Enzymes that reversibly catalyze the oxidation of a 3-hydroxyacyl CoA to 3-ketoacyl CoA in the presence of NAD. They are key enzymes in the oxidation of fatty acids and in mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis.
Enzymes that catalyze the first step in the beta-oxidation of FATTY ACIDS.
A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for medium-chain fatty acids. It forms a complex with ELECTRON TRANSFERRING FLAVOPROTEINS and conveys reducing equivalents to UBIQUINONE.
S-Acyl coenzyme A. Fatty acid coenzyme A derivatives that are involved in the biosynthesis and oxidation of fatty acids as well as in ceramide formation.
An enzyme that catalyses the last step of the TRIACYLGLYCEROL synthesis reaction in which diacylglycerol is covalently joined to LONG-CHAIN ACYL COA to form triglyceride. It was formerly categorized as EC 2.3.1.124.
An enzyme that catalyzes the formation of cholesterol esters by the direct transfer of the fatty acid group from a fatty acyl CoA derivative. This enzyme has been found in the adrenal gland, gonads, liver, intestinal mucosa, and aorta of many mammalian species. EC 2.3.1.26.
A tetrameric enzyme that, along with the coenzyme NAD+, catalyzes the interconversion of LACTATE and PYRUVATE. In vertebrates, genes for three different subunits (LDH-A, LDH-B and LDH-C) exist.
Enzymes from the transferase class that catalyze the transfer of acyl groups from donor to acceptor, forming either esters or amides. (From Enzyme Nomenclature 1992) EC 2.3.
Coenzyme A is an essential coenzyme that plays a crucial role in various metabolic processes, particularly in the transfer and activation of acetyl groups in important biochemical reactions such as fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, and the citric acid cycle.
A zinc-containing enzyme which oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols or hemiacetals in the presence of NAD. In alcoholic fermentation, it catalyzes the final step of reducing an aldehyde to an alcohol in the presence of NADH and hydrogen.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Enzymes that catalyze the dehydrogenation of GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE. Several types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase exist including phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating varieties and ones that transfer hydrogen to NADP and ones that transfer hydrogen to NAD.
Enzymes that catalyze the formation of acyl-CoA derivatives. EC 6.2.1.
An enzyme that oxidizes an aldehyde in the presence of NAD+ and water to an acid and NADH. This enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.1.1.70.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-glutamate and water to 2-oxoglutarate and NH3 in the presence of NAD+. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.4.1.2.
Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) is an enzyme that plays a critical role in the pentose phosphate pathway, catalyzing the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate to 6-phosphoglucono-δ-lactone while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydrogen (NADPH), thereby protecting cells from oxidative damage and maintaining redox balance.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of (S)-malate and NAD+ to oxaloacetate and NADH. EC 1.1.1.37.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate and NAD+ to yield 2-ketoglutarate, carbon dioxide, and NADH. It occurs in cell mitochondria. The enzyme requires Mg2+, Mn2+; it is activated by ADP, citrate, and Ca2+, and inhibited by NADH, NADPH, and ATP. The reaction is the key rate-limiting step of the citric acid (tricarboxylic) cycle. (From Dorland, 27th ed) (The NADP+ enzyme is EC 1.1.1.42.) EC 1.1.1.41.
A subclass of enzymes which includes all dehydrogenases acting on primary and secondary alcohols as well as hemiacetals. They are further classified according to the acceptor which can be NAD+ or NADP+ (subclass 1.1.1), cytochrome (1.1.2), oxygen (1.1.3), quinone (1.1.5), or another acceptor (1.1.99).
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
An enzyme that catalyzes the first and rate-determining steps of peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids. It acts on COENZYME A derivatives of fatty acids with chain lengths from 8 to 18, using FLAVIN-ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE as a cofactor.
Compounds with three contiguous nitrogen atoms in linear format, H2N-N=NH, and hydrocarbyl derivatives.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
An 86-amino acid polypeptide, found in central and peripheral tissues, that displaces diazepam from the benzodiazepine recognition site on the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (RECEPTORS, GABA). It also binds medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters and serves as an acyl-CoA transporter. This peptide regulates lipid metabolism.
A fatty acid coenzyme derivative which plays a key role in fatty acid oxidation and biosynthesis.
A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reduction of lipoamide by NADH to yield dihydrolipoamide and NAD+. The enzyme is a component of several MULTIENZYME COMPLEXES.
A flavoprotein containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of SUCCINATE to fumarate. In most eukaryotic organisms this enzyme is a component of mitochondrial electron transport complex II.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Reversibly catalyze the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of carbohydrates to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2.; and 1.1.99.
An alcohol oxidoreductase which catalyzes the oxidation of L-iditol to L-sorbose in the presence of NAD. It also acts on D-glucitol to form D-fructose. It also acts on other closely related sugar alcohols to form the corresponding sugar. EC 1.1.1.14
The class of all enzymes catalyzing oxidoreduction reactions. The substrate that is oxidized is regarded as a hydrogen donor. The systematic name is based on donor:acceptor oxidoreductase. The recommended name will be dehydrogenase, wherever this is possible; as an alternative, reductase can be used. Oxidase is only used in cases where O2 is the acceptor. (Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992, p9)
Glycerolphosphate Dehydrogenase is an enzyme (EC 1.1.1.8) that catalyzes the reversible conversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to glycerol 3-phosphate, using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as an electron acceptor in the process.
A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.
Oxidoreductases that are specific for ALDEHYDES.
A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-diphosphate coupled to adenosine 5'-phosphate by pyrophosphate linkage. It is found widely in nature and is involved in numerous enzymatic reactions in which it serves as an electron carrier by being alternately oxidized (NAD+) and reduced (NADH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for long-chain fatty acids. It forms a complex with ELECTRON-TRANSFERRING FLAVOPROTEINS and conveys reducing equivalents to UBIQUINONE.
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
A glucose dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of beta-D-glucose to form D-glucono-1,5-lactone, using NAD as well as NADP as a coenzyme.
Enzymes of the oxidoreductase class that catalyze the dehydrogenation of hydroxysteroids. (From Enzyme Nomenclature, 1992) EC 1.1.-.
The Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex is a multi-enzyme complex involved in the citric acid cycle, catalyzing the oxidative decarboxylation of alpha-ketoglutarate to succinyl-CoA and CO2, thereby connecting the catabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, and fats to the generation of energy in the form of ATP.
FATTY ACIDS in which the carbon chain contains one or more double or triple carbon-carbon bonds.
A group of 16-carbon fatty acids that contain no double bonds.
A characteristic feature of enzyme activity in relation to the kind of substrate on which the enzyme or catalytic molecule reacts.
Reversibly catalyzes the oxidation of a hydroxyl group of sugar alcohols to form a keto sugar, aldehyde or lactone. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.; EC 1.1.2. and EC 1.1.99.
Catalyze the oxidation of 3-hydroxysteroids to 3-ketosteroids.
D-Glucose:1-oxidoreductases. Catalyzes the oxidation of D-glucose to D-glucono-gamma-lactone and reduced acceptor. Any acceptor except molecular oxygen is permitted. Includes EC 1.1.1.47; EC 1.1.1.118; EC 1.1.1.119 and EC 1.1.99.10.
Fatty acid esters of cholesterol which constitute about two-thirds of the cholesterol in the plasma. The accumulation of cholesterol esters in the arterial intima is a characteristic feature of atherosclerosis.
An enzyme of the oxidoreductase class that catalyzes the reaction 6-phospho-D-gluconate and NADP+ to yield D-ribulose 5-phosphate, carbon dioxide, and NADPH. The reaction is a step in the pentose phosphate pathway of glucose metabolism. (From Dorland, 27th ed) EC 1.1.1.43.
A flavoprotein and iron sulfur-containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the oxidation of NADH to NAD. In eukaryotes the enzyme can be found as a component of mitochondrial electron transport complex I. Under experimental conditions the enzyme can use CYTOCHROME C GROUP as the reducing cofactor. The enzyme was formerly listed as EC 1.6.2.1.
A group of fatty acids that contain 18 carbon atoms and a double bond at the omega 9 carbon.
The process of converting an acid into an alkyl or aryl derivative. Most frequently the process consists of the reaction of an acid with an alcohol in the presence of a trace of mineral acid as catalyst or the reaction of an acyl chloride with an alcohol. Esterification can also be accomplished by enzymatic processes.
Artifactual vesicles formed from the endoplasmic reticulum when cells are disrupted. They are isolated by differential centrifugation and are composed of three structural features: rough vesicles, smooth vesicles, and ribosomes. Numerous enzyme activities are associated with the microsomal fraction. (Glick, Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 1990; from Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)
An enzyme that catalyzes the dehydrogenation of inosine 5'-phosphate to xanthosine 5'-phosphate in the presence of NAD. EC 1.1.1.205.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Alcohol oxidoreductases with substrate specificity for LACTIC ACID.
In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.
Flavoproteins that catalyze reversibly the reduction of carbon dioxide to formate. Many compounds can act as acceptors, but the only physiologically active acceptor is NAD. The enzymes are active in the fermentation of sugars and other compounds to carbon dioxide and are the key enzymes in obtaining energy when bacteria are grown on formate as the main carbon source. They have been purified from bovine blood. EC 1.2.1.2.
Physiological processes in biosynthesis (anabolism) and degradation (catabolism) of LIPIDS.
A class of enzymes that catalyzes the oxidation of 17-hydroxysteroids to 17-ketosteroids. EC 1.1.-.
Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, stored in fat cells and used as energy; they are measured in blood tests to assess heart disease risk, with high levels often resulting from dietary habits, obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol consumption.
Electron-dense cytoplasmic particles bounded by a single membrane, such as PEROXISOMES; GLYOXYSOMES; and glycosomes.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of XANTHINE in the presence of NAD+ to form URIC ACID and NADH. It acts also on a variety of other purines and aldehydes.
Hydroxybutyrate Dehydrogenase is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of certain acids, specifically catalyzing the reversible conversion of D-3-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate.
A ketone oxidoreductase that catalyzes the overall conversion of alpha-keto acids to ACYL-CoA and CO2. The enzyme requires THIAMINE DIPHOSPHATE as a cofactor. Defects in genes that code for subunits of the enzyme are a cause of MAPLE SYRUP URINE DISEASE. The enzyme was formerly classified as EC 1.2.4.3.
The addition of an organic acid radical into a molecule.
The insertion of recombinant DNA molecules from prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic sources into a replicating vehicle, such as a plasmid or virus vector, and the introduction of the resultant hybrid molecules into recipient cells without altering the viability of those cells.
Oxidoreductases that are specific for KETONES.
An enzyme that catalyzes reversibly the conversion of palmitoyl-CoA to palmitoylcarnitine in the inner mitochondrial membrane. EC 2.3.1.21.
The E1 component of the multienzyme PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX. It is composed of 2 alpha subunits (pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha subunit) and 2 beta subunits (pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 beta subunit).
Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate. A coenzyme composed of ribosylnicotinamide 5'-phosphate (NMN) coupled by pyrophosphate linkage to the 5'-phosphate adenosine 2',5'-bisphosphate. It serves as an electron carrier in a number of reactions, being alternately oxidized (NADP+) and reduced (NADPH). (Dorland, 27th ed)
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.
The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that catalyzes the reversible conversion of CORTISOL to the inactive metabolite CORTISONE. Enzymes in this class can utilize either NAD or NADP as cofactors.
Acetyl CoA participates in the biosynthesis of fatty acids and sterols, in the oxidation of fatty acids and in the metabolism of many amino acids. It also acts as a biological acetylating agent.
A generic term for fats and lipoids, the alcohol-ether-soluble constituents of protoplasm, which are insoluble in water. They comprise the fats, fatty oils, essential oils, waxes, phospholipids, glycolipids, sulfolipids, aminolipids, chromolipids (lipochromes), and fatty acids. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
An X-linked recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of saturated very long chain fatty acids in the LYSOSOMES of ADRENAL CORTEX and the white matter of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. This disease occurs almost exclusively in the males. Clinical features include the childhood onset of ATAXIA; NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HYPERPIGMENTATION; ADRENAL INSUFFICIENCY; SEIZURES; MUSCLE SPASTICITY; and DEMENTIA. The slowly progressive adult form is called adrenomyeloneuropathy. The defective gene ABCD1 is located at Xq28, and encodes the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS).
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of UDPglucose to UDPglucuronate in the presence of NAD+. EC 1.1.1.22.
An oxidoreductase involved in pyrimidine base degradation. It catalyzes the catabolism of THYMINE; URACIL and the chemotherapeutic drug, 5-FLUOROURACIL.
A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for short-chain fatty acids. It forms a complex with ELECTRON-TRANSFERRING FLAVOPROTEINS and conveys reducing equivalents to UBIQUINONE.
A disease-producing enzyme deficiency subject to many variants, some of which cause a deficiency of GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE activity in erythrocytes, leading to hemolytic anemia.
The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.
A low-affinity 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase found in a variety of tissues, most notably in LIVER; LUNG; ADIPOSE TISSUE; vascular tissue; OVARY; and the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. The enzyme acts reversibly and can use either NAD or NADP as cofactors.
Structurally related forms of an enzyme. Each isoenzyme has the same mechanism and classification, but differs in its chemical, physical, or immunological characteristics.
The degree of similarity between sequences of amino acids. This information is useful for the analyzing genetic relatedness of proteins and species.
An NAD-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible DEAMINATION of L-ALANINE to PYRUVATE and AMMONIA. The enzyme is needed for growth when ALANINE is the sole CARBON or NITROGEN source. It may also play a role in CELL WALL synthesis because L-ALANINE is an important constituent of the PEPTIDOGLYCAN layer.
A 3-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase which catalyzes the reversible reduction of the active androgen, DIHYDROTESTOSTERONE to 5 ALPHA-ANDROSTANE-3 ALPHA,17 BETA-DIOL. It also has activity towards other 3-alpha-hydroxysteroids and on 9-, 11- and 15- hydroxyprostaglandins. The enzyme is B-specific in reference to the orientation of reduced NAD or NADPH.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
Sugar alcohol dehydrogenases that have specificity for MANNITOL. Enzymes in this category are generally classified according to their preference for a specific reducing cofactor.
A constituent of STRIATED MUSCLE and LIVER. It is an amino acid derivative and an essential cofactor for fatty acid metabolism.
Chromatography on thin layers of adsorbents rather than in columns. The adsorbent can be alumina, silica gel, silicates, charcoals, or cellulose. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Catalyzes reversibly the oxidation of hydroxyl groups of prostaglandins.
The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A class of membrane lipids that have a polar head and two nonpolar tails. They are composed of one molecule of the long-chain amino alcohol sphingosine (4-sphingenine) or one of its derivatives, one molecule of a long-chain acid, a polar head alcohol and sometimes phosphoric acid in diester linkage at the polar head group. (Lehninger et al, Principles of Biochemistry, 2nd ed)
Systems of enzymes which function sequentially by catalyzing consecutive reactions linked by common metabolic intermediates. They may involve simply a transfer of water molecules or hydrogen atoms and may be associated with large supramolecular structures such as MITOCHONDRIA or RIBOSOMES.
A metalloflavoprotein enzyme involved the metabolism of VITAMIN A, this enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of RETINAL to RETINOIC ACID, using both NAD+ and FAD coenzymes. It also acts on both the 11-trans- and 13-cis-forms of RETINAL.
Fats present in food, especially in animal products such as meat, meat products, butter, ghee. They are present in lower amounts in nuts, seeds, and avocados.
The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.
Closed vesicles of fragmented endoplasmic reticulum created when liver cells or tissue are disrupted by homogenization. They may be smooth or rough.
A group of enzymes that catalyze the reversible reduction-oxidation reaction of 20-hydroxysteroids, such as from a 20-ketosteroid to a 20-alpha-hydroxysteroid (EC 1.1.1.149) or to a 20-beta-hydroxysteroid (EC 1.1.1.53).
Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.
"Esters are organic compounds that result from the reaction between an alcohol and a carboxylic acid, playing significant roles in various biological processes and often used in pharmaceutical synthesis."
An high-affinity, NAD-dependent 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase that acts unidirectionally to catalyze the dehydrogenation of CORTISOL to CORTISONE. It is found predominantly in mineralocorticoid target tissues such as the KIDNEY; COLON; SWEAT GLANDS; and the PLACENTA. Absence of the enzyme leads to a fatal form of childhood hypertension termed, APPARENT MINERALOCORTICOID EXCESS SYNDROME.
A mitochondrial flavoprotein, this enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of 3-methylbutanoyl-CoA to 3-methylbut-2-enoyl-CoA using FAD as a cofactor. Defects in the enzyme, is associated with isovaleric acidemia (IVA).
Semiautonomous, self-reproducing organelles that occur in the cytoplasm of all cells of most, but not all, eukaryotes. Each mitochondrion is surrounded by a double limiting membrane. The inner membrane is highly invaginated, and its projections are called cristae. Mitochondria are the sites of the reactions of oxidative phosphorylation, which result in the formation of ATP. They contain distinctive RIBOSOMES, transfer RNAs (RNA, TRANSFER); AMINO ACYL T RNA SYNTHETASES; and elongation and termination factors. Mitochondria depend upon genes within the nucleus of the cells in which they reside for many essential messenger RNAs (RNA, MESSENGER). Mitochondria are believed to have arisen from aerobic bacteria that established a symbiotic relationship with primitive protoeukaryotes. (King & Stansfield, A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A broad category of membrane transport proteins that specifically transport FREE FATTY ACIDS across cellular membranes. They play an important role in LIPID METABOLISM in CELLS that utilize free fatty acids as an energy source.
Fractionation of a vaporized sample as a consequence of partition between a mobile gaseous phase and a stationary phase held in a column. Two types are gas-solid chromatography, where the fixed phase is a solid, and gas-liquid, in which the stationary phase is a nonvolatile liquid supported on an inert solid matrix.
An enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of aspartic beta-semialdehyde to homoserine, which is the branch point in biosynthesis of methionine, lysine, threonine and leucine from aspartic acid. EC 1.1.1.3.

Molecular heterogeneity in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency causing pediatric cardiomyopathy and sudden death. (1/138)

BACKGROUND: Genetic defects are being increasingly recognized in the etiology of primary cardiomyopathy (CM). Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the first step in the beta-oxidation spiral of fatty acid metabolism, the crucial pathway for cardiac energy production. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 37 patients with CM, nonketotic hypoglycemia and hepatic dysfunction, skeletal myopathy, or sudden death in infancy with hepatic steatosis, features suggestive of fatty acid oxidation disorders. Single-stranded conformational variance was used to screen genomic DNA. DNA sequencing and mutational analysis revealed 21 different mutations on the VLCAD gene in 18 patients. Of the mutations, 80% were associated with CM. Severe CM in infancy was recognized in most patients (67%) at presentation. Hepatic dysfunction was common (33%). RNA blot analysis and VLCAD enzyme assays showed a severe reduction in VLCAD mRNA in patients with frame-shift or splice-site mutations and absent or severe reduction in enzyme activity in all. CONCLUSIONS: Infantile CM is the most common clinical phenotype of VLCAD deficiency. Mutations in the human VLCAD gene are heterogeneous. Although mortality at presentation is high, both the metabolic disorder and cardiomyopathy are reversible.  (+info)

The medium-/long-chain fatty acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (fadF) gene of Salmonella typhimurium is a phase 1 starvation-stress response (SSR) locus. (2/138)

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is an enteric pathogen that causes significant morbidity in humans and other mammals. During their life cycle, salmonellae must survive frequent exposures to a variety of environmental stresses, e.g. carbon-source (C) starvation. The starvation-stress response (SSR) of S. typhimurium encompasses the genetic and physiological realignments that occur when an essential nutrient becomes limiting for bacterial growth. The function of the SSR is to produce a cell capable of surviving long-term starvation. This paper reports that three C-starvation-inducible lac fusions from an S. typhimurium C-starvation-inducible lac fusion library are all within a gene identified as fadF, which encodes an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACDH) specific for medium-/long-chain fatty acids. This identification is supported by several findings: (a) significant homology at the amino acid sequence level with the ACDH enzymes from other bacteria and eukaryotes, (b) undetectable beta-oxidation levels in fadF insertion mutants, (c) inability of fad insertion mutants to grow on oleate or decanoate as a sole C-source, and (d) inducibility of fadF::lac fusions by the long-chain fatty acid oleate. In addition, the results indicate that the C-starvation-induction of fadF is under negative control by the FadR global regulator and positive control by the cAMP:cAMP receptor protein complex and ppGpp. It is also shown that the fadF locus is important for C-starvation-survival in S. typhimurium. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that fadF is induced within cultured Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells, suggesting that signals for its induction (C-starvation and/or long-chain fatty acids) may be present in the intracellular environment encountered by S. typhimurium. However, fadF insertion mutations did not have an overt effect on mouse virulence.  (+info)

Cloning and mapping of three pig acyl-CoA dehydrogenase genes. (3/138)

To investigate the structure of porcine genes involved in the beta-oxidation of fatty acid, we isolated the short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) genes from the pig. The cDNA of SCAD, MCAD and LCAD genes were 1899 bp, 1835 bp 1835 bp and 1704 bp long and coded for 413-aa, 422-aa and 430-aa precursor proteins, respectively. Three genes, SCAD, MCAD and LCAD were mapped to 14p16.2-23.2, 6q32.4-33, and 15q24.2-26.3, respectively.  (+info)

Arrhythmias and conduction defects as presenting symptoms of fatty acid oxidation disorders in children. (4/138)

BACKGROUND: The clinical manifestations of inherited disorders of fatty acid oxidation vary according to the enzymatic defect. They may present as isolated cardiomyopathy, sudden death, progressive skeletal myopathy, or hepatic failure. Arrhythmia is an unusual presenting symptom of fatty acid oxidation deficiencies. METHODS AND RESULTS: Over a period of 25 years, 107 patients were diagnosed with an inherited fatty acid oxidation disorder. Arrhythmia was the predominant presenting symptom in 24 cases. These 24 cases included 15 ventricular tachycardias, 4 atrial tachycardias, 4 sinus node dysfunctions with episodes of atrial tachycardia, 6 atrioventricular blocks, and 4 left bundle-branch blocks in newborn infants. Conduction disorders and atrial tachycardias were observed in patients with defects of long-chain fatty acid transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane (carnitine palmitoyl transferase type II deficiency and carnitine acylcarnitine translocase deficiency) and in patients with trifunctional protein deficiency. Ventricular tachycardias were observed in patients with any type of fatty acid oxidation deficiency. Arrhythmias were absent in patients with primary carnitine carrier, carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, and medium chain acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiencies. CONCLUSIONS: The accumulation of arrhythmogenic intermediary metabolites of fatty acids, such as long-chain acylcarnitines, may be responsible for arrhythmias. Inborn errors of fatty acid oxidation should be considered in unexplained sudden death or near-miss in infants and in infants with conduction defects or ventricular tachycardia. Diagnosis can be easily ascertained by an acylcarnitine profile from blood spots on filter paper.  (+info)

Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase is a key enzyme in the mitochondrial beta-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. (5/138)

The first reaction of mitochondrial beta-oxidation, which is catalyzed by acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, was studied with unsaturated fatty acids that have a double bond either at the 4,5 or 5,6 position. The CoA thioesters of docosahexaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, 4,7,10-cis-hexadecatrienoic acid, 5-cis-tetradecenoic acid, and 4-cis-decenoic acid were effectively dehydrogenated by both rat and human long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (LCAD), whereas they were poor substrates of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (VLCAD). VLCAD, however, was active with CoA derivatives of long-chain saturated fatty acids or unsaturated fatty acids that have double bonds further removed from the thioester function. Although bovine LCAD effectively dehydrogenated 5-cis-tetradecenoyl-CoA (14:1) and 4,7,10-cis-hexadecatrienoyl-CoA, it was nearly inactive toward the other unsaturated substrates. The catalytic efficiency of rat VLCAD with 14:1 as substrate was only 4% of the efficiency determined with tetradecanoyl-CoA, whereas LCAD acted equally well on both substrates. The conclusion of this study is that LCAD serves an important, if not essential function in the beta-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids.  (+info)

Effect of endurance training on lipid metabolism in women: a potential role for PPARalpha in the metabolic response to training. (6/138)

Endurance training increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. However, the source of the additional fat and the mechanisms for increasing FAO capacity in muscle are not clear. We measured whole body and regional lipolytic activity and whole body and plasma FAO in six lean women during 90 min of bicycling exercise (50% pretraining peak O(2) consumption) before and after 12 wk of endurance training. We also assessed skeletal muscle content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and its target proteins that regulate FAO [medium-chain and very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD and VLCAD)]. Despite a 25% increase in whole body FAO during exercise after training (P < 0.05), training did not alter regional adipose tissue lipolysis (abdominal: 0.56 +/- 0.26 and 0.57 +/- 0.10 micromol x 100 g(-1) x min(-1); femoral: 0.13 +/- 0.07 and 0.09 +/- 0.02 micromol x 100 g(-1) x min(-1)), whole body palmitate rate of appearance in plasma (168 +/- 18 and 150 +/- 25 micromol/min), and plasma FAO (554 +/- 61 and 601 +/- 45 micromol/min). However, training doubled the levels of muscle PPARalpha, MCAD, and VLCAD. We conclude that training increases the use of nonplasma fatty acids and may enhance skeletal muscle oxidative capacity by PPARalpha regulation of gene expression.  (+info)

Mitochondrial transcription factor A is increased but expression of ATP synthase beta subunit and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase genes are decreased in hearts of copper-deficient rats. (7/138)

The mechanism(s) by which impaired mitochondrial respiratory function and the accumulation of lipid droplets and mitochondria in hearts of copper-deficient rats occur remains unclear. It is not known whether specific components of the regulatory pathway involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, such as mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) and nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2), are activated in copper deficiency. Little is known about gene expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in hearts of copper-deficient rats. Male weanling rats were fed copper-adequate (CuA), copper-deficient (CuD) or pair-fed (CuP) diets for 5 wk. Mitochondria and lipid droplet volume densities from electron micrographs were greater and there was an elevation in the mtTFA protein level in hearts of copper-deficient rats. DNA binding activities of NRF-1 and NRF-2 did not differ among the groups. Northern blot analysis of cardiac tissue revealed that transcripts of F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase subunit c were greater, but mRNA levels of ATP synthase beta subunit and the FAO enzyme, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), were lower in hearts of copper-deficient rats. Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) mRNA levels did not differ among treatment groups. These results suggest that certain components of the mitochondrial biogenesis program are activated in hearts of copper-deficient rats. F(1)F(0)-ATP synthase beta subunit and MCAD transcript levels remain low, which may contribute to impaired mitochondrial respiratory function, decreased fatty acid utilization and lipid droplet accumulation in hearts of copper-deficient rats.  (+info)

Production of fatty acid components of meadowfoam oil in somatic soybean embryos. (8/138)

The seed oil of meadowfoam (Limnanthes alba) and other Limnanthes spp. is enriched in the unusual fatty acid Delta(5)-eicosenoic acid (20:1Delta(5)). This fatty acid has physical and chemical properties that make the seed oil of these plants useful for a number of industrial applications. An expressed sequence tag approach was used to identify cDNAs for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of 20:1Delta(5)). By random sequencing of a library prepared from developing Limnanthes douglasii seeds, a class of cDNAs was identified that encode a homolog of acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) desaturases found in animals, fungi, and cyanobacteria. Expression of a cDNA for the L. douglasii acyl-CoA desaturase homolog in somatic soybean (Glycine max) embryos behind a strong seed-specific promoter resulted in the accumulation of Delta(5)-hexadecenoic acid to amounts of 2% to 3% (w/w) of the total fatty acids of single embryos. Delta(5)-Octadecenoic acid and 20:1Delta(5) also composed <1% (w/w) each of the total fatty acids of these embryos. In addition, cDNAs were identified from the L. douglasii expressed sequence tags that encode a homolog of fatty acid elongase 1 (FAE1), a beta-ketoacyl-CoA synthase that catalyzes the initial step of very long-chain fatty acid synthesis. Expression of the L. douglassi FAE1 homolog in somatic soybean embryos was accompanied by the accumulation of C(20) and C(22) fatty acids, principally as eicosanoic acid, to amounts of 18% (w/w) of the total fatty acids of single embryos. To partially reconstruct the biosynthetic pathway of 20:1Delta(5) in transgenic plant tissues, cDNAs for the L. douglasii acyl-CoA desaturase and FAE1 were co-expressed in somatic soybean embryos. In the resulting transgenic embryos, 20:1Delta(5) and Delta(5)-docosenoic acid composed up to 12% of the total fatty acids.  (+info)

3-Hydroxyacyl CoA Dehydrogenases (3-HADs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. These enzymes catalyze the third step of the beta-oxidation process, which involves the oxidation of 3-hydroxyacyl CoA to 3-ketoacyl CoA. This reaction is an essential part of the energy-generating process that occurs in the mitochondria of cells and allows for the breakdown of fatty acids into smaller molecules, which can then be used to produce ATP, the primary source of cellular energy.

There are several different isoforms of 3-HADs, each with specific substrate preferences and tissue distributions. The most well-known isoform is the mitochondrial 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (M3HD), which is involved in the oxidation of medium and long-chain fatty acids. Other isoforms include the short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD) and the long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), which are involved in the oxidation of shorter and longer chain fatty acids, respectively.

Deficiencies in 3-HADs can lead to serious metabolic disorders, such as 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (3-HAD deficiency), which is characterized by the accumulation of toxic levels of 3-hydroxyacyl CoAs in the body. Symptoms of this disorder can include hypoglycemia, muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and developmental delays. Early diagnosis and treatment of 3-HAD deficiency are essential to prevent serious complications and improve outcomes for affected individuals.

Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the body's energy production process. They are responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of various fatty acids, which are broken down into smaller molecules called acyl-CoAs in the body.

More specifically, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases facilitate the removal of electrons from the acyl-CoA molecules, which are then transferred to coenzyme Q10 and eventually to the electron transport chain. This process generates energy in the form of ATP, which is used by cells throughout the body for various functions.

There are several different types of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, each responsible for oxidizing a specific type of acyl-CoA molecule. These include:

* Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 12 to 20 carbon atoms
* Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 14 to 20 carbon atoms
* Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 6 to 12 carbon atoms
* Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), which oxidizes acyl-CoAs with 4 to 8 carbon atoms
* Isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase, which oxidizes isovaleryl-CoA, a specific type of branched-chain acyl-CoA molecule

Deficiencies in these enzymes can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) or long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCADD), which can cause symptoms such as hypoglycemia, muscle weakness, and developmental delays.

Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase is a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the body's energy production process. Specifically, they are involved in the breakdown of fatty acids within the cells.

More technically, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases catalyze the removal of electrons from the thiol group of acyl-CoAs, forming a trans-double bond and generating FADH2. This reaction is the first step in each cycle of fatty acid beta-oxidation, which occurs in the mitochondria of cells.

There are several different types of acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, each specific to breaking down different lengths of fatty acids. For example, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) is responsible for breaking down longer chain fatty acids, while medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) breaks down medium-length chains.

Deficiencies in these enzymes can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as MCAD deficiency or LC-FAOD (long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders), which can cause symptoms like vomiting, lethargy, and muscle weakness, especially during periods of fasting or illness.

Acyl Coenzyme A (often abbreviated as Acetyl-CoA or Acyl-CoA) is a crucial molecule in metabolism, particularly in the breakdown and oxidation of fats and carbohydrates to produce energy. It is a thioester compound that consists of a fatty acid or an acetate group linked to coenzyme A through a sulfur atom.

Acyl CoA plays a central role in several metabolic pathways, including:

1. The citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle): In the mitochondria, Acyl-CoA is formed from the oxidation of fatty acids or the breakdown of certain amino acids. This Acyl-CoA then enters the citric acid cycle to produce high-energy electrons, which are used in the electron transport chain to generate ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the main energy currency of the cell.
2. Beta-oxidation: The breakdown of fatty acids occurs in the mitochondria through a process called beta-oxidation, where Acyl-CoA is sequentially broken down into smaller units, releasing acetyl-CoA, which then enters the citric acid cycle.
3. Ketogenesis: In times of low carbohydrate availability or during prolonged fasting, the liver can produce ketone bodies from acetyl-CoA to supply energy to other organs, such as the brain and heart.
4. Protein synthesis: Acyl-CoA is also involved in the modification of proteins by attaching fatty acid chains to them (a process called acetylation), which can influence protein function and stability.

In summary, Acyl Coenzyme A is a vital molecule in metabolism that connects various pathways related to energy production, fatty acid breakdown, and protein modification.

Diacylglycerol O-Acyltransferase (DGAT) is an enzyme that catalyzes the final step in triacylglycerol synthesis, which is the formation of diacylglycerol and fatty acyl-CoA into triacylglycerol. This enzyme plays a crucial role in lipid metabolism and energy storage in cells. There are two main types of DGAT enzymes, DGAT1 and DGAT2, which share limited sequence similarity but have similar functions. Inhibition of DGAT has been explored as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

Sterol O-Acyltransferase (SOAT, also known as ACAT for Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in cholesterol homeostasis within cells. Specifically, it catalyzes the reaction of esterifying free cholesterol with fatty acyl-coenzyme A (fatty acyl-CoA) to form cholesteryl esters. This enzymatic activity allows for the intracellular storage of excess cholesterol in lipid droplets, reducing the levels of free cholesterol in the cell and thus preventing its potential toxic effects on membranes and proteins. There are two isoforms of SOAT, SOAT1 and SOAT2, which exhibit distinct subcellular localization and functions. Dysregulation of SOAT activity has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorders.

L-Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme found in various tissues within the body, including the heart, liver, kidneys, muscles, and brain. It plays a crucial role in the process of energy production, particularly during anaerobic conditions when oxygen levels are low.

In the presence of the coenzyme NADH, LDH catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to lactate, generating NAD+ as a byproduct. Conversely, in the presence of NAD+, LDH can convert lactate back to pyruvate using NADH. This reversible reaction is essential for maintaining the balance between lactate and pyruvate levels within cells.

Elevated blood levels of LDH may indicate tissue damage or injury, as this enzyme can be released into the circulation following cellular breakdown. As a result, LDH is often used as a nonspecific biomarker for various medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), liver disease, muscle damage, and certain types of cancer. However, it's important to note that an isolated increase in LDH does not necessarily pinpoint the exact location or cause of tissue damage, and further diagnostic tests are usually required for confirmation.

Acyltransferases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an acyl group (a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and single-bonded to a hydrogen atom) from one molecule to another. This transfer involves the formation of an ester bond between the acyl group donor and the acyl group acceptor.

Acyltransferases play important roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of lipids, fatty acids, and other metabolites. They are also involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign substances) by catalyzing the addition of an acyl group to these compounds, making them more water-soluble and easier to excrete from the body.

Examples of acyltransferases include serine palmitoyltransferase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of sphingolipids, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), which facilitates the transfer of cholesteryl esters between lipoproteins.

Acyltransferases are classified based on the type of acyl group they transfer and the nature of the acyl group donor and acceptor molecules. They can be further categorized into subclasses based on their sequence similarities, three-dimensional structures, and evolutionary relationships.

Coenzyme A, often abbreviated as CoA or sometimes holo-CoA, is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role in several important chemical reactions in the body, particularly in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, and amino acids. It is composed of a pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) derivative called pantothenate, an adenosine diphosphate (ADP) molecule, and a terminal phosphate group.

Coenzyme A functions as a carrier molecule for acetyl groups, which are formed during the breakdown of carbohydrates, fatty acids, and some amino acids. The acetyl group is attached to the sulfur atom in CoA, forming acetyl-CoA, which can then be used as a building block for various biochemical pathways, such as the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle) and fatty acid synthesis.

In summary, Coenzyme A is a vital coenzyme that helps facilitate essential metabolic processes by carrying and transferring acetyl groups in the body.

Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is a group of enzymes responsible for catalyzing the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, and reducing equivalents such as NAD+ to NADH. In humans, ADH plays a crucial role in the metabolism of ethanol, converting it into acetaldehyde, which is then further metabolized by aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) into acetate. This process helps to detoxify and eliminate ethanol from the body. Additionally, ADH enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of other alcohols, such as methanol and ethylene glycol, which can be toxic if allowed to accumulate in the body.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolic pathway of glycolysis. Its primary function is to convert glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (a triose sugar phosphate) into D-glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate, while also converting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) into its reduced form NADH. This reaction is essential for the production of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during cellular respiration. GAPDH has also been implicated in various non-metabolic processes, including DNA replication, repair, and transcription regulation, due to its ability to interact with different proteins and nucleic acids.

Coenzyme A (CoA) ligases, also known as CoA synthetases, are a class of enzymes that activate acyl groups, such as fatty acids and amino acids, by forming a thioester bond with coenzyme A. This activation is an essential step in various metabolic pathways, including fatty acid oxidation, amino acid catabolism, and the synthesis of several important compounds like steroids and acetylcholine.

CoA ligases catalyze the following reaction:

acyl group + ATP + CoA ↔ acyl-CoA + AMP + PP~i~

In this reaction, an acyl group (R-) from a carboxylic acid is linked to the thiol (-SH) group of coenzyme A through a high-energy thioester bond. The energy required for this activation is provided by the hydrolysis of ATP to AMP and inorganic pyrophosphate (PP~i~).

CoA ligases are classified into three main types based on the nature of the acyl group they activate:

1. Acyl-CoA synthetases (or long-chain fatty acid CoA ligases) activate long-chain fatty acids, typically containing 12 or more carbon atoms.
2. Aminoacyl-CoA synthetases activate amino acids to form aminoacyl-CoAs, which are essential intermediates in the catabolism of certain amino acids.
3. Short-chain specific CoA ligases activate short-chain fatty acids (up to 6 carbon atoms) and other acyl groups like acetate or propionate.

These enzymes play a crucial role in maintaining cellular energy homeostasis, metabolism, and the synthesis of various essential biomolecules.

Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) is a class of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of alcohol and other aldehydes in the body. These enzymes catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids, using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a cofactor.

There are several isoforms of ALDH found in different tissues throughout the body, with varying substrate specificities and kinetic properties. The most well-known function of ALDH is its role in alcohol metabolism, where it converts the toxic aldehyde intermediate acetaldehyde to acetate, which can then be further metabolized or excreted.

Deficiencies in ALDH activity have been linked to a number of clinical conditions, including alcohol flush reaction, alcohol-induced liver disease, and certain types of cancer. Additionally, increased ALDH activity has been associated with chemotherapy resistance in some cancer cells.

Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GLDH or GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of amino acids, particularly within liver and kidney tissues. It catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate, which links amino acid metabolism with the citric acid cycle and energy production. This enzyme is significant in clinical settings as its levels in blood serum can be used as a diagnostic marker for diseases that damage liver or kidney cells, since these cells release GLDH into the bloodstream upon damage.

Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), also known as Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase, is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in cellular metabolism, particularly in the glycolytic pathway. It catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG), while also converting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to its reduced form NADH. This reaction is essential for the production of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during cellular respiration. GAPDH has been widely used as a housekeeping gene in molecular biology research due to its consistent expression across various tissues and cells, although recent studies have shown that its expression can vary under certain conditions.

Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle or tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. It catalyzes the reversible oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate, while simultaneously reducing NAD+ to NADH. This reaction is essential for energy production in the form of ATP and NADH within the cell.

There are two main types of Malate Dehydrogenase:

1. NAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH1): Found primarily in the cytoplasm, this isoform plays a role in the malate-aspartate shuttle, which helps transfer reducing equivalents between the cytoplasm and mitochondria.
2. FAD-dependent Malate Dehydrogenase (MDH2): Located within the mitochondrial matrix, this isoform is involved in the Krebs cycle for energy production.

Abnormal levels of Malate Dehydrogenase enzyme can be indicative of certain medical conditions or diseases, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), muscle damage, or various types of cancer. Therefore, MDH enzyme activity is often assessed in diagnostic tests to help identify and monitor these health issues.

Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate in the presence of NAD+ or NADP+, producing NADH or NADPH respectively. This reaction occurs in the citric acid cycle, also known as the Krebs cycle or tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is a crucial metabolic pathway in the cell's energy production and biosynthesis of various molecules. There are three isoforms of IDH found in humans: IDH1 located in the cytosol, IDH2 in the mitochondrial matrix, and IDH3 within the mitochondria. Mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 have been associated with several types of cancer, such as gliomas and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), leading to abnormal accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate, which can contribute to tumorigenesis.

Alcohol oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones, while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to NADH. These enzymes play an important role in the metabolism of alcohols and other organic compounds in living organisms.

The most well-known example of an alcohol oxidoreductase is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which is responsible for the oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde in the liver during the metabolism of alcoholic beverages. Other examples include aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH).

These enzymes are important targets for the development of drugs used to treat alcohol use disorder, as inhibiting their activity can help to reduce the rate of ethanol metabolism and the severity of its effects on the body.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Acyl-CoA oxidase is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the breakdown of fatty acids within the body. It is located in the peroxisomes, which are small organelles found in the cells of living organisms. The primary function of acyl-CoA oxidase is to catalyze the initial step in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids, a process that involves the sequential removal of two-carbon units from fatty acid molecules in the form of acetyl-CoA.

The reaction catalyzed by acyl-CoA oxidase is as follows:

acyl-CoA + FAD → trans-2,3-dehydroacyl-CoA + FADH2 + H+

In this reaction, the enzyme removes a hydrogen atom from the fatty acyl-CoA molecule and transfers it to its cofactor, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). This results in the formation of trans-2,3-dehydroacyl-CoA, FADH2, and a proton. The FADH2 produced during this reaction can then be used to generate ATP through the electron transport chain, while the trans-2,3-dehydroacyl-CoA undergoes further reactions in the beta-oxidation pathway.

There are two main isoforms of acyl-CoA oxidase found in humans: ACOX1 and ACOX2. ACOX1 is primarily responsible for oxidizing straight-chain fatty acids, while ACOX2 specializes in the breakdown of branched-chain fatty acids. Mutations in the genes encoding these enzymes can lead to various metabolic disorders, such as peroxisomal biogenesis disorders and Refsum disease.

Triazenes are a class of organic compounds that contain a triazene functional group, which is composed of three nitrogen atoms bonded in a row (-N=N-NH-). In the context of medicine, certain triazene derivatives have been studied and used in cancer chemotherapy. For example, dacarbazine (also known as DTIC) is a triazene anticancer drug that is used to treat malignant melanoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma. These compounds are believed to work by alkylating DNA, which can disrupt cancer cell growth and division. However, their use is limited due to side effects and the development of resistance in some cases.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

A Diazepam Binding Inhibitor (DBI) is a protein that inhibits the binding of benzodiazepines, such as diazepam, to their receptor site in the central nervous system. DBI is also known as the alpha-2-macroglobulin-like protein 1 or A2ML1. It is involved in regulating the activity of the GABA-A receptor complex, which plays a crucial role in inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. When DBI binds to the benzodiazepine site on the GABA-A receptor, it prevents diazepam and other benzodiazepines from exerting their effects, which include sedation, anxiety reduction, muscle relaxation, and anticonvulsant activity.

Palmitoyl Coenzyme A, often abbreviated as Palmitoyl-CoA, is a type of fatty acyl coenzyme A that plays a crucial role in the body's metabolism. It is formed from the esterification of palmitic acid (a saturated fatty acid) with coenzyme A.

Medical Definition: Palmitoyl Coenzyme A is a fatty acyl coenzyme A ester, where palmitic acid is linked to coenzyme A via an ester bond. It serves as an important intermediate in lipid metabolism and energy production, particularly through the process of beta-oxidation in the mitochondria. Palmitoyl CoA also plays a role in protein modification, known as S-palmitoylation, which can affect protein localization, stability, and function.

Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DHLD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in several important metabolic pathways in the human body, including the citric acid cycle and the catabolism of certain amino acids. DHLD is a component of multi-enzyme complexes, such as the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) and the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDC).

The primary function of DHLD is to catalyze the oxidation of dihydrolipoamide, a reduced form of lipoamide, back to its oxidized state (lipoamide) while simultaneously reducing NAD+ to NADH. This reaction is essential for the continued functioning of the PDC and KGDC, as dihydrolipoamide is a cofactor for these enzyme complexes.

Deficiencies in DHLD can lead to serious metabolic disorders, such as maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and riboflavin-responsive multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (RR-MADD). These conditions can result in neurological symptoms, developmental delays, and metabolic acidosis, among other complications. Treatment typically involves dietary modifications, supplementation with specific nutrients, and, in some cases, enzyme replacement therapy.

Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is an enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the process of cellular respiration, specifically in the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle) and the electron transport chain. It is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of eukaryotic cells.

SDH catalyzes the oxidation of succinate to fumarate, converting it into a molecule of fadaquate in the process. During this reaction, two electrons are transferred from succinate to the FAD cofactor within the SDH enzyme complex, reducing it to FADH2. These electrons are then passed on to ubiquinone (CoQ), which is a mobile electron carrier in the electron transport chain, leading to the generation of ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

SDH is also known as mitochondrial complex II because it is the second complex in the electron transport chain. Mutations in the genes encoding SDH subunits or associated proteins have been linked to various human diseases, including hereditary paragangliomas, pheochromocytomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and some forms of neurodegenerative disorders.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Carbohydrate dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of carbohydrates, including sugars and sugar alcohols. These enzymes play a crucial role in cellular metabolism by helping to convert these molecules into forms that can be used for energy or as building blocks for other biological compounds.

During the oxidation process, carbohydrate dehydrogenases remove hydrogen atoms from the carbohydrate substrate and transfer them to an electron acceptor, such as NAD+ or FAD. This results in the formation of a ketone or aldehyde group on the carbohydrate molecule and the reduction of the electron acceptor to NADH or FADH2.

Carbohydrate dehydrogenases are classified into several subgroups based on their substrate specificity, cofactor requirements, and other factors. Some examples include glucose dehydrogenase, galactose dehydrogenase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase.

These enzymes have important applications in various fields, including biotechnology, medicine, and industry. For example, they can be used to detect or quantify specific carbohydrates in biological samples, or to produce valuable chemical compounds through the oxidation of renewable resources such as plant-derived sugars.

L-Iditol 2-Dehydrogenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction between L-iditol and NAD+ to produce L-sorbose and NADH + H+. This enzyme plays a role in the metabolism of sugars, specifically in the conversion of L-iditol to L-sorbose in various organisms, including bacteria and fungi. The reaction catalyzed by this enzyme is part of the polyol pathway, which is involved in the regulation of osmotic pressure and other cellular processes.

Oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions, which involve the transfer of electrons from one molecule (the reductant) to another (the oxidant). These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy production, metabolism, and detoxification.

The oxidoreductase-catalyzed reaction typically involves the donation of electrons from a reducing agent (donor) to an oxidizing agent (acceptor), often through the transfer of hydrogen atoms or hydride ions. The enzyme itself does not undergo any permanent chemical change during this process, but rather acts as a catalyst to lower the activation energy required for the reaction to occur.

Oxidoreductases are classified and named based on the type of electron donor or acceptor involved in the reaction. For example, oxidoreductases that act on the CH-OH group of donors are called dehydrogenases, while those that act on the aldehyde or ketone groups are called oxidases. Other examples include reductases, peroxidases, and catalases.

Understanding the function and regulation of oxidoreductases is important for understanding various physiological processes and developing therapeutic strategies for diseases associated with impaired redox homeostasis, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of glucose and lipids. It catalyzes the conversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), which is a key intermediate in the synthesis of triglycerides, phospholipids, and other glycerophospholipids.

There are two main forms of GPD: a cytoplasmic form (GPD1) and a mitochondrial form (GPD2). The cytoplasmic form is involved in the production of NADH, which is used in various metabolic processes, while the mitochondrial form is involved in the production of ATP, the main energy currency of the cell.

Deficiencies or mutations in GPD can lead to a variety of metabolic disorders, including glycerol kinase deficiency and congenital muscular dystrophy. Elevated levels of GPD have been observed in certain types of cancer, suggesting that it may play a role in tumor growth and progression.

The liver is a large, solid organ located in the upper right portion of the abdomen, beneath the diaphragm and above the stomach. It plays a vital role in several bodily functions, including:

1. Metabolism: The liver helps to metabolize carbohydrates, fats, and proteins from the food we eat into energy and nutrients that our bodies can use.
2. Detoxification: The liver detoxifies harmful substances in the body by breaking them down into less toxic forms or excreting them through bile.
3. Synthesis: The liver synthesizes important proteins, such as albumin and clotting factors, that are necessary for proper bodily function.
4. Storage: The liver stores glucose, vitamins, and minerals that can be released when the body needs them.
5. Bile production: The liver produces bile, a digestive juice that helps to break down fats in the small intestine.
6. Immune function: The liver plays a role in the immune system by filtering out bacteria and other harmful substances from the blood.

Overall, the liver is an essential organ that plays a critical role in maintaining overall health and well-being.

Aldehyde oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids using NAD+ or FAD as cofactors. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of aldehydes generated from various metabolic processes, such as lipid peroxidation and alcohol metabolism. These enzymes are widely distributed in nature and have been identified in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals.

The oxidation reaction catalyzed by aldehyde oxidoreductases involves the transfer of electrons from the aldehyde substrate to the cofactor, resulting in the formation of a carboxylic acid and reduced NAD+ or FAD. The enzymes are classified into several families based on their sequence similarity and cofactor specificity.

One of the most well-known members of this family is alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), which catalyzes the oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones as part of the alcohol metabolism pathway. Another important member is aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which further oxidizes the aldehydes generated by ADH to carboxylic acids, thereby preventing the accumulation of toxic aldehydes in the body.

Deficiencies in ALDH enzymes have been linked to several human diseases, including alcoholism and certain types of cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of aldehyde oxidoreductases is essential for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

NAD (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It plays an essential role in cellular metabolism, particularly in redox reactions, where it acts as an electron carrier. NAD exists in two forms: NAD+, which accepts electrons and becomes reduced to NADH. This pairing of NAD+/NADH is involved in many fundamental biological processes such as generating energy in the form of ATP during cellular respiration, and serving as a critical cofactor for various enzymes that regulate cellular functions like DNA repair, gene expression, and cell death.

Maintaining optimal levels of NAD+/NADH is crucial for overall health and longevity, as it declines with age and in certain disease states. Therefore, strategies to boost NAD+ levels are being actively researched for their potential therapeutic benefits in various conditions such as aging, neurodegenerative disorders, and metabolic diseases.

Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, long-chain (LCHAD) is a medical term that refers to an enzyme found in the body that plays a crucial role in breaking down fatty acids for energy. This enzyme is responsible for catalyzing the first step in the beta-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, which involves the removal of hydrogen atoms from the fatty acid molecule to create a double bond.

Mutations in the gene that encodes LCHAD can lead to deficiencies in the enzyme's activity, resulting in an accumulation of unmetabolized long-chain fatty acids in the body. This can cause a range of symptoms, including hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), muscle weakness, and liver dysfunction. In severe cases, LCHAD deficiency can lead to serious complications such as heart problems, developmental delays, and even death.

LCHAD deficiency is typically diagnosed through newborn screening or genetic testing, and treatment may involve dietary modifications, supplementation with medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), and avoidance of fasting to prevent the breakdown of fatty acids for energy. In some cases, LCHAD deficiency may require more intensive treatments such as carnitine supplementation or liver transplantation.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Glucose 1-Dehydrogenase (G1DH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of β-D-glucose into D-glucono-1,5-lactone and reduces the cofactor NAD+ into NADH. This reaction plays a role in various biological processes, including glucose sensing and detoxification of reactive carbonyl species. G1DH is found in many organisms, including humans, and has several isoforms with different properties and functions.

Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in steroid hormone metabolism. They catalyze the oxidation and reduction reactions of hydroxyl groups on the steroid molecule, which can lead to the activation or inactivation of steroid hormones. HSDs are involved in the conversion of various steroids, including sex steroids (e.g., androgens, estrogens) and corticosteroids (e.g., cortisol, cortisone). These enzymes can be found in different tissues throughout the body, and their activity is regulated by various factors, such as hormones, growth factors, and cytokines. Dysregulation of HSDs has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

The Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase Complex (KGDC or α-KGDH) is a multi-enzyme complex that plays a crucial role in the Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle. It is located within the mitochondrial matrix of eukaryotic cells and functions to catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of α-ketoglutarate into succinyl-CoA, thereby connecting the Krebs cycle to the electron transport chain for energy production.

The KGDC is composed of three distinct enzymes:

1. α-Ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (E1): This enzyme catalyzes the decarboxylation and oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to form a thioester intermediate with lipoamide, which is bound to the E2 component.
2. Dihydrolipoyl succinyltransferase (E2): This enzyme facilitates the transfer of the acetyl group from the lipoamide cofactor to CoA, forming succinyl-CoA and regenerating oxidized lipoamide.
3. Dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E3): The final enzyme in the complex catalyzes the reoxidation of reduced lipoamide back to its disulfide form, using FAD as a cofactor and transferring electrons to NAD+, forming NADH.

The KGDC is subject to regulation by several mechanisms, including phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions that can inhibit or activate the complex, respectively. Dysfunction of this enzyme complex has been implicated in various diseases, such as neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Unsaturated fatty acids are a type of fatty acid that contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain. These double bonds can be either cis or trans configurations, although the cis configuration is more common in nature. The presence of these double bonds makes unsaturated fatty acids more liquid at room temperature and less prone to spoilage than saturated fatty acids, which do not have any double bonds.

Unsaturated fatty acids can be further classified into two main categories: monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). MUFAs contain one double bond in their carbon chain, while PUFAs contain two or more.

Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (a MUFA found in olive oil), linoleic acid (a PUFA found in vegetable oils), and alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 PUFA found in flaxseed and fish). Unsaturated fatty acids are essential nutrients for the human body, as they play important roles in various physiological processes such as membrane structure, inflammation, and blood clotting. It is recommended to consume a balanced diet that includes both MUFAs and PUFAs to maintain good health.

Palmitic acid is a type of saturated fatty acid, which is a common component in many foods and also produced by the body. Its chemical formula is C16:0, indicating that it contains 16 carbon atoms and no double bonds. Palmitic acid is found in high concentrations in animal fats, such as butter, lard, and beef tallow, as well as in some vegetable oils, like palm kernel oil and coconut oil.

In the human body, palmitic acid can be synthesized from other substances or absorbed through the diet. It plays a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy storage, membrane structure formation, and signaling pathways regulation. However, high intake of palmitic acid has been linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases due to its potential to raise low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in the blood.

It is essential to maintain a balanced diet and consume palmitic acid-rich foods in moderation, along with regular exercise and a healthy lifestyle, to reduce the risk of chronic diseases.

Substrate specificity in the context of medical biochemistry and enzymology refers to the ability of an enzyme to selectively bind and catalyze a chemical reaction with a particular substrate (or a group of similar substrates) while discriminating against other molecules that are not substrates. This specificity arises from the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, which has evolved to match the shape, charge distribution, and functional groups of its physiological substrate(s).

Substrate specificity is a fundamental property of enzymes that enables them to carry out highly selective chemical transformations in the complex cellular environment. The active site of an enzyme, where the catalysis takes place, has a unique conformation that complements the shape and charge distribution of its substrate(s). This ensures efficient recognition, binding, and conversion of the substrate into the desired product while minimizing unwanted side reactions with other molecules.

Substrate specificity can be categorized as:

1. Absolute specificity: An enzyme that can only act on a single substrate or a very narrow group of structurally related substrates, showing no activity towards any other molecule.
2. Group specificity: An enzyme that prefers to act on a particular functional group or class of compounds but can still accommodate minor structural variations within the substrate.
3. Broad or promiscuous specificity: An enzyme that can act on a wide range of structurally diverse substrates, albeit with varying catalytic efficiencies.

Understanding substrate specificity is crucial for elucidating enzymatic mechanisms, designing drugs that target specific enzymes or pathways, and developing biotechnological applications that rely on the controlled manipulation of enzyme activities.

Sugar alcohol dehydrogenases (SADHs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the interconversion between sugar alcohols and sugars, which involves the gain or loss of a pair of electrons, typically in the form of NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism of sugar alcohols, which are commonly found in various plants and some microorganisms.

Sugar alcohols, also known as polyols, are reduced forms of sugars that contain one or more hydroxyl groups instead of aldehyde or ketone groups. Examples of sugar alcohols include sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, and erythritol. SADHs can interconvert these sugar alcohols to their corresponding sugars through a redox reaction that involves the transfer of hydrogen atoms.

The reaction catalyzed by SADHs is typically represented as follows:

R-CH(OH)-CH2OH + NAD(P)+ ↔ R-CO-CH2OH + NAD(P)H + H+

where R represents a carbon chain, and CH(OH)-CH2OH and CO-CH2OH represent the sugar alcohol and sugar forms, respectively.

SADHs are widely distributed in nature and have been found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. These enzymes have attracted significant interest in biotechnology due to their potential applications in the production of sugar alcohols and other value-added products. Additionally, SADHs have been studied as targets for developing novel antimicrobial agents, as inhibiting these enzymes can disrupt the metabolism of certain pathogens that rely on sugar alcohols for growth and survival.

3-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in steroid hormone biosynthesis. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of 3-beta-hydroxy steroids to 3-keto steroids, which is an essential step in the production of various steroid hormones, including progesterone, cortisol, aldosterone, and sex hormones such as testosterone and estradiol.

There are several isoforms of 3-HSDs that are expressed in different tissues and have distinct substrate specificities. For instance, 3-HSD type I is primarily found in the ovary and adrenal gland, where it catalyzes the conversion of pregnenolone to progesterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone to 17-hydroxycortisol. On the other hand, 3-HSD type II is mainly expressed in the testes, adrenal gland, and placenta, where it catalyzes the conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione and androstenedione to testosterone.

Defects in 3-HSDs can lead to various genetic disorders that affect steroid hormone production and metabolism, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as adrenal insufficiency, ambiguous genitalia, and sexual development disorders.

Glucose dehydrogenases (GDHs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of glucose to generate gluconic acid or glucuronic acid. This reaction involves the transfer of electrons from glucose to an electron acceptor, most commonly nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) or phenazine methosulfate (PMS).

GDHs are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They play important roles in different biological processes, such as glucose metabolism, energy production, and detoxification of harmful substances. Based on their cofactor specificity, GDHs can be classified into two main types: NAD(P)-dependent GDHs and PQQ-dependent GDHs.

NAD(P)-dependent GDHs use NAD+ or NADP+ as a cofactor to oxidize glucose to glucono-1,5-lactone, which is then hydrolyzed to gluconic acid by an accompanying enzyme. These GDHs are involved in various metabolic pathways, such as the Entner-Doudoroff pathway and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway.

PQQ-dependent GDHs, on the other hand, use pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) as a cofactor to catalyze the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid directly. These GDHs are typically found in bacteria and play a role in energy production and detoxification.

Overall, glucose dehydrogenases are essential enzymes that contribute to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis and energy balance in living organisms.

Cholesteryl esters are formed when cholesterol, a type of lipid (fat) that is important for the normal functioning of the body, becomes combined with fatty acids through a process called esterification. This results in a compound that is more hydrophobic (water-repelling) than cholesterol itself, which allows it to be stored more efficiently in the body.

Cholesteryl esters are found naturally in foods such as animal fats and oils, and they are also produced by the liver and other cells in the body. They play an important role in the structure and function of cell membranes, and they are also precursors to the synthesis of steroid hormones, bile acids, and vitamin D.

However, high levels of cholesteryl esters in the blood can contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, a condition characterized by the buildup of plaque in the arteries, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Cholesteryl esters are typically measured as part of a lipid profile, along with other markers such as total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.

Phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the pentose phosphate pathway, which is a metabolic pathway that supplies reducing energy to cells by converting glucose into ribose-5-phosphate and NADPH.

PGD catalyzes the third step of this pathway, in which 6-phosphogluconate is converted into ribulose-5-phosphate, with the concurrent reduction of NADP+ to NADPH. This reaction is essential for the generation of NADPH, which serves as a reducing agent in various cellular processes, including fatty acid synthesis and antioxidant defense.

Deficiencies in PGD can lead to several metabolic disorders, such as congenital nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, which is characterized by the premature destruction of red blood cells due to a defect in the pentose phosphate pathway.

NADH dehydrogenase, also known as Complex I, is an enzyme complex in the electron transport chain located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. It catalyzes the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ and the reduction of coenzyme Q to ubiquinol, playing a crucial role in cellular respiration and energy production. The reaction involves the transfer of electrons from NADH to coenzyme Q, which contributes to the generation of a proton gradient across the membrane, ultimately leading to ATP synthesis. Defects in NADH dehydrogenase can result in various mitochondrial diseases and disorders.

Oleic acid is a monounsaturated fatty acid that is commonly found in various natural oils such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and grapeseed oil. Its chemical formula is cis-9-octadecenoic acid, and it is a colorless liquid at room temperature. Oleic acid is an important component of human diet and has been shown to have potential health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease and improving immune function. It is also used in the manufacture of soaps, cosmetics, and other personal care products.

Esterification is a chemical reaction that involves the conversion of an alcohol and a carboxylic acid into an ester, typically through the removal of a molecule of water. This reaction is often catalyzed by an acid or a base, and it is a key process in organic chemistry. Esters are commonly found in nature and are responsible for the fragrances of many fruits and flowers. They are also important in the production of various industrial and consumer products, including plastics, resins, and perfumes.

Microsomes are subcellular membranous vesicles that are obtained as a byproduct during the preparation of cellular homogenates. They are not naturally occurring structures within the cell, but rather formed due to fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during laboratory procedures. Microsomes are widely used in various research and scientific studies, particularly in the fields of biochemistry and pharmacology.

Microsomes are rich in enzymes, including the cytochrome P450 system, which is involved in the metabolism of drugs, toxins, and other xenobiotics. These enzymes play a crucial role in detoxifying foreign substances and eliminating them from the body. As such, microsomes serve as an essential tool for studying drug metabolism, toxicity, and interactions, allowing researchers to better understand and predict the effects of various compounds on living organisms.

Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMDH or IMPDH) is an enzyme that is involved in the de novo biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. It catalyzes the conversion of inosine monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine monophosphate (XMP), which is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP).

There are two isoforms of IMPDH, type I and type II, which are encoded by separate genes. Type I IMPDH is expressed in most tissues, while type II IMPDH is primarily expressed in lymphocytes and other cells involved in the immune response. Inhibitors of IMPDH have been developed as immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection of transplanted organs. Defects in the gene encoding IMPDH type II have been associated with retinal degeneration and hearing loss.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

Lactate dehydrogenases (LDH) are a group of intracellular enzymes found in nearly all human cells, particularly in the heart, liver, kidneys, muscles, and brain. They play a crucial role in energy production during anaerobic metabolism, converting pyruvate to lactate while regenerating NAD+ from NADH. LDH exists as multiple isoenzymes (LDH-1 to LDH-5) in the body, each with distinct distributions and functions.

An elevated level of LDH in the blood may indicate tissue damage or injury, as these enzymes are released into the circulation following cellular destruction. Therefore, measuring LDH levels is a common diagnostic tool to assess various medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction (heart attack), liver disease, muscle damage, and some types of cancer. However, an isolated increase in LDH may not be specific enough for a definitive diagnosis, and additional tests are usually required for confirmation.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

Formate dehydrogenases (FDH) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of formic acid (formate) to carbon dioxide and hydrogen or to carbon dioxide and water, depending on the type of FDH. The reaction is as follows:

Formic acid + Coenzyme Q (or NAD+) -> Carbon dioxide + H2 (or H2O) + Reduced coenzyme Q (or NADH)

FDHs are widely distributed in nature and can be found in various organisms, including bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. They play a crucial role in the metabolism of many microorganisms that use formate as an electron donor for energy conservation or as a carbon source for growth. In addition to their biological significance, FDHs have attracted much interest as biocatalysts for various industrial applications, such as the production of hydrogen, reduction of CO2, and detoxification of formic acid in animal feed.

FDHs can be classified into two main types based on their cofactor specificity: NAD-dependent FDHs and quinone-dependent FDHs. NAD-dependent FDHs use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a cofactor, while quinone-dependent FDHs use menaquinone or ubiquinone as a cofactor. Both types of FDHs have a similar reaction mechanism that involves the transfer of a hydride ion from formate to the cofactor and the release of carbon dioxide.

FDHs are composed of two subunits: a small subunit containing one or two [4Fe-4S] clusters and a large subunit containing a molybdenum cofactor (Moco) and one or two [2Fe-2S] clusters. Moco is a complex prosthetic group that consists of a pterin ring, a dithiolene group, and a molybdenum atom coordinated to three ligands: a sulfur atom from the dithiolene group, a terminal oxygen atom from a mononucleotide, and a serine residue. The molybdenum center can adopt different oxidation states (+4, +5, or +6) during the catalytic cycle, allowing for the transfer of electrons and the activation of formate.

FDHs have various applications in biotechnology and industry, such as the production of hydrogen gas, the removal of nitrate from wastewater, and the synthesis of fine chemicals. The high selectivity and efficiency of FDHs make them attractive catalysts for these processes, which require mild reaction conditions and low energy inputs. However, the stability and activity of FDHs are often limited by their sensitivity to oxygen and other inhibitors, which can affect their performance in industrial settings. Therefore, efforts have been made to improve the properties of FDHs through protein engineering, genetic modification, and immobilization techniques.

Lipid metabolism is the process by which the body breaks down and utilizes lipids (fats) for various functions, such as energy production, cell membrane formation, and hormone synthesis. This complex process involves several enzymes and pathways that regulate the digestion, absorption, transport, storage, and consumption of fats in the body.

The main types of lipids involved in metabolism include triglycerides, cholesterol, phospholipids, and fatty acids. The breakdown of these lipids begins in the digestive system, where enzymes called lipases break down dietary fats into smaller molecules called fatty acids and glycerol. These molecules are then absorbed into the bloodstream and transported to the liver, which is the main site of lipid metabolism.

In the liver, fatty acids may be further broken down for energy production or used to synthesize new lipids. Excess fatty acids may be stored as triglycerides in specialized cells called adipocytes (fat cells) for later use. Cholesterol is also metabolized in the liver, where it may be used to synthesize bile acids, steroid hormones, and other important molecules.

Disorders of lipid metabolism can lead to a range of health problems, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). These conditions may be caused by genetic factors, lifestyle habits, or a combination of both. Proper diagnosis and management of lipid metabolism disorders typically involves a combination of dietary changes, exercise, and medication.

17-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in steroid hormone biosynthesis. They are involved in the conversion of 17-ketosteroids to 17-hydroxy steroids or vice versa, by adding or removing a hydroxyl group (–OH) at the 17th carbon atom of the steroid molecule. This conversion is essential for the production of various steroid hormones, including cortisol, aldosterone, and sex hormones such as estrogen and testosterone.

There are several isoforms of 17-HSDs, each with distinct substrate specificities, tissue distributions, and functions:

1. 17-HSD type 1 (17-HSD1): This isoform primarily catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), an active form of estrogen. It is mainly expressed in the ovary, breast, and adipose tissue.
2. 17-HSD type 2 (17-HSD2): This isoform catalyzes the reverse reaction, converting estradiol (E2) to estrone (E1). It is primarily expressed in the placenta, prostate, and breast tissue.
3. 17-HSD type 3 (17-HSD3): This isoform is responsible for the conversion of androstenedione to testosterone, an essential step in male sex hormone biosynthesis. It is predominantly expressed in the testis and adrenal gland.
4. 17-HSD type 4 (17-HSD4): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to androstenedione, an intermediate step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. It is primarily expressed in the placenta.
5. 17-HSD type 5 (17-HSD5): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of cortisone to cortisol, a critical step in glucocorticoid biosynthesis. It is predominantly expressed in the adrenal gland and liver.
6. 17-HSD type 6 (17-HSD6): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of androstenedione to testosterone, similar to 17-HSD3. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the ovary.
7. 17-HSD type 7 (17-HSD7): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the ovary.
8. 17-HSD type 8 (17-HSD8): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
9. 17-HSD type 9 (17-HSD9): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
10. 17-HSD type 10 (17-HSD10): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
11. 17-HSD type 11 (17-HSD11): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
12. 17-HSD type 12 (17-HSD12): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
13. 17-HSD type 13 (17-HSD13): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
14. 17-HSD type 14 (17-HSD14): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
15. 17-HSD type 15 (17-HSD15): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
16. 17-HSD type 16 (17-HSD16): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
17. 17-HSD type 17 (17-HSD17): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
18. 17-HSD type 18 (17-HSD18): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
19. 17-HSD type 19 (17-HSD19): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
20. 17-HSD type 20 (17-HSD20): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
21. 17-HSD type 21 (17-HSD21): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
22. 17-HSD type 22 (17-HSD22): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
23. 17-HSD type 23 (17-HSD23): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
24. 17-HSD type 24 (17-HSD24): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the testis.
25. 17-HSD type 25 (17-HSD25): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of estrone (E1) to estradiol (E2), similar to 17-HSD1. However, it has a different substrate specificity and is primarily expressed in the placenta.
26. 17-HSD type 26 (17-HSD26): This isoform catalyzes the conversion of DHEA to androstenedione, similar to 17-HSD4. However

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in the body, and they're found in the food we eat. They're carried in the bloodstream to provide energy to the cells in our body. High levels of triglycerides in the blood can increase the risk of heart disease, especially in combination with other risk factors such as high LDL (bad) cholesterol, low HDL (good) cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

It's important to note that while triglycerides are a type of fat, they should not be confused with cholesterol, which is a waxy substance found in the cells of our body. Both triglycerides and cholesterol are important for maintaining good health, but high levels of either can increase the risk of heart disease.

Triglyceride levels are measured through a blood test called a lipid panel or lipid profile. A normal triglyceride level is less than 150 mg/dL. Borderline-high levels range from 150 to 199 mg/dL, high levels range from 200 to 499 mg/dL, and very high levels are 500 mg/dL or higher.

Elevated triglycerides can be caused by various factors such as obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, and certain medical conditions like diabetes, hypothyroidism, and kidney disease. Medications such as beta-blockers, steroids, and diuretics can also raise triglyceride levels.

Lifestyle changes such as losing weight, exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet low in saturated and trans fats, avoiding excessive alcohol consumption, and quitting smoking can help lower triglyceride levels. In some cases, medication may be necessary to reduce triglycerides to recommended levels.

Microbodies are small, membrane-bound organelles found in the cells of eukaryotic organisms. They typically measure between 0.2 to 0.5 micrometers in diameter and play a crucial role in various metabolic processes, particularly in the detoxification of harmful substances and the synthesis of lipids.

There are several types of microbodies, including:

1. Peroxisomes: These are the most common type of microbody. They contain enzymes that help break down fatty acids and amino acids, producing hydrogen peroxide as a byproduct. Another set of enzymes within peroxisomes then converts the harmful hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen, thus detoxifying the cell.
2. Glyoxysomes: These microbodies are primarily found in plants and some fungi. They contain enzymes involved in the glyoxylate cycle, a metabolic pathway that helps convert stored fats into carbohydrates during germination.
3. Microbody-like particles (MLPs): These are smaller organelles found in certain protists and algae. Their functions are not well understood but are believed to be involved in lipid metabolism.

It is important to note that microbodies do not have a uniform structure or function across all eukaryotic cells, and their specific roles can vary depending on the organism and cell type.

Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of purines, which are nitrogen-containing compounds that form part of DNA and RNA. Specifically, XDH helps to break down xanthine and hypoxanthine into uric acid, a waste product that is excreted in the urine.

XDH can exist in two interconvertible forms: a dehydrogenase form (XDH) and an oxidase form (XO). In its dehydrogenase form, XDH uses NAD+ as an electron acceptor to convert xanthine into uric acid. However, when XDH is converted to its oxidase form (XO), it can use molecular oxygen as an electron acceptor instead, producing superoxide and hydrogen peroxide as byproducts. These reactive oxygen species can contribute to oxidative stress and tissue damage in the body.

Abnormal levels or activity of XDH have been implicated in various diseases, including gout, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, also known as hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.16), is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidation of succinic semialdehyde to succinate, which is a key step in the GABA degradation pathway.

Deficiency in this enzyme can lead to an accumulation of succinic semialdehyde and its downstream metabolite, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), resulting in neurological symptoms such as developmental delay, hypotonia, seizures, and movement disorders. GHB is a naturally occurring neurotransmitter and also a recreational drug known as "Grievous Bodily Harm" or "Liquid Ecstasy."

The gene that encodes for succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase is located on chromosome 6 (6p22.3) and has been identified as ALDH5A1. Mutations in this gene can lead to succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, which is an autosomal recessive disorder.

Acylation is a medical and biological term that refers to the process of introducing an acyl group (-CO-) into a molecule. This process can occur naturally or it can be induced through chemical reactions. In the context of medicine and biology, acylation often occurs during post-translational modifications of proteins, where an acyl group is added to specific amino acid residues, altering the protein's function, stability, or localization.

An example of acylation in medicine is the administration of neuraminidase inhibitors, such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu), for the treatment and prevention of influenza. These drugs work by inhibiting the activity of the viral neuraminidase enzyme, which is essential for the release of newly formed virus particles from infected cells. Oseltamivir is administered orally as an ethyl ester prodrug, which is then hydrolyzed in the body to form the active acylated metabolite that inhibits the viral neuraminidase.

In summary, acylation is a vital process in medicine and biology, with implications for drug design, protein function, and post-translational modifications.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Ketone oxidoreductases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the conversion of ketones to corresponding alcohols or vice versa, through the process of reduction or oxidation. These enzymes play an essential role in various metabolic pathways and biochemical reactions within living organisms.

In the context of medical research and diagnostics, ketone oxidoreductases have gained attention for their potential applications in the development of biosensors to detect and monitor blood ketone levels, particularly in patients with diabetes. Elevated levels of ketones in the blood (known as ketonemia) can indicate a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis, which requires prompt medical attention.

One example of a ketone oxidoreductase is the enzyme known as d-beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (d-BDH), which catalyzes the conversion of d-beta-hydroxybutyrate to acetoacetate. This reaction is part of the metabolic pathway that breaks down fatty acids for energy production, and it becomes particularly important during periods of low carbohydrate availability or insulin deficiency, as seen in diabetes.

Understanding the function and regulation of ketone oxidoreductases can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders like diabetes and contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for their management.

Carnitine O-palmitoyltransferase (CPT) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix, where they undergo beta-oxidation to produce energy. There are two main forms of this enzyme: CPT1 and CPT2.

CPT1 is located on the outer mitochondrial membrane and catalyzes the transfer of a long-chain fatty acyl group from coenzyme A (CoA) to carnitine, forming acylcarnitine. This reaction is reversible and allows for the regulation of fatty acid oxidation in response to changes in energy demand.

CPT2 is located on the inner mitochondrial membrane and catalyzes the reverse reaction, transferring the long-chain fatty acyl group from carnitine back to CoA, allowing for the entry of the fatty acid into the beta-oxidation pathway.

Deficiencies in CPT1 or CPT2 can lead to serious metabolic disorders, such as carnitine deficiency and mitochondrial myopathies, which can cause muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and other symptoms. Treatment may involve dietary modifications, supplementation with carnitine or medium-chain fatty acids, and in some cases, enzyme replacement therapy.

NADP (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate) is a coenzyme that plays a crucial role as an electron carrier in various redox reactions in the human body. It exists in two forms: NADP+, which functions as an oxidizing agent and accepts electrons, and NADPH, which serves as a reducing agent and donates electrons.

NADPH is particularly important in anabolic processes, such as lipid and nucleotide synthesis, where it provides the necessary reducing equivalents to drive these reactions forward. It also plays a critical role in maintaining the cellular redox balance by participating in antioxidant defense mechanisms that neutralize harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS).

In addition, NADP is involved in various metabolic pathways, including the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle in photosynthesis. Overall, NADP and its reduced form, NADPH, are essential molecules for maintaining proper cellular function and energy homeostasis.

'Escherichia coli' (E. coli) is a type of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that commonly inhabits the intestinal tract of humans and warm-blooded animals. It is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and one of the most well-studied prokaryotic model organisms in molecular biology.

While most E. coli strains are harmless and even beneficial to their hosts, some serotypes can cause various forms of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal illnesses in humans and animals. These pathogenic strains possess virulence factors that enable them to colonize and damage host tissues, leading to diseases such as diarrhea, urinary tract infections, pneumonia, and sepsis.

E. coli is a versatile organism with remarkable genetic diversity, which allows it to adapt to various environmental niches. It can be found in water, soil, food, and various man-made environments, making it an essential indicator of fecal contamination and a common cause of foodborne illnesses. The study of E. coli has contributed significantly to our understanding of fundamental biological processes, including DNA replication, gene regulation, and protein synthesis.

Cholesterol is a type of lipid (fat) molecule that is an essential component of cell membranes and is also used to make certain hormones and vitamins in the body. It is produced by the liver and is also obtained from animal-derived foods such as meat, dairy products, and eggs.

Cholesterol does not mix with blood, so it is transported through the bloodstream by lipoproteins, which are particles made up of both lipids and proteins. There are two main types of lipoproteins that carry cholesterol: low-density lipoproteins (LDL), also known as "bad" cholesterol, and high-density lipoproteins (HDL), also known as "good" cholesterol.

High levels of LDL cholesterol in the blood can lead to a buildup of cholesterol in the walls of the arteries, increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke. On the other hand, high levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with a lower risk of these conditions because HDL helps remove LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream and transport it back to the liver for disposal.

It is important to maintain healthy levels of cholesterol through a balanced diet, regular exercise, and sometimes medication if necessary. Regular screening is also recommended to monitor cholesterol levels and prevent health complications.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

11-Beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11-β-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of steroid hormones, particularly cortisol and cortisone, which belong to the class of glucocorticoids. These enzymes exist in two isoforms: 11-β-HSD1 and 11-β-HSD2.

1. 11-β-HSD1: This isoform is primarily located within the liver, adipose tissue, and various other peripheral tissues. It functions as a NADPH-dependent reductase, converting inactive cortisone to its active form, cortisol. This enzyme helps regulate glucocorticoid action in peripheral tissues, influencing glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation.
2. 11-β-HSD2: This isoform is predominantly found in mineralocorticoid target tissues such as the kidneys, colon, and salivary glands. It functions as a NAD+-dependent dehydrogenase, converting active cortisol to its inactive form, cortisone. By doing so, it protects the mineralocorticoid receptor from being overstimulated by cortisol, ensuring aldosterone specifically binds and activates this receptor to maintain proper electrolyte and fluid balance.

Dysregulation of 11-β-HSDs has been implicated in several disease states, including metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and psychiatric disorders. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat related conditions.

Acetyl Coenzyme A, often abbreviated as Acetyl-CoA, is a key molecule in metabolism, particularly in the breakdown and oxidation of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins to produce energy. It is a coenzyme that plays a central role in the cellular process of transforming the energy stored in the chemical bonds of nutrients into a form that the cell can use.

Acetyl-CoA consists of an acetyl group (two carbon atoms) linked to coenzyme A, a complex organic molecule. This linkage is facilitated by an enzyme called acetyltransferase. Once formed, Acetyl-CoA can enter various metabolic pathways. In the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), Acetyl-CoA is further oxidized to release energy in the form of ATP, NADH, and FADH2, which are used in other cellular processes. Additionally, Acetyl-CoA is involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids, cholesterol, and certain amino acids.

In summary, Acetyl Coenzyme A is a vital molecule in metabolism that connects various biochemical pathways for energy production and biosynthesis.

Lipids are a broad group of organic compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in nonpolar organic solvents. They include fats, waxes, sterols, fat-soluble vitamins (such as vitamins A, D, E, and K), monoglycerides, diglycerides, triglycerides, and phospholipids. Lipids serve many important functions in the body, including energy storage, acting as structural components of cell membranes, and serving as signaling molecules. High levels of certain lipids, particularly cholesterol and triglycerides, in the blood are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Adrenoleukodystrophy (ADL) is a rare genetic disorder that affects the nervous system and adrenal glands. It is characterized by the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) in the brain, leading to progressive neurological symptoms such as behavioral changes, visual loss, hearing loss, seizures, and difficulties with coordination and movement.

ADL is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene, which provides instructions for making a protein involved in the breakdown of VLCFA. Without this protein, VLCFAs accumulate in the brain and adrenal glands, leading to damage and dysfunction.

There are several forms of ADL, including:

* Childhood cerebral ADL: This is the most severe form of the disorder, typically affecting boys between the ages of 4 and 8. It progresses rapidly and can lead to significant neurological impairment within a few years.
* Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN): This form of ADL affects both men and women and is characterized by progressive stiffness, weakness, and spasticity in the legs. It typically develops in adulthood and progresses slowly over many years.
* Addison's disease: This is a condition that affects the adrenal glands, leading to hormonal imbalances and symptoms such as fatigue, weight loss, and low blood pressure.

There is no cure for ADL, but treatments can help manage the symptoms and slow down the progression of the disorder. These may include dietary changes, medications to control seizures or hormone levels, and physical therapy. In some cases, stem cell transplantation may be recommended as a treatment option.

Uridine Diphosphate (UDP) Glucose Dehydrogenase is an enzyme that plays a role in carbohydrate metabolism. Its systematic name is UDP-glucose:NAD+ oxidoreductase, and it catalyzes the following chemical reaction:

UDP-glucose + NAD+ -> UDP-glucuronate + NADH + H+

This enzyme helps convert UDP-glucose into UDP-glucuronate, which is a crucial component in the biosynthesis of various substances in the body, such as glycosaminoglycans and other glyconjugates. The reaction also results in the reduction of NAD+ to NADH, which is an essential coenzyme in numerous metabolic processes.

UDP-glucose dehydrogenase is widely distributed in various tissues, including the liver, kidney, and intestine. Deficiencies or mutations in this enzyme can lead to several metabolic disorders, such as glucosuria and hypermethioninemia.

Butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase (BD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the breakdown and metabolism of fatty acids, specifically those with medium chain length. It catalyzes the oxidation of butyryl-CoA to crotonyl-CoA, which is an important step in the beta-oxidation pathway.

The reaction catalyzed by BD can be summarized as follows:

butyryl-CoA + FAD → crotonyl-CoA + FADH2 + CO2

In this reaction, butyryl-CoA is oxidized to crotonyl-CoA, and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) is reduced to FADH2. The release of CO2 is a byproduct of the reaction.

BD is an important enzyme in energy metabolism, as it helps to generate reducing equivalents that can be used in the electron transport chain to produce ATP, the primary source of cellular energy. Deficiencies in BD have been linked to various metabolic disorders, including a rare genetic disorder known as multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD), which is characterized by impaired fatty acid and amino acid metabolism.

Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the normal functioning of an enzyme called G6PD. This enzyme is found in red blood cells and plays a crucial role in protecting them from damage.

In people with G6PD deficiency, the enzyme's activity is reduced or absent, making their red blood cells more susceptible to damage and destruction, particularly when they are exposed to certain triggers such as certain medications, infections, or foods. This can lead to a condition called hemolysis, where the red blood cells break down prematurely, leading to anemia, jaundice, and in severe cases, kidney failure.

G6PD deficiency is typically inherited from one's parents in an X-linked recessive pattern, meaning that males are more likely to be affected than females. While there is no cure for G6PD deficiency, avoiding triggers and managing symptoms can help prevent complications.

In the context of medical and biological sciences, a "binding site" refers to a specific location on a protein, molecule, or cell where another molecule can attach or bind. This binding interaction can lead to various functional changes in the original protein or molecule. The other molecule that binds to the binding site is often referred to as a ligand, which can be a small molecule, ion, or even another protein.

The binding between a ligand and its target binding site can be specific and selective, meaning that only certain ligands can bind to particular binding sites with high affinity. This specificity plays a crucial role in various biological processes, such as signal transduction, enzyme catalysis, or drug action.

In the case of drug development, understanding the location and properties of binding sites on target proteins is essential for designing drugs that can selectively bind to these sites and modulate protein function. This knowledge can help create more effective and safer therapeutic options for various diseases.

11-Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 (11β-HSD1) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of steroid hormones, particularly cortisol, in the body. Cortisol is a glucocorticoid hormone produced by the adrenal glands that helps regulate various physiological processes such as metabolism, immune response, and stress response.

11β-HSD1 is primarily expressed in liver, fat, and muscle tissues, where it catalyzes the conversion of cortisone to cortisol. Cortisone is a biologically inactive form of cortisol that is produced when cortisol levels are high, and it needs to be converted back to cortisol for the hormone to exert its effects.

By increasing the availability of active cortisol in these tissues, 11β-HSD1 has been implicated in several metabolic disorders, including obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Inhibitors of 11β-HSD1 are currently being investigated as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of these conditions.

Isoenzymes, also known as isoforms, are multiple forms of an enzyme that catalyze the same chemical reaction but differ in their amino acid sequence, structure, and/or kinetic properties. They are encoded by different genes or alternative splicing of the same gene. Isoenzymes can be found in various tissues and organs, and they play a crucial role in biological processes such as metabolism, detoxification, and cell signaling. Measurement of isoenzyme levels in body fluids (such as blood) can provide valuable diagnostic information for certain medical conditions, including tissue damage, inflammation, and various diseases.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Alanine Dehydrogenase (ADH) is an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion between alanine and pyruvate with the reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydride (NADH). This reaction plays a role in the metabolism of amino acids, particularly in the catabolism of alanine.

In humans, there are multiple isoforms of ADH that are expressed in different tissues and have different functions. The isoform known as ALDH4A1 is primarily responsible for the conversion of alanine to pyruvate in the liver. Deficiencies or mutations in this enzyme can lead to a rare genetic disorder called 4-hydroxybutyric aciduria, which is characterized by elevated levels of 4-hydroxybutyric acid in the urine and neurological symptoms.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Mannitol dehydrogenases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of mannitol to mannose or the reverse reduction reaction, depending on the cofactor used. These enzymes play a crucial role in the metabolism of mannitol, a sugar alcohol found in various organisms, including bacteria, fungi, and plants.

There are two main types of mannitol dehydrogenases:

1. Mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (MT-2DH; EC 1.1.1.67): This enzyme oxidizes mannitol to fructose, using NAD+ as a cofactor. It is widely distributed in bacteria and fungi, contributing to their metabolic versatility.
2. Mannitol-1-dehydrogenase (MT-1DH; EC 1.1.1.17): This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of mannitol to mannose, using NADP+ as a cofactor. It is primarily found in plants and some bacteria, where it plays a role in osmoregulation and stress response.

In summary, mannitol dehydrogenases are enzymes that facilitate the interconversion of mannitol and its corresponding sugars (mannose or fructose) through oxidation-reduction reactions.

Carnitine is a naturally occurring substance in the body that plays a crucial role in energy production. It transports long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, where they can be broken down to produce energy. Carnitine is also available as a dietary supplement and is often used to treat or prevent carnitine deficiency.

The medical definition of Carnitine is:

"A quaternary ammonium compound that occurs naturally in animal tissues, especially in muscle, heart, brain, and liver. It is essential for the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria, where they can be oxidized to produce energy. Carnitine also functions as an antioxidant and has been studied as a potential treatment for various conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and kidney disease."

Carnitine is also known as L-carnitine or levocarnitine. It can be found in foods such as red meat, dairy products, fish, poultry, and tempeh. In the body, carnitine is synthesized from the amino acids lysine and methionine with the help of vitamin C and iron. Some people may have a deficiency in carnitine due to genetic factors, malnutrition, or certain medical conditions, such as kidney disease or liver disease. In these cases, supplementation may be necessary to prevent or treat symptoms of carnitine deficiency.

Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is a type of chromatography used to separate, identify, and quantify the components of a mixture. In TLC, the sample is applied as a small spot onto a thin layer of adsorbent material, such as silica gel or alumina, which is coated on a flat, rigid support like a glass plate. The plate is then placed in a developing chamber containing a mobile phase, typically a mixture of solvents.

As the mobile phase moves up the plate by capillary action, it interacts with the stationary phase and the components of the sample. Different components of the mixture travel at different rates due to their varying interactions with the stationary and mobile phases, resulting in distinct spots on the plate. The distance each component travels can be measured and compared to known standards to identify and quantify the components of the mixture.

TLC is a simple, rapid, and cost-effective technique that is widely used in various fields, including forensics, pharmaceuticals, and research laboratories. It allows for the separation and analysis of complex mixtures with high resolution and sensitivity, making it an essential tool in many analytical applications.

Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenases (HPGDs) are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of prostaglandins, which are hormone-like lipid compounds with various physiological effects in the body. The oxidation reaction catalyzed by HPGDs involves the removal of hydrogen atoms from the prostaglandin molecule and the addition of a ketone group in its place.

The HPGD family includes several isoforms, each with distinct tissue distributions and substrate specificities. The most well-known isoform is 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH), which preferentially oxidizes PGE2 and PGF2α at the 15-hydroxyl position, thereby inactivating these prostaglandins.

The regulation of HPGD activity is critical for maintaining prostaglandin homeostasis, as imbalances in prostaglandin levels have been linked to various pathological conditions, including inflammation, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. For example, decreased 15-PGDH expression has been observed in several types of cancer, leading to increased PGE2 levels and promoting tumor growth and progression.

Overall, Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenases play a crucial role in regulating prostaglandin signaling and have important implications for human health and disease.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Sphingolipids are a class of lipids that contain a sphingosine base, which is a long-chain amino alcohol with an unsaturated bond and an amino group. They are important components of animal cell membranes, particularly in the nervous system. Sphingolipids include ceramides, sphingomyelins, and glycosphingolipids.

Ceramides consist of a sphingosine base linked to a fatty acid through an amide bond. They play important roles in cell signaling, membrane structure, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Sphingomyelins are formed when ceramides combine with phosphorylcholine, resulting in the formation of a polar head group. Sphingomyelins are major components of the myelin sheath that surrounds nerve cells and are involved in signal transduction and membrane structure.

Glycosphingolipids contain one or more sugar residues attached to the ceramide backbone, forming complex structures that play important roles in cell recognition, adhesion, and signaling. Abnormalities in sphingolipid metabolism have been linked to various diseases, including neurological disorders, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

Multienzyme complexes are specialized protein structures that consist of multiple enzymes closely associated or bound together, often with other cofactors and regulatory subunits. These complexes facilitate the sequential transfer of substrates along a series of enzymatic reactions, also known as a metabolic pathway. By keeping the enzymes in close proximity, multienzyme complexes enhance reaction efficiency, improve substrate specificity, and maintain proper stoichiometry between different enzymes involved in the pathway. Examples of multienzyme complexes include the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the citrate synthase complex, and the fatty acid synthetase complex.

Retinal dehydrogenase, also known as Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of alcohol and other aldehydes in the body. In the eye, retinal dehydrogenase plays a specific role in the conversion of retinaldehyde to retinoic acid, which is an important molecule for the maintenance and regulation of the visual cycle and overall eye health.

Retinoic acid is involved in various physiological processes such as cell differentiation, growth, and survival, and has been shown to have a protective effect against oxidative stress in the retina. Therefore, retinal dehydrogenase deficiency or dysfunction may lead to impaired visual function and increased susceptibility to eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy.

Dietary fats, also known as fatty acids, are a major nutrient that the body needs for energy and various functions. They are an essential component of cell membranes and hormones, and they help the body absorb certain vitamins. There are several types of dietary fats:

1. Saturated fats: These are typically solid at room temperature and are found in animal products such as meat, butter, and cheese, as well as tropical oils like coconut and palm oil. Consuming a high amount of saturated fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and increase the risk of heart disease.
2. Unsaturated fats: These are typically liquid at room temperature and can be further divided into monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats, found in foods such as olive oil, avocados, and nuts, can help lower levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol while maintaining levels of healthy HDL cholesterol. Polyunsaturated fats, found in foods such as fatty fish, flaxseeds, and walnuts, have similar effects on cholesterol levels and also provide essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids that the body cannot produce on its own.
3. Trans fats: These are unsaturated fats that have been chemically modified to be solid at room temperature. They are often found in processed foods such as baked goods, fried foods, and snack foods. Consuming trans fats can raise levels of unhealthy LDL cholesterol and lower levels of healthy HDL cholesterol, increasing the risk of heart disease.

It is recommended to limit intake of saturated and trans fats and to consume more unsaturated fats as part of a healthy diet.

Molecular weight, also known as molecular mass, is the mass of a molecule. It is expressed in units of atomic mass units (amu) or daltons (Da). Molecular weight is calculated by adding up the atomic weights of each atom in a molecule. It is a useful property in chemistry and biology, as it can be used to determine the concentration of a substance in a solution, or to calculate the amount of a substance that will react with another in a chemical reaction.

Microsomes, liver refers to a subcellular fraction of liver cells (hepatocytes) that are obtained during tissue homogenization and subsequent centrifugation. These microsomal fractions are rich in membranous structures known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), particularly the rough ER. They are involved in various important cellular processes, most notably the metabolism of xenobiotics (foreign substances) including drugs, toxins, and carcinogens.

The liver microsomes contain a variety of enzymes, such as cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, that are crucial for phase I drug metabolism. These enzymes help in the oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis of xenobiotics, making them more water-soluble and facilitating their excretion from the body. Additionally, liver microsomes also host other enzymes involved in phase II conjugation reactions, where the metabolites from phase I are further modified by adding polar molecules like glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetyl groups.

In summary, liver microsomes are a subcellular fraction of liver cells that play a significant role in the metabolism and detoxification of xenobiotics, contributing to the overall protection and maintenance of cellular homeostasis within the body.

20-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases (20-HSDs) are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of steroid hormones. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of steroid hormone precursors to their active forms by adding or removing a hydroxyl group at the 20th carbon position of the steroid molecule.

There are several isoforms of 20-HSDs, each with distinct tissue distribution and substrate specificity. The most well-known isoforms include 20-HSD type I and II, which have opposing functions in regulating the activity of cortisol, a glucocorticoid hormone produced by the adrenal gland.

Type I 20-HSD, primarily found in the liver and adipose tissue, converts inactive cortisone to its active form, cortisol. In contrast, type II 20-HSD, expressed mainly in the kidney, brain, and immune cells, catalyzes the reverse reaction, converting cortisol back to cortisone.

Dysregulation of 20-HSDs has been implicated in various medical conditions, such as metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, and cancers. Therefore, understanding the function and regulation of these enzymes is essential for developing targeted therapies for these conditions.

Molecular models are three-dimensional representations of molecular structures that are used in the field of molecular biology and chemistry to visualize and understand the spatial arrangement of atoms and bonds within a molecule. These models can be physical or computer-generated and allow researchers to study the shape, size, and behavior of molecules, which is crucial for understanding their function and interactions with other molecules.

Physical molecular models are often made up of balls (representing atoms) connected by rods or sticks (representing bonds). These models can be constructed manually using materials such as plastic or wooden balls and rods, or they can be created using 3D printing technology.

Computer-generated molecular models, on the other hand, are created using specialized software that allows researchers to visualize and manipulate molecular structures in three dimensions. These models can be used to simulate molecular interactions, predict molecular behavior, and design new drugs or chemicals with specific properties. Overall, molecular models play a critical role in advancing our understanding of molecular structures and their functions.

Esters are organic compounds that are formed by the reaction between an alcohol and a carboxylic acid. They are widely found in nature and are used in various industries, including the production of perfumes, flavors, and pharmaceuticals. In the context of medical definitions, esters may be mentioned in relation to their use as excipients in medications or in discussions of organic chemistry and biochemistry. Esters can also be found in various natural substances such as fats and oils, which are triesters of glycerol and fatty acids.

11-Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 (11β-HSD2) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the regulation of steroid hormones, particularly cortisol and aldosterone. It is primarily found in tissues such as the kidneys, colon, and salivary glands.

The main function of 11β-HSD2 is to convert active cortisol into inactive cortisone, which helps to prevent excessive mineralocorticoid receptor activation by cortisol. This is important because cortisol can bind to and activate mineralocorticoid receptors, leading to increased sodium reabsorption and potassium excretion in the kidneys, as well as other effects on blood pressure and electrolyte balance.

By converting cortisol to cortisone, 11β-HSD2 helps to protect mineralocorticoid receptors from being overstimulated by cortisol, allowing aldosterone to bind and activate these receptors instead. This is important for maintaining normal blood pressure and electrolyte balance.

Deficiencies or mutations in the 11β-HSD2 enzyme can lead to a condition called apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME), which is characterized by high blood pressure, low potassium levels, and increased sodium reabsorption in the kidneys. This occurs because cortisol is able to bind to and activate mineralocorticoid receptors in the absence of 11β-HSD2 activity.

Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenase (IVD) is an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the catabolism of leucine, an essential amino acid. This enzyme is located in the mitochondrial matrix and is responsible for catalyzing the third step in the degradation pathway of leucine.

Specifically, Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenase facilitates the conversion of isovaleryl-CoA to 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA through the removal of two hydrogen atoms from the substrate. This reaction requires the coenzyme flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as an electron acceptor, which gets reduced to FADH2 during the process.

Deficiency in Isovaleryl-CoA Dehydrogenase can lead to a rare genetic disorder known as isovaleric acidemia, characterized by the accumulation of isovaleryl-CoA and its metabolic byproducts, including isovaleric acid, 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid, and methylcrotonylglycine. These metabolites can cause various symptoms such as vomiting, dehydration, metabolic acidosis, seizures, developmental delay, and even coma or death in severe cases.

Mitochondria are specialized structures located inside cells that convert the energy from food into ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which is the primary form of energy used by cells. They are often referred to as the "powerhouses" of the cell because they generate most of the cell's supply of chemical energy. Mitochondria are also involved in various other cellular processes, such as signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Mitochondria have their own DNA, known as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is inherited maternally. This means that mtDNA is passed down from the mother to her offspring through the egg cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a variety of diseases and conditions, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and aging.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are a group of membrane-bound proteins that play a crucial role in the uptake and transport of long-chain fatty acids across the plasma membrane of cells. They are widely expressed in various tissues, including the heart, muscle, adipose tissue, and liver.

FATPs have several domains that enable them to perform their functions, including a cytoplasmic domain that binds to fatty acids, a transmembrane domain that spans the plasma membrane, and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) domain that hydrolyzes ATP to provide energy for fatty acid transport.

FATPs also play a role in the regulation of intracellular lipid metabolism by modulating the activity of enzymes involved in fatty acid activation, desaturation, and elongation. Mutations in FATP genes have been associated with various metabolic disorders, including congenital deficiency of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), a rare autosomal recessive disorder that affects fatty acid oxidation.

In summary, fatty acid transport proteins are essential for the uptake and metabolism of long-chain fatty acids in cells and have implications in various metabolic disorders.

Chromatography, gas (GC) is a type of chromatographic technique used to separate, identify, and analyze volatile compounds or vapors. In this method, the sample mixture is vaporized and carried through a column packed with a stationary phase by an inert gas (carrier gas). The components of the mixture get separated based on their partitioning between the mobile and stationary phases due to differences in their adsorption/desorption rates or solubility.

The separated components elute at different times, depending on their interaction with the stationary phase, which can be detected and quantified by various detection systems like flame ionization detector (FID), thermal conductivity detector (TCD), electron capture detector (ECD), or mass spectrometer (MS). Gas chromatography is widely used in fields such as chemistry, biochemistry, environmental science, forensics, and food analysis.

Homoserine dehydrogenase is an enzyme involved in the metabolism of certain amino acids. Specifically, it catalyzes the conversion of homoserine to aspartate semialdehyde, which is a key step in the biosynthesis of several essential amino acids, including threonine, methionine, and isoleucine. The reaction catalyzed by homoserine dehydrogenase involves the oxidation of homoserine to form aspartate semialdehyde, using NAD or NADP as a cofactor. There are several isoforms of this enzyme found in different organisms, and it has been studied extensively due to its importance in amino acid metabolism and potential as a target for antibiotic development.

... (EC 1.3.8.8, palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenase, palmitoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl ... long-chain-acyl-CoA:(acceptor) 2,3-oxidoreductase, ACADL (gene).) is an enzyme with systematic name long-chain acyl-CoA: ... medium-chain, and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases from rat liver mitochondria. Isolation of the holo- and apoenzymes and ... Long-chain+acyl-CoA+dehydrogenase at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Portal: Biology (EC ...
... (EC 1.3.8.9, ACADVL (gene).) is an enzyme with systematic name very-long-chain acyl-CoA: ... "Structural basis for substrate fatty acyl chain specificity: crystal structure of human very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... Very-long-chain+acyl-CoA+dehydrogenase at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Portal: Biology ... I. Purification and properties of very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 267 (2 ...
... medium-chain, and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases from rat liver mitochondria. Isolation of the holo- and apoenzymes and ... Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase Butyryl-CoA (also known as butanoyl-CoA) Mahler HR (January 1954). " ... Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.1, butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, butanoyl-CoA dehydrogenase, butyryl dehydrogenase, ... short-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase, short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxyacyl CoA reductase, butanoyl-CoA:( ...
... medium-chain, and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases from rat liver mitochondria. Isolation of the holo- and apoenzymes and ... acyl dehydrogenase (ambiguous), fatty-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ambiguous), acyl CoA dehydrogenase (ambiguous), general acyl CoA ... Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.7, fatty acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase (ambiguous), acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase ... dehydrogenase (ambiguous), medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA:(acceptor) 2,3-oxidoreductase (ambiguous), ...
I The mechanism of elongation of long-chain fatty acids by acetyl-CoA". Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 164 (3): 498-517. doi:10.1016/ ... In enzymology, an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.3.1.8) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction acyl-CoA + ... crotonyl-CoA reductase, and acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (NADP+). As of late 2007, only one structure has been solved for this class ... Other names in common use include 2-enoyl-CoA reductase, dehydrogenase, acyl coenzyme A (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, ...
... load and carnitine load on plasma long-chain acylcarnitine levels in mitochondrial very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... This acyl-Coenzyme A dehydrogenase is specific to long-chain and very-long-chain fatty acids. A deficiency in this gene product ... "acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain". Strauss AW, Powell CK, Hale DE, Anderson MM, Ahuja A, Brackett JC, Sims HF (Nov 1995 ... Very long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, mitochondrial (VLCAD) is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ACADVL ...
Due to this mutation, effective levels of very long-chain-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase are low or absent in the body, giving rise to ... A change of the gene that codes for very long-chain-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (VLCAD) results in a deficiency or malfunction of ... "Very Long Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (LCAD)". "VLCAD deficiency , Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center ( ... Mutations in the ACADVL gene lead to inadequate levels of an enzyme called very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase ...
"Long-Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology". eMedicine. 24 March 2016. Retrieved ... long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD), long-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase, and long-chain thiolase activities. ... Avoiding factors that might precipitate condition Glucose Low fat/high carbohydrate nutrition Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... "HADHA hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase/3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase/enoyl-CoA hydratase (trifunctional protein), alpha subunit [Homo ...
... or long-chain fatty acid acyl-CoA substrates. While different dehydrogenases target fatty acids of varying chain length, all ... "Thermal unfolding of medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and iso(3)valeryl-CoA dehydrogenase: study of the effect of genetic ... "Mechanism of activation of acyl-CoA substrates by medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase: interaction of the thioester carbonyl ... Acyl CoA Beta oxidation Thorpe, C.; Kim, J. J. (June 1995). "Structure and Mechanism of Action of the Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenases ...
"Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency as a cause of pulmonary surfactant dysfunction". The Journal of Biological ... "ACADM - Medium-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, mitochondrial precursor - Homo sapiens (Human) - ACADM gene & protein". ... Wang SS, Fernhoff PM, Hannon WH, Khoury MJ (1999). "Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency human genome epidemiology ... "Molecular cloning of cDNAs encoding rat and human medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and assignment of the gene to human ...
... acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, long chain - which is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family. The acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family ... "Cardiac hypertrophy in mice with long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase or very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency". ... Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, long chain". Kurtz DM, Tolwani RJ, Wood PA (May 1998). "Structural characterization of the mouse long- ... Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, long chain is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ACADL gene. ACADL is a gene that encodes LCAD ...
"Identification and characterization of new long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases". Molecular Genetics and Metabolism. 102 (4): 418 ... Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, member 10 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ACAD10 gene. This gene encodes a member ... "Entrez Gene: Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family, member 10". Bian L, Hanson RL, Muller YL, Ma L, Kobes S, Knowler WC, Bogardus C, ... of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family of enzymes (ACADs), which participate in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria ...
Retrieved 5 January 2013.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link) "Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... A very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) is a fatty acid with 22 or more carbons. Their biosynthesis occurs in the endoplasmic ... doi:10.1016/j.plipres.2006.01.004 "Very-long-chain fatty acids from the animal and plant kingdoms" Rezanka, Tomas Progress in ... Trenkamp, S.; Martin, W.; Tietjen, K. (10 August 2004). "Specific and differential inhibition of very-long-chain fatty acid ...
Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, C-2 to C-3 short chain is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ACADS gene. This gene encodes a ... The coding sequence of this gene is 1239 bp long. The encoded protein has 412 amino acids, and its size is 44.3 kDa (Human) or ... "Entrez Gene: Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, C-2 to C-3 short chain". Tein I, Elpeleg O, Ben-Zeev B, Korman SH, Lossos A, Lev D, Lerman ... As short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase is involved in beta-oxidation, a deficiency in this enzyme is marked by an increased ...
"Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD 9) is the long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in human embryonic and fetal brain". Biochemical and ... typically C16-acylCoA and longer. It has been observed that ACAD9 can catalyze acyl-CoAs with very long chains. The specific ... "Purification of human very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase and characterization of its deficiency in seven patients". ... Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase family member 9, mitochondrial is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the ACAD9 gene. Mitochondrial ...
... it interferes with the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria. Also, it inhibits acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, so ...
... is broken down into shorter-chain fatty acids in the human liver by the long-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase enzyme. ... although the long-term use of Lorenzo's oil (oleic acid and erucic acid) in the treatment of adrenoleukodystrophy or ... While there are reports of toxicity from long-term use of Lorenzo's oil (which contains erucic acid and other ingredients), ... Erucic acid is produced by elongation of oleic acid via oleoyl-coenzyme A and malonyl-CoA. ...
If the fatty acyl-CoA has a long chain, then the carnitine shuttle must be utilized: Acyl-CoA is transferred to the hydroxyl ... is not an appropriate substrate for acyl CoA dehydrogenase, or enoyl CoA hydratase: If the acyl CoA contains a cis-Δ3 bond, ... Cn-acyl-CoA + FAD + NAD+ + H 2O + CoA → Cn-2-acyl-CoA + FADH 2 + NADH + H+ + acetyl-CoA Free fatty acids cannot penetrate any ... The final cycle produces two separate acetyl CoAs, instead of one acyl CoA and one acetyl CoA. For every cycle, the Acyl CoA ...
CoA) hydratase, long-chain 3-hydroxy acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-ketoacyl CoA thiolase. Fatty acid beta- ... "Long-Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: eMedicine Pediatrics: Genetics and Metabolic Disease". Retrieved 2009-07-11. Wang ...
... deficiency of Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, short chain, deficiency of Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain, deficiency of Acyl- ... promyelocytic leukemia Acute renal failure Acute respiratory distress syndrome Acute tubular necrosis Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ... CoA oxidase deficiency Adactylia unilateral dominant ADAM complex Adams-Nance syndrome Adams-Oliver syndrome Addison's disease ... vitiligo Alpers disease Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency Alpha-2 deficient collagen disease Alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase ...
Trimethoprim Triple A syndrome Tumors Tyrosinaemia type 1 Urea cycle disorder Uremia Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... Reye syndrome Ritonavir Saquinavir Sepsis Septic shock Severe hepatitis Sheehan syndrome Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... deficiency Maple syrup urine disease Mcquarrie type infantile idiopathic hypoglycemia Medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... Disorders of fatty acid oxidation Medium chain acylCoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD) Familial Leucine sensitive hypoglycemia ...
... displays decreased thermal stability and is overrepresented in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient patients with ... A crystal structure of the complex of one of its interactors, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD; gene name ACADM) has ... "Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, electron transfer flavoprotein and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase". Biochemical Society ... Crane FL, Beinert H (September 1954). "A Link Between Fatty Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase and Cytochrome C: A New Flavin Enzyme". ...
... displays decreased thermal stability and is overrepresented in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient patients with ... A crystal structure of the complex of one of its interactors, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD; gene name ACADM) has ... "Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, electron transfer flavoprotein and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase". Biochemical Society ... Crane FL, Beinert H (September 1954). "A Link Between Fatty Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase and Cytochrome C: A New Flavin Enzyme". ...
ISBN 978-1-118-16945-2. Roth, Karl S. (2013-12-19). "Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency". Medscape. Beermann, C.; ... Long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are fatty acids with aliphatic tails of 13 to 21 carbons. Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) ... The cytosolic acetyl-CoA is carboxylated by acetyl CoA carboxylase into malonyl-CoA, the first committed step in the synthesis ... Malonyl-CoA is then involved in a repeating series of reactions that lengthens the growing fatty acid chain by two carbons at a ...
... the fatty acyl-CoA dehydrogenases for short, medium, long, and very long acyl chains, and related enzymes. PPARα functions as a ... the fatty acyl group is transferred from fatty acyl-carnitine to coenzyme A, regenerating fatty acyl-CoA and a free carnitine ... displacing AMP to form thioester fatty acyl-CoA. In the second reaction, acyl-CoA is transiently attached to the hydroxyl group ... The first reaction of the carnitine shuttle is a two-step process catalyzed by a family of isozymes of acyl-CoA synthetase that ...
These enzymes are better equipped to oxidize Acyl-CoA with long chains that the mitochondria cannot handle. Beta oxidation ... Beta oxidation of acyl-CoA occurs in four steps. 1. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase catalyzes dehydrogenation of the acyl-CoA, creating ... The latter conversion is mediated by acyl-CoA synthase" acyl-P + HS-CoAacyl-S-CoA + Pi + H+ Three types of acyl-CoA ... For example, the substrates for medium chain acyl-CoA synthase are 4-11 carbon fatty acids. The enzyme acyl-CoA thioesterase ...
... as opposed to long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases, which ligate fatty acids to CoA, to produce the CoA ester. The role of the ACOT ... In the mitochondria, acyl-CoA esters are involved in the acylation of mitochondrial NAD+ dependent dehydrogenases; because ... Acyl-CoA thioesterase 9 is a protein that is encoded by the human ACOT9 gene. It is a member of the acyl-CoA thioesterase ... These enzymes have also been referred to in the literature as acyl-CoA hydrolases, acyl-CoA thioester hydrolases, and palmitoyl ...
Acyl-CoA dehydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze formation of a double bond between C2 (α) and C3 (β) of the acyl-CoA ... Abedi E, Sahari MA (September 2014). "Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid sources and evaluation of their nutritional and ... Thorpe C, Kim JJ (June 1995). "Structure and mechanism of action of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenases". FASEB Journal. 9 (9): 718-25 ... Plant stearoyl-acyl-carrier-protein desaturase (EC 1.14.19.1), an enzyme that catalyzes the introduction of a double bond at ...
Short-chain hydroxy Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCHAD) Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCAD) Multiple acyl ... 1 in 75,000 Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCAD) > 1 in 25,000 Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... Medium/short-chain L-3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency Medium-chain ketoacyl-CoA thiolase deficiency Dienoyl-CoA ... 1 in 100,000 Inborn errors of fatty acid metabolism Long-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCHAD) > ...
April 2011). "Toxic response caused by a misfolding variant of the mitochondrial protein short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase". ... Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in ... Haw JS, Galaviz KI, Straus AN, Kowalski AJ, Magee MJ, Weber MB, Wei J, Narayan KM, Ali MK (December 2017). "Long-term ... A 2017 review found that, long term, lifestyle changes decreased the risk by 28%, while medication does not reduce risk after ...
Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.8, palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenase, palmitoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl ... long-chain-acyl-CoA:(acceptor) 2,3-oxidoreductase, ACADL (gene).) is an enzyme with systematic name long-chain acyl-CoA: ... medium-chain, and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases from rat liver mitochondria. Isolation of the holo- and apoenzymes and ... Long-chain+acyl-CoA+dehydrogenase at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Portal: Biology (EC ...
Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats to ... medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/very-long-chain-acyl-coa-dehydrogenase-deficiency/ Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats ... This gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, which is required to break ...
The other 2 activities of the protein are 2-enoyl coenzyme A (CoA) hydratase (LCEH) and long-chain 3-ketoacyl CoA thiolase ( ... Long-chain 3-hydroxy acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (LCHAD) is 1 of 3 enzymatic activities that make up the trifunctional ... encoded search term (Long-Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency) and Long-Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency What to ... Scalais E, Bottu J, Wanders RJ, Ferdinandusse S, Waterham HR, De Meirleir L. Familial very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ...
At least 3 separate acyl-CoA dehydrogenases are known; they are as follows:. *. Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Length of ... Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (MCAD) Deficiency (MCADD) * Sections Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (MCAD) Deficiency ... encoded search term (Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase (MCAD) Deficiency (MCADD)) and Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase ( ... Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in children with non- ketotic hypoglycemia and low carnitine levels. Pediatr Res ...
Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency ... a secondary marker for medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency), immunoreactive trypsinogen (a primary marker for cystic ... Laboratories also may retain tested specimens for a longer period or indefinitely for quality assurance and educational ... Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Medium/short-chain L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA ...
... such as long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), medium chain-specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), and very long-chain acyl ... Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) protein regulates long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by deacetylating conserved lysines near the active site. ... SIRT3 deficient mice accumulate long-chain fatty acids and decrease fatty acid oxidation during calorie restriction [85]. ... investigated the SIRT3 expression in people who engaged in life-long exercise and reported that life-long physical activity can ...
The deficiency in the Acadvl product (very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, VLCAD) reduces myocardial fatty acid β-oxidation ... acyl-CoA oxidase (Acox1) (5′-TGTGACCCTTGGCTCTGTTCT-3′ and 5′-TGTAGTAAGATTCGTGGACCTCTG-3′), acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long ... β-oxidation of long chain and very long chain fatty acids, our data suggest that AICAR may enhance lipid mitochondrial β- ... long chain and very long chain fatty acids are the major components of storage triglycerides and derivatives (diacylglycerols, ...
Newborn screening information for short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency ... They are categorized as either short, medium, long, or very long. Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase specializes at breaking ... Conditions Short-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) is a condition in ... Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) is estimated to affect one in 40,000 to 100,000 newborns. ...
Targeted disruption of mouse long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase gene reveals crucial roles for fatty acid oxidation. Proc Natl ... Mitochondrial dysfunction due to long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency causes hepatic steatosis and hepatic insulin ... SIRT3 promotes β-oxidation by activating long-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) activity and ketone body generation by ... the hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HADHA), the α-subunit of the MTP complex, was found to be highly regulated by SIRT3 [73]. ...
Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) This deficiency is similar to LCHADD but is commonly associated with ... a hydroxyacyl dehydrogenase, and a lyase) specific for different chain lengths (very long chain, long chain, medium chain, and ... Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) This deficiency is the most common defect in the beta-oxidation cycle. ... Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (LCHADD) This deficiency is the 2nd most common fatty acid oxidation ...
It plays an essential role in the transfer of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for beta-oxidation. ... such as long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. ... Short-chain Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: studies in a large family adding to the complexity of the disorder. Pediatrics. ... Regulation of the intramitochondrial free CoA also is affected, with accumulation of acyl-CoA esters in the mitochondria. This ...
acyl-CoA dehydrogenase long chain .... ACADM. 34. ACADM. acyl-CoA dehydrogenase medium chai.... ... acyl-CoA synthetase long chain fam.... ACTN2. 88. ACTN2. actinin alpha 2 [Source:HGNC Symbo.... ...
... long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (L-CHAD) and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). ...
Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Deficiency of very long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase (VLCAD), which ... CACT deficiency causes a defect in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid ß-oxidation, with variable clinical severity. Severe ... Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a disorder of long-chain fatty-acid oxidation. The three clinical ... Other clinical features are typical for disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation: poor feeding, lethargy, hypoketotic ...
Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency 12% * Proteins 11% * Vitamin D 11% ... Long-Chain-3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase 16% * 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase 15% ...
... program is to detect and manage treatable conditions in the early stages prior to the occurrence of long-term and irreversible ... Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Glutaric acidemia type II. Long-chain L-3 hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... Follow-up testing includes plasma or serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and branched -chain fatty acids (BFAs), red ... Singh I, Moser AE, Moser HW, Kishimoto Y. Adrenoleukodystrophy: Impaired oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in white ...
Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCADD; OMIM 609575) deficiency is the most common long-chain mitochondrial FAO ... To understand the role of gluconeogenesis in the pathophysiology of long-chain mitochondrial FAO defects, we injected VLCAD- ... Heptanoate Improves Compensatory Mechanism of Glucose Homeostasis in Mitochondrial Long-Chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Defect. ... Are all HCL systems the same? long term outcomes of three HCL systems in children with type 1 diabetes: real-life registry- ...
Clinical and biochemical outcome of patients with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Rovelli Valentina et al. ...
Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.9). Creators: Christoff Odendaal, Barbara Bakker, Karen van Eunen ...
One of them could be identified as a very long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial inner membrane ( ... namely succinyl-CoA dehydrogenase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase, are strongly up-regulated in HE mice. These proteomic ... isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase) suggest that the capacity of these acetyl-CoA-consuming pathways is ... In addition to aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase down-regulation, we noticed that three ...
Whartons paternity came to light because Ryder has a rare disease called VLCAD or Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ... "I mean, I dont know how long I will wait, but Ill wait," Floyd said. ...
Carnitine metabolism disorders are autosomal recessive inherited disorders of mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids ... In both forms, CACT deficiency (see below) or very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) may also be considered ... As a result, the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria and thus fatty acid oxidation is impaired. Most ... Carnitine metabolism disorders are autosomal recessive inherited disorders of mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids ...
Chets genetic condition-a rare metabolic one called very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, or VLCAD-is chronic and ... Not only were they listening but they were ready to help-a life preserver tossed when expectations of help had long since ...
Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT), and other fatty acid oxidation ... very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [VLCAD], carnitine palmitoyltransferase [CPT] II). (See "Specific fatty acid oxidation ... Fatty acid oxidation defects, the most common of which is medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency (see "Overview ... such as medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency), some GSDs, disorders of gluconeogenesis, and hereditary fructose ...
It plays an essential role in the transfer of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for beta-oxidation. ... such as long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency. ... Short-chain Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: studies in a large family adding to the complexity of the disorder. Pediatrics. ... Long-Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency * Medium-Chain Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency ...
... several mitochondrial dehydrogenases that utilize flavin adenine dinucleotide as cofactor including the acyl-CoA dehydrogenases ... and long-chain fatty acyl carnitine, urinary glutaric acid, 3-hydroxy glutaric acid, isovalerylglycine, and ethylmalonic acid, ... suggesting the possibility of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. ". 03/26/1994 - "After ifosfamide overdose in a ... Multiple Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Deficiency 01/01/1984 - "A highly elevated concentration of 14.48 mumol/l glutaric acid ...
  • Very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a condition that prevents the body from converting certain fats into energy, particularly during periods without food (fasting). (medlineplus.gov)
  • Schiff M, Mohsen AW, Karunanidhi A, McCracken E, Yeasted R, Vockley J. Molecular and cellular pathology of very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Scalais E, Bottu J, Wanders RJ, Ferdinandusse S, Waterham HR, De Meirleir L. Familial very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency as a cause of neonatal sudden infant death: Improved survival by prompt diagnosis. (medscape.com)
  • Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and choroidal neovascularization]. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical, biochemical, and morphologic investigations of a case of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Peripheral sensory-motor polyneuropathy, pigmentary retinopathy, and fatal cardiomyopathy in long-chain 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: clinical presentation and follow-up of 50 patients. (medscape.com)
  • Acute dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with deficiency of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. (medscape.com)
  • Optimal dietary therapy of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Gillingham MB, Purnell JQ, Jordan J, Stadler D, Haqq AM, Harding CO. Effects of higher dietary protein intake on energy balance and metabolic control in children with long-chain 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Gillingham MB, Scott B, Elliott D, Harding CO. Metabolic control during exercise with and without medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) in children with long-chain 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • IJlst L, Wanders RJ, Ushikubo S, Kamijo T, Hashimoto T. Molecular basis of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency: identification of the major disease-causing mutation in the alpha-subunit of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein. (medscape.com)
  • Pigmentary retinopathy in long chain 3-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • Infants suspected to have very-long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency from newborn screening. (medscape.com)
  • MCT oil-based diet reverses hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with very long chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency. (medscape.com)
  • In 1983, Gregersen et al demonstrated a medium-chain acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency in a patient with hypoketotic hypoglycemia. (medscape.com)
  • Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) is a condition in which the body is unable to break down certain fats. (babysfirsttest.org)
  • Short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) is estimated to affect one in 40,000 to 100,000 newborns. (babysfirsttest.org)
  • If your baby's newborn screening result for short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) was out of the normal range, your baby's doctor or the state screening program will contact you to arrange for your child to have additional testing. (babysfirsttest.org)
  • Each child with short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) has a different experience. (babysfirsttest.org)
  • Some children with short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) take prescription L-carnitine supplements. (babysfirsttest.org)
  • Children who are treated early for short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCAD) can have healthy growth and development. (babysfirsttest.org)
  • [ 1 ] Intracellular carnitine deficiency impairs the entry of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical and biochemical outcome of patients with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. (cdc.gov)
  • According to Romper, Wharton's paternity came to light because Ryder has a rare disease called VLCAD or Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. (celebrityinsider.org)
  • In both forms, CACT deficiency (see below) or very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency ( VLCADD ) may also be considered here as differential diagnoses. (medicover-genetics.com)
  • Chet's genetic condition-a rare metabolic one called very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, or VLCAD-is chronic and qualifies him for palliative care. (hoaghospitalfoundation.org)
  • A deficiency of either proline oxidase or pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase results in a buildup of proline in the body. (chemeurope.com)
  • Long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.8, palmitoyl-CoA dehydrogenase, palmitoyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase, long-chain-acyl-CoA:(acceptor) 2,3-oxidoreductase, ACADL (gene). (wikipedia.org)
  • On the mechanism of dehydrogenation of fatty acyl derivatives of coenzyme A. III. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lysine acetylation is a common reversible PMP that consists of the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) to a lysine residue on targeted proteins. (explorationpub.com)
  • Lysine acetylation consists of the addition of an acetyl group from acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to a lysine residue within a protein. (explorationpub.com)
  • Carnitine binds acyl residues and helps in their elimination, decreasing the number of acyl residues conjugated with coenzyme A (CoA) and increasing the ratio between free and acylated CoA. (medscape.com)
  • Entry into the beta-oxidation cycle requires the action of acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, the first enzyme in the sequence, which removes electrons from the alpha-carbon and the beta-carbon, introducing a double bond. (medscape.com)
  • Acetyl CoA is generated from fatty acids through repeated beta-oxidation cycles. (msdmanuals.com)
  • It plays an essential role in the transfer of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for beta-oxidation. (medscape.com)
  • Consequently, long-chain fatty acids are not available for beta-oxidation and energy production, and the production of ketone bodies (which are used by the brain) is also impaired. (medscape.com)
  • This acyl-CoA is linked to carnitine by the action of CPT I, with simultaneous transport across the mitochondrial membrane barrier. (medscape.com)
  • However, mitochondrial dysfunction eventually occurs, likely due to increased lipids and impaired electron chain activity [ 10 , 18 , 19 ]. (explorationpub.com)
  • Carnitine metabolism disorders are autosomal recessive inherited disorders of mitochondrial oxidation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA). (medicover-genetics.com)
  • To date, there have been no randomized controlled trials that have examined the effects of long-term CR on muscle mitochondrial function in humans. (medscape.com)
  • Once inside the mitochondrion, the action of CPT II at the inner surface of the membrane releases free carnitine, which exits to the cytosol and leaves behind the acyl-CoA molecule. (medscape.com)
  • One of the main mechanisms by which AMPK contributes to restore the metabolic status is through inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the subsequent reduction of malonyl-CoA, an allosteric inhibitor of the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1). (hindawi.com)
  • The Commissioner of Public Health shall publish a list of all the abnormal conditions for which the department screens newborns under the newborn screening program, which shall include screening for amino acid disorders, organic acid disorders and fatty acid oxidation disorders, including, but not limited to, long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (L-CHAD) and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD). (ct.gov)
  • In addition, AMPK is also able to regulate the long-term metabolic response by modulating the activity of transcription factors, such as the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) [ 10 - 14 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Our different analyses indicate that, in HE mice, the capacity of several metabolic pathways is altered to promote the availability of acetyl-CoA, glycerol-3-phosphate, ATP and NADPH for TG de novo biosynthesis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Acute metabolic decompensation requires prompt recognition and intervention to prevent mortality and long-term morbidity. (medilib.ir)
  • Cleavage of the 3-keto compound at the now unstable alpha-beta carbon bond and transfer of another CoA moiety to the new fragment results in 2 products: acetyl-CoA, composed of the carbonyl and original alpha-carbon from the starting molecule, and a new fatty acyl-CoA that is 2 carbons shorter than the original molecule. (medscape.com)
  • Purification and characterization of short-chain, medium-chain, and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases from rat liver mitochondria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulation of the intramitochondrial free CoA also is affected, with accumulation of acyl-CoA esters in the mitochondria. (medscape.com)
  • As a result, the transport of long-chain fatty acids into the mitochondria and thus fatty acid oxidation is impaired. (medicover-genetics.com)
  • Sets of 4 enzymes (an acyl dehydrogenase, a hydratase, a hydroxyacyl dehydrogenase, and a lyase) specific for different chain lengths (very long chain, long chain, medium chain, and short chain) are required to catabolize fatty acids completely. (msdmanuals.com)
  • This gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, which is required to break down (metabolize) a group of fats called very long-chain fatty acids. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Hyperprolinemia type II is caused by a mutation in the ALDH4A1 gene, for the enzyme pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. (chemeurope.com)
  • This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction a long-chain acyl-CoA + electron-transfer flavoprotein ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } a long-chain trans-2,3-dehydroacyl-CoA + reduced electron-transfer flavoprotein This enzyme contains FAD as prosthetic group and participates in fatty acid metabolism and PPAR signaling pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Management and outcome in 75 individuals with long-chain fatty acid oxidation defects: results from a workshop. (medscape.com)
  • Oxidation of the hydroxyl substituent group on the beta-carbon creates an inherently unstable beta-ketoacyl-CoA compound. (medscape.com)
  • When cells do not have enough of this enzyme, very long-chain fatty acids are not broken down properly. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The aim of newborn screening (NBS) program is to detect and manage treatable conditions in the early stages prior to the occurrence of long-term and irreversible sequalae. (lidsen.com)
  • Very long-chain fatty acids or partially metabolized fatty acids may also build up in tissues and damage the heart, liver, and muscles. (medlineplus.gov)
  • These are, in turn, transferred to the electron transport chain with the production of ATP. (medscape.com)
  • In the process, another electron transfer occurs, this time to nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD), and more ATP is produced by passage down the electron transport chain. (medscape.com)
  • With attention focused on the definition of additional disorders, researchers described patients with a Reye syndrome-like presentation who excreted dicarboxylic acids of chain lengths C6-C10 in their urine. (medscape.com)
  • In the cytosol, a saturated, straight-chain fatty acid molecule with no double bonds is activated by the action of fatty acyl-CoA synthetase to form its corresponding acyl-CoA. (medscape.com)
  • The next step is the introduction of a water molecule and resaturation of the double bond to form fatty enoyl-CoA. (medscape.com)
  • is an enzyme with systematic name long-chain acyl-CoA:electron-transfer flavoprotein 2,3-oxidoreductase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long-chain acylcarnitines are also toxic and may have an arrhythmogenic effect, causing sudden cardiac death. (medscape.com)
  • PPARs are physiologically activated by long chain fatty acids and eicosanoid products, acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors. (hindawi.com)
  • Predicted to enable medium-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and very-long-chain-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. (nih.gov)
  • Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency Fatty acid oxidation disorders are lipid metabolism disorders that are caused by a lack or deficiency of the enzymes needed to break down fats, resulting in delayed mental and physical development. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The objective of the work described in this thesis was to develop and apply magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods for non-invasive in vivo investigations of myocardial lipid accumulation and energy metabolism in a mouse model of long-chain FAO deficiency, i.e. the long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) knockout (KO) mouse. (tue.nl)
  • Cleavage of the 3-keto compound at the now unstable alpha-beta carbon bond and transfer of another CoA moiety to the new fragment results in 2 products: acetyl-CoA, composed of the carbonyl and original alpha-carbon from the starting molecule, and a new fatty acyl-CoA that is 2 carbons shorter than the original molecule. (medscape.com)
  • Glucose within the hepatocytes is mainly metabolized to pyruvate via glycolysis after which to acetyl-CoA to generate ATP in the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. (translateinthetownships.com)
  • De novo FFA synthesis includes citrate export from mitochondria inside a carrier-mediated manner, the ATP-dependent citrate lyase reaction that provides in the cytosol acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate. (translateinthetownships.com)
  • Acetyl-CoA by way of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (activated by citrate) produces malonyl-CoA to start FFA synthesis [40]. (translateinthetownships.com)
  • This gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, which is required to break down (metabolize) a group of fats called very long-chain fatty acids. (medlineplus.gov)
  • When cells do not have enough of this enzyme, very long-chain fatty acids are not broken down properly. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The affected protein could be an enzyme, a hormone, or a specific molecule such as hemoglobin or immunoglobulin chain. (nih.gov)
  • UniProt Number - a unique identifier assigned to all proteins, including enzymes, hemoglobin subunits, and immunoglobulin chains. (nih.gov)
  • In the cytosol, a saturated, straight-chain fatty acid molecule with no double bonds is activated by the action of fatty acyl-CoA synthetase to form its corresponding acyl-CoA. (medscape.com)
  • Patients with an inborn error in long-chain FAO may present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and liver disease, and/or a life-threatening cardiac phenotype that includes conduction abnormalities, arrhythmias, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (tue.nl)
  • Therefore, current treatment strategies for patients with a long-chain FAO defect aim at preventing hypoketotic hypoglycemia, particularly via avoidance of fasting. (tue.nl)
  • Cluster 9 was particularly intriguing that the mutant ferS was significantly enhanced in expression of fusarinine C synthase, cytochrome P450 52A10, cytochrome P450 CYP56C1, C-14 sterol reductase, ergosterol biosynthesis ERG4/ERG24 family protein, autophagy-related protein, oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase, L-lactate Caspase 6 custom synthesis dehydrogenase and two major facilitator superfamily transporters, compared with wild variety (Fig. 6). (igf-1r.com)
  • Oxidation of the hydroxyl substituent group on the beta-carbon creates an inherently unstable beta-ketoacyl-CoA compound. (medscape.com)
  • 11. Tissue-specific strategies of the very-long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-deficient (VLCAD-/-) mouse to compensate a defective fatty acid β-oxidation. (nih.gov)
  • A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for long-chain fatty acids. (bvsalud.org)
  • The lack of these enzymes leaves the body short of energy and allows breakdown products, such as acyl-CoA, to accumulate. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Protein analysis showed increased levels of the myosin heavy chain, slow fiber type protein, and the complexes I, II, III, IV, and V of the oxidative phosphorylation. (physiology.org)
  • Decision analyses and economic evaluations can help inform policy decisions for newborn screening programs by providing a systematic approach to synthesizing available evidence and providing projected estimates of long-term clinical and economic outcomes when long-term data are not available. (cdc.gov)
  • which is important given the lack of long-term outcomes data for most conditions considered for newborn screening. (cdc.gov)
  • Tandem Mass Spectrometry is used to detect elevations of several long- chain and hydroxy acylcarnitines (C18:1-OH), C16-OH, C14-OH, C18). (wv.gov)
  • Long-chain acylcarnitines are also toxic and may have an arrhythmogenic effect, causing sudden cardiac death. (medscape.com)
  • The next step is the introduction of a water molecule and resaturation of the double bond to form fatty enoyl-CoA. (medscape.com)
  • Over the long term, children have delayed mental and physical development, an enlarged liver, heart muscle weakness, and an irregular heartbeat. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The scarcity of data on the costs of screening, follow-up, treatment, and long-term disability must be addressed to improve the evaluation process for nominated conditions. (cdc.gov)
  • Decision analysis can provide an approach for synthesizing evidence from disparate sources to assist decision makers in estimating potential long-term health benefits and harms. (cdc.gov)
  • With attention focused on the definition of additional disorders, researchers described patients with a Reye syndrome-like presentation who excreted dicarboxylic acids of chain lengths C6-C10 in their urine. (medscape.com)
  • The pathogenesis underlying the development of cardiac disease in long-chain FAO disorders is still unclear, explaining the lack of evidence-based treatment options. (tue.nl)
  • To facilitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention and management of cardiomyopathy, a better understanding of the etiology of cardiac disease in long-chain FAO disorders is crucial. (tue.nl)
  • Going all the way back to the 1921 book by Emil Kraeplin where the connection between uric acid and " manic symptoms " was discussed, there is quite a long history attached to this area. (blogspot.com)