Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Hyaline Membrane Disease: A respiratory distress syndrome in newborn infants, usually premature infants with insufficient PULMONARY SURFACTANTS. The disease is characterized by the formation of a HYALINE-like membrane lining the terminal respiratory airspaces (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and subsequent collapse of the lung (PULMONARY ATELECTASIS).Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Hyalin: A clear, homogenous, structureless, eosinophilic substance occurring in pathological degeneration of tissues.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)ArchivesBiological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Blood Component Transfusion: The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.Plateletpheresis: The preparation of platelet concentrates with the return of red cells and platelet-poor plasma to the donor.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Blood DonorsSleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).IllinoisChicagoGrateful Med: A microcomputer-based software package providing a user-friendly interface to the MEDLARS system of the National Library of Medicine.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Adult Stem Cells: Cells with high proliferative and self renewal capacities derived from adults.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).WashingtonRespiratory Insufficiency: Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Tanning: A process of preserving animal hides by chemical treatment (using vegetable tannins, metallic sulfates, and sulfurized phenol compounds, or syntans) to make them immune to bacterial attack, and subsequent treatments with fats and greases to make them pliable. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)Nasal Sprays: Pharmacologic agents delivered into the nostrils in the form of a mist or spray.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Tissue Conditioning (Dental): The use of a treatment material (tissue conditioner) to re-establish tone and health to irritated oral soft tissue, usually applied to the edentulous alveolar ridge.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Salmonella Food Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of food harboring species of SALMONELLA. Conditions of raising, shipping, slaughtering, and marketing of domestic animals contribute to the spread of this bacterium in the food supply.Methylmethacrylates: The methyl esters of methacrylic acid that polymerize easily and are used as tissue cements, dental materials, and absorbent for biological substances.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.ShoesRespiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Bronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Heart-Lung Transplantation: The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Cytomegalovirus Infections: Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Marketing: Activity involved in transfer of goods from producer to consumer or in the exchange of services.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury: Lung damage that is caused by the adverse effects of PULMONARY VENTILATOR usage. The high frequency and tidal volumes produced by a mechanical ventilator can cause alveolar disruption and PULMONARY EDEMA.Journalism, Medical: The collection, writing, and editing of current interest material on topics related to biomedicine for presentation through the mass media, including newspapers, magazines, radio, or television, usually for a public audience such as health care consumers.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.
(1/1061) Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) caused by red blood cell transfusion involving residual plasma anti-HLA antibodies: a report on two cases and general considerations.

TRALI is considered a serious hazard among immune complications of blood transfusion and its occurrence is admitted to be globally underestimated. Each type of blood product is likely to cause TRALI. We report here on two consecutive observations of TRALI caused by red blood cell concentrates, in which anti-HLA class I and class II antibodies resulting from post-gravitational allo-immunization were evidenced in donors. HLA class I and II antigenic community between recipients and donors' husbands were found and strong reacting IgG antibodies directed at several of those common antigens were detected in the donors' serum. Both donors had more than 3 pregnancies, raising the issue of blood donor selection or of plasma reduction for cellular products.  (+info)

(2/1061) Mechanisms of pulmonary dysfunction after on-pump and off-pump cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study.

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary dysfunction following cardiac surgery is believed to be caused, at least in part, by a lung vascular injury and/or atelectasis following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) perfusion and collapse of non-ventilated lungs. METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we studied the postoperative pulmonary leak index (PLI) for 67Ga-transferrin and (transpulmonary) extravascular lung water (EVLW) in consecutive patients undergoing on-pump (n = 31) and off-pump (n = 8) cardiac surgery. We also studied transfusion history, radiographs, ventilatory and gas exchange variables. RESULTS: The postoperative PLI and EVLW were elevated above normal in 42 and 29% after on-pump surgery and 63 and 37% after off-pump surgery, respectively (ns). Transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates, PLI, EVLW, occurrence of atelectasis, ventilatory variables and duration of mechanical ventilation did not differ between groups, whereas patients with atelectasis had higher venous admixture and airway pressures than patients without atelectasis (P = 0.037 and 0.049). The PLI related to number of RBC concentrates infused (P = 0.025). CONCLUSION: The lung vascular injury in about half of patients after cardiac surgery is not caused by CPB perfusion but by trauma necessitating RBC transfusion, so that off-pump surgery may not afford a benefit in this respect. However, atelectasis rather than lung vascular injury is a major determinant of postoperative pulmonary dysfunction, irrespective of CPB perfusion.  (+info)

(3/1061) Toward early identification of acute lung injury in the emergency department.

BACKGROUND: There are no studies evaluating the epidemiology of pediatric acute lung injury (ALI) in the emergency department (ED), where early identification and interventions are most likely to be helpful. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of the ALI precursor acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) in the ED. METHODS: We analyzed 11,664 pediatric patient records from 16 EDs. Records were selected if oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) was recorded during the visit. Virtual partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) was calculated from SpO(2), thus allowing calculation of ratios of pO(2) to fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO(2)) (PFRs). Patients with a PFR < 300 were classified as having AHRF. Univariate analyses and logistic regression were used to test the association of clinical factors with the presence of AHRF and intubation. RESULTS: AHRF criteria (ie, PFR < 300) were met in 121 (2.9%) of the 4,184 patients with an oxygenation measurement. The following variables were independently associated with ALI: higher Pediatric Risk of Admission II score (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 1.12 [1.08-1.16]; p < .001), higher heart rate (1.02 [1.01-1.03]; p = .009), a positive chest radiograph (2.35 [1.02-5.43]; p = .045), and lower temperature (0.49 [0.36-0.68]; p < .001).The final model had an R(2) = .20. CONCLUSION: We found nonintubated AHRF to be prevalent in the ED. The low R(2) for the regression model for AHRF underscores the lack of criteria for early identification of patients with respiratory compromise. Our findings represent an important first step toward establishing the true incidence of ALI in the pediatric ED.  (+info)

(4/1061) Keratinocyte growth factor protects against Clara cell injury induced by naphthalene.

 (+info)

(5/1061) NKG2D-dependent effector function of bronchial epithelium-activated alloreactive T-cells.

 (+info)

(6/1061) Low tidal volume ventilation is associated with reduced mortality in HIV-infected patients with acute lung injury.

 (+info)

(7/1061) Plasma receptor for advanced glycation end products and clinical outcomes in acute lung injury.

 (+info)

(8/1061) Predictors of mortality in acute lung injury during the era of lung protective ventilation.

 (+info)

*  Transfusion-related acute lung injury
... (TRALI) is a serious blood transfusion complication characterized by the acute onset of ... TRALI is defined as an acute lung injury that is temporally related to a blood transfusion; specifically, it occurs within the ... The blood component transfused is not part of the case definition.[citation needed] Transfusion-related acute lung injury ( ... Occasionally more severe lung injury occurs as a result of this phenomenon and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) ...
*  Phagocyte
Neutrophils also play a key role in the development of most forms of acute lung injury. Here, activated neutrophils release the ... Experiments have shown that a reduction in the number of neutrophils lessens the effects of acute lung injury, but treatment by ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Abraham E (April 2003). "Neutrophils and acute lung injury". Crit. Care Med. 31 ... "Neutrophil activation and acute lung injury". Curr Opin Crit Care. 7 (1): 1-7. doi:10.1097/00075198-200102000-00001. PMID ...
*  Blood transfusion
Transfusion-associated acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome that is similar to Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ... Kim, Jeongmin; Na, Sungwon (30 March 2015). "Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives". Korean Journal of ... Cochrane Injuries Group, publishes systematic reviews of interventions for traumatic injury, which include evaluations of blood ... Acute hemolytic reactions are defined according to Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) as "fever and other symptoms/signs of ...
*  Serious Hazards of Transfusion
... transfusion-related acute lung injury donor strategies and the impact on the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury: a ... "Pathogenesis of non-antibody mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury from bench to bedside". Blood Reviews. 29 (1): 51- ... "Antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from discovery to prevention". British Journal of Haematology. 170 (5 ... infections through better skin cleansing procedures and the incidence of life-threatening transfusion-related acute lung injury ...
*  Sodium hypochlorite
This gaseous product can cause acute lung injury. Chronic exposure, for example, from the air at swimming pools where chlorine ...
*  Jehovah's Witnesses and blood transfusions
A 2006 Awake! highlighted dangers from transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Opposition to the Watch Tower doctrines ... Heart-Lung Machine, a method in which blood is diverted to an artificial heart-lung machine and directed back into the patient ...
*  High-frequency ventilation
... especially in the context of ARDS and acute lung injury. This is commonly referred to as lung protective ventilation. There are ... Krishnan JA, Brower RG (2000). "High-frequency ventilation for acute lung injury and ARDS". Chest. 118 (3): 795-807. doi: ... Jet ventilation has been shown to reduce ventilator induced lung injury by as much as 20%. Usage of high frequency jet ... High frequency ventilation is thought to reduce ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), ...
*  Cathepsin G
Kawabata K, Hagio T, Matsuoka S (September 2002). "The role of neutrophil elastase in acute lung injury". European Journal of ... Moraes TJ, Chow CW, Downey GP (April 2003). "Proteases and lung injury". Critical Care Medicine. 31 (4 Suppl): S189-94. doi: ... acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cystic fibrosis. A recent study shows that patients with CTSG gene polymorphisms have ... ischemic reperfusion injury, and bone metastasis. It is also implicated in a variety of infectious inflammatory diseases, ...
*  Ventilator-associated lung injury
... (VALI) is an acute lung injury that develops during mechanical ventilation and is termed ... associated lung injury VALI is most common in patients receiving mechanical ventilation for acute lung injury or acute ... ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) if it can be proven that the mechanical ventilation caused the acute lung injury. In ... By opening the lung and keeping the lung open RACE (and VALI) is reduced. Another possible ventilator associated lung injury is ...
*  Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist
Brochard LJ (November 2009). "Tidal volume during acute lung injury: let the patient choose?". Intensive Care Medicine. 35 (11 ... As a result, the pressure in the airway drops, causing an inflow of air into the lungs. With NAVA, the electrical activity of ... Del Sorbo L, Slutsky AS (February 2010). "Ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure: new and ongoing pathophysiological ... March 2010). "Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist increases respiratory variability and complexity in acute respiratory ...
*  Mechanical ventilation
Ventilator-associated lung injury - Ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) refers to acute lung injury that occurs during ... Ventilation with lower Tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory ... One of the primary complications that presents in patients mechanically ventilated is acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory ... It is clinically indistinguishable from acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Diaphragm - ...
*  Cytokine storm
"Angiotensin II and the fibroproliferative response to acute lung injury". Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. Royal Free and ... Marshall and co-workers also found that angiotensin II was associated with cytokine-mediated lung injury and suggested a role ... If a cytokine storm occurs in the lungs, for example, fluids and immune cells such as macrophages may accumulate and eventually ... Wang and co-workers published data that cytokine-mediated pulmonary damage (apoptosis of lung epithelial cells) in response to ...
*  PTX3
He X, Han B, Liu M (2007). "Long pentraxin 3 in pulmonary infection and acute lung injury". Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell Mol. ... PTX3 behaves as an acute phase response protein, as the blood levels of PTX3, low in normal conditions (about 25 ng/mL in the ... Lee GW, Goodman AR, Lee TH, Vilcek J (1994). "Relationship of TSG-14 protein to the pentraxin family of major acute phase ... is a novel member of the pentaxin family of acute phase proteins". J. Immunol. 150 (5): 1804-12. PMID 7679696. Alles VV, ...
*  Respiratory therapist
The National Certification Corporation Cheifetz IM (2011). "Management of acute lung injury: sharing data between adults and ... They practice in acute care facilities, long-term acute care facilities, skilled nursing facilities, assisted-living centers, ... Scientific research also takes place to look for causes and possible treatment in diseases such as asthma and lung cancer. The ... Outpatient clinical practice Respiratory therapists are also primary clinicians in conducting tests to measure lung function ...
*  Neutrophil extracellular traps
"Platelets induce neutrophil extracellular traps in transfusion-related acute lung injury". The Journal of Clinical ... specifically in the lung capillaries and liver sinusoids). Intra-vascular NET formation is tightly controlled and is regulated ... in flow chambers in vitro and intravital microscopy demonstrated that bacterial trapping occurs in the liver sinusoids and lung ...
*  Julio Montaner
His initial research focused on animal models of acute lung injury. Montaner initially planned on returning to Argentina after ... Montaner, J.G.; Russel, J.; Lawson, L.; Ruedy, J. (1989). "Acute Respiratory Failure Secondary to Pneumocystis Carinii ...
*  Metal fume fever
In the case of non-allergic acute lung injury, standard or recommended approaches to treatment have not been defined. The ... "Chemical Pneumonitis and Acute Lung Injury Caused by Inhalation of Nickel Fumes". Internal Medicine. 50 (18): 2035-8. doi: ... Patients may present with wheezing or crackles in the lungs. They typically have an increased white blood cell count, and urine ... When respiratory symptoms are prominent, metal fume fever may be confused with acute bronchitis or pneumonia. The diagnosis is ...
*  Blood plasma
"Female Plasma May Not Increase Risk for Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury". Medscape. October 23, 2007. Retrieved 2011-07- ... because of concerns about transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and female donors who may have higher leukocyte ...
*  Transfusion associated circulatory overload
TACO and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) are often difficult to distinguish in the acute situation. TACO is ... "Distinguishing between transfusion related acute lung injury and transfusion associated circulatory overload". Current Opinion ... Transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload by M. A. Popovsky. Skeate, Robert C; ... These draft criteria are: acute onset or worsening respiratory distress during or up to 12 hours after transfusion, plus two or ...
*  PDE2A
2005). "Phosphodiesterase 2 inhibition diminished acute lung injury in murine pneumococcal pneumonia". Critical Care Medicine. ...
*  RNF13
2006). "The role of metallothionein in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury". Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 34 (1): 73-82. ...
*  Airway pressure release ventilation
... airway pressure release ventilation is indicated in patients with acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome and ... Bailey H. Formosa V. "Airway pressure release ventilation increases cardiac performance in patients with acute lung injury/ ... 1991). "Airway pressure release ventilation during acute lung injury: a prospective multicenter trial". Critical Care Medicine ... 2003). "Spontaneous breathing improves lung aeration in oleic acid-induced lung injury". Anesthesiology. 99 (2): 376-84. doi: ...
*  Post-intensive care syndrome
... long-term neuropsychological function in survivors of acute lung injury". Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 185 (12): 1307-15. doi ... "Intensive care unit hypoglycemia predicts depression during early recovery from acute lung injury". Crit. Care Med. 36 (10): ... In people who experience acute respiratory distress syndrome and are treated with mechanical ventilation, lung function is ... The most commonly impaired lung function is diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide, as well as reduced lung volumes and ...
*  Differential diagnoses of depression
In one study of patients recovering from acute lung injury in intensive care, those patients who developed hypoglycemia while ... October 2008). "Intensive care unit hypoglycemia predicts depression during early recovery from acute lung injury*". Critical ... in mild traumatic brain injuries, it may also occur in moderate and severe cases of traumatic brain injury. A diagnosis may be ... It can be transient, acute or chronic. It can be a primary disorder or a co-morbid one. Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also ...
*  Acute respiratory distress syndrome
... "acute lung injury" or ALI, as the term was commonly being misused to characterize a less severe degree of lung injury. Instead ... Bakowitz, Magdalena (August 2012). "Acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in the injured patient". ... acute lung injury, and acute respiratory distress syndrome: time for a reevaluation". Critical Care Medicine. 28 (1): 232-235. ... It is typically provoked by an acute injury to the lungs that results in flooding of the lungs' microscopic air sacs ...
*  Andhra Medical College
The acute medical care unit runs for 24 hours. Dr. W. C. Gray was the first professor and head. Jeypore Sri Vikram Deo Varma ... An exclusive unit of 'Head Injury and Intensive Care' was started in 1991. Superspeciality course (M.Ch.) was started in 1986. ... Mahatma Gandhi Ward for non-tuberculosis lung diseases. The Department of Communicable Diseases is situated opposite the TB ...
Acute lung injury  Acute lung injury
Definition of Acute lung injury, symptoms of Acute lung injury, treatment of Acute lung injury, and prevention of Acute lung ... Acute respiratory distress syndrome; Acute lung injury Causes. ARDS can be caused by any major lung inflammation or injury. ... Acute lung injury. Definition. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening condition that causes lung ... Acute lung injury. Cholelithiasis. Anorchia. Alcohol in pregnancy. Actinomycosis. Acquired disorders of platelet function. ...
more infohttp://diseasereference.net/info/ards-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome/206862.html
Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Review Article | British Journal of Medical Practitioners  Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Review Article | British Journal of Medical Practitioners
Incidence and outcomes of acute lung injury. N Engl J Med 2005; 353: 1685-16937. Finney SJ, Evans TW. Acute lung injury outside ... Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is a continuum of clinical and radiographic changes affecting the lungs, characterised by acute onset ... Table 4 Lung ventilation in different parts of lung with acute lung injury ... The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. Comparison of Two Fluid Management Strategies in Acute Lung Injury. New Engl J ...
more infohttp://www.bjmp.org/content/acute-lung-injury-and-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-review-article
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome | Memorial Hospital  Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome | Memorial Hospital
Emerging therapies for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Expert Opin Emgerg Drugs. 2007; ... Treating the underlying cause or injury. * Providing support until the lungs heal: * Mechanical ventilation-a machine to help ... To help reduce your chance of getting ARDS, seek timely treatment for any direct or indirect injury to the lungs. ... ARDS starts with the tiny blood vessels in the lungs. These vessels leak fluid into the lung sacs. The fluid decreases the ...
more infohttps://memorialhospitaljax.com/hl/?/96471/Acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome&com.dotmarketing.htmlpage.language=1
VIDEO: Reducing TRALI Risk - Transfusion News  VIDEO: Reducing TRALI Risk - Transfusion News
Today we will be discussing TRALI, or transfusion-related acute lung injury. TRALI accounts for almost half of all transfusion- ... Aspirin-triggered 15-epi-lipoxin A4 regulates neutrophil-platelet aggregation and attenuates acute lung injury in mice. Blood ... AABB Bulletin Highlights Recommendations to Reduce the Risk of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) ... The fat and the skinny on acute lung injury. Blood 2014;124: 2617-8. ...
more infohttp://transfusionnews.com/2014/12/15/video-reducing-trali-risk/
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome | TriStar Southern Hills  Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome | TriStar Southern Hills
Emerging therapies for treatment of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Expert Opin Emgerg Drugs. 2007; ... Treating the underlying cause or injury. * Providing support until the lungs heal: * Mechanical ventilation-a machine to help ... To help reduce your chance of getting ARDS, seek timely treatment for any direct or indirect injury to the lungs. ... ARDS starts with the tiny blood vessels in the lungs. These vessels leak fluid into the lung sacs. The fluid decreases the ...
more infohttps://tristarsouthernhills.com/hl/?/96471/Adult-respiratory-distress-syndrome
Acute Lung Injury Treatment Market - Scope, Size, Share, Analysis by 2025  Acute Lung Injury Treatment Market - Scope, Size, Share, Analysis by 2025
Acute Lung Injury Treatment Market is expected to grow healthy rate in near future; Acute lung injury is observed as a part of ... Acute Lung Injury Treatment Market report presents a detailed overview of the present scope of growth for companies operating; ... systemic inflammatory process wherein the lung manifests symptoms similar to other tissues such as destruction in capillary ... Global Acute Lung Injury Market: Snapshot. Acute lung injury, a common condition characterized by acute severe hypoxia without ...
more infohttps://www.tmrresearch.com/acute-lung-injury-treatment-market
Acute Lung Injury and Repair | SpringerLink  Acute Lung Injury and Repair | SpringerLink
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the incidence ... This book provides an overview of acute lung injury and repair, describes current animal models to study lung injury and ... Bacterial infections Hyperoxia LPS and bacterial pneumonia Transfusion-related acute lung injury Ventilator-induced lung injury ... Acute Lung Injury and Repair: Scientific Fundamentals and Methods is a useful resource for physicians and scientists who are ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-319-46527-2
CXCR2 in Acute Lung Injury  CXCR2 in Acute Lung Injury
... reperfusion injury or acute lung injury (ALI) [1].. ALI and its more severe form acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are ... M. Cepkova and M. A. Matthay, "Pharmacotherapy of acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome," Journal of ... One pathological hallmark of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome is the uncontrolled transmigration of ... "Sequential recruitment of neutrophils into lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in LPS-induced acute lung injury," American ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/mi/2012/740987/
Glucocorticoids and acute lung injury.  Glucocorticoids and acute lung injury.
Studies of HPA axis activation and the role of relative adrenal insufficiency on the outcome of patients with acute lung injury ... relative adrenal insufficiency in patients with acute lung injury/ARDS is unknown. It is also unclear whether such a response, ... The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's ARDS Network currently is testing the use of methylprednisolone in late ARDS. ... Previous Document: Mechanisms of pulmonary edema clearance during acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: role of the Na,K.... ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Glucocorticoids-acute-lung-injury/12682449.html
Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury  Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury
Studies were searched in PUBMED by using the terms "extravascular lung water" (EVLW) and "acute lung injury" (ALI) or "acute ... Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury. Ritesh Maharaj. Division of Intensive Care Medicine, King's College Hospital, ... F. Michard, V. Zarka, S. Alaya, S. Sakka, and M. Klein, "Better characterization of acute lung injury/ARDS using lung water," ... Both experimental and clinical studies were searched in PUBMED using the term "extravascular lung water" and "acute lung injury ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/crp/2012/407035/
Cytokine-mediated inflammation in acute lung injury.  - PubMed - NCBI  Cytokine-mediated inflammation in acute lung injury. - PubMed - NCBI
Clinical acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients. There is ... Cytokine-mediated inflammation in acute lung injury.. Goodman RB1, Pugin J, Lee JS, Matthay MA. ... and anti-inflammatory cytokines play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory-induced lung injury from sepsis, ... A recent multi-center clinical trial found that a lung-protective ventilatory strategy reduces mortality by 22% in patients ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14563354?dopt=Abstract
Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury - 899 Words | Bartleby  Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury - 899 Words | Bartleby
Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) has been an upcoming cause of transfusion related mortality. It is characterized ... Acute Kidney Injury : Acute Liver Injury. 1419 Words , 6 Pages * Blood Transfusion And Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury. ... Acute Treatment Of Acute Kidney Injury. 967 Words , 4 Pages Acute kidney injury (AKI, previously referred to as acute renal ... Acute Kidney Injury : Acute Liver Injury. 1419 Words , 6 Pages Prerenal Acute Kidney Injury Pathophysiology The human body has ...
more infohttps://www.bartleby.com/essay/Transfusion-Related-Acute-Lung-Injury-PKUJSVVKRZ3W
Acute Lung Injury | American Lung Association  Acute Lung Injury | American Lung Association
Find facts about lung diseases, such as lung cancer, COPD, asthma. ... Learn how to improve your lung health. Make efforts towards clean air and smokefree living. ... What is LUNG FORCE?. LUNG FORCE unites women and their loved ones across the country to stand together in the fight against ... American Lung Association , 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872)1-800-LUNGUSA , Submit A Question , Live Chat ...
more infohttp://www.lung.org/our-initiatives/research/meet-the-research-team/acute-lung-injury.html
Alternatives to animal research in acute lung injury | The BMJ  Alternatives to animal research in acute lung injury | The BMJ
Alternatives to animal research in acute lung injury BMJ 2014; 349 :g4171 ... Alternatives to animal research in acute lung injury. BMJ 2014; 349 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g4171 (Published 10 July ...
more infohttps://www.bmj.com/content/349/bmj.g4171
Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)  Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)
This is defined as new acute lung injury, with acute onset during or within 6 hours of completion of a transfusion, hypoxaemia ... Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI). This document is only valid for the day on which it is accessed. Please read our ...
more infohttps://www.starship.org.nz/for-health-professionals/national-guidelines-paediatric-oncology-and-haematology/t/transfusion-related-acute-lung-injury-trali/
Acute Lung Injury  Acute Lung Injury
Occurs about 7 days following injury. Acute interstitial pneumonia (Hamman-Rich syndrome) is organizing DAD with no known cause ...
more infohttp://pathhsw5m54.ucsf.edu/overview/acuteli.html
Transfusion-related acute lung injury  Transfusion-related acute lung injury
Pulmonary injury from transfusion-related acute lung injury. Clin Chest Med. 2004;25:105-111. [PubMed] ... which is characterized by acute respiratory distress. It is a clinical diagnosis and may be diagnosed when acute lung injury ( ... Transfusion-related acute lung injury. Report of a clinical look-back investigation. JAMA. 2002;287:1968-71. [PubMed] ... Transfusion-related acute lung injury. Ramakant Dixit, Sidharth Sharma, and A. R. Parmez ...
more infohttp://pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC2937292/
Neutrophils and acute lung injury  Neutrophils and acute lung injury
Neutrophils are an important component of the inflammatory response that characterizes acute lung injury (ALI). This discussion ... Furthermore, in neutropenic patients with lung injury, deterioration of pulmonary function as neutropenia resolves has been ... The accumulation of activated neutrophils in the lungs is an early step in the pulmonary inflammatory process that leads to ALI ... The neutrophils that accumulate in the lungs in models of ALI demonstrate increased activation of the kinases Akt and p38; ...
more infohttps://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00003246-200304001-00004
Stem cell therapy holds promise for acute lung injury - Thaindian News  Stem cell therapy holds promise for acute lung injury - Thaindian News
... has shown that adult stem cells from bone marrow can help treat acute lung injury. Acute lung ... Acute lung injury? Stem cell therapy may help - Oct 30, 2009. *Bone marrow stem-cell therapy could treat acute lung injury: ... Acute lung injury (ALI) can be caused by any major inflammation or injury to the lungs and is a major cause of death in ... Tags: acute lung injury, adult stem cells, air sacs, blood vessels, bone marrow, cause of death, cd34, cell population, chicago ...
more infohttp://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/health/stem-cell-therapy-holds-promise-for-acute-lung-injury_100267100.html
Sleep Intervention During Acute Lung Injury - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  Sleep Intervention During Acute Lung Injury - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Acute Lung Injury. Lung Injury. Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract Diseases. Respiration Disorders. Infant, Premature, Diseases. ... Critical Illness Sleep Acute Lung Injury Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Drug: Dexmedetomidine Drug: Midazolam and Fentanyl ... Critically ill patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) who receive mechanical ... on sleep and inflammation in critically ill patients with Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Disorder Syndrome (ALI/ARDS ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01050699?term=respiratory+distress+syndrome+OR+surfactant+deficiency&recr=Open&fund=01&rank=9
  • Potential treatment methods such as statin therapy and nutritional strategies are also expected to gain more focus from research bodies operating in the area of treatment of acute lung injury. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Uncontrolled, excessive infiltration of leukocytes into the tissue leads to a destruction of organ structure and is a main characteristic of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders like atherosclerosis, reperfusion injury or acute lung injury (ALI) [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Cathepsin G has been reported to play an important role in a variety of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, coronary artery disease, periodontitis, ischemic reperfusion injury, and bone metastasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ongoing research in the area of fluid conservation and lung-protective ventilation strategies have demonstrated improvements in survival rate of patients. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Acute lung injury is a part of the systemic inflammatory process where the lung demonstrates symptoms similar to other tissues such as extravascation of protein rich fluid, destruction in capillary endothelium, and interstitial edema. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Recent data have highlighted the role of extravascular lung water in response to treatment to guide fluid therapy and ventilator strategies. (hindawi.com)
  • When mice that had been injected with a compound that causes ALI were injected with the purified and cultured Flk and CD34 stem cells, the progenitor cells were able to repair the lung injury, prevent fluid build-up, and led to improved survival. (thaindian.com)
  • A2B adenosine receptor signaling attenuates acute lung injury by enhancing alveolar fluid clearance in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Silicosis is a lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline free silica dust. (medindia.net)
  • IRV is a strategy (method or style) of ventilating the lungs in such a way that the amount of time the lungs are in inhalation is greater than the amount of time they are in exhalation, allowing for a constant inflation of the lungs, ensuring they remain "recruited" (meaning they participate in gas exchange and are not allowed to deflate to get stuck together or tighten up). (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute kidney injury (AKI, previously referred to as acute renal failure) is a common and serious condition particularly among hospitalized patients with acute illness and those undergoing major surgery.It can be life-threatening but it can also be reversible. (bartleby.com)
  • Generally, PICS is considered distinct from the impairments experienced by those who survive critical illness and intensive care following traumatic brain injury and stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • This leads to stiffening of the lungs and eventually triggering mismatch in ventilation-perfusion. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Moreover, spontaneous contractions of the diaphragm during APRV may open dependent atelectatic lung regions, improving ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) matching and gas exchange. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This is commonly referred to as lung protective ventilation. (wikipedia.org)
  • APRV is currently the most efficient, conventional mode for lung protective ventilation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study found that female lung transplant recipients who received a lung from either a male or female donor were almost 60% more likely to suffer from primary graft dysfunction, compared with male recipients who received their lung from a male donor. (innovations-report.com)
  • The researchers took into account factors such as the donor s age, race, cause of death, and the recipient s age, race and reason for lung transplant, as well as the size matching between the donor and recipient. (innovations-report.com)
  • Once the lung is taken out of the donor, it is put on ice, and during this time, no blood flows through the organ. (innovations-report.com)
  • This review highlights the role of CXCR2 in acute lung injury and discusses its potential as a therapeutic target. (hindawi.com)
  • These therapeutic cells employed integrins to stick to the site of injury and turn on cellular and molecular repair machinery. (thaindian.com)
  • Acute Lung Injury - Pipeline Review, H1 2014, provides an overview of the Acute Lung Injurys therapeutic pipeline. (sbwire.com)
  • This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutic development for Acute Lung Injury, complete with comparative analysis at various stages, therapeutics assessment by drug target, mechanism of action (MoA), route of administration (RoA) and molecule type, along with latest updates, and featured news and press releases. (sbwire.com)
  • It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Acute Lung Injury and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects. (sbwire.com)
  • Extravascular lung water measurement offers information not otherwise available by other methods such as chest radiography, arterial blood gas, and chest auscultation at the bedside. (hindawi.com)
  • Data from experimental studies suggest that EVLW on chest radiography may only be detectable when the lung water increases by more than 35% [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Washington, Oct 29 (ANI): A new study in mice, conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, has shown that adult stem cells from bone marrow can help treat acute lung injury. (thaindian.com)
  • The study included data on all 7,482 adult lung transplants performed in the United States between 1994 and 2002. (innovations-report.com)
  • Female lung transplant recipients are significantly more likely to suffer from a type of injury to the transplanted lung called primary graft dysfunction than male lung transplant patients, according to a study to be presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference on May 24. (innovations-report.com)
  • Lung graft dysfunction is associated with a high death rate, prolonged hospital stay and other serious complications. (innovations-report.com)
  • However, psychological researchers are continuing to show that thoughts, perceptions and aspects of personality may be linked to the incidence of injury. (bartleby.com)
  • Pneumoconiosis is a group of lung diseases caused by inhaled dust particles. (medindia.net)
  • MMP-8, -9, and to a lesser extent, MMP-2, -3, -11 and -12 were identified at higher levels in lung secretions of pediatric ALI patients compared with controls. (medsci.org)
  • These results identify a specific repertoire of MMP isoforms in the lung secretions of pediatric ALI patients, and demonstrate inverse changes in MMPs -8 and -9 with protracted disease. (medsci.org)
  • If PMN migration into the lung is impaired, the immune response is severely disturbed [ 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • As augmented vascular leakage is a principal occurrence in the acute lung injury and thus, therapies are being targeted towards decreasing the leakage. (tmrresearch.com)
  • ACE inhibitors and receptor antagonists, already widely used clinically, should be assessed as potential new therapies for fibrotic lung disease. (nih.gov)