A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.
Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.
Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
Continuous care and monitoring of newborn infants with life-threatening conditions, in any setting.
A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.
An infant during the first month after birth.
Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).
A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.
The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.
Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.
Techniques for administering artificial respiration without the need for INTRATRACHEAL INTUBATION.
Application of a life support system that circulates the blood through an oxygenating system, which may consist of a pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. Examples of its use are to assist victims of smoke inhalation injury, respiratory failure, and cardiac failure.
Techniques for effecting the transition of the respiratory-failure patient from mechanical ventilation to spontaneous ventilation, while meeting the criteria that tidal volume be above a given threshold (greater than 5 ml/kg), respiratory frequency be below a given count (less than 30 breaths/min), and oxygen partial pressure be above a given threshold (PaO2 greater than 50mm Hg). Weaning studies focus on finding methods to monitor and predict the outcome of mechanical ventilator weaning as well as finding ventilatory support techniques which will facilitate successful weaning. Present methods include intermittent mandatory ventilation, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, and mandatory minute volume ventilation.
The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
Devices that cover the nose and mouth to maintain aseptic conditions or to administer inhaled anesthetics or other gases. (UMDNS, 1999)
The posture of an individual lying face down.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.
Injury following pressure changes; includes injury to the eustachian tube, ear drum, lung and stomach.
Ventilatory support system using frequencies from 60-900 cycles/min or more. Three types of systems have been distinguished on the basis of rates, volumes, and the system used. They are high frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV); HIGH-FREQUENCY JET VENTILATION; (HFJV); and high-frequency oscillation (HFO).
A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.
The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)
Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.
An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.
The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.
Inhalation of oxygen aimed at restoring toward normal any pathophysiologic alterations of gas exchange in the cardiopulmonary system, as by the use of a respirator, nasal catheter, tent, chamber, or mask. (From Dorland, 27th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)
Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.
Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.
Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.
Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
RESPIRATORY MUSCLE contraction during INHALATION. The work is accomplished in three phases: LUNG COMPLIANCE work, that required to expand the LUNGS against its elastic forces; tissue resistance work, that required to overcome the viscosity of the lung and chest wall structures; and AIRWAY RESISTANCE work, that required to overcome airway resistance during the movement of air into the lungs. Work of breathing does not refer to expiration, which is entirely a passive process caused by elastic recoil of the lung and chest cage. (Guyton, Textbook of Medical Physiology, 8th ed, p406)
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
A pulmonary surfactant associated-protein that plays an essential role in alveolar stability by lowering the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inherited deficiency of pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B is one cause of RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN.
The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.
Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase when the patient has an artificial airway in place and is connected to a ventilator.
Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.
Diseases of newborn infants present at birth (congenital) or developing within the first month of birth. It does not include hereditary diseases not manifesting at birth or within the first 30 days of life nor does it include inborn errors of metabolism. Both HEREDITARY DISEASES and METABOLISM, INBORN ERRORS are available as general concepts.
A clinical manifestation of abnormal increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in arterial blood.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
Removal of an endotracheal tube from the patient.
An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.
That part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT or the air within the respiratory tract that does not exchange OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE with pulmonary capillary blood.
Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.
A chronic lung disease developed after OXYGEN INHALATION THERAPY or mechanical ventilation (VENTILATION, MECHANICAL) usually occurring in certain premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE) or newborn infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN). Histologically, it is characterized by the unusual abnormalities of the bronchioles, such as METAPLASIA, decrease in alveolar number, and formation of CYSTS.
Body ventilators that assist ventilation by applying intermittent subatmospheric pressure around the thorax, abdomen, or airway and periodically expand the chest wall and inflate the lungs. They are relatively simple to operate and do not require tracheostomy. These devices include the tank ventilators ("iron lung"), Portalung, Pneumowrap, and chest cuirass ("tortoise shell").
An infant whose weight at birth is less than 1500 grams (3.3 lbs), regardless of gestational age.
A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.
Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.
Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.
Institutions which provide health-related care and services to individuals who do not require the degree of care which hospitals or skilled nursing facilities provide, but because of their physical or mental condition require care and services above the level of room and board.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Lung damage that is caused by the adverse effects of PULMONARY VENTILATOR usage. The high frequency and tidal volumes produced by a mechanical ventilator can cause alveolar disruption and PULMONARY EDEMA.
Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.
Devices in which blood and oxygen are separated by a semipermeable membrane, generally of Teflon or polypropylene, across which gas exchange occurs. The membrane may be arranged as a series of parallel plates or as a number of hollow fibers; in the latter arrangement, the blood may flow inside the fibers, which are surrounded by gas, or the blood may flow outside the fibers and the gas inside the fibers. (Dorland, 28th ed)
X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.
A subspecialty of Pediatrics concerned with the newborn infant.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.
Functional competence of specific organs or body systems of the FETUS in utero.
Any disorder marked by obstruction of conducting airways of the lung. AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION may be acute, chronic, intermittent, or persistent.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
HYPOVENTILATION syndrome in very obese persons with excessive ADIPOSE TISSUE around the ABDOMEN and DIAPHRAGM. It is characterized by diminished to absent ventilatory chemoresponsiveness; chronic HYPOXIA; HYPERCAPNIA; POLYCYTHEMIA; and long periods of sleep during day and night (HYPERSOMNOLENCE). It is a condition often related to OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA but can occur separately.
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
Complex pharmaceutical substances, preparations, or matter derived from organisms usually obtained by biological methods or assay.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.
A disease of chronic diffuse irreversible airflow obstruction. Subcategories of COPD include CHRONIC BRONCHITIS and PULMONARY EMPHYSEMA.
An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.
Inhaling liquid or solids, such as stomach contents, into the RESPIRATORY TRACT. When this causes severe lung damage, it is called ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.
A pulmonary surfactant associated protein that plays a role in alveolar stability by lowering the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. It is a membrane-bound protein that constitutes 1-2% of the pulmonary surfactant mass. Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein C is one of the most hydrophobic peptides yet isolated and contains an alpha-helical domain with a central poly-valine segment that binds to phospholipid bilayers.
A measure of the quality of health care by assessment of unsuccessful results of management and procedures used in combating disease, in individual cases or series.
Usually high-molecular-weight, straight-chain primary alcohols, but can also range from as few as 4 carbons, derived from natural fats and oils, including lauryl, stearyl, oleyl, and linoleyl alcohols. They are used in pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, detergents, plastics, and lube oils and in textile manufacture. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck, or the opening so created.
A technique of respiratory therapy, in either spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients, in which airway pressure is maintained above atmospheric pressure throughout the respiratory cycle by pressurization of the ventilatory circuit. (On-Line Medical Dictionary [Internet]. Newcastle upon Tyne(UK): The University Dept. of Medical Oncology: The CancerWEB Project; c1997-2003 [cited 2003 Apr 17]. Available from: http://cancerweb.ncl.ac.uk/omd/)
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the bronchi.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.
A respiratory distress syndrome in newborn infants, usually premature infants with insufficient PULMONARY SURFACTANTS. The disease is characterized by the formation of a HYALINE-like membrane lining the terminal respiratory airspaces (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and subsequent collapse of the lung (PULMONARY ATELECTASIS).
A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
Proteins found in the LUNG that act as PULMONARY SURFACTANTS.
The nursing specialty that deals with the care of newborn infants during the first four weeks after birth.
Application of positive pressure to the inspiratory phase of spontaneous respiration.
The number of times an organism breathes with the lungs (RESPIRATION) per unit time, usually per minute.
Injection of air or a more slowly absorbed gas such as nitrogen, into the PLEURAL CAVITY to collapse the lung.
A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.
The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.
The hospital unit in which patients with respiratory conditions requiring special attention receive intensive medical care and surveillance.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.
A clear, yellowish liquid that envelopes the FETUS inside the sac of AMNION. In the first trimester, it is likely a transudate of maternal or fetal plasma. In the second trimester, amniotic fluid derives primarily from fetal lung and kidney. Cells or substances in this fluid can be removed for prenatal diagnostic tests (AMNIOCENTESIS).
A water-soluble ester of METHYLPREDNISOLONE used for cardiac, allergic, and hypoxic emergencies.
The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).
An enlarged THYROID GLAND with at least 50% of the gland situated behind the STERNUM. It is an unusual presentation of an intrathoracic goiter. Substernal goiters frequently cause compression on the TRACHEA leading to deviation, narrowing, and respiratory symptoms.
Postmortem examination of the body.
A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
Care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities associated with the cardiopulmonary system. It includes the therapeutic use of medical gases and their administrative apparatus, environmental control systems, humidification, aerosols, ventilatory support, bronchopulmonary drainage and exercise, respiratory rehabilitation, assistance with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and maintenance of natural, artificial, and mechanical airways.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
Any hindrance to the passage of air into and out of the lungs.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.
An abundant pulmonary surfactant-associated protein that binds to a variety of lung pathogens, resulting in their opsinization. It also stimulates MACROPHAGES to undergo PHAGOCYTOSIS of microorganisms. Surfactant protein A contains a N-terminal collagen-like domain and a C-terminal lectin domain that are characteristic of members of the collectin family of proteins.
Water content outside of the lung vasculature. About 80% of a normal lung is made up of water, including intracellular, interstitial, and blood water. Failure to maintain the normal homeostatic fluid exchange between the vascular space and the interstitium of the lungs can result in PULMONARY EDEMA and flooding of the alveolar space.
Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.
The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.
Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.
Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.
A glucocorticoid given orally, parenterally, by local injection, by inhalation, or applied topically in the management of various disorders in which corticosteroids are indicated. Its lack of mineralocorticoid properties makes betamethasone particularly suitable for treating cerebral edema and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p724)
An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.
A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.
The force acting on the surface of a liquid, tending to minimize the area of the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A syndrome of persistent PULMONARY HYPERTENSION in the newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN) without demonstrable HEART DISEASES. This neonatal condition can be caused by severe pulmonary vasoconstriction (reactive type), hypertrophy of pulmonary arterial muscle (hypertrophic type), or abnormally developed pulmonary arterioles (hypoplastic type). The newborn patient exhibits CYANOSIS and ACIDOSIS due to the persistence of fetal circulatory pattern of right-to-left shunting of blood through a patent ductus arteriosus (DUCTUS ARTERIOSUS, PATENT) and at times a patent foramen ovale (FORAMEN OVALE, PATENT).
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Protein-lipid combinations abundant in brain tissue, but also present in a wide variety of animal and plant tissues. In contrast to lipoproteins, they are insoluble in water, but soluble in a chloroform-methanol mixture. The protein moiety has a high content of hydrophobic amino acids. The associated lipids consist of a mixture of GLYCEROPHOSPHATES; CEREBROSIDES; and SULFOGLYCOSPHINGOLIPIDS; while lipoproteins contain PHOSPHOLIPIDS; CHOLESTEROL; and TRIGLYCERIDES.
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Drugs used for their effects on the respiratory system.
Respiratory retention of carbon dioxide. It may be chronic or acute.
Procedure to accelerate the ability of a patient to walk or move about by reducing the time to AMBULATION. It is characterized by a shorter period of hospitalization or recumbency than is normally practiced.
Degeneration of white matter adjacent to the CEREBRAL VENTRICLES following cerebral hypoxia or BRAIN ISCHEMIA in neonates. The condition primarily affects white matter in the perfusion zone between superficial and deep branches of the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY. Clinical manifestations include VISION DISORDERS; CEREBRAL PALSY; PARAPLEGIA; SEIZURES; and cognitive disorders. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1021; Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1997, Ch4, pp30-1)
Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
An acute form of TUBERCULOSIS in which minute tubercles are formed in a number of organs of the body due to dissemination of the bacilli through the blood stream.
These include the muscles of the DIAPHRAGM and the INTERCOSTAL MUSCLES.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.
A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.
Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.
Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.
The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).
Electrically powered devices that are intended to assist in the maintenance of the thermal balance of infants, principally by controlling the air temperature and humidity in an enclosure. (from UMDNS, 1999)
Diseases of the respiratory system in general or unspecified or for a specific respiratory disease not available.
A respiratory stimulant that enhances respiration by acting as an agonist of peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid bodies. The drug increases arterial oxygen tension while decreasing arterial carbon dioxide tension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It may also prove useful in the treatment of nocturnal oxygen desaturation without impairing the quality of sleep.
A subtype of INFLUENZA A VIRUS with the surface proteins hemagglutinin 1 and neuraminidase 1. The H1N1 subtype was responsible for the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918.
Non-therapeutic positive end-expiratory pressure occurring frequently in patients with severe airway obstruction. It can appear with or without the administration of external positive end-expiratory pressure (POSITIVE-PRESSURE RESPIRATION). It presents an important load on the inspiratory muscles which are operating at a mechanical disadvantage due to hyperinflation. Auto-PEEP may cause profound hypotension that should be treated by intravascular volume expansion, increasing the time for expiration, and/or changing from assist mode to intermittent mandatory ventilation mode. (From Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 12th ed, p1127)
Methods of creating machines and devices.
Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.
Drugs that interrupt transmission of nerve impulses at the skeletal neuromuscular junction. They can be of two types, competitive, stabilizing blockers (NEUROMUSCULAR NONDEPOLARIZING AGENTS) or noncompetitive, depolarizing agents (NEUROMUSCULAR DEPOLARIZING AGENTS). Both prevent acetylcholine from triggering the muscle contraction and they are used as anesthesia adjuvants, as relaxants during electroshock, in convulsive states, etc.
Blocking of a blood vessel by fat deposits in the circulation. It is often seen after fractures of large bones or after administration of CORTICOSTEROIDS.
A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The musculofibrous partition that separates the THORACIC CAVITY from the ABDOMINAL CAVITY. Contraction of the diaphragm increases the volume of the thoracic cavity aiding INHALATION.
Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.
Continuous recording of the carbon dioxide content of expired air.
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.
The administration of therapeutic agents drop by drop, as eye drops, ear drops, or nose drops. It is also administered into a body space or cavity through a catheter. It differs from THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION in that the irrigate is removed within minutes, but the instillate is left in place.
A nonreassuring fetal status (NRFS) indicating that the FETUS is compromised (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 1988). It can be identified by sub-optimal values in FETAL HEART RATE; oxygenation of FETAL BLOOD; and other parameters.
A measure of the amount of WATER VAPOR in the air.
Sepsis associated with HYPOTENSION or hypoperfusion despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Perfusion abnormalities may include, but are not limited to LACTIC ACIDOSIS; OLIGURIA; or acute alteration in mental status.
A nitrogen-free class of lipids present in animal and particularly plant tissues and composed of one mole of glycerol and 1 or 2 moles of phosphatidic acid. Members of this group differ from one another in the nature of the fatty acids released on hydrolysis.
A condition caused by inhalation of MECONIUM into the LUNG of FETUS or NEWBORN, usually due to vigorous respiratory movements during difficult PARTURITION or respiratory system abnormalities. Meconium aspirate may block small airways leading to difficulties in PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE and ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.
A disorder characterized by procoagulant substances entering the general circulation causing a systemic thrombotic process. The activation of the clotting mechanism may arise from any of a number of disorders. A majority of the patients manifest skin lesions, sometimes leading to PURPURA FULMINANS.
The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.
Care of infants in the home or institution.
A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
CHILDBIRTH at the end of a normal duration of PREGNANCY, between 37 to 40 weeks of gestation or about 280 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period.
Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.
A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of proteins, including elastin. It cleaves preferentially bonds at the carboxyl side of Ala and Val, with greater specificity for Ala. EC 3.4.21.37.
The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.
Lipids containing one or more phosphate groups, particularly those derived from either glycerol (phosphoglycerides see GLYCEROPHOSPHOLIPIDS) or sphingosine (SPHINGOLIPIDS). They are polar lipids that are of great importance for the structure and function of cell membranes and are the most abundant of membrane lipids, although not stored in large amounts in the system.
ENTEROCOLITIS with extensive ulceration (ULCER) and NECROSIS. It is observed primarily in LOW BIRTH WEIGHT INFANT.
A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.
Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.
A group of CORTICOSTEROIDS that affect carbohydrate metabolism (GLUCONEOGENESIS, liver glycogen deposition, elevation of BLOOD SUGAR), inhibit ADRENOCORTICOTROPIC HORMONE secretion, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. They also play a role in fat and protein metabolism, maintenance of arterial blood pressure, alteration of the connective tissue response to injury, reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes, and functioning of the central nervous system.
The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The removal of secretions, gas or fluid from hollow or tubular organs or cavities by means of a tube and a device that acts on negative pressure.
Mechanical ventilation delivered to match the patient's efforts in breathing as detected by the interactive ventilation device.
Interstitial pneumonia caused by extensive infection of the lungs (LUNG) and BRONCHI, particularly the lower lobes of the lungs, by MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE in humans. In SHEEP, it is caused by MYCOPLASMA OVIPNEUMONIAE. In CATTLE, it may be caused by MYCOPLASMA DISPAR.
Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
A PREDNISOLONE derivative with similar anti-inflammatory action.
An abnormal increase in the amount of oxygen in the tissues and organs.
Patients' guests and rules for visiting.
Hospital facilities which provide care for newborn infants.
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), decreasing the tidal volume on the ventilator (usually 6-8 mL/kg) to 4-6 mL/kg ... has been accepted progressively in critical care for adult, pediatric, and neonatal patients requiring mechanical ventilation ... Permissive hypercapnia, a ventilatory strategy for acute respiratory failure in which the lungs are ventilated with a low ... Irwin and Rippe's Intensive Care Medicine (Fifth ed.). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-3548-3. Archived from the ...
... has shown to be useful in neonatal intensive care settings for premature infants with Infant respiratory distress syndrome, as ... Roca, O.; Riera, J.; Torres, F.; Masclans, J. R. (2010). "High-flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure". Respiratory ... Traditional oxygen therapy is limited to six liters a minute and does not begin to approach the inspiratory demand of an adult ... "Children with respiratory distress treated with high-flow nasal cannula". Journal of Intensive Care Medicine. 24 (5): 323-328. ...
Allardet-Servent J (2011). "High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: ... acute respiratory failure, sleep apnea, etc. Often BPAP is incorrectly referred to as "BiPAP". BiPAP is the name of a portable ... Donn SM (2009). "Neonatal ventilators: how do they differ?". J Perinatol. 29 Suppl 2: S73-8. doi:10.1038/jp.2009.23. PMID ... 4th European Congress on Intensive Care Medicine. Baveno-Stresa C. Hormann, M. Baum, C. Putensen, N. J. Mutz & H. Benzer ( ...
"Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults with severe respiratory failure: a multi-center database". Intensive Care ... Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. *Neonatal ... Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Synonyms. Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), adult respiratory distress syndrome, shock ... "adult respiratory distress syndrome" has at times been used to differentiate ARDS from "infant respiratory distress syndrome" ...
... acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (PaO2/FiO2 ratio, 300), different ratio in pediatric acute respiratory distress ... Neonatal sepsisEdit. In common clinical usage, neonatal sepsis refers to a bacterial blood stream infection in the first month ... evidence of hypercapnic respiratory failure), or. *supplemental oxygen requirement of greater than FiO2 0.5 to maintain oxygen ... "Annals of Intensive Care. 4: 21. doi:10.1186/s13613-014-0021-0. PMC 4122823. PMID 25110606.. ...
... acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (PaO2/FiO2 ratio< 300), different ratio in pediatric acute respiratory distress ... Criteria with regard to hemodynamic compromise or respiratory failure are not useful because they present too late for ... April 2013). "Neonatal infectious diseases: Evaluation of neonatal sepsis". Pediatric Clinics of North America. 60 (2): 367-89 ... The SOFA score was intended to be used in the intensive care unit (ICU) where it is administered upon admission to the ICU and ...
... activation syndrome Acute radiation syndrome Acute respiratory distress syndrome Acute retroviral syndrome Adams-Nance syndrome ... syndrome Napoleonist Syndrome Nasodigitoacoustic syndrome Naxos syndrome Nelson's syndrome NEMO deficiency syndrome Neonatal ... Post-acute-withdrawal syndrome Post-concussion syndrome Post-Ebola virus syndrome post-embolization syndrome Post-intensive ... Adams-Oliver syndrome Adams-Stokes syndrome Adducted thumb syndrome Adie syndrome Adiposogenital dystrophy Adult-onset ...
... water and protein from acute respiratory distress syndrome, water from congestive heart failure, or blood from haemorrhage. ... Brochard, L. (1998). "Respiratory pressure-volume curves". In Tobin, M.J. (ed.). Principles and practice of intensive care ... Neonatal ventilators (bubble CPAP[clarification needed])-Designed with the preterm neonate in mind, these are a specialized ... is used initially for an adult, it is easy to calculate the next FiO 2 to be used, and easy to estimate the shunt fraction. The ...
In newborns, hypoglycemia can produce irritability, jitters, myoclonic jerks, cyanosis, respiratory distress, apneic episodes, ... or adults with polycythemia. High neonatal hematocrits are particularly likely to confound glucose measurement by meter. Second ... Idiopathic postprandial syndrome without demonstrably low glucose levels at the time of symptoms can be more of a management ... When a person has not been unconscious, failure of carbohydrate to reverse the symptoms in 10-15 minutes increases the ...
"Systematic review of determinants of mortality in high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome ... "High-frequency oscillatory ventilation for adult respiratory distress syndrome--a pilot study". Critical Care Medicine. 25 (6 ... "Comparison of high-frequency jet ventilation to conventional ventilation during severe acute respiratory failure in humans". ... In some neonatal patients HFOV may be used as the first-line ventilator due to the high susceptibility of the premature infant ...
HFT has shown to be useful in neonatal intensive care settings for premature infants with infant respiratory distress syndrome ... Roca, O.; Riera, J.; Torres, F.; Masclans, J. R. (2010). "High-flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure". Respiratory ... special nasal cannula and tubing large enough to deliver flow rates of respiratory gas of up to 50 liters per minute in adults ... For example, physicians may use CPAP in infants with respiratory distress syndrome. It is associated with a decrease in the ...
Treatment with antenatal corticosteroids reduces the risk of perinatal death, neonatal death and respiratory distress syndrome ... After delivery, plastic wraps or warm mattresses are useful to keep the infant warm on their way to the neonatal intensive care ... Young adults born preterm seem to acknowledge that they have more health problems than their peers, yet feel the same degree of ... Haram K, Mortensen JH, Morrison JC (March 2015). "Tocolysis for acute preterm labor: does anything work". The Journal of ...
... acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (PaO2/FiO2 ratio, 300), different ratio in pediatric acute respiratory distress ... Neonatal sepsis[խմբագրել , խմբագրել կոդը]. In common clinical usage, neonatal sepsis refers to a bacterial blood stream ... evidence of hypercapnic respiratory failure), or. *supplemental oxygen requirement of greater than FiO2 0.5 to maintain oxygen ... 45,0 45,1 «Iatrogenic salt water drowning and the hazards of a high central venous pressure»։ Annals of Intensive Care 4: 21։ ...
... acute respiratory distress syndrome and "pulmonary injuries similar to that seen in victims of chlorine gas exposure". Apart ... and over-stretching can lead to adult respiratory distress syndrome - a condition that requires prolonged mechanical ventilator ... respiratory failure) or has ceased completely (respiratory arrest). Use of the manual resuscitator force-feeds air or oxygen ... Dasta JF, McLaughlin TP, Mody SH, Tak Piech C. Daily cost of an intensive care unit stay: The contribution of mechanical ...
... acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), or near-drowning. Specifically, intubation is considered if the arterial partial ... RSI may also be used in prehospital emergency situations when a patient is conscious but respiratory failure is imminent (such ... There are significant differences in airway anatomy and respiratory physiology between children and adults, and these are taken ... Zaichkin, J; Weiner, GM (February 2011). "Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) 2011: new science, new strategies". Advances in ...
Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. *Neonatal ... APACHE II was designed to measure the severity of disease for adult patients admitted to intensive care units. It has not been ... Organ system failure. Shock sequence. SIRS. Sepsis. Severe sepsis. Septic shock. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Other ... The score was validated on the dataset from 17,440 adult medical/surgical intensive care unit (ICU) admissions at 40 US ...
Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. *Neonatal ... Common conditions that are treated within ICUs include acute (or adult) respiratory distress syndrome, hypertension, metastases ... An intensive care unit (ICU), also known as an intensive therapy unit or intensive treatment unit (ITU) or critical care unit ( ... Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This specialty unit cares for neonatal patients who have not left the hospital after birth ...
... of those dying of respiratory distress syndrome, 25% dying of other respiratory conditions, and 24% dying of sudden infant ... Advancements in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit can be related to the decline in infant mortality in addition to the ... acute respiratory infection, diarrhea, measles, and malaria. Acute respiratory infection such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and ... infant mortality rates are commonly not recorded due to failure to register for death certificates.[62] Failure to register is ...
As per other opioids but with less respiratory depression and constipation. Psychiatric AEs reported. Serotonin syndrome ... for acute postoperative pain in adults". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 10 (10): CD007550. doi:10.1002/14651858. ... "Evidence-based use of indomethacin and ibuprofen in the neonatal intensive care unit". Clinics in Perinatology. 39 (1): 111-36 ... Severe pain (including labour pain); cough due to terminal lung cancer; angina; left ventricular failure.. As per codeine. ...
In newborns, hypoglycemia can produce irritability, jitters, myoclonic jerks, cyanosis, respiratory distress, apneic episodes, ... or adults with polycythemia.[23] High neonatal hematocrits are particularly likely to confound glucose measurement by meter. ... Medications (insulin and sulfonylureas), sepsis, kidney failure, certain tumors, liver disease[1][2][3]. ... Idiopathic postprandial syndrome without demonstrably low glucose levels at the time of symptoms can be more of a management ...
PAP ventilation is often used for patients who have acute type 1 or 2 respiratory failure. Usually PAP ventilation will be ... Gregory GA; Kitterman JA; Phibbs RH; Tooley WH; Hamilton WK (1971). "Treatment of the idiopathic respiratory-distress syndrome ... George Gregory and colleagues in the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of California, San Francisco. A variation ... "Effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in obstructive sleep apnoea in adults" (PDF). National ...
The major complication of COVID-19 is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which may be aggravated by vitamin D ... The Swedish National Food Agency recommends a daily intake of 10 μg (400 IU) of vitamin D3 for children and adults up to 75 ... A meta-analysis of three studies on the effect of oral vitamin D supplementation indicated a lower intensive care unit (ICU) ... These may be followed by polyuria, polydipsia, weakness, insomnia, nervousness, pruritus and ultimately kidney failure. ...
Several studies have documented neonatal abstinence syndrome, a syndrome of neurological, gastrointestinal, autonomic, ... "Comparative efficacy and acceptability of 21 antidepressant drugs for the acute treatment of adults with major depressive ... endocrine and/or respiratory symptoms among a large minority of infants with intrauterine exposure. These syndromes are short- ... About 1 to 2 babies per 1000 babies born in the U.S. develop PPHN shortly after birth, and often they need intensive medical ...
Other complications of infection include acute respiratory distress syndrome, meningitis, encephalitis, and worsening of pre- ... Adults who develop organ failure from influenza and children who have PIM scores and acute renal failure have higher rates of ... Influenza can affect pregnancy, including causing smaller neonatal size, increased risk of premature birth, and an increased ... less labor-intensive, and less complex than existing methods while also being able to differentiate influenza species and IAV ...
"Acute respiratory distress syndrome after bacteremic sepsis does not increase mortality". American Journal of Respiratory and ... 2011). "Society's failure to protect a precious resource: Antibiotics". The Lancet. 378 (9788): 369-71. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736( ... Garbino, J; Kolarova, L; Rohner, P; Lew, D; Pichna, P; Pittet, D (2002). "Secular trends of candidemia over 12 years in adult ... In: Oh's Manual for Intensive Care Medicine. Bersten A, Sony N, Oh T, eds. 6th ed. Butterworth-Heinemann (Elsevier Ltd), London ...
Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is an acute multisystem life-threatening disease resulting in multiple organ failure. The severity ... S.agalactiae neonatal meningitis does not present with the hallmark sign of adult meningitis, a stiff neck; rather, it presents ... respiratory distress, or urticaria) following administration of a penicillin or a cephalosporin (low risk of anaphylaxis) could ... colonization with Group B Streptococcus Is associated with an increased rate of infants transferred to the neonatal intensive ...
... especially of the respiratory system - and pneumonia-induced respiratory failure is the most frequent cause of death. Unless ... Adult-onset). Adulthood. The adult-onset form (sometimes classified as a late-onset SMA type 3) usually manifests after the ... Symptoms are critical (including respiratory distress and poor feeding) which usually result in death within weeks. In ... and is diagnosed in babies that are born so weak that they can survive only a few weeks even with intensive respiratory support ...
If acute coronary syndrome ("heart attack") is suspected, many people are admitted briefly for observation, sequential ECGs, ... or there are signs of respiratory distress. Entonox is frequently used by EMS personnel in the prehospital environment. However ... Signs and symptoms of heart failure may also present. On auscultation, loud ejection systolic murmur can be best heard at the ... Depending upon the diagnosis, a person may be placed in the intensive care unit, admitted to the hospital, or be treated ...
In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), decreasing the tidal volume on the ventilator (usually 6-8 mL/kg) to 4-6 mL/kg ... has been accepted progressively in critical care for adult, pediatric, and neonatal patients requiring mechanical ventilation ... Permissive hypercapnia, a ventilatory strategy for acute respiratory failure in which the lungs are ventilated with a low ... Irwin and Rippes Intensive Care Medicine (Fifth ed.). Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 0-7817-3548-3. Archived from the ...
Neonatal Respiratory Distress 84,33 EUR* Details Cardiopulmonary Interactions in Acute Respiratory Failure (Update in Intensive ... Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome: An Aspect of Multiple Organ Failure Results of a Prospective Clinical Study: Results of a ... Prospective Clinical Study - An Aspect of Multiple Organ Failure 117,69 EUR*. * Beschreibung ...
Noninvasive Ventilation in Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.- Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in ... From the reviews:"This is a multiauthored review of noninvasive ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure. . Senior ... The closing chapters examine uses of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in neonatal and pediatric care. This book, written by ... Noninvasive Ventilation in Adult Liver Transplantation.- Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilation in Patients Undergoing Lung ...
Acute renal failure (20). *. Respiratory medicine. *. Adult respiratory distress syndrome. *. Asthma (93) ...
Treatment of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome: role of extracorporeal gas exchange. Intensive Care Med. 2006;32(10): ... Position paper for the organization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation programs for acute respiratory failure in adult ... Extracorporeal circulation (ECMO) in neonatal respiratory failure. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1977;74(6):826-33.PubMedGoogle ... Extracorporeal life support for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults. Ann Surg. 2004;240(4):595-605; discussion ...
... and anti-inflammatory cytokines will determine the outcome in infants with severe respiratory failure receiving extracor ... Martin TR: Cytokines and the acute respiratory distress syndrome: a question of balance. Nat Med 1997;3:272-273. ... Repine JE: Scientific perspectives on adult respiratory distress syndrome. Lancet 1992;339:466-469. ... Field DJ, Bohin S: Epidemiology; in Greenough A, Robertson NRC, Milner AD (eds): Neonatal Respiratory Disorders. London, Arnold ...
... in older children and adults ventilated in Paediatric and Adult Intensive Care for acute respiratory distress syndrome/acute ... These include respiratory failure in preterm infants (with Professor Howard Clark), children (Dr John Pappachan) and adults ( ... being applied to characterize surfactant phospholipid synthesis and secretion in preterm infants at risk of developing neonatal ... Dushianthan, A., Grocott, M. P. W., Postle, A. D., & Cusack, R. (2011). Acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute lung ...
This includes those with meconium aspiration syndrome (newborns), heart failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary ... State-of-the-Art ICUs: ECMO is provided in either the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) or the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit ... World-Renowned Expertise: We have exceptional experience using ECMO in children and adults. Our researchers have conducted ... respiratory therapists, neurologists, palliative care specialists, social workers, physical and occupational therapists, skin ...
neonatal hypoxic respiratory failure. *congenital heart disease. *acquired/acute respiratory distress syndrome (lung disease) ... Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn. Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult. Respiratory Insufficiency. Acute Lung Injury. ... Patients who are transferred to an intensive care unit already on inhaled nitric oxide from another institution will be treated ... Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Infant Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome ...
... in CAP in contrast to adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and septic shock 5, 6. Glynn et al. 3 found that plasma IL-10 ... Failure of intensive care unit support to influence mortality from pneumococcal bacteremia. JAMA 1983;249:1055-1057. ... Plasma IL-1ra has been studied in adult and neonatal sepsis and very high levels on admission are associated with less ... Disease severity scores like APACHE II and the simplified acute physiology score were originally designed for use in intensive ...
High mortality rates were seen in patients with DIC and multi-organ system failure or acute respiratory distress syndrome. ... Most research in DIC is focused on adults. The papers below, however, are particularly relevant to recent advances in the ... "Disseminated intravascular coagulation score is associated with mortality for children with shock". Intensive Care Med.. vol. ... An excellent review of protein C deficiency, which can predispose patients to develop DIC particularly in the neonatal period.) ...
Intensive care. *. Adult intensive care (249). *. Mechanical ventilation (31). *. Neonatal intensive care (3) ... Acute renal failure (20). *. Respiratory medicine. *. Adult respiratory distress syndrome. *. Asthma (93) ...
The patients condition deteriorated and progressed to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome with multiple organ failure ... He was intubated and transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with an arterial cord blood pH of 6.78 and base deficit of ... aureus clones USA300 and USA400 are emerging causes of community-acquired pneumonia in healthy adults and are leading to a rise ... Because of impending respiratory failure, she was admitted to the Medical Intensive Care Unit where mechanical ventilation was ...
... of exogenous pulmonary surfactant on all-cause mortality in children mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure. We ... trials of pulmonary surfactant that enrolled intubated and mechanically ventilated children with acute respiratory failure. We ... Exogenous surfactant is used to treat acute respiratory failure in children, although the benefits and harms in this setting ... Aerosolized surfactant in adults with sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. Exosurf Acute Respiratory Distress ...
as a clinical Syndrome that occurs 24 to 48 hours after a direct or indirect hing injury [1]. It is... ... Acute respiratory distress Syndrome (ARDS) was first described in 1967 by Asbough et al. ... Pulmonary circulation during adult respiratory distress syndrome. In: Zapol WM, Falke KJ (eds) Acute respiratory failure. ... Lyrene RK, Truog WE (1981) Adult respiratory distress syndrome in a pediatric intensive care unit: Predisposing conditions, ...
Acute respiratory distress syndrome: Supportive care and oxygenation in adults. Congestive Heart Failure. Le T, Bhushan V,‎ ... Neonatal respiratory distr ess syndrome (NRDS), or surfactant deficiency disorder, is a lung disorder in infants that is caused ... An Official American Thoracic Society/European Society of Intensive Care Medicine/Society of Critical Care Medicine Clinical ... Inhaled nitric oxide for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults. Acute respiratory distress syndrome ...
... may impact outcome.What This Article Tells Us That Is NewIn acute respiratory distress syndrom... ... s PerspectiveWhat We Already Know about This TopicAcute respiratory distress syndrome is defined according to clinical criteria ... Severe pneumonia is a common cause of acute respiratory failure and the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Despite the ... More News: Anesthesia , Anesthesiology , Bacterial Pneumonia , Intensive Care , Pneumonia , Respiratory Medicine , Study ...
Discovery is conducting a Phase 2 clinical trial to address Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) in adults, and is also ... address neonatal respiratory failures.. To address the various respiratory conditions affecting pediatric, young adult and ... SRT pipeline is initially focused on the most significant respiratory conditions prevalent in the neonatal intensive care unit ... The Companys lead product, Surfaxin(r), for the prevention of Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) in premature infants, has ...
In severely affected patients, the illness progresses to hypoxemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome ... One in three young adults at a higher risk of severe COVID-19 due to smoking, vaping Now, a new study shows that about one in ... Human genome may explain the neonatal origins of chronic immune and inflammatory diseases A study published in the journal ... This has fueled an intensive search for small molecules and proteins that can inhibit viral entry and replication. ...
We included all consecutive adult patients treated with venovenous ECMO (VV-ECMO) for at least 48 h during a 34-month study. At ... and several studies have reported encouraging survival rates using VV-ECMO in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ... Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for neonatal and pediatric respiratory failure: an evidence-based review of the past decade ... Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for 2009 Influenza A(H1N1) Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. JAMA. 2009; 302:1888-1895; ...
High mortality rates were seen in patients with DIC and multi-organ system failure or acute respiratory distress syndrome. ... Higher Buprenorphine Dose May Not Increase Severity of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. *Terms Used for Addiction May Be ... "Disseminated intravascular coagulation score is associated with mortality for children with shock". Intensive Care Med.. vol. ... Most research in DIC is focused on adults. The papers below, however, are particularly relevant to recent advances in the ...
The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. N Engl J Med. 2000 May 4;342(18):1301-8.. 2. Terragni PP, Rosboch G et al. ... Diaphragm electromyographic activity as a predictor of weaning failure. Intensive Care Med. 2012 Dec;38(12):2017-25.. 6. Dysart ... Neonatal prongs and masks. The Miniflow® system is a complete system for providing NIV NAVA and nasal CPAP. The weight of the ... Guidelines for aerosol devices in infants, children and adults: which to choose,. why and how to achieve effective aerosol ...
Incidence and outcome of acute respiratory distress syndrome in the era of lung protective ventilation (2011) Intensive Care ... Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult, statistics and numerical data, Adult, Blood Transfusion, Cause of Death, Extracorporeal ... 674-679; UK collaborative randomized trial of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (1996) Lancet, 348, pp. 75-82; ... in managing acute respiratory distress syndrome had been accepted. Severe lung injury with respiratory failure is often ...
Noninvasive Ventilation in Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Agarwal, Ritesh ... "This is a multiauthored review of noninvasive ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure. … Senior trainees and ... The closing chapters examine uses of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in neonatal and pediatric care. This book, written by ... both within and outside of intensive care units. Due attention is also paid to weaning from conventional mechanical ventilation ...
Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Buckley MS, Agarwal SK, ... J Intensive Care Med ;! Intravenously administered, oxygenation might be adversely affected in the neonatal brain oxygenation ... Efficacy of inhaled nitric oxide in a porcine model of adult respiratory distress syndrome. J Clin Invest 1997; 100: 2424-9, ... Oxide on oxygenation and mortality in patients with acute respiratory failure and pulmonary vasoconstriction decreases. In ...
... has shown to be useful in neonatal intensive care settings for premature infants with Infant respiratory distress syndrome, as ... Roca, O.; Riera, J.; Torres, F.; Masclans, J. R. (2010). "High-flow oxygen therapy in acute respiratory failure". Respiratory ... Traditional oxygen therapy is limited to six liters a minute and does not begin to approach the inspiratory demand of an adult ... "Children with respiratory distress treated with high-flow nasal cannula". Journal of Intensive Care Medicine. 24 (5): 323-328. ...
... following questions regarding the place of extracorporeal life support for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: 1 ... The influenza H1N1 epidemics in 2009 led a substantial number of people to develop severe acute respiratory distress syndrome ... Contemporary extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for adult respiratory failure: life support in the new era. Intensive Care Med ... Yuan S, Tsukahara E, De La Cruz K, Kelly RB: How we provide transfusion support for neonatal and pediatric patients on ...
Allardet-Servent J (2011). "High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome: ... acute respiratory failure, sleep apnea, etc. Often BPAP is incorrectly referred to as "BiPAP". BiPAP is the name of a portable ... Donn SM (2009). "Neonatal ventilators: how do they differ?". J Perinatol. 29 Suppl 2: S73-8. doi:10.1038/jp.2009.23. PMID ... 4th European Congress on Intensive Care Medicine. Baveno-Stresa C. Hormann, M. Baum, C. Putensen, N. J. Mutz & H. Benzer ( ...
On hospital day 3, he experienced acute renal failure, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and severe anemia (hemoglobin: 6.3 ... At that time, she was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. All cultures were negative, and she was discharged from the ... mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure associated with adult respiratory distress syndrome. Repeat blood films on the ... His illness was diagnosed as adult respiratory distress syndrome, and his antimalarial treatment was changed to intravenous ...
  • In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), decreasing the tidal volume on the ventilator (usually 6-8 mL/kg) to 4-6 mL/kg may decrease barotrauma by decreasing ventilatory peak airway pressures and leads to improved respiratory recovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • The permissive hypercapnia leads to respiratory acidosis which might have negative side effects, but given that the patient is in ARDS, improving ventilatory function is more important. (wikipedia.org)
  • For that reason, the implementation of extracorporeal CO2 removal (iLA Membrane Ventilator, Novalung) at an early stage of ARDS, has become a well established standard[citation needed] to allow for protective ventilation and avoid respiratory acidosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), sepsis, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), pulmonary embolism, barotrauma, and pulmonary edema are among the complications that can occur in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. (cdc.gov)
  • Research suggests that most VAEs in adult patients are due to pneumonia, ARDS, atelectasis, and pulmonary edema [17]. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, little is known about the role of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in CAP in contrast to adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and septic shock 5 , 6 . (ersjournals.com)
  • Trials of surfactant in adults with ALI and ARDS have not demonstrated a mortality benefit [ 6 - 9 ], perhaps due to inherent differences in the aetiology of lung injury in adults, the design features of the trials, the mode and timing of surfactant administration or the type and dose of surfactant used. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Acute respiratory distress Syndrome (ARDS) was first described in 1967 by Asbough et al. (springer.com)
  • Whereas the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) significantly increased the survival rate of neonates with severe acute respiratory failure up to 85%, the world wide mortality rate of children with severe ARDS and extracorporeal lung support is still 50% (ELSO report 07/95) [9]. (springer.com)
  • Pulmonary - Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) 2000. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe inflammatory reaction of the lungs to pulmonary damage. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a potentially life-threatening condition in which there is profound respiratory failure. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • When the origins of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are discussed (1, 2), the study usually mentioned is that of Ashbaugh et al (3). (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Consider ARDS in patients with rapid-onset respiratory failure and a potential trigger. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • ARDS is a clinical syndrome of acute respiratory failure characterized by hypoxemia and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates that cannot be fully accounted for by heart failure or fluid overload. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • In severely affected patients, the illness progresses to hypoxemic respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (news-medical.net)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is common among mechanically ventilated children and accompanies up to 30% of all pediatric intensive care unit deaths. (frontiersin.org)
  • Though ARDS diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, biological markers of acute lung damage have been extensively studied in adults and children. (frontiersin.org)
  • The biochemical signature of ARDS has been increasingly well described in adult populations, and this has led to the identification of molecular phenotypes to augment clinical classifications. (frontiersin.org)
  • Additionally, because of the lower incidence of and mortality from ARDS in pediatric patients relative to adults and lack of robust clinical predictors of outcome, there is an ongoing interest in biological markers as surrogate outcome measures. (frontiersin.org)
  • At least 30% of children require invasive mechanical ventilation, and those who develop the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may account for as much as 30% of all PICU mortality ( 1 , 2 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • ARDS by the most recent Berlin definition ( 4 ), formerly known as the severe subgroup of "acute lung injury," can result from these processes ( 5 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • These may all contribute to the increase in PVR seen in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (7). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • We summarize the current modes of respiratory monitoring and their potential practical applications during invasive and noninvasive ventilation and during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients affected by severe ARDS, needing rescue therapies to maintain blood oxygenation adequate. (springer.com)
  • Intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) Network subjects. (springer.com)
  • 1-5 Recently, there has been increased interest in the use of HFO as a rescue therapy for both pediatric 6,7 and adult 8 patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (asahq.org)
  • In 2000, ARDS Network trial compared the effects of 6 versus 12 mL/kg of tidal volume per predicted body weight (PBW) among 861 patients and noted an overall 22% reduction in mortality rate, more ventilator-free days, and more organ-failure-free days in the low-tidal-volume group. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Rubenfeld et al found that common barriers to the initiation of low tidal volume ventilation include unwillingness to relinquish control of the ventilator, failure to recognize patients as having ALI/ARDS, and perceived contraindications to low tidal volume ventilation. (bioportfolio.com)
  • The syndrome, initially called acute respiratory distress in adult and is now named as the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Many clinical studies evaluated the applicability of PulmoVista® 500 (Dräger Medical GmbH, Lübeck, Germany) and similar EIT devices in estimating optimal PEEP after recruitment maneuvers (RM) in lung healthy patients and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ventilation distribution in cystic fibrosis, COPB, pneumonia and respiratory diseases syndrome in infants. (signavitae.com)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung condition that prevents enough oxygen from getting to the lungs and into the blood. (adam.com)
  • ARDS often occurs along with the failure of other organ systems, such as the liver or kidneys . (adam.com)
  • An echocardiogram may be needed to rule out heart failure , which can look similar to ARDS on a chest x-ray. (adam.com)
  • ARDS often needs to be treated in an intensive care unit (ICU). (adam.com)
  • With the global H1N1 influenza outbreaks of 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, ECMO experienced a resurgence in use to support patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) who failed conventional mechanical ventilation. (hkmj.org)
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), also called acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a type of lung (pulmonary) failure that may result from any disease that causes large amounts of fluid to collect in the lungs. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • ARDS is not itself a specific disease, but a syndrome, a group of symptoms and signs that make up one of the most important forms of lung or respiratory failure . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The result is the type of breathing distress called ARDS. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • ARDS is one of the major causes of excess fluid in the lungs, the other being heart failure . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This report describes a 24-year-old patient with marked and continuous hypoxemia resulting from severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) secondary to pneumonia, which in turn was refractory to mechanical ventilation and other conventional adjunctive therapies. (edu.pl)
  • 3] Li X, Ma X. Acute respiratory failure in COVID-19: is it "typical" ARDS? (signavitae.com)
  • It is applied for the treatment of newborns, children and adults with pulmonary hypertension, oxygen deficiency, neonatal pulmonary failure, persistent pulmonary hypertension of neonates, pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (eku-elektronik.de)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ) is type of respiratory failure characterized by rapid onset of widespread inflammation in the lungs . (wikipedia.org)
  • [1] Although the terminology of "adult respiratory distress syndrome" has at times been used to differentiate ARDS from " infant respiratory distress syndrome " in newborns, the international consensus is that "acute respiratory distress syndrome" is the best term because ARDS can affect people of all ages. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first group consisted of polytrauma patients, second group of patients with pancreatitis and/or peritonitis, third group were postoperative patients, and fourth group were patients with various medical diagnosis: sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), acute lung failure (ALF), and acute heart failure (AHF). (signavitae.com)
  • Most patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) can be managed with conventional modes of mechanical ventilation. (clinicalpainadvisor.com)
  • A potential clinical manifestation of infection with many respiratory viruses (such as coronaviruses or influenzas) is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) - a disorder in which fluid leaks into the lungs, making breathing difficult or impossible. (mallinckrodt.com)
  • iNO has been evaluated in randomized controlled trials, both in pediatric and adult patients with ARDS. (mallinckrodt.com)
  • Plasma IL-1ra has been studied in adult and neonatal sepsis and very high levels on admission are associated with less favourable clinical outcome 7 , 8 . (ersjournals.com)
  • This may improve characterization of acute respiratory distress syndrome and ultimately facilitate individualized care.Background The aquaporin-5 (AQP5) -1364A/C promoter single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with an alteredAQP5 expression and mortality in sepsis. (medworm.com)
  • As in adults, acute lung injury (ALI) in children occurs as a consequence of various direct (e.g., infectious pneumonia, bronchiolitis, aspiration, traumatic lung contusion) or indirect (e.g., sepsis, shock, massive blood transfusion, non-pulmonary trauma) injuries to the lung. (frontiersin.org)
  • Neonatal sepsis is a major cause of hospitalization and infant death and can result from meningitis, pneumonia, gastroenteritis, or other serious infections. (arupconsult.com)
  • Recently, the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) released an international guideline for the management of septic shock and sepsis-associated organ dysfunction in children, which serves as a companion to the SSC guideline for adult sepsis . (arupconsult.com)
  • What are the risk factors for neonatal sepsis? (arupconsult.com)
  • What role does laboratory testing play in diagnosing neonatal sepsis? (arupconsult.com)
  • What role do acute phase markers such as procalcitonin and C-reactive protein play in a neonatal sepsis workup? (arupconsult.com)
  • a cutoff of 2.0-2.5 ng/mL is moderately accurate in predicting neonatal sepsis. (arupconsult.com)
  • Most cases of neonatal sepsis (roughly 80-90%) present in the first 2 days of life. (arupconsult.com)
  • Neonatal sepsis is defined as a systemic infection occurring in infants ≤28 days old. (arupconsult.com)
  • Early-onset neonatal sepsis is defined as sepsis presenting within 72 hours of birth, and late-onset sepsis as sepsis occurring after 72 hours in infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and after 7 days of life in full-term infants. (arupconsult.com)
  • 6] NIV is also well established for use in the of children with respiratory compromise or hypoxaemia associated neonatal setting, in the management of all-cause respiratory distress with sepsis or septic shock. (who.int)
  • Research interests at Frankston Intensive Care Unit are varied and include sedation, renal replacement therapy, nutrition, echocardiography and ultrasound, extracorporeal techniques mechanical ventilation and sepsis. (peninsulahealth.org.au)
  • Sepsis is a clinical syndrome defined by the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in response to proven or suspected infection. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Gram-negative bacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae with a predominance of Escherichia coli , remain the most common isolates (60%-70%) from neonatal foals with sepsis. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • All sepsis syndromes (eg, sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock, multiple organ dysfunction) have a common pathogenesis that also includes endotoxemia related to gram-negative infections. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • However, the major risk factor for sepsis in foals is failure to receive an adequate quality or quantity of colostral antibodies. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • No patient was treated by special anti-viral agents for COVID-19, and usual antibiotic treatment for neonatal sepsis was administered for all cases. (kowsarpub.com)
  • It is likely that the imbalance between the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines will determine the outcome in infants with severe respiratory failure receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). (karger.com)
  • Multiple clinical studies have evaluated this technology, the strongest evidence to date supporting its use being the Conventional Ventilation or ECMO for Severe Adult Respiratory Failure (CESAR) trial, which showed survival advantage when patients were treated with a protocol that included ECMO. (springer.com)
  • Extracorporeal circulation (ECMO) in neonatal respiratory failure. (springer.com)
  • We have exceptional experience using ECMO in children and adults. (nyp.org)
  • ECMO is provided in either the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) or the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital. (nyp.org)
  • Bartlett R. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adults. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • We included all consecutive adult patients treated with venovenous ECMO (VV-ECMO) for at least 48 h during a 34-month study. (springeropen.com)
  • Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) has become a widely accepted treatment option for life-threatening acute respiratory failure when mechanical ventilation (MV) and adjunctive measures fail to provide adequate gas exchange or when lung rest cannot be achieved due to high ventilator requirements [ 1 , 2 ]. (springeropen.com)
  • The main objective of this study was to evaluate the rates of both infections and colonisations related to ECMO devices in VV-ECMO adult patients at the time of ECMO removal. (springeropen.com)
  • abstract = "Objectives: The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in managing acute respiratory distress syndrome had been accepted. (elsevier.com)
  • The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is spreading rapidly, with successful procedures reported in the ECMO for Severe Adult Respiratory failure (CESAR) trial and treatment of the H1N1 pandemic. (kjim.org)
  • The popularity of ECMO as a treatment for acute respiratory failure has increased, especially since 2009 because of the H1N1 influenza pandemic and the ECMO for Severe Adult Respiratory failure (CESAR) trial [ 1 ]. (kjim.org)
  • As a result, an Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) Registry Report published in 2012 revealed 400 cases of adult respiratory failure ECMO cases during 2011. (kjim.org)
  • Some of the many problems associated with ECMO include bleeding from the cannula or surgical sites, infection, oxygenator failure, tubing rupture, pump malfunction, intracranial hemorrhage, and seizures [ 2 ]. (kjim.org)
  • A few studies have shown that increased experience or familiarity with ECMO management is important for increasing the chances of patient survival and reducing the probability of mechanical component failures [ 3 , 4 ]. (kjim.org)
  • To compare complications and survival between the two-site veno-venous versus the veno-venous double lumen extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in infants with respiratory failure. (signavitae.com)
  • Both cannulation modes for ECMO are safe for use in infants with respiratory failure. (signavitae.com)
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides temporary life support for children with severe respiratory or cardiac failure. (signavitae.com)
  • Since 1990, more than 29,000 children with respiratory failure have received ECMO. (signavitae.com)
  • Although many previous studies describe ECMO treatment in neonatal or pediatric respiratory failure, (2-10) the impact of different veno-venous ECMO methods has remained unconsidered. (signavitae.com)
  • Since 1990, more than 30,000 treatments were added to the database containing data from neonatal, pediatric and adult ECMO cases. (signavitae.com)
  • The objective of this study was to compare complications and survival between veno-venous two-site ECMO (VV ECMO) and veno-venous double lumen ECMO (VVDL ECMO) in infants with respiratory failure. (signavitae.com)
  • An alternative treatment, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), uses cardio-pulmonary bypass technology to temporarily provide gas exchange to patients with severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory failure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The use of ECMO to support neonatal patients with severe respiratory failure has been rigorously evaluated in an RCT[ 6 , 7 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The neonatal ECMO RCT convincingly demonstrated the effectiveness of ECMO in improving patient survival without severe disability. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Neonatal ECMO in the UK is now a supra-regional service receiving central funding. (biomedcentral.com)
  • 105. Current trends in neonatal ECMO. (elso.org)
  • Furthermore, ECMO therapy for neonatal and pediatric patients uses comparable blood flow rates with current rotary blood pumps. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Although the blood flow rates used in ECCO 2 R are lower, and the cannulae are typically smaller than in high-flow ECMO, bleeding, clotting, and acquired van Willebrand syndrome are nonetheless common complications, influencing the outcome of clinical trials. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Over these decades, despite a lack of robust supportive data, ECMO has been used for severe respiratory and cardiac failure refractory to conventional treatment. (hkmj.org)
  • In 2010, five ECMO centres focusing on VV-ECMO were established under the governance of the Coordinating Committee in Intensive Care Units (COC ICU) of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority. (hkmj.org)
  • Most ECMO ICUs also provide VA-ECMO support for patients with severe circulatory failure and some to rescue patients with refractory cardiac arrest. (hkmj.org)
  • The Italian ECMO network experience during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic: preparation for severe respiratory emergency outbreaks. (edu.pl)
  • This experimental approach currently being applied to characterize surfactant phospholipid synthesis and secretion in preterm infants at risk of developing neonatal chronic lung disease and in older children and adults ventilated in Paediatric and Adult Intensive Care for acute respiratory distress syndrome/acute lung injury. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) refers to respiratory support optimise clinical paediatric outcomes. (who.int)
  • 1] This form of provided by stand-alone machines, and have been adapted for use in ventilation is gaining popularity in adult and paediatric practice, as low-resource settings. (who.int)
  • To describe the incidence and mortality of invasive infections in Indigenous children admitted to paediatric and general intensive care units (ICUs) in Australia. (mja.com.au)
  • Retrospective multi-centre cohort study of Australian and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care Registry data. (mja.com.au)
  • Respiratory failure in children Respiratory failure in the paediatric population differs from the adult population by the presence of some discrete age-related groups of differentials, with specific focus on consequences of prematurity and congenital disease. (wefaak.com)
  • This document is intended for clinicians taking care of hospitalised adult and paediatric patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) when 2019-nCoV infection is suspected. (who.int)
  • Permissive hypercapnia is hypercapnia (i.e. high concentration of carbon dioxide in blood) in respiratory insufficient patients in which oxygenation has become so difficult that the optimal mode of mechanical ventilation (with oxygenation in mind) is not capable of exchanging enough carbon dioxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Permissive hypercapnia, a ventilatory strategy for acute respiratory failure in which the lungs are ventilated with a low inspiratory volume and pressure, has been accepted progressively in critical care for adult, pediatric, and neonatal patients requiring mechanical ventilation and is one of the central components of current protective ventilatory strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome Mechanical ventilation Irwin, Richard S. (wikipedia.org)
  • Noninvasive mechanical ventilation is an effective technique for the management of patients with acute or chronic respiratory failure. (indigo.ca)
  • Clinical applications are then considered in depth in a series of chapters that address the use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in chronic settings and in critical care, both within and outside of intensive care units. (indigo.ca)
  • The closing chapters examine uses of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in neonatal and pediatric care. (indigo.ca)
  • It stabilizes critical derangements of oxygenation and ventilation, allowing time to diagnose, treat, and recover from the underlying cause of organ failure. (springer.com)
  • Randomized clinical trial of pressure-controlled inverse ratio ventilation and extracorporeal CO2 removal for adult respiratory distress syndrome. (springer.com)
  • Mechanical ventilation is an essential, life-saving therapy for patients with critical illness and respiratory failure. (cdc.gov)
  • In preterm neonates, prolonged mechanical ventilation for respiratory distress syndrome can contribute to the development of chronic lung disease [6]. (cdc.gov)
  • Because of impending respiratory failure, she was admitted to the Medical Intensive Care Unit where mechanical ventilation was initiated and she underwent a spontaneous vaginal delivery of a live male infant. (cdc.gov)
  • Inspired by the success of surfactants in reducing mortality and the need for mechanical ventilation in neonatal respiratory distress syndrome [ 5 ], investigators have studied exogenous surfactant in other populations with various causes of respiratory failure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Hickling KG, Henderson SJ, Jackson R (1990) Low mortality associated with low volume pressure limited ventilation with permissive hypercapnia in severe adult respiratory distress syndrome. (springer.com)
  • 0. Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Summary for Clinicians: Mechanical Ventilation in Adult Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Clinical Practice Guideline. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • CLD is a costly syndrome associated with surfactant and SP-B deficiency, and the prolonged use of mechanical ventilation and oxygen supplementation, usually associated with a premature infant being treated for RDS. (rxpgnews.com)
  • This is a multiauthored review of noninvasive ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure. (springer.com)
  • High-flow therapy has shown to be useful in neonatal intensive care settings for premature infants with Infant respiratory distress syndrome, as it prevents many infants from needing artificial ventilation via intubation, and allows safe respiratory management at lower FiO2 levels, and thus reduces the risk of retinopathy of prematurity and oxygen toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ventilation monitoring plays an important role in the current management of patients with acute respiratory failure, but sometimes there's a lack of definitions regarding which "signals" and "derived variables" should be prioritized, as well as specifications about the timing and modes of application. (springer.com)
  • Jordan J, Rose L, Dainty KN, Noyes J, Blackwood B. Factors that impact on the use of mechanical ventilation weaning protocols in critically ill adults and children: a qualitative evidence-synthesis. (springer.com)
  • A ventilator strategy combining low tidal volume ventilation, recruitment maneuvers, and high positive end-expiratory pressure does not increase sedative, opioid, or neuromuscular blocker use in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome and may improve patient comfort. (springer.com)
  • Sole ML, Bennett M, Ashworth S. Clinical indicators for endotracheal suctioning in adult patients receiving mechanical ventilation. (springer.com)
  • Early pulmonary parenchymal failure requiring invasive ventilation occurs less frequently. (springer.com)
  • Moderately preterm infants who received invasive mechanical ventilation in the past can often be managed nowadays with noninvasive respiratory support. (springer.com)
  • Alegria X, Claure N, Wada Y, Esquer C, D'Ugard C, Bancalari E (2006) Acute effects of PEEP on center output during tidal volume and respiratory synchronized ventilation in preterm infants. (springer.com)
  • 15.6%) cases received invasive ventilation (NIV failure). (who.int)
  • 11] it might prevent the need for endotracheal intubation[2] and, in so nCPAP has been shown to be effective in the management of doing, prevent complications associated with invasive mechanical older children with bronchiolitis and other respiratory illnesses, and ventilation. (who.int)
  • While extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is proven to result in improved outcome when compared to conventional ventilation in neonates with severe respiratory failure, there is currently no good evidence from randomised controlled trials to compare these managements for important clinical outcomes in adults, although evidence from case series is promising. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac Ultrasound in predicting outcomes of weaning from mechanical ventilation. (peninsulahealth.org.au)
  • Background A B S T R A C T When intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) was introduced in newborn infants with hypoxic respiratory failure from hyaline membrane disease (HMD), mortality was high and air leaks problematic. (docplayer.net)
  • It is used to successfully extubate patients that might still benefit from positive pressure but who may not need invasive ventilation, such as obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or patients with congestive heart failure. (statpearls.com)
  • Patients with poor respiratory drive need invasive ventilation or non-invasive ventilation with CPAP plus additional pressure support and a backup rate (BiPAP). (statpearls.com)
  • Slower rates are commonly used in patients with severe air trapping (eg, acute asthma , COPD ), and passive oxygenation without positive pressure ventilation shows promise in the first minutes after cardiac arrest. (merckmanuals.com)
  • All patients required respiratory support and sedation management according to different techniques of ventilation: 100% received deep sedation (RASS -4) before intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation and 19% received light sedation (RASS -1) and noninvasive ventilation). (signavitae.com)
  • Pressure-targeted ventilation is generally recommended in pediatric patients, with initial ventilator settings varying depending on age and the etiology of respiratory failure. (ebmedicine.net)
  • Mechanical ventilation affects local and systemic cytokines in an animal model of acute respiratory distress syndrome. (yug-avtosport.ru)
  • Effect of enhanced ultraviolet germicidal irradiation in the heating ventilation and air conditioning system on ventilator-associated pneumonia in a neonatal intensive care unit. (buffalo.edu)
  • Respiratory failure occurs when the overall system cannot support the body's necessarily ventilation, oxygenation or both. (wefaak.com)
  • Bernet V, Hug MI, Frey B. Predictive factors for the success of noninvasive mask ventilation in infants and children with acute respiratory failure. (wefaak.com)
  • High-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) has been used in conjunction with conventional ventilation for infants with respiratory failure. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The authors modified an adult jet ventilation injector (Hunsaker Mon-Jet Ventilation Tube(®)) to be able to provide transglottal high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) in small children undergoing laryngeal procedures with CO2 laser. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Abstract: BACKGROUND: Weaning patients from mechanical ventilation is an important problem in intensive care units. (clab.info)
  • Background Traditional approaches to mechanical ventilation use tidal volumes of 10 to 15 ml per kilogram of body weight and may cause stretch-induced lung injury in patients with acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. (clab.info)
  • The need for mechanical ventilation is a common feature of the patient requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). (rcjournal.com)
  • Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death and morbidity despite advances in diagnostic methods, antimicrobial and intensive care treatment 1 . (ersjournals.com)
  • S. aureus clones USA300 and USA400 are emerging causes of community-acquired pneumonia in healthy adults and are leading to a rise in co-infections with influenza and MRSA. (cdc.gov)
  • Polymorphisms of aquaporin-5, a key mediator of inflammation, may impact outcome.What This Article Tells Us That Is NewIn acute respiratory distress syndrome attributable to bacterial pneumonia, the C-allele of the aquaporin-5 -1364A/C promoter polymorphism is associated with less pulmonary inflammation and greater survival. (medworm.com)
  • Accordingly, the authors tested the hypotheses that the AC/CC genotype in patients with bacterially evoked pneumonia resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with (1) attenuated pulmonary inflammation and (2) higher 30-day survival.Methods In this prospective, observational study, bronchoalveolar lavage and blood sampling were performed within 24 h of intensive care unit admission. (medworm.com)
  • Conditions such as general respiratory failure, asthma exacerbation, COPD exacerbation, bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and congestive heart failure are all possible situations where high-flow therapy may be indicated. (wikipedia.org)
  • 89. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Adult Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality. (elso.org)
  • Pneumonia is a breathing (respiratory) condition in which there is an infection of the lung. (adam.com)
  • [3] [4] Physicians may also use CPAP to treat hypoxia and decrease the work of breathing in infants with acute infectious processes such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia or for those with collapsible airways such as in tracheomalacia. (statpearls.com)
  • Discrepancy between clinical criteria for diagnosing acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to community acquired pneumonia with autopsy findings of diffuse alveolar damage. (edu.pl)
  • This disease is characterized by: being directly transmitted, being related to the appearance of severe pneumonia, having an unfavorable evolution in older adults and/or patients with comorbidities, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes or immunosuppression, and by spreading rapidly throughout the world 1 1. (scielosp.org)
  • 3 , 5 , 7 , 11 , 12 Morbidities of GERD in preterm infants include aspiration pneumonia, failure to thrive, and exacerbation of respiratory symptoms, including chronic lung disease. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Bux J. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a serious adverse event of blood transfusion. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Severe lung injury with respiratory failure is often encountered in trauma patients. (elsevier.com)
  • However, despite advances in ventilator management, the mortality rate of acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome remains very high (approximately 40 to 50 percent). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Left panel is the pressure-volume relationship plot in patient with acute lung injury. (clinicalpainadvisor.com)
  • as a clinical Syndrome that occurs 24 to 48 hours after a direct or indirect hing injury [1]. (springer.com)
  • Lyrene RK, Truog WE (1981) Adult respiratory distress syndrome in a pediatric intensive care unit: Predisposing conditions, clinical course, and outcome. (springer.com)
  • DeBruin W, Notterman DA, Magid M et al (1992) Acute hypoxemic respiratory failure in infants and children: Clinical and pathologic characteristics. (springer.com)
  • Davis SL, Furman DP, Costarino AT et al (1993) Adult respiratory distress syndrome in children: Associated disease, clinical course, and predictors of death. (springer.com)
  • Hess DR. Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the dominant clinical problem faced by preterm infants. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Editor 's PerspectiveWhat We Already Know about This TopicAcute respiratory distress syndrome is defined according to clinical criteria, but lack of precise characterization may contribute to negative trials and impede personalized care. (medworm.com)
  • New techniques of respiratory monitoring have recently been made available for clinical use, but their use and arrangement are not always well defined. (springer.com)
  • Clinical review: respiratory monitoring in the ICU-a consensus of 16. (springer.com)
  • Brierley J et al (2009) Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine. (springer.com)
  • nCPAP was used clinical y for the management of children with respiratory compromise secondary to non-pulmonary illnesses, particularly diarrhoeal disease. (who.int)
  • Hispanic women have clinical or subclinical pid are similarly at risk for iat- adults with renal failure, heart sequelae failure, or short-bowel syndrome). (wellchild.org)
  • Dr. Wiesen is currently a Pulmonary and Intensive Care Attending Physician at Community Intensivists where his duties include general clinical care and workflow organization and protocol authorship. (experts.com)
  • In this restrospective study we have analyzed 72 (out of 608) patients that were admitted to intensive care due to worsening clinical conditions. (signavitae.com)
  • Enterobacter infections do not have a clinical presentation that is specific enough to differentiate them from other acute bacterial infections. (medscape.com)
  • PPL is widely reported to have a poor prognosis in the neonatal period and little is known about the clinical features of patients who survive the newborn period. (lymphedemapeople.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Clinical observations suggest the immaturity of the neonate's ability to respond appropriately to cardio-respiratory challenges and tilt test could help in detecting autonomic dysfunction in neonates. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Relation of unrecognized hypervolemia in chronic heart failure to clinical status, hemodynamics, and patient outcomes. (signavitae.com)
  • 11. Boldt J. Clinical review: Hemodynamic monitoring in intensive care unit. (signavitae.com)
  • The refinement and continual development as well as the expanded clinical application of the mechanical ventilator have been prominent factors in the development and growth of the profession of respiratory care as well as critical care medicine. (rcjournal.com)
  • This is the first edition of this document for novel coronavirus, an adaption of WHO Clinical management of severe acute respiratory infection when MERS-CoV infection is suspected publication (2019). (who.int)
  • 34 weeks gestation) neonates with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with clinical or echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension in conjunction with ventilatory support and other appropriate agents. (mallinckrodt.com)
  • The objective of the present systematic review is to assess the effect of exogenous pulmonary surfactant on all-cause mortality in children mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The primary objective of the systematic review is to assess the effect of the administration of pulmonary surfactant compared with no therapy or with placebo on all-cause mortality (at or before hospital discharge) in mechanically ventilated children with acute respiratory failure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Timmons OD, Dean JM, Vernon DD (1991) Mortality rates and prognostic variables in children with adult respiratory distress syndrome. (springer.com)
  • The primary outcomes, such as Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and hospital mortality rates, were higher during period 1 (91.3%) than period 2 (66.7%, p = 0.013). (kjim.org)
  • Acute RV decompensation may be a sudden, unpredictable event and produces significant perioperative morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • 103. Oxygen Thresholds and Mortality During Extracorporeal Life Support in Adult Patients. (elso.org)
  • 86. Development and Validation of a Score to Predict Mortality in Children Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Respiratory Failure: Pediatric Pulmonary Rescue with Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Prediction Score. (elso.org)
  • P172 Acute NIV and mortality - failure of delivery or patient selection? (bmj.com)
  • In this population, Metoprolol Succinate extended-release tablets decreased the rate of mortality plus hospitalization, largely through a reduction in cardiovascular mortality and hospitalizations for heart failure. (drugs.com)
  • Circulating myeloperoxidase is elevated in septic shock and is associated with systemic organ failure and mortality in critically ill patients. (otago.ac.nz)
  • Both apgar score and arterial blood pH predict the neonatal mortality in asphyxia. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Neonatal respiratory disorders are a leading cause of perinatal mortality due to complications resulting from premature births and prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse, but optimal treatments for these symptoms are still unclear due to a variety of confounds and risk factors. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • The new Intensive care unit admission rates for invasive infections were higher for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children than for non-Indigenous Australians, particularly for staphylococcal infections, and the population-based ICU mortality attributable to infections was more than twice that of non-Indigenous children. (mja.com.au)
  • It is a primary treatment for hypercarbic respiratory failure or is an adjunct to reduce potentially injurious levels of mechanical ventilator support in hypoxemic respiratory failure. (springer.com)
  • The definition algorithm is based on objective, streamlined, and potentially automatable criteria that identify a broad range of conditions and complications occurring in mechanically-ventilated patients in adult locations. (cdc.gov)
  • This case emphasizes the potential lethality of respiratory complications related to seasonal influenza. (cdc.gov)
  • The innovation of surfactant replacement therapy in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome has proven to increase the survival and minimize the complications of the premature neonate. (brightkite.com)
  • Chronic hypoxic events during pregnancy associated with mild to moderate maternal hypertension have shown however to sometime accelerate fetal lung maturity and surfactant production leading to a decrease in neonatal respiratory complications. (brightkite.com)
  • However, measuring respiration in newborn mice is difficult and commercial components are expensive and often require modification, creating a barrier and limiting our understanding of the short and long-term effects of birth complications on respiratory function. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Renal function tests and liver function tests: may provide clues to the aetiology or identify complications associated with respiratory failure. (patient.info)
  • The neonatal course was notable for a birth weight of the infant of 2,825 g and Apgar scores of 5 and 8 at 1 and 5 minutes, respectively. (cdc.gov)
  • Infant respiratory distress syndrome due to a deficiency of surfactant in the lungs of a baby born prematurely. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Similar events can lead to the infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), with surfactant deficiency and lung immaturity as underlying conditions ( 3 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • See also Overview of Respiratory Arrest , How to Do the Heimlich Maneuver in the Conscious Adult , and How to Treat the Choking Conscious Infant . (merckmanuals.com)
  • The effectiveness of a parent participation improvement program for parents on partnership, attachment infant growth in a neonatal intensive care unit: A randomized controlled trial. (helsinki.fi)
  • Centrifugal pump and roller pump in adult cardiac surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. (springer.com)
  • In a study of 145 patients with a mean systolic PAP (sPAP) of 68 mmHg undergoing non-cardiac surgery, 16 patients developed congestive heart failure (11%) and five patients died from RV failure (3.5%) (5). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Bleeding and Thrombosis With Pediatric Extracorporeal Life Support: A Roadmap for Management, Research, and the Future From the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society: Part 1. (childrenshospital.org)
  • This prospective study involved 60 patients without known cardiac or pulmonary diseases admitted to the intensive care unit at our Hospital after elective abdominal or vascular surgery. (signavitae.com)
  • It is used in hypoxic respiratory failure associated with congestive heart failure in which it augments the cardiac output and improves V/Q matching. (statpearls.com)
  • Decompensated cardiac failure. (nih.gov)
  • Heart Failure: Worsening cardiac failure may occur. (nih.gov)
  • Echocardiography: if a cardiac cause of acute respiratory failure is suspected. (patient.info)
  • Thus, toxic shock syndromes resulting from streptococcal or Staphylococcus aureus infection are hyperinflammatory septic syndromes that closely resemble diseases characterized by endotoxemia. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation resuscitation in adult patients with refractory septic shock. (edu.pl)
  • and acute gastroenteritis complicated by septic shock (n=28/317). (who.int)
  • Patients with HUS can present with infectious diarrhea and renal failure, and also can present with seizures or other neurological symptoms associated with clotting in the brain. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • isolated cases of renal impairment or acute renal failure have been reported. (nih.gov)
  • The influenza H1N1 epidemics in 2009 led a substantial number of people to develop severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and refractory hypoxemia. (springeropen.com)
  • The purpose of this study is to determine whether inhaled iloprost is safe and effective in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension who are sick in the intensive care unit. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • He was intubated and transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with an arterial cord blood pH of 6.78 and base deficit of 16 mmol/L. Nasal swab culture isolated methicillin-sensitive S. aureus . (cdc.gov)
  • An epidemiologic, prospective, observational study was conducted in the 14-bed medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a teaching hospital (Hôpital Nord, Marseille, France), a regional referral centre for the treatment of acute severe respiratory failure. (springeropen.com)
  • Discovery's SRT pipeline is initially focused on the most significant respiratory conditions prevalent in the neonatal intensive care unit. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Immunotherapy improves the prognosis of lung cancer: do we have to change intensive care unit admission and triage guidelines? (springermedizin.de)
  • Parental coping in the neonatal intensive care unit. (stanford.edu)
  • Impact of an EMR-Based Daily Patient Update Letter on Communication and Parent Engagement in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. (stanford.edu)
  • Regardless of other major vessels (ie, coronary arteries, subclavian arter- ies, which arise normally from the intracellular space and connected to suction abortion for teens (handout), american medical for children with down syn- surgical emergencies of the state in which neonatal intensive care unit. (wellchild.org)
  • In a 1-year period (from January to December 2017) in our intensive care unit (ICU) we had a total of 8 patients with LVAD implantation. (signavitae.com)
  • To investigate whether lung ultrasound can be used to detect extravascular lung water overload in the intensive care unit early after surgery. (signavitae.com)
  • PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio, and appearance of B-lines were determined upon admission to the intensive care unit and at 6, 12, and 24 h later. (signavitae.com)
  • Severe disease" was defined as laboratory confirmed H1N1 flu, leading to admission to an intensive care unit or death, among women who were either pregnant or had given birth within six weeks. (medpagetoday.com)
  • CPAP may be used in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to treat preterm infants whose lungs have not yet fully developed and who may have respiratory distress syndrome from surfactant deficiency. (statpearls.com)
  • Distribution and pathophysiology of acute lobar collapse in the pediatric intensive care unit. (yug-avtosport.ru)
  • 3 We have recently reported that the incidence of severe infections in children that require admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) was increasing in Australia and New Zealand, 4 consistent with recent reports from the United States. (mja.com.au)
  • Mechanisms underlying thrombocytopenia in the neonatal intensive care unit. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Thrombocytopenia is one of the most common hematological problems among neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), but in the majority of cases the kinetic mechanism responsible is unclear. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants struggle with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and beyond discharge. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Hemodynamic monitoring in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) settings is usually introduced when a patient becomes hemodynamically unstable. (signavitae.com)
  • Positive-pressure devices started to become available around 1900 and today's typical intensive care unit (ICU) ventilator did not begin to be developed until the 1940s. (rcjournal.com)
  • Early identification of those with severe manifestations (see Table 2) allows for immediate optimized supportive care treatments and safe, rapid admission (or referral) to intensive care unit according to institutional or national protocols. (who.int)
  • A patient with acute respiratory failure generally needs prompt hospital admission in an intensive care unit. (patient.info)
  • The daily insulin requirements are increased too quickly.Predisposing patient factors past history relevant conditions include major trauma severe force or multiple organ failure, in intensive care unit subsequent management involves a complete d. (nationalnewstoday.com)
  • His parents report the infant's 3-year-old sister was recently diagnosed with respiratory syncytial virus. (ebmedicine.net)
  • Efficacy of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I in the hospital management of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. (yug-avtosport.ru)
  • In severe cases of DIC, severe hemorrhage and clotting can lead to life threatening symptoms, including intracranial hemorrhage, necrosis of digits or limbs, or organ failure. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Heated humidification of the respiratory gas facilitates secretion clearance and decreases the development of bronchial hyper-response symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Manifestations range from nonspecific symptoms to multiorgan failure. (arupconsult.com)
  • Fifty-six mothers of premature infants who participated in a study to reduce symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) completed the Brief COPE, a self-report inventory of coping mechanisms, the Stanford Acute Stress Reaction Questionnaire to assess acute stress disorder (ASD) and the Davidson Trauma Scale to assess PTSD. (stanford.edu)
  • Although all of the patients initially experienced respiratory distress, respiratory symptoms improved in most patients after infancy and were notably better by the age of 6 yrs. (lymphedemapeople.com)
  • What are the symptoms of pediatric acute respiratory failure? (wefaak.com)
  • However, the severity of symptoms in children and neonates is less than in adults. (kowsarpub.com)
  • Severe respiratory symptoms were reported in two cases. (kowsarpub.com)
  • Regarding the lack of significant respiratory symptoms in most of the patients, the lung computed tomography (CT) scan was taken just from one neonate. (kowsarpub.com)
  • In order to improve the oxygenation of ventilated patients nitric oxide (NO) is added to the respiratory gas. (eku-elektronik.de)
  • Pharmacologic strategies in neonatal pulmonary hypertension other than nitric oxide. (buffalo.edu)
  • Mallinckrodt markets iNO as INOmax® (nitric oxide) gas for inhalation in the U.S. for the treatment of term and near-term neonates with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. (mallinckrodt.com)
  • While nitric oxide has not been specifically studied or used to treat COVID-19, in vitro it has demonstrated an inhibitory effect on the replication cycle of severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV). (mallinckrodt.com)
  • Surfaxin, a precision-engineered lung surfactant replacement therapy, has received an Approvable Letter from the U.S. FDA for the prevention of Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) in premature infants and is pending approval. (rxpgnews.com)
  • The Company's lead product, Surfaxin(r), for the prevention of Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) in premature infants, has received an Approvable Letter from the FDA and is under review for approval in Europe by the EMEA. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a problem often seen in premature babies. (adam.com)
  • Insufficiency or inactivation of surfactant is a major cause of respiratory failure in preterm infants and in patients in Intensive Care, and contributes to the pathology of a wide range of other lung diseases including asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • Acute respiratory insufficiency. (springer.com)
  • Benditt JO (2009) Initiating noninvasive management of respiratory insufficiency in neuromuscular disease. (springer.com)
  • If angina markedly worsens or acute coronary insufficiency develops, Metoprolol Succinate extended-release administration should be reinstated promptly, at least temporarily, and other measures appropriate for the management of unstable angina should be taken. (drugs.com)
  • In 2011, CDC organized a working group composed of members of several stakeholder organizations to address the limitations of the NHSN PNEU definitions and propose a new approach to surveillance for Ventilator-Associated Events (VAE) for NHSN [16], focusing on adult patients. (cdc.gov)
  • Ventilator Strategies and Rescue Therapies for Management of Acute Respiratory Failure in the Emergency Department. (zaednoplovdiv.com)
  • Due to the decreased stress of effort needed to breathe, the neonatal body is able to spend more time utilizing metabolic efforts elsewhere, which causes decreased days on a mechanical ventilator, faster weight gain, and overall decreased hospital stay entirely. (wikipedia.org)
  • A ventilator assists breathing using either pressure control or volume control based on the equation of motion for the respiratory system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The respiratory therapist asks you what ventilator settings you would like to use, but you hesitate. (ebmedicine.net)
  • Optimizing ventilator strategies may reduce respiratory morbidities in preterm infants. (frontiersin.org)
  • Indeed, the expansion and increased sophistication of the mechanical ventilator parallels similar developments in the respiratory therapy profession. (rcjournal.com)
  • We included prospective, randomized, controlled trials of pulmonary surfactant that enrolled intubated and mechanically ventilated children with acute respiratory failure. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Survival of mechanically ventilated patients admitted to intensive care units. (helsinki.fi)
  • This is an excellent review of recent developments in respiratory care based on this therapy. (springer.com)
  • Heated humidified high-flow (HHHF) therapy is a type of respiratory support method that delivers a high flow (liters per minute) of medical gas to a patient through an interface (nasal cannulae) intended to create a wash-out of the upper airway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traditional oxygen therapy is limited to six liters a minute and does not begin to approach the inspiratory demand of an adult and therefore the oxygen is then diluted with room air during inspiration. (wikipedia.org)
  • With High Flow Therapy, the goal is to deliver a respiratory gas flow volume sufficient to meet or exceed the patient's inspiratory flow rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • 5] Compared iht other forms of NIV in adults, more frequently in older children,[3] where it has been shown to be as high-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) is associated with effective as nCPAP for some conditions. (who.int)
  • Respiratory Therapy magazine distributed by Goldstein & Associates. (clab.info)
  • Impact of macrolide therapy in critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure: a desirability of outcome ranking analysis to investigate the OUTCOMEREA database. (helsinki.fi)
  • Efficacy and economic assessment of conventional ventilatory support versus extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe adult respiratory failure (CESAR): a multicentre randomised controlled trial. (springer.com)
  • Weinberg, J., J. Borg, G. Bevegård, Sinderby, C. Respiratory response to exercise in patients with prior polio at risk for ventilatory failure. (ventquest.ca)
  • The airway pressures and oxygen concentrations required to maintain adequate blood gases are often very high in patients with severe respiratory failure, and this combination of barotrauma, volutrauma and oxygen toxicity can prevent lung recovery. (biomedcentral.com)
  • BackgroundIn preterm infants, the time from initiation to full oral feeding can take weeks, which represents a very worrisome problem in neonatal medicine. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is considered one of the major contributors to severe pulmonary dysfunction and consequent death in preterm infants. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Chronic respiratory failure - Respiratory failure happens gradually as a result of a long-standing disease or condition. (wefaak.com)
  • Spirometry: useful in the evaluation of chronic respiratory failure. (patient.info)
  • Pulmonary function tests are useful in the evaluation of chronic respiratory failure. (patient.info)
  • Many patients with chronic respiratory failure can be treated at home, depending on the severity of respiratory failure, underlying cause, comorbidities and social circumstances. (patient.info)
  • 96. Neurologic Injury in Adults Supported with Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Respiratory Failure: Findings from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Database. (elso.org)
  • Retrieval of critically ill adults using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: an Australian experience. (edu.pl)
  • IL-10 levels on admission to hospital also correlated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores. (ersjournals.com)
  • The median age was 38 years (25-58 years), the median injury severity score was 29(25-34), the median admission Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 25(21-36), and the median blood transfusion volume was 5500 mL (3500-13 000). (elsevier.com)
  • Acute lung disease or injury is a frequent contributor to admission to pediatric (PICU) and/or neonatal (NICU) intensive care units. (frontiersin.org)
  • The current COVID-19 pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), seems to attack the human airway epithelium primarily. (news-medical.net)
  • Airway collapse is typically seen in adults and children who have breathing problems such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a cessation or pause in breathing while asleep. (statpearls.com)
  • However, mean airway and alveolar pressures are probably comparable during HFO in the adult (Figure 3). (clinicalpainadvisor.com)
  • In particular, the focus of his research are the mechanisms whereby lipid signalling and oxidation of lipids contribute to inflammatory processes in a wide range of pathological states, including respiratory, cardiovascular, cancer and neurological diseases. (southampton.ac.uk)
  • Discovery Laboratories, Inc. is a biotechnology company developing its proprietary surfactant technology as Surfactant Replacement Therapies (SRT) for respiratory diseases. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Discovery believes that through its technology, pulmonary surfactants have the potential, for the first time, to address respiratory diseases where there are few or no approved therapies available. (rxpgnews.com)
  • In an aging society, various studies are being conducted to explore the relationship between active oxygen and aging-related diseases such as cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and metabolic syndrome. (news-medical.net)
  • Respiratory diseases. (yug-avtosport.ru)
  • 1] Lai C, Shih T, Ko W, Tang H, Hsueh P. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19): the epidemic and the challenges. (signavitae.com)
  • Con el objetivo de describir las manifestaciones de pacientes con enfermedad por coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), se evaluaron variables sociodemográficas, antecedentes, manifestaciones clínicas y radiológicas, tratamientos y evolución en pacientes que ingresaron por emergencia, del 6 al 25 de marzo de 2020, al Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins en Lima. (scielosp.org)
  • The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) originated in China in 2019 and is caused by a new virus, called SARS-CoV-2, which stands for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. (scielosp.org)
  • A new coronavirus associated with human respiratory disease in China. (scielosp.org)
  • The 2019-nCoV acute respiratory disease is caused by a novel beta coronavirus from a family of Coronaviridae, in the same subgenus of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus but in a different category, which was first detected in China in December 2019. (kowsarpub.com)
  • Other causes include cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (due to endothelial injury and secondary pulmonary vasoconstriction) (8), protamine reactions (9) and acute pulmonary embolism. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Viral Infection in the Development and Progression of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. (designskills.com)
  • It can be used to check for a urinary tract infection in adults. (adam.com)
  • Post-Infectious Guillain-Barré Syndrome Related to SARS-CoV-2 Infection: A Systematic Review. (signavitae.com)
  • She has an upper respiratory tract infection that began 2 days ago, and she has been receiving albuterol every 2 hours via her inhaler for the past 12 hours. (ebmedicine.net)
  • We anticipated that including trials enrolling children with acute respiratory failure from a variety of causes would result in a heterogeneous population and would increase the generalizability of the results. (biomedcentral.com)
  • I specialize in neonatal-perinatal care, bioethics, prenatal consultations, critical care for pediatric patients and palliative care for pediatrics patients. (forensisgroup.com)
  • Although it mostly affects adults, according to the report of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), about 9% of all COVID-19 cases are children ( 3 ). (kowsarpub.com)
  • The cannula improves the respiratory distress, the oxygen saturation, and the patient's comfort. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4 Etiology of Respiratory Failure This list is common to many MICU / SICU patients But are brain-injured patients really different? (docplayer.net)
  • This paper will discuss the etiology of respiratory distress syndrome type I, the treatment options and nursing care of the neonate during surfactant replacement. (brightkite.com)
  • a history of travel to or residence in the city of Wuhan, Hubei Province, China in the 14 days prior to symptom onset, or · patient is a health care worker who has been working in an environment where severe acute respiratory infections of unknown etiology are being cared for. (who.int)
  • The modified British Thoracic Society (BTS) prognostic rule and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score were used to assess disease severity. (ersjournals.com)
  • Disease severity scores like APACHE II and the simplified acute physiology score were originally designed for use in intensive and high dependency care units to assess multi-organ failure 9 , 10 . (ersjournals.com)
  • The national database known as AORTIC (Australian Outcomes Research Tool for Intensive Care) stores raw data and undertakes calculations to provide the Acute Physiology, Age, & Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE III) and Simplified Acute Physiology (SAPS) score for each patient. (peninsulahealth.org.au)
  • Moler FW, Custer JR, Bartlett R et al (1994) Extracorporeal life support for severe pediatric respiratory failure: An updated experience 1991-1993. (springer.com)
  • Respiratory failure occurs when disease of the heart or lungs leads to failure to maintain adequate blood oxygen levels (hypoxia) or increased blood carbon dioxide levels (hypercapnia) [ 1 ] . (patient.info)
  • Many critical care medicine experts have worked as registered nurses in emergency rooms (ER), intensive care units (ICU) , and other hospital settings, since critical care nursing is very important in providing the proper form of medical treatment. (forensisgroup.com)
  • American Journal of Respiratory och Critical Care Medicine. (ventquest.ca)