
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Interactions between clinical and psychological factors during the adaptation period following liver transplantation. [Italian]...Interactions between clinical and psychological factors during the adaptation period following liver transplantation. [Italian]...

Interactions between clinical and psychological factors during the adaptation period following liver transplantation. [Italian] ... You are here: Home / Test Division / Reference Database / 1990 to 1999 / 1999 / Interactions between clinical and psychological ... Adaptation. Adjustment. Age. ANOVA. Anxiety. Anxiety Scale. Client characteristics. Depression. Depression Scale. General Well- ...
more infohttp://www.upress.umn.edu/test-division/bibliography/1990-1999/1999/franzese_interactions_1999

The ALS AssociationThe ALS Association

PSYCHOLOGICAL ADAPTATION. A. Assessment. 1. Evaluate the patient and familys support systems and coping patterns with ...
more infohttp://www.alsa.org/als-care/resources/publications-videos/factsheets/nursing-management-in-als.html

Psychological studies in Huntingtons disease: making up the balance | Journal of Medical GeneticsPsychological studies in Huntington's disease: making up the balance | Journal of Medical Genetics

ASSESSMENT OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ADAPTATION. Wellbeing was assessed through self-report questionnaires and by means of interviews. ... The level of psychological adaptation after the test (anxiety, depression, hopelessness, intrusion, and avoidance) was ... Psychological wellbeing of test applicants before disclosure of test result. The mean scores of psychological wellbeing and ... Course of psychological wellbeing after the test result General measures of psychological wellbeing and Huntington specific ...
more infohttps://jmg.bmj.com/content/38/12/852

Models of Alcoholism:  Medical / Physiological Causes - NCADD Blog RollModels of Alcoholism: Medical / Physiological Causes - NCADD Blog Roll

Psychological Adaptation Models in Illness and Recovery:. Further modern research asks that we look at individuals and their ... In the Psychological Adaptation model, this exemplifies the Mature mechanism of Altruism: selflessly helping others. The ... This model of Mature human psychological adaptation, however, emphasizes that the brain function at its healthy best. Heavy, ... whether viewed in the Psychological Adaptation or the Twelve Step models-suggests that brain recovery process are at work. We ...
more infohttps://www.ncadd.org/index.php/blogs/research-update/models-of-alcoholism-medical-physiological-causes

Adaptive behavior, functional outcomes, and quality of life outcomes of children requiring urgent ICU admission. - NextBio...Adaptive behavior, functional outcomes, and quality of life outcomes of children requiring urgent ICU admission. - NextBio...

Adaptation, Psychological Adolescent Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Child Child, Preschool Emergencies Extracorporeal Membrane ...
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Long-term improvement in coping skills following multimodal treatment in war veterans with chronic PTSD. - NextBio articleLong-term improvement in coping skills following multimodal treatment in war veterans with chronic PTSD. - NextBio article

Adaptation, Psychological Adult Antidepressive Agents Antipsychotic Agents Combined Modality Therapy Croatia Humans Male ...
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NIOSHTIC-2  Publications Search - 20035039 - Linkage of job characteristics and depression in a national health survey in the...NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search - 20035039 - Linkage of job characteristics and depression in a national health survey in the...

Psychological-adaptation; Psychological-factors; Psychological-processes; Psychological-responses; Psychological-stress; Work- ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nioshtic-2/20035039.html

NIOSHTIC-2  Publications Search - 20040765 - The relationship of work, self-care, and quality of life in a sample of older...NIOSHTIC-2 Publications Search - 20040765 - The relationship of work, self-care, and quality of life in a sample of older...

Psychological-adaptation; Quality-standards; Medical-monitoring; Stress; Author Keywords: Adherence; Aging workforce; ... Adaptation; Health-surveys; Questionnaires; Job-analysis; Mathematical-models; Statistical-analysis; Pharmaceuticals; Diet; ...
more infohttps://www.cdc.gov/niosh/nioshtic-2/20040765.html

Culture - Page 20 - Association for Psychological Science - APSCulture - Page 20 - Association for Psychological Science - APS

Psychological Adaptation to Urbanization, Technology Reflected In Word Usage Over Last Two Centuries. New research shows that ... The findings are forthcoming in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. "This research ... Legendary psychological scientist Jerome S. Bruner, who made groundbreaking contributions to cognitive psychology and the ...
more infohttps://www.psychologicalscience.org/tag/culture/page/20

behaviour | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesbehaviour | Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Consumption, contact and copulation: how pathogens have shaped human psychological adaptations. Debra Lieberman, Joseph ...
more infohttp://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/collection/behaviour?page=7

Tailored Intervention to Promote Positive Airway Pressure Adherence - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govTailored Intervention to Promote Positive Airway Pressure Adherence - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Adaptation, psychological. Health behavior. Patient education. Additional relevant MeSH terms: Sleep Apnea, Obstructive. Sleep ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01454830

Managing Yourself:  Jane E. Schober: Mass Market: 9780333731420: Powells BooksManaging Yourself: Jane E. Schober: Mass Market: 9780333731420: Powell's Books

Adaptation, Psychological. Related Subjects. History and Social Science. History and Social Science » Economics. History and ...
more infohttp://www.powells.com/book/managing-yourself-9780333731420
  • This difference in theory can be seen in research on modern human sexual preferences, with behaviourists arguing that attraction has conditioning influences, such as from the media or cultural norms, while others arguing it is based on psychological adaptations. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is extensive evidence that incest avoidance, which is the tendency to avoid sexual intercourse with close relatives is an evolved behavioural adaptation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet, only one study addressed the psychological functioning of people at risk for HD before presymptomatic testing was introduced. (bmj.com)
  • Most psychological studies were started when clinicians and researchers became concerned about the effects of a presymptomatic test on people at risk. (bmj.com)
  • Before predictive testing became possible, Folstein et al 11 12 analysed psychological characteristics and psychiatric disorders among the offspring of HD patients and other at risk people. (bmj.com)