Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury: Lung damage that is caused by the adverse effects of PULMONARY VENTILATOR usage. The high frequency and tidal volumes produced by a mechanical ventilator can cause alveolar disruption and PULMONARY EDEMA.Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Hyperoxia: An abnormal increase in the amount of oxygen in the tissues and organs.Extravascular Lung Water: Water content outside of the lung vasculature. About 80% of a normal lung is made up of water, including intracellular, interstitial, and blood water. Failure to maintain the normal homeostatic fluid exchange between the vascular space and the interstitium of the lungs can result in PULMONARY EDEMA and flooding of the alveolar space.Tidal Volume: The volume of air inspired or expired during each normal, quiet respiratory cycle. Common abbreviations are TV or V with subscript T.Pneumonia: Infection of the lung often accompanied by inflammation.Smoke Inhalation Injury: Pulmonary injury following the breathing in of toxic smoke from burning materials such as plastics, synthetics, building materials, etc. This injury is the most frequent cause of death in burn patients.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Blood-Air Barrier: The barrier between capillary blood and alveolar air comprising the alveolar EPITHELIUM and capillary ENDOTHELIUM with their adherent BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPITHELIAL CELL cytoplasm. PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE occurs across this membrane.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Lipopolysaccharides: Lipid-containing polysaccharides which are endotoxins and important group-specific antigens. They are often derived from the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria and induce immunoglobulin secretion. The lipopolysaccharide molecule consists of three parts: LIPID A, core polysaccharide, and O-specific chains (O ANTIGENS). When derived from Escherichia coli, lipopolysaccharides serve as polyclonal B-cell mitogens commonly used in laboratory immunology. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Peroxidase: A hemeprotein from leukocytes. Deficiency of this enzyme leads to a hereditary disorder coupled with disseminated moniliasis. It catalyzes the conversion of a donor and peroxide to an oxidized donor and water. EC 1.11.1.7.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Reperfusion Injury: Adverse functional, metabolic, or structural changes in ischemic tissues resulting from the restoration of blood flow to the tissue (REPERFUSION), including swelling; HEMORRHAGE; NECROSIS; and damage from FREE RADICALS. The most common instance is MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.Mice, Inbred C57BLLiquid Ventilation: Artificial respiration (RESPIRATION, ARTIFICIAL) using an oxygenated fluid.Neutrophil Infiltration: The diffusion or accumulation of neutrophils in tissues or cells in response to a wide variety of substances released at the sites of inflammatory reactions.Hydrochloric Acid: A strong corrosive acid that is commonly used as a laboratory reagent. It is formed by dissolving hydrogen chloride in water. GASTRIC ACID is the hydrochloric acid component of GASTRIC JUICE.Bronchoalveolar Lavage: Washing out of the lungs with saline or mucolytic agents for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It is very useful in the diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary infiltrates in immunosuppressed patients.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Macrophages, Alveolar: Round, granular, mononuclear phagocytes found in the alveoli of the lungs. They ingest small inhaled particles resulting in degradation and presentation of the antigen to immunocompetent cells.Ventilators, Mechanical: Mechanical devices used to produce or assist pulmonary ventilation.Lung Compliance: The capability of the LUNGS to distend under pressure as measured by pulmonary volume change per unit pressure change. While not a complete description of the pressure-volume properties of the lung, it is nevertheless useful in practice as a measure of the comparative stiffness of the lung. (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p562)Respiratory Mechanics: The physical or mechanical action of the LUNGS; DIAPHRAGM; RIBS; and CHEST WALL during respiration. It includes airflow, lung volume, neural and reflex controls, mechanoreceptors, breathing patterns, etc.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Bleomycin: A complex of related glycopeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces verticillus consisting of bleomycin A2 and B2. It inhibits DNA metabolism and is used as an antineoplastic, especially for solid tumors.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Respiratory Mucosa: The mucous membrane lining the RESPIRATORY TRACT, including the NASAL CAVITY; the LARYNX; the TRACHEA; and the BRONCHI tree. The respiratory mucosa consists of various types of epithelial cells ranging from ciliated columnar to simple squamous, mucous GOBLET CELLS, and glands containing both mucous and serous cells.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Oleic Acid: An unsaturated fatty acid that is the most widely distributed and abundant fatty acid in nature. It is used commercially in the preparation of oleates and lotions, and as a pharmaceutical solvent. (Stedman, 26th ed)Prone Position: The posture of an individual lying face down.Pulmonary Fibrosis: A process in which normal lung tissues are progressively replaced by FIBROBLASTS and COLLAGEN causing an irreversible loss of the ability to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream via PULMONARY ALVEOLI. Patients show progressive DYSPNEA finally resulting in death.Pulmonary Surfactants: Substances and drugs that lower the SURFACE TENSION of the mucoid layer lining the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Lung Volume Measurements: Measurement of the amount of air that the lungs may contain at various points in the respiratory cycle.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Chemokine CXCL2: A CXC chemokine that is synthesized by activated MONOCYTES and NEUTROPHILS. It has specificity for CXCR2 RECEPTORS.Pneumonia, Aspiration: A type of lung inflammation resulting from the aspiration of food, liquid, or gastric contents into the upper RESPIRATORY TRACT.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Inflammation: A pathological process characterized by injury or destruction of tissues caused by a variety of cytologic and chemical reactions. It is usually manifested by typical signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Injury Severity Score: An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.Shock, Hemorrhagic: Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Neutrophil Activation: The process in which the neutrophil is stimulated by diverse substances, resulting in degranulation and/or generation of reactive oxygen products, and culminating in the destruction of invading pathogens. The stimulatory substances, including opsonized particles, immune complexes, and chemotactic factors, bind to specific cell-surface receptors on the neutrophil.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Administration, Inhalation: The administration of drugs by the respiratory route. It includes insufflation into the respiratory tract.APACHE: An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.High-Frequency Ventilation: Ventilatory support system using frequencies from 60-900 cycles/min or more. Three types of systems have been distinguished on the basis of rates, volumes, and the system used. They are high frequency positive-pressure ventilation (HFPPV); HIGH-FREQUENCY JET VENTILATION; (HFJV); and high-frequency oscillation (HFO).Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Inflammation Mediators: The endogenous compounds that mediate inflammation (AUTACOIDS) and related exogenous compounds including the synthetic prostaglandins (PROSTAGLANDINS, SYNTHETIC).Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung: A heterogeneous aggregate of at least three distinct histological types of lung cancer, including SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA; ADENOCARCINOMA; and LARGE CELL CARCINOMA. They are dealt with collectively because of their shared treatment strategy.Epithelial Cells: Cells that line the inner and outer surfaces of the body by forming cellular layers (EPITHELIUM) or masses. Epithelial cells lining the SKIN; the MOUTH; the NOSE; and the ANAL CANAL derive from ectoderm; those lining the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM and the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM derive from endoderm; others (CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM and LYMPHATIC SYSTEM) derive from mesoderm. Epithelial cells can be classified mainly by cell shape and function into squamous, glandular and transitional epithelial cells.Endotoxins: Toxins closely associated with the living cytoplasm or cell wall of certain microorganisms, which do not readily diffuse into the culture medium, but are released upon lysis of the cells.Interleukin-6: A cytokine that stimulates the growth and differentiation of B-LYMPHOCYTES and is also a growth factor for HYBRIDOMAS and plasmacytomas. It is produced by many different cells including T-LYMPHOCYTES; MONOCYTES; and FIBROBLASTS.Fluorocarbons: Liquid perfluorinated carbon compounds which may or may not contain a hetero atom such as nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur, but do not contain another halogen or hydrogen atom. This concept includes fluorocarbon emulsions and fluorocarbon blood substitutes.Endotoxemia: A condition characterized by the presence of ENDOTOXINS in the blood. On lysis, the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria enters the systemic circulation and initiates a pathophysiologic cascade of pro-inflammatory mediators.Leg Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the leg.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Respiratory Dead Space: That part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT or the air within the respiratory tract that does not exchange OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE with pulmonary capillary blood.One-Lung Ventilation: Techniques for supplying artificial respiration to a single lung.Nitrosomethylurethane: An alkylating carcinogen that produces gastrointestinal and probably lung and nervous system tumors.Blood Component Transfusion: The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Random Allocation: A process involving chance used in therapeutic trials or other research endeavor for allocating experimental subjects, human or animal, between treatment and control groups, or among treatment groups. It may also apply to experiments on inanimate objects.Burns: Injuries to tissues caused by contact with heat, steam, chemicals (BURNS, CHEMICAL), electricity (BURNS, ELECTRIC), or the like.Chemokines: Class of pro-inflammatory cytokines that have the ability to attract and activate leukocytes. They can be divided into at least three structural branches: C; (CHEMOKINES, C); CC; (CHEMOKINES, CC); and CXC; (CHEMOKINES, CXC); according to variations in a shared cysteine motif.Respiratory Rate: The number of times an organism breathes with the lungs (RESPIRATION) per unit time, usually per minute.Air Pressure: The force per unit area that the air exerts on any surface in contact with it. Primarily used for articles pertaining to air pressure within a closed environment.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Critical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Respiratory System Agents: Drugs used for their effects on the respiratory system.Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein B: A pulmonary surfactant associated-protein that plays an essential role in alveolar stability by lowering the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inherited deficiency of pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B is one cause of RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME, NEWBORN.Uteroglobin: A steroid-inducible protein that was originally identified in uterine fluid. It is a secreted homodimeric protein with identical 70-amino acid subunits that are joined in an antiparallel orientation by two disulfide bridges. A variety of activities are associated with uteroglobin including the sequestering of hydrophobic ligands and the inhibition of SECRETORY PHOSPHOLIPASE A2.Respiratory Function Tests: Measurement of the various processes involved in the act of respiration: inspiration, expiration, oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, lung volume and compliance, etc.Mice, Inbred BALB CCells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Eye Injuries: Damage or trauma inflicted to the eye by external means. The concept includes both surface injuries and intraocular injuries.Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D: An abundant pulmonary surfactant-associated protein that binds to a variety of lung pathogens and enhances their opsinization and killing by phagocytic cells. Surfactant protein D contains a N-terminal collagen-like domain and a C-terminal lectin domain that are characteristic of members of the collectin family of proteins.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Instillation, Drug: The administration of therapeutic agents drop by drop, as eye drops, ear drops, or nose drops. It is also administered into a body space or cavity through a catheter. It differs from THERAPEUTIC IRRIGATION in that the irrigate is removed within minutes, but the instillate is left in place.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Shock: A pathological condition manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.Total Lung Capacity: The volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration. It is the equivalent to each of the following sums: VITAL CAPACITY plus RESIDUAL VOLUME; INSPIRATORY CAPACITY plus FUNCTIONAL RESIDUAL CAPACITY; TIDAL VOLUME plus INSPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus functional residual capacity; or tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve volume plus EXPIRATORY RESERVE VOLUME plus residual volume.Interleukin-8: A member of the CXC chemokine family that plays a role in the regulation of the acute inflammatory response. It is secreted by variety of cell types and induces CHEMOTAXIS of NEUTROPHILS and other inflammatory cells.Partial Pressure: The pressure that would be exerted by one component of a mixture of gases if it were present alone in a container. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Burns, Inhalation: Burns of the respiratory tract caused by heat or inhaled chemicals.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Oxidative Stress: A disturbance in the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in favor of the former, leading to potential damage. Indicators of oxidative stress include damaged DNA bases, protein oxidation products, and lipid peroxidation products (Sies, Oxidative Stress, 1991, pxv-xvi).NF-kappa B: Ubiquitous, inducible, nuclear transcriptional activator that binds to enhancer elements in many different cell types and is activated by pathogenic stimuli. The NF-kappa B complex is a heterodimer composed of two DNA-binding subunits: NF-kappa B1 and relA.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Blast Injuries: Injuries resulting when a person is struck by particles impelled with violent force from an explosion. Blast causes pulmonary concussion and hemorrhage, laceration of other thoracic and abdominal viscera, ruptured ear drums, and minor effects in the central nervous system. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Fluid Therapy: Therapy whose basic objective is to restore the volume and composition of the body fluids to normal with respect to WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE. Fluids may be administered intravenously, orally, by intermittent gavage, or by HYPODERMOCLYSIS.Respiratory Insufficiency: Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)Thoracic Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the chest area.Interleukin-1beta: An interleukin-1 subtype that is synthesized as an inactive membrane-bound pro-protein. Proteolytic processing of the precursor form by CASPASE 1 results in release of the active form of interleukin-1beta from the membrane.Pneumonia, Bacterial: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections.Abdominal Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving organs in the abdominal cavity.Malondialdehyde: The dialdehyde of malonic acid.Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Leukocyte Elastase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of proteins, including elastin. It cleaves preferentially bonds at the carboxyl side of Ala and Val, with greater specificity for Ala. EC 3.4.21.37.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Arm Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the arm.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Pulmonary Atelectasis: Absence of air in the entire or part of a lung, such as an incompletely inflated neonate lung or a collapsed adult lung. Pulmonary atelectasis can be caused by airway obstruction, lung compression, fibrotic contraction, or other factors.Sheep: Any of the ruminant mammals with curved horns in the genus Ovis, family Bovidae. They possess lachrymal grooves and interdigital glands, which are absent in GOATS.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Nitric Oxide: A free radical gas produced endogenously by a variety of mammalian cells, synthesized from ARGININE by NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE. Nitric oxide is one of the ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXING FACTORS released by the vascular endothelium and mediates VASODILATION. It also inhibits platelet aggregation, induces disaggregation of aggregated platelets, and inhibits platelet adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide activates cytosolic GUANYLATE CYCLASE and thus elevates intracellular levels of CYCLIC GMP.Phosgene: A highly toxic gas that has been used as a chemical warfare agent. It is an insidious poison as it is not irritating immediately, even when fatal concentrations are inhaled. (From The Merck Index, 11th ed, p7304)Models, Animal: Non-human animals, selected because of specific characteristics, for use in experimental research, teaching, or testing.Hand Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the hand.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Toll-Like Receptor 4: A pattern recognition receptor that interacts with LYMPHOCYTE ANTIGEN 96 and LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES. It mediates cellular responses to GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA.Protein C: A vitamin-K dependent zymogen present in the blood, which, upon activation by thrombin and thrombomodulin exerts anticoagulant properties by inactivating factors Va and VIIIa at the rate-limiting steps of thrombin formation.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Cobra Venoms: Venoms from snakes of the genus Naja (family Elapidae). They contain many specific proteins that have cytotoxic, hemolytic, neurotoxic, and other properties. Like other elapid venoms, they are rich in enzymes. They include cobramines and cobralysins.Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Chlorine: A greenish-yellow, diatomic gas that is a member of the halogen family of elements. It has the atomic symbol Cl, atomic number 17, and atomic weight 70.906. It is a powerful irritant that can cause fatal pulmonary edema. Chlorine is used in manufacturing, as a reagent in synthetic chemistry, for water purification, and in the production of chlorinated lime, which is used in fabric bleaching.Endothelial Cells: Highly specialized EPITHELIAL CELLS that line the HEART; BLOOD VESSELS; and lymph vessels, forming the ENDOTHELIUM. They are polygonal in shape and joined together by TIGHT JUNCTIONS. The tight junctions allow for variable permeability to specific macromolecules that are transported across the endothelial layer.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Pneumocytes: Epithelial cells that line the PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Hospital Mortality: A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.Spinal Injuries: Injuries involving the vertebral column.Fibroblast Growth Factor 7: A fibroblast growth factor that is a specific mitogen for EPITHELIAL CELLS. It binds a complex of HEPARAN SULFATE and FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 2B.Chemokine CXCL1: A CXC chemokine with specificity for CXCR2 RECEPTORS. It has growth factor activities and is implicated as a oncogenic factor in several tumor types.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Blotting, Western: Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.HMGB1 Protein: A 24-kDa HMGB protein that binds to and distorts the minor grove of DNA.Knee Injuries: Injuries to the knee or the knee joint.Heterocyclic Compounds, 2-Ring: A class of organic compounds containing two ring structures, one of which is made up of more than one kind of atom, usually carbon plus another atom. The heterocycle may be either aromatic or nonaromatic.Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1: A cell-surface ligand involved in leukocyte adhesion and inflammation. Its production is induced by gamma-interferon and it is required for neutrophil migration into inflamed tissue.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Protective Agents: Synthetic or natural substances which are given to prevent a disease or disorder or are used in the process of treating a disease or injury due to a poisonous agent.Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II: A CALCIUM-independent subtype of nitric oxide synthase that may play a role in immune function. It is an inducible enzyme whose expression is transcriptionally regulated by a variety of CYTOKINES.Organ Size: The measurement of an organ in volume, mass, or heaviness.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Plateletpheresis: The preparation of platelet concentrates with the return of red cells and platelet-poor plasma to the donor.Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Bronchi: The larger air passages of the lungs arising from the terminal bifurcation of the TRACHEA. They include the largest two primary bronchi which branch out into secondary bronchi, and tertiary bronchi which extend into BRONCHIOLES and PULMONARY ALVEOLI.Heart Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the heart.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Receptors, Interleukin-8B: High-affinity G-protein-coupled receptors for INTERLEUKIN-8 present on NEUTROPHILS; MONOCYTES; and T-LYMPHOCYTES. These receptors also bind several other CXC CHEMOKINES.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Abbreviated Injury Scale: Classification system for assessing impact injury severity developed and published by the American Association for Automotive Medicine. It is the system of choice for coding single injuries and is the foundation for methods assessing multiple injuries or for assessing cumulative effects of more than one injury. These include Maximum AIS (MAIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), and Probability of Death Score (PODS).Angiopoietin-2: An angiopoietin that is closely related to ANGIOPOIETIN-1. It binds to the TIE-2 RECEPTOR without receptor stimulation and antagonizes the effect of ANGIOPOIETIN-1. However its antagonistic effect may be limited to cell receptors that occur within the vasculature. Angiopoietin-2 may therefore play a role in down-regulation of BLOOD VESSEL branching and sprouting.Therapeutic Irrigation: The washing of a body cavity or surface by flowing water or solution for therapy or diagnosis.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Erythrocyte Transfusion: The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Almitrine: A respiratory stimulant that enhances respiration by acting as an agonist of peripheral chemoreceptors located on the carotid bodies. The drug increases arterial oxygen tension while decreasing arterial carbon dioxide tension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It may also prove useful in the treatment of nocturnal oxygen desaturation without impairing the quality of sleep.Trachea: The cartilaginous and membranous tube descending from the larynx and branching into the right and left main bronchi.Pressure: A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Platelet Transfusion: The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome: A systemic inflammatory response to a variety of clinical insults, characterized by two or more of the following conditions: (1) fever >38 degrees C or HYPOTHERMIA 90 beat/minute; (3) tachypnea >24 breaths/minute; (4) LEUKOCYTOSIS >12,000 cells/cubic mm or 10% immature forms. While usually related to infection, SIRS can also be associated with noninfectious insults such as TRAUMA; BURNS; or PANCREATITIS. If infection is involved, a patient with SIRS is said to have SEPSIS.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Pulmonary Ventilation: The total volume of gas inspired or expired per unit of time, usually measured in liters per minute.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Paraquat: A poisonous dipyridilium compound used as contact herbicide. Contact with concentrated solutions causes irritation of the skin, cracking and shedding of the nails, and delayed healing of cuts and wounds.Meconium Aspiration Syndrome: A condition caused by inhalation of MECONIUM into the LUNG of FETUS or NEWBORN, usually due to vigorous respiratory movements during difficult PARTURITION or respiratory system abnormalities. Meconium aspirate may block small airways leading to difficulties in PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE and ASPIRATION PNEUMONIA.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Ozone: The unstable triatomic form of oxygen, O3. It is a powerful oxidant that is produced for various chemical and industrial uses. Its production is also catalyzed in the ATMOSPHERE by ULTRAVIOLET RAY irradiation of oxygen or other ozone precursors such as VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS and NITROGEN OXIDES. About 90% of the ozone in the atmosphere exists in the stratosphere (STRATOSPHERIC OZONE).Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A: An abundant pulmonary surfactant-associated protein that binds to a variety of lung pathogens, resulting in their opsinization. It also stimulates MACROPHAGES to undergo PHAGOCYTOSIS of microorganisms. Surfactant protein A contains a N-terminal collagen-like domain and a C-terminal lectin domain that are characteristic of members of the collectin family of proteins.Shock, Surgical: A type of shock that occurs as a result of a surgical procedure.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Thrombomodulin: A cell surface glycoprotein of endothelial cells that binds thrombin and serves as a cofactor in the activation of protein C and its regulation of blood coagulation.Fibrinolysis: The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.Airway Resistance: Physiologically, the opposition to flow of air caused by the forces of friction. As a part of pulmonary function testing, it is the ratio of driving pressure to the rate of air flow.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.

Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) caused by red blood cell transfusion involving residual plasma anti-HLA antibodies: a report on two cases and general considerations. (1/1061)

TRALI is considered a serious hazard among immune complications of blood transfusion and its occurrence is admitted to be globally underestimated. Each type of blood product is likely to cause TRALI. We report here on two consecutive observations of TRALI caused by red blood cell concentrates, in which anti-HLA class I and class II antibodies resulting from post-gravitational allo-immunization were evidenced in donors. HLA class I and II antigenic community between recipients and donors' husbands were found and strong reacting IgG antibodies directed at several of those common antigens were detected in the donors' serum. Both donors had more than 3 pregnancies, raising the issue of blood donor selection or of plasma reduction for cellular products.  (+info)

Mechanisms of pulmonary dysfunction after on-pump and off-pump cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort study. (2/1061)

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary dysfunction following cardiac surgery is believed to be caused, at least in part, by a lung vascular injury and/or atelectasis following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) perfusion and collapse of non-ventilated lungs. METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we studied the postoperative pulmonary leak index (PLI) for 67Ga-transferrin and (transpulmonary) extravascular lung water (EVLW) in consecutive patients undergoing on-pump (n = 31) and off-pump (n = 8) cardiac surgery. We also studied transfusion history, radiographs, ventilatory and gas exchange variables. RESULTS: The postoperative PLI and EVLW were elevated above normal in 42 and 29% after on-pump surgery and 63 and 37% after off-pump surgery, respectively (ns). Transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates, PLI, EVLW, occurrence of atelectasis, ventilatory variables and duration of mechanical ventilation did not differ between groups, whereas patients with atelectasis had higher venous admixture and airway pressures than patients without atelectasis (P = 0.037 and 0.049). The PLI related to number of RBC concentrates infused (P = 0.025). CONCLUSION: The lung vascular injury in about half of patients after cardiac surgery is not caused by CPB perfusion but by trauma necessitating RBC transfusion, so that off-pump surgery may not afford a benefit in this respect. However, atelectasis rather than lung vascular injury is a major determinant of postoperative pulmonary dysfunction, irrespective of CPB perfusion.  (+info)

Toward early identification of acute lung injury in the emergency department. (3/1061)

BACKGROUND: There are no studies evaluating the epidemiology of pediatric acute lung injury (ALI) in the emergency department (ED), where early identification and interventions are most likely to be helpful. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of the ALI precursor acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) in the ED. METHODS: We analyzed 11,664 pediatric patient records from 16 EDs. Records were selected if oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) was recorded during the visit. Virtual partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) was calculated from SpO(2), thus allowing calculation of ratios of pO(2) to fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO(2)) (PFRs). Patients with a PFR < 300 were classified as having AHRF. Univariate analyses and logistic regression were used to test the association of clinical factors with the presence of AHRF and intubation. RESULTS: AHRF criteria (ie, PFR < 300) were met in 121 (2.9%) of the 4,184 patients with an oxygenation measurement. The following variables were independently associated with ALI: higher Pediatric Risk of Admission II score (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 1.12 [1.08-1.16]; p < .001), higher heart rate (1.02 [1.01-1.03]; p = .009), a positive chest radiograph (2.35 [1.02-5.43]; p = .045), and lower temperature (0.49 [0.36-0.68]; p < .001).The final model had an R(2) = .20. CONCLUSION: We found nonintubated AHRF to be prevalent in the ED. The low R(2) for the regression model for AHRF underscores the lack of criteria for early identification of patients with respiratory compromise. Our findings represent an important first step toward establishing the true incidence of ALI in the pediatric ED.  (+info)

Keratinocyte growth factor protects against Clara cell injury induced by naphthalene. (4/1061)

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NKG2D-dependent effector function of bronchial epithelium-activated alloreactive T-cells. (5/1061)

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Low tidal volume ventilation is associated with reduced mortality in HIV-infected patients with acute lung injury. (6/1061)

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Plasma receptor for advanced glycation end products and clinical outcomes in acute lung injury. (7/1061)

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Predictors of mortality in acute lung injury during the era of lung protective ventilation. (8/1061)

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Data & statistics on Acute Lung Injury: MRNA expression of Interleukin-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells before injury and after injury. NG, acute lung injury with normoglycemia group; HG, acute lung injury with hyperglycemia group; HG-VI, acute lung injury with hyperglycemia treated with intravenous insulin group; HG-AI, acute lung injury with hyperglycemia treated with aerosolized insulin group; IL-8, interleukin-8. Boxes extend ..., Particle-induced acute lung injury. Results obtained from analysis performed on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples recovered from animals at 24 h post-exposure. Animals were exposed by intratracheal instillation to: saline ( E); OFA100 ( C); OFA400 (P); ROFA#6 ( 1); or ARD ([). Various biomarkers of acute lung injury were assessed such as: A) edema/secretory activity (protein/mL); B) edema (albumin/mL); ..., Inhaltsverzeichnis Einleitung Hypothesen Theoretische Grundlagen der Hypothesen Patienten und Methodik Patienten Pneumonie Acute lung injury / Acute
Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been
Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) is an important life-threatening complication that is related with blood transfusion. The frequency is reported as 1/5.000. It is generally characterized with hypoxia that appears at the 2-6th hours after the blood transfusion, bilateral infiltration in the chest radiography, and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Acute respiratory distress, hypotension, tachycardia and fever accompany the clinical picture. Past surgery, blood transfusion, and sepsis are among the factors that trigger the disease. In this study, the efficiency of the hemodialysis applied in the right time in the treatment of a heavy TRALI case developed after a blood transfusion has been presented.. Keywords: Acute lung injury, efficiency, hemodialysis, ...
Medical information, Acute lung injury. Definition of Acute lung injury, symptoms of Acute lung injury, treatment of Acute lung injury, and prevention of Acute lung injury. Exams and Tests Acute lung injury.
The report titled, "Acute Lung Injury Treatment Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2017 - 2025" by TMR Research furnishes an in-depth analysis of the vital catalysts and deterrents of the global market for acute lung injury treatment, alongside accurate figures, charts, diagrams, and graphs. The report offers an insightful assessment of the leading geographical segments and the growth opportunities offered by each of them. Acute lung injury is a prominent cause of morbidity and mortality across the world. Since one of the common conditions that is associated with severe hypoxia is acute lung injury, acute lung injury treatment market is expected to soar as its incidence keeps escalating worldwide, augmenting mortality rates. Researchers can now have access to critical information pertaining to the pathophysiology of the condition as well as numerous biological markers related to worse clinical outcomes of patients, thanks to the recent technological ...
Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, developed as promising anti-tumor drugs, exhibit their anti-inflammatory properties due to their effects on reduction of inflammatory cytokines. To investigate the protective effect of butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. ALI was induced in Balb/c mice by intratracheally instillation of LPS (1 mg/kg). Before 1 hour of LPS administration, the mice received butyrate (10 mg/kg) orally. The animals in each group were sacrificed at different time point after LPS administration. Pulmonary histological changes were evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin stain and lung wet/dry weight ratios were observed. Concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in lung tissue homogenates were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Expression of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 in
GlobalDatas clinical trial report, Acute Lung Injury Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2012 provides data on the Acute Lung Injury clinical trial scenario. This report provides elemental information and data relating to the clinical trials on Acute Lung Injury. It includes an overview of the trial numbers and their recruitment status as per the site of trial conduction across the globe. The databook offers a preliminary coverage of disease clinical trials by their phase, trial status, prominence of the sponsors and also provides briefing pertaining to the number of trials for the key drugs for treating Acute Lung Injury. This report is built using data and information sourced from proprietary databases, primary and secondary research and in-house analysis by GlobalDatas team of industry experts. Note: Certain sections in the report may be removed or altered based on the availability and relevance of data for the indicated disease.
Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSCs)-based therapy seems to be a promising treatment for acute lung injury, but the therapeutic effects of BMSCs transplantation on acute lung injury induced by brain ischemia and the mechanisms have not been totally elucidated. This study explores the effects of transplantation of BMSCs on acute lung injury induced by focal cerebral ischemia and investigates the underlying mechanism. Acute lung injury model was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). BMSCs (with concentration of 1 × 106/ml) were transplanted into host through tail vein 1 day after MCAO. Then, the survival, proliferation and migration of BMSCs in lung were observed at 4 days after transplantation, and histology observation and lung function were assessed for 7 days. Meanwhile, in situ hybridization (ISH), qRT-PCR and western blotting were employed to detect the expression of TNF-α in lung. Neurobehavioral deficits and acute lung injury could be seen in brain ischemia rats. Implanted
Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality in the US. Previously, we established an immune-mediated TRALI mouse model, wherein mice with cognate antigen were challenged with MHC class I mAb. In this study, when mice housed in a rodent, specific pathogen-free barrier room were challenged with MHC I mAb, there was significant protection from TRALI compared with nonbarrier mice. Priming mice with LPS restored lung injury with mAb challenge. Using TLR4-deficient bone marrow chimeras, the priming phenotype was restricted to animals with WT hematopoietic cells, and depletion of either neutrophils or platelets was protective. Both neutrophils and platelets were sequestered in the lungs of mice with TRALI, and retention of platelets was neutrophil dependent. Interestingly, treatment with aspirin prevented lung injury and mortality, but blocking the P selectin or CD11b/CD18 pathways did not. These data suggest a 2-step mechanism of TRALI: ...
While longer storage of buffy coat-derived PLTs was associated with an increased risk of TRALI, storage of plasma for up to 2 years and red blood cells for up to 35 days was not associated with the risk of TRALI.
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Transfusion Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine. ...
The British Society for Haematology is registered in England and Wales as a Company Limited by Guarantee, No 2645706 and as a Charity, No 1005735 Registered Office and correspondence address: 100 White Lion Street London N1 9PF. Phone: 020 7713 0990 ...
Intravenous literature: Kleinman, S., Grossman, B. and Kopko, P. (2010). A national survey of transfusion-related acute lung injury risk reduction policies for platelets and plasma in the United States. Transfusion. [epub ahead of print] Abstract: BACKGROUND: Little information exists on the specific transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) risk reduction practices used by multiple blood collecting…
Acute lung injury, a common condition characterized by acute severe hypoxia without evidence of hydrostatic pulmonary edema, remains a key source of mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients. The condition has a high incidence rate across the globe and overall rate of mortality remains high. Pathogenesis of the condition is explained by injuries to both the alveolar and endothelium epithelium. Recent advances in the field have helped researchers gain a better understanding of pathophysiology of the condition and several biological markers associated with worse clinical outcomes have been identified. Ongoing research in the area of fluid conservation and lung-protective ventilation strategies have demonstrated improvements in survival rate of patients. Potential treatment methods such as statin therapy and nutritional strategies are also expected to gain more focus from research bodies operating in the area of treatment of acute lung injury.. Request a sample copy of the Report @ ...
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Objective:Although ventilation with small tidal volumes is recommended in patients with established acute lung injury, most others receive highly variable tidal volume aimed in part at normalizing arterial blood gas values. We tested the hypothesis that acute lung injury, which develops after the in
The avian influenza virus (AIV) can cross species barriers and expand its host range from birds to mammals, even humans. Avian influenza is characterized by pronounced activation of the proinflammatory cytokine cascade, which perpetuates the inflammatory response, leading to persistent systemic inflammatory response syndrome and pulmonary infection in animals and humans. There are currently no specific treatment strategies for avian influenza. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) would have beneficial effects in the treatment of H9N2 AIV-induced acute lung injury in mice. Six- to 8-week-old C57BL/6 mice were infected intranasally with 1 × 104 MID50 of A/HONG KONG/2108/2003 [H9N2 (HK)] H9N2 virus to induce acute lung injury. After 30 min, syngeneic MSCs were delivered through the caudal vein. Three days after infection, we measured the survival rate, lung weight, arterial blood gas, and cytokines in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum, and assessed pathological changes to
Stephen M. Black and a team of researchers have uncovered information that could help with treatment for acute lung injury. A summary of their study recently appeared in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, where they noted that a bacterial infection can throw off the equilibrium of two key proteins in the lungs and also put patients at risk of a highly lethal acute lung injury (ALI).. As Stephen M. Black explained in a recent press release, "Bacteria can alter a single amino acid in the protein RhoA, pushing its activity level well above that of Rac1 and prompting blood vessels to leak and flood thousands of tiny air sacs in the lungs." Fortunately there might be a biological shield that is able to protect RhoA from potentially lethal alterations.. Stephen M. Black compared activation of RhoA to a rapid-fire gun that does not require the operator to pause and reload. As he explained, "Activation of RhoA is an early, early event and it is a pathological activation. The cell cannot regulate it ...
(Health-NewsWire.Net, March 24, 2020 ) Market Overview The Global Acute Lung Injury Market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 5.8% during the forecasting period (2019-2026). Acute lung injury is a severe condition caused by acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. It is a crucial source of mortality a
Press Release issued May 28, 2014: Reportstack, provider of premium market research reports announces the addition of Acute Lung Injury - Pipeline Review, H1 2014 market report to its offering Acute Lung Injury - Pipeline Review, H1 2014
Acute lung injury complicates approximately 25-30% of subjects undergoing oesophagectomy. Experimental studies suggest that treatment with beta agonists may prevent the development of acute lung injury by decreasing inflammatory cell infiltration, activation and inflammatory cytokine release, enhancing basal alveolar fluid clearance and improving alveolar capillary barrier function.The Beta Agonist Lung Injury TrIal (prevention) is a multi-centre, randomised, double blind, placebo-controlled trial. The aim of the trial is to determine in patients undergoing elective transthoracic oesphagectomy, if treatment with inhaled salmeterol 100 mcg twice daily started at induction of anaesthesia and continued for 72 hours thereafter compared to placebo affect the incidence of early acute lung injury and other clinical, resource and patient focused outcomes. The primary outcome will be the development of acute lung injury within 72 hours of oesophagectomy. The trial secondary outcomes are the development of acute
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|i|α|/i|-Mangostin (MAN) is a bioactive xanthone isolated from mangosteen. This study was designed to investigate its therapeutic effects on acute lung injury (ALI) and explore the underlying mechanisms of action. Rats from treatment groups were subject to oral administration of MAN for 3 consecutive days beforehand, and then ALI was induced in all the rats except for normal controls via an intraperitoneal injection with lipopolysaccharide. The severity of disease was evaluated by histological examination and hematological analysis. Protein expressions in tissues and cells were examined with immunohistochemical and immunoblotting methods, respectively. The levels of cytokines and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) were determined using ELISA and colorimetric kits, respectively. It was found that MAN treatment significantly improved histological conditions, reduced leucocytes counts, relieved oxidative stress, and declined TNF-|i|α|/i| levels in ALI rats. Meanwhile, MAN treatment
The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a form of severe acute lung injury (ALI) characterized by hypoxemic respiratory failure (the lungs are unable to absorb oxygen to the arterial blood) and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema (accumulation of fluid in the lungs). The syndrome may be caused by direct or indirect injury to the lungs. It is associated with a mortality rate of up to 40-50%. There are no marketed pharmacologic therapies for this devastating syndrome.. This study aims to assess the safety, tolerability and pharmacodynamics of GSK2586881, a recombinant human angiotensin converting enzyme type 2 (rhACE2).. ACE2 is involved in the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS), which controls blood pressure, electrolytes and intravascular fluid volume. A key function of rhACE2 is believed to be the cleavage of Angiotensin II (Ang II) to Ang (1-7), which have opposing physiological roles. Elevated levels of Ang II are associated with vasoconstriction, inflammation, fibrosis, vascular leak, and ...
Acute lung injury (ALI) is an example of a critical care syndrome with limited treatment options once the condition is fully established.Not surprisingly, many treatments targeting the mechanisms identified in preclinical studies have failed to improve patient outcomes.The most likely reason could be due to inadequate and delayed recognition of patients at risk and the subsequent development of the full blown syndrome.ALI/ARDS usually develops during the first hours of ICU admission, and often is the very reason for ICU admission.. Clinical prediction models have been extensively used in the clinical practice to identify patients at high risks who may benefit from specific interventions. However, no such tool exists to predict the development of ALI in patients at risk. We have recently developed an ALI prediction model (Lung Injury Prediction Score:LIPS)which incorporates demographic, environmental and clinical characteristics at the time of, and before, hospital admission. If validated, this ...
The article presents the results of a prospective, population based, cohort study conducted in 21 hospitals in and around King County, Washington. The aim was to determine the incidence and mortality associated with acute lung injury (ALI/ARDS). Under the study, 4251 adults requiring mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours were screened. Out of 1687 patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure, 1113 had ALI, 828 of whom had ARDS. The study found that the calculated incidence of ALI/ARDS was 2-40 times higher than previously reported with an estimated 190,600 new cases of ALI every year ...
The purpose of the study is to identify the patients at high risk of developing Acute Lung Injury (ALI) at the time of hospital admission, and before intensive care unit admission.. Aim 1- To validate the prediction model (Lung Injury Prediction Score) in a population based sample of hospitalized patients.. Aim 2- To determine the significance of health-care related ALI risk modifiers in a population based sample.. Aim 3- To compare the short and long term outcomes between patients at high risk who do, and do not develop ALI.. ...
DescriptionMacrophage origin and activity is complex in response to acute lung injury. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has a divergent role in the stages following intratracheal bleomycin mediated lung injury (ITB). We hypothesize iNOS is necessary for macrophage activation during the inflammatory and resolution phases that follow ITB. Further, recruited macrophages classically activate during inflammation and resident macrophages alternatively activate during resolution. To test these hypotheses, iNOS was manipulated via scavenge of products, systemic selective iNOS inhibition and chimeric mice in which particular populations were NOS2-/-. C57/BL6 mice were intratracheally instilled with bleomycin and samples collected 8 and 15 days following instillation. This work identified oxidants to promote inflammation during the early stages following ITB. Systemic iNOS inhibition reduced classical activation of recruited macrophages during inflammation and alternative activation of recruited ...
Attempts to develop drug treatments for acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been marred by unfulfilled expectations....
TY - JOUR. T1 - Suppression of inflammation and acute lung injury by Miz1 via repression of C/EBP-δ. AU - Do-Umehara, Hanh Chi. AU - Chen, Cong. AU - Urich, Daniela. AU - Zhou, Liang. AU - Qiu, Ju. AU - Jang, Samuel. AU - Zander, Alia. AU - Baker, Margaret A.. AU - Eilers, Martin. AU - Sporn, Peter H S. AU - Ridge, Karen M.. AU - Sznajder, Jacob I.. AU - Budinger, G. R Scott. AU - Mutlu, Gökhan M.. AU - Lin, Anning. AU - Liu, Jing. PY - 2013/5/1. Y1 - 2013/5/1. N2 - Inflammation is essential for host defense but can cause tissue damage and organ failure if unchecked. How the inflammation is resolved remains elusive. Here we report that the transcription factor Miz1 was required for terminating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. Genetic disruption of the Miz1 POZ domain, which is essential for the transactivation or repression activity of Miz1, resulted in hyperinflammation, lung injury and greater mortality in LPS-treated mice but a lower bacterial load and mortality in mice with ...
Acute lung injury patients on ventilators who require a feeding tube have a similar number of ventilator-free hospital days and similar mortality rates if they receive a low-calorie feeding program initially followed by a full-calorie program compared to a full-calorie program right away. These results are part of a new clinical study funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.. The patients in the low-calorie, or delayed, feeding program received about 400 calories per day for the first six days before advancing to a full feeding program. The patients enrolled in the full feeding program were advanced as quickly as they could tolerate to a full daily calorie and protein goal based on weight (averaging about 1,300 calories per day).. "The appropriate feeding protocol for mechanically ventilated patients is an important practical question that has been debated in intensive care units for decades," said Susan B. Shurin, M.D., acting ...
El Departament investiga les bases moleculars i les vies de senyalització que sassocien al dany i la reparació en malalties de base isquèmica i inflamatòria així com nous marcadors proteics associats a la resposta immune. ...
To evaluate the impact of acute lung inflammation on tumor metastasis, the authors combined two well-established acute infection models, the LPS-induced acute lung injury/inflammation (ALI) and the DH5α bacterial pneumonia, with experimental metastasis models in mice. Both tail vein injection and an orthotopic tumor cell model resulted in enhanced lung metastasis in mice with bacterial lung infections. These findings potentially have broad applicability for the treatment of metastasis in cancers of different histologic origin because melanoma, lung, prostate, and colorectal cancer cell lines were all evaluated in this study.. The mechanistic basis for bacterial-induced tumor cell recruitment to the lungs was investigated in a series of assays using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from control, LPS-, or bacteria-injected mice. Yan and colleagues observed increased migration of CXCR4+ tumor cells toward the BALF from infected mice. Because LPS itself was not found to be responsible for the ...
Dr. Summers laboratory focuses on lung metabolism and understanding how local and systemic metabolic derangements contribute to the onset and progression of lung diseases.. One major area of investigation is on the relationship between obesity and acute lung injury. Recent epidemiological studies indicate a paradoxical relationship exists between obesity and acute lung injury, in that, obese individuals are at increased risk for developing acute lung injury but outcomes in established disease are improved when compared to lean patients. In these investigations, Dr. Summers laboratory is utilizing genetic and diet-induced obesity models to understand how injury and inflammatory responses differ during obesity. These studies aim to direct future clinical investigations focusing on the prevention and the treatment of acute lung injury in lean and obese subjects.. In related studies, Dr. Summers laboratory is investigating the association between hormonal responses from adipose tissue and ...
Individuals with the human neutrophil antigen (HNA)-3b/3b type can produce HNA-3a antibodies, which have been reported to cause severe, sometimes fatal transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Our study aimed to determine the genotype frequency of HNA-3a/3b which will be helpful to estimate the potential risk for forming anti-HNA-3a, the clinically relevant antibody linked to TRALI in two different ethnic groups of southern China. Five hundred unrelated and healthy blood donors (284 male, 216 female; 300 Zhuangs, 200 Dongs) from the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region were simultaneously typed for the HNA-3 allele using a polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) method ...
Aim: This study was to observe the changes of the gene expression of microRNA-155 and 127 in the neonatal rats with Acute Lung Injury (ALI). Methods:..
Adult stem cells from bone marrow can help treat acute lung injury, a new mice study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine has shown.
... local vendors of Global Acute Lung Injury Market, some of them are GSK, Altor BioScience Corp, Faron Pharmaceuticals Oy, Altor BioScience Corp, APEPTICO,
A new study published by the National Institute of Health has found that cannabinoids can be an effective treatment for acute lung injury.
TY - JOUR. T1 - New insights into acute lung injury. AU - Black, Stephen Matthew. PY - 2010/5/1. Y1 - 2010/5/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951021969&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77951021969&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1016/j.vph.2010.02.002. DO - 10.1016/j.vph.2010.02.002. M3 - Editorial. C2 - 20188857. AN - SCOPUS:77951021969. VL - 52. SP - 171. EP - 174. JO - Vascular Pharmacology. JF - Vascular Pharmacology. SN - 1537-1891. IS - 5-6. ER - ...
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Background: Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) is a major cause of transfusionrelated morbidity and mortality in the intensive care unit setting. There is a paucity of such data from Pakistan. The purpose of this study is to assess the incidence and outcome of TRALI in critically ill children admitted in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of Pakistan. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study of all critically ill or injured children who developed TRALI or "possible" TRALI after blood transfusion based on Canadian Conference Consensus criteria in a closed multidisciplinary-cardiothoracic PICU from January 2012 to June 2016 ...
Lung acute and chronic infections are the most common infections in humans (11, 20, 21) Tumor metastasis is the major cause for cancer-related death (6, 7). Although chronic inflammation has been identified as one of the hallmarks of cancer (38) and has been shown to be causative and/or promoting in many cancers, the effects of acute lung infection on tumor metastatic potential have not been directly tested previously. The LPS ALI model is not new: The major infiltrated immune cell type has been identified (24), cytokines induced by LPS have been identified, and gene expression analyses using the ALI model have been conducted (39, 40). Here we have combined two different acute lung infection models with a tumor lung metastasis model and showed clear and dramatic enhancement by both bacteria and LPS on lung metastasis of mouse tumor cells representing four different types of cancer. In addition, we tested two reagents, AM3100 and AMO, for their ability to block the enhancement. These results have ...
Cerrar Maskara S Sen N et al. Correlation between lung injury score and serum albumin levels in patietns at risk for developing acute lung injury. Nutrition. 2000; 16: 91-94 ...
Dr. Wiener-Kronish has devoted much of her academic career to investigating the mechanism of acute lung injury produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram negative bacterium that can infect patients in the intensive care unit. Her past research focused on the mechanism of pleural fluid formation during acute lung injury, how toxins produced by Pseudomonascause acute lung injury, and the production of humanized antibodies that will block these products. Most recently, she has investigated the epidemiology of bacterial communities in asthmatics, critically ill patients and in young, newly colonized patients with cystic fibrosis. The goal of her research is to establish whether there are beneficial communities of bacteria that protect patients against asthma and infections. Dr. Wiener-Kronish is working with oral biologists and environmental scientists to utilize molecular identification of bacteria for these investigations.. ...
Although multiple potential molecular targets have been identified and shown to be effective in animal models of ALI, none has yet translated to clinical benefit for patients with ALI/ARDS. One of the major pitfalls to translation from bench to bedside is the diversity of animal models that do not fully reproduce human conditions. Indeed, recent reviews have highlighted the features required to optimally model ALI/ARDS, and that no current animal model replicates the complexities of this devastating disorder [3, 4, 15]. In this study, we describe a mouse model of ALI/ARDS induced by bilateral instillation of acid, which we believe represents a significant step forward in terms of reproducing the vast majority of the main pathophysiological hallmarks of clinical ALI/ARDS.. The primary goal of the current study was to develop a model that induced substantial injury but had low mortality over time, allowing investigation into the resolution/repair processes from this highly injured baseline. ...
The most significant finding of this study is that the expression and activity of the RNA editase ADAR1 is upregulated in lungs subjected to endotoxin-induced microvascular injury and in alveolar macrophages stimulated with endotoxin, live bacteria, or IFN. These findings implicate for the first time RNA editing as a possible inflammatory event. Specifically, the data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing is involved in the pathogenic mechanisms that lead to acute lung injury. Another significant finding is that ADAR1 is expressed in sham mouse lungs, which was previously demonstrated only in the rat.8 The sequence of early production of IFN, a known inducer of ADAR1,12 followed by ADAR1 expression and development of microvascular lung injury, suggests that A-to-I RNA editing may be a proximal event in the inflammatory cascade involved in the pathogenesis of microvascular lung injury. Furthermore, it is conceivable that early induction of pulmonary IFN during the inflammatory process could be the ...
Description: This book, describing management principles for common cardiopulmonary critical care problems, is Volume 214 of the Lung Biology in Health and Disease series. A companion volume is Practical Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine: Respiratory Failure (Volume 213). Purpose: Management principles are provided for common cardiopulmonary problems seen in multidisciplinary critical care practice. Audience: Senior residents, fellows, or practitioners requiring a refresher may benefit from this work. Editors and authors represent institutions throughout the United States, with the greatest concentration of contributions coming from the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Features: Cardiopulmonary problems are the principal emphasis of this volume, with discussion on acute lung injury, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, coronary syndromes, and heart failure dominating the discussion. Additional topics include gastrointestinal hemorrhage, neurologic ...
In the current study, administration of 20E resulted in a decrease of the alveolar cell damage and decline of the TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 expression in the ALI mice, which suggested a protective-role of 20E against LPS injury is closely associated with suppression of TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 production. Inflammation cascade is initiated by the innate immune system, in which TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 play a key role in the inflammatory response [13]. Generally, inflammatory response is taken as a direct pathogenic-signal in ALI [14]. It has been demonstrated that the over-expression of these pro-inflammatory mediators contribute to ALI or lung cancer [15]. Thus, down-regulation of TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-8 expression derived from 20E is beneficial in reducing the lung damage of mice. Similar studies are also reported in ALI cases. Administration of dexamethasone-21-acetate can dramatically reduce the concentration of cytokines TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 against the damage of LPS on lung [16]. ...
Pulmonary EC dysfunction, as characterized by parenchymal edema caused by neutrophil extravasation, is a major feature of ALI/ARDS (14, 51). Pulmonary injury at the capillary EC barrier is observed with increased gaps between cells and increased permeability (5). Injury induced by LPS in mice has been shown to be consistent with sepsis-induced ALI (1, 32).. LPS is a component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS is an endotoxin and induces strong responses from the immune systems of healthy animals (32). The effects of LPS are exerted through the generation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. These substances cause lung inflammation, as well as the subsequent edema and injury in lungs that occur in ALI/ARDS (2, 28, 39). We evaluated the effects of LPS-induced inflammation and vascular leakage over time. We observed significant increases in lung permeability in our LPS-generated model of lung injury. Extravasation of EBDA into lung tissue and protein into BALF was ...
Results HMGB1 increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 15 min and p38 at 30 min after stimulation HMGB1 increased IL-8 secretion (from 6.46 ng/ml to 8.75 ng/ml, p,0.01) and significant decrease in TIMP-1 secretion (from 19.79 ng/ml to 16.9 ng/ml, p,0.05) at 72 h. MAPK activation, IL-8 increase and TIMP-1 decrease was significantly reversed in the presence of sRAGE (p,0.05) (Abstract S52 Figure 1). Incubating cells with a RAGE blocking antibody inhibited MAPK phosphorylation by HMGB1. ...
Santschi M, Jouvet P, Leclerc F, Gauvin F, Newth CJ, Carroll CL, Flori H, Tasker RC, Rimensberger PC, Randolph AG, PALIVE Investigators, Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators Network (PALISI), European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care (ESPNIC) (2010) Acute lung injury in children: therapeutic practice and feasibility of international clinical trials. Pediatr Crit Care Med 11:681-689CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar ...
Sepsis and the related systemic inflammatory response is a major public health problem and one of the leading causes of death in intensive care units. More than...
Sonia López-Cuenca, Silvia Morales-García, Ana Martín-Hita, Fernando Frutos-Vivar, Pilar Fernández-Segoviano and Andrés Esteban ...
Lung infections account for a tremendous burden of disease, representing the most frequent cause of infection-related deaths and a common cause of acute lung injury. The innate immune response is critical for the prevention of lower respiratory tract infections. Yet, this response must be tightly regulated, such that adequate host defenses do not result in inflammatory lung injury.. Our long-term goal is to elucidate intra- and extra-pulmonary signaling events required for an immune response that is both effective and balanced. The local response to lung infections includes neutrophil recruitment, expression of soluble mediators such as cytokines, and the extravasation of plasma constituents from the vascular space into the alveolar space. The result is an inflammatory milieu and cellular composition that promotes local immune responsiveness. This physiologic transition within the lung, however, occurs in tandem with a systemic acute phase response (APR), typified by altered circulating levels ...
The US has witnessed a spate of patients presenting with acute lung injury associated with e-cigarettes or vaping product use. A new study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine shows the pattern of the outbreak in California where recreational cannabis use is legal and which has among the maximum cases of the strange illness ...
Phospholipase, Inhibition, mRNA, Role, Treatment, Concentration, Immunofluorescence, Acute Lung Injury, Administration, Compliance, Edema, Gene, Inflammation, Injury, Lung, Lung Injury, Mice, Myeloperoxidase, Neutrophil, Pulmonary Injury
Injury, Lung, Lung Injury, Permeability, Endothelial Cell, Cell, Human, Acute Lung Injury, Anp, Inflammation, Kinase, Lung Inflammation, Inhibition, Electrical Resistance, Gtpase, Phosphorylation, Sepsis, Thrombin, Role, Treatment
Theravance Biopharma has dosed the first patient in the phase 2 study of JAKi TD-0903 to treat patients with acute lung injury (ALI) due to Covid-19.
is focused on lung and vascular biology to study the molecular mechanisms of acute lung injury/ARDS, and pulmonary hypertension and identify ...
11/23/16 11:25 Ali is an Orange tabby that is a 14 years old. The owner received Ali 2 weeks ago from a neighbor. The owner suffers from allergies and cant care for Ali. Ali has no known illness. Ali has been introduced to small children ages 4. He keeps to them self and does not solicit attention. He stares and sits in high top area. Ali displays the same behavior around stranger. But he slowly allowed warms up and solicits attention. Ali has lived with a small dog and they were respectful of each others space. Ali has lived with another cat in his previous home. The cats engaged in play and lounged around the house together. Ali allows being petting and holding for a few. He has never received a bath, has his nails trimmed or has his coat brushed. Ali has never had a bite history or scratch history. He walks into his carrier but meows and cries in the carrier. He always uses his hooded litter box that was located in a spare room of the house. Ali is described as mellow, friendly and ...
Lindell, Robert B.; Gertz, Shira J.; Rowan, Courtney M.; McArthur, Jennifer; Beske, Florian; Plunkett, Adrian; Weiss, Scott L.; Thomas, Neal J.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; for the Sepsis PRevalence, OUtcomes, and Therapies Study Investigators and the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators (PALISI) Network Less ...
MS Program Jennifer Burwinkel (Reed Lab) Differences in in vitro Infection of Macrophages and Lung Epithelium by Virulent and Attenuated Strains of F. tularensis and Bethany Flage (Mailliard Lab) Heme Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inflammasome Activatio...
Many chemicals cause irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract. In severe cases respiratory tract irritation can progress to ARDS/acute lung injury, which may be delayed in onset for up to 24 to 72 hours in some cases ...
Kasotakis, George, Ekaterina Kintsurashvili, Manuel D. Galvan, Christopher Graham, J Todd Purves, Suresh Agarwal, David L. Corcoran, Bruce A. Sullenger, Scott M. Palmer, and Daniel G. Remick. "Histone Deacetylase 7 Inhibition in a Murine Model of Gram-Negative Pneumonia-Induced Acute Lung Injury." Shock 53, no. 3 (March 2020): 344-51. https://doi.org/10.1097/SHK.0000000000001372.. ...
Yang Sun, Chenggang Li (co-1st author), Yuelong Shu, Xiangwu Ju, Zhen Zou, Hongliang Wang, Shuan Rao, Feng Guo, Haolin Liu, Wenlong Nan, Yan Zhao, Yiwu Yan, Jun Tang, Chen Zhao, Peng Yang, Kangtai Liu, Shunxin Wang, Huijun Lu, Xiao Li, Lei Tan, Rongbao Gao, Jingdong Song, Xiang Gao, Xinlun Tian, Yingzhi Qin, Kai-Feng Xu, Dangsheng Li, Ningyi Jin, and Chengyu Jiang. Inhibition of autophagy ameliorates acute lung injury caused by avian influenza A H5N1 infection. SCIENCE SIGNALING. 2012 Feb 21;5(212):ra16. PMID: 22355189 ...
Chylarecka, D. and Kim, T. K. and Tarafder, K. and Mueller, K. and Goedel, K. and Czekaj, I. and Waeckerlin, C. and Cinchetti, M. and Ali, Md E. and Piamonteze, C. and Schmitt, F. and Wuestenberg, J. P. and Ziegler, C. and Nolting, F. and Aeschlimann, M. and Oppeneer, P. M. and Ballav, N. and Jung, T. A. ...
Liepos 13-14 d., Latvijoje, Pilskalni trasoje, vyks Baltijos ali autokroso taur s, automobili klasi B1600, OPEN 4500, B600 var yb 1 etapas ...
Erektilna disfunkcija (ED ali (moška) impotenca) je spolna disfunkcija, pri kateri moški pri spolnem odnosu ni sposoben doseči ali zadosti dolgo ohraniti erekcije penisa. Vzroki za to so lahko različni, npr. kardiovaskularne okvare ali sladkorna bolezen, terapija pa je večinoma uspešna. ...
Tečaj iz kriptografije in seminar iz kriptografije - podiplomski študij matematike (cet. 8-10) in IMFM (cet. 14-16), Jadranska 19 (III/PS), LJ ...
Mohammad Reza Mohammadi, Nastaran Ahmadi, Ali Khaleghi, Hadi Zarafshan*, Seyed Ali Mostafavi, Koorosh Kamali, Mehdi Rahgozar, Ameneh Ahmadi, Zahra Hooshyari, Seyyed Salman Alavi, Alia Shakiba, Maryam Salmanian, Parviz Molavi, Nasrin Sarraf, Seyed Kaveh Hojjat, Soleiman Mohammadzadeh, Shahrokh Amiri, Soroor Arman, Ahmad Ghanizadeh ...
An attempt to validate the modification of the American-European consensus definition of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome by the Berlin definition in a university hospital ...
Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as noncardiogenic pulmonary edema temporally related to the transfusion of blood products. We present a patient who, while undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation, developed acute pulmonary edema within minutes of administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP).
References 1. Ashbaugh DG, Bigelow DB, Petty TL et al. Acute Respiratory Distress in Adults. Lancet. 1967; 2: 319-3232. Murray JF, Matthay MA, Luce JM et al. An expanded definition of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1988; 138: 720-7233. Bernard GR, Artigas A, Brigham KL et al. The American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS. Definitions, mechanisms, relevant outcomes and clinical trial coordination. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 1994 Mar; 149 (3 Pt 1): 818-8244. Rubenfeld GD, Herridge MS. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Acute Lung Injury. Chest. 2007; 131 (2): 554-5625. McCallum NS, Evans TW. Epidemiology of Acute Lung Injury. Current Opinion in Critical Care. 2005: 11; 43-496. Rubenfeld GD, Caldwell E, Peabody E et al. Incidence and outcomes of acute lung injury. N Engl J Med 2005; 353: 1685-16937. Finney SJ, Evans TW. Acute lung injury outside the ICU: a significant problem. Critical Care. 2007; 11: 1698. Hudson LD, Milberg JA, Anardi D et al. Clinical risks for ...
1. Gervais HW, Eberle B, Konietzke D, Hennes HJ, Dick W, "Comparison of blood gases of ventilated patients during transport". Critical Care Medicine 1987;15:761-763.. 2. Weiss, Steven J., et al. "Automatic Transport Ventilator Versus Bag Valve In The EMS Setting: A Prospective, Randomized Trial." Southern Medical Journal 98.10 (2005): 970-976.. 3. Slutsky AS, Ranieri VM. Ventilator-induced lung injury. N Engl J Med. 2013 Nov 28;369(22):2126-36.. 4. Gattinoni L, Tonetti T, Cressoni M, Cadringher P, Herrmann P, Moerer O, Protti A, Gotti M, Chiurazzi C, Carlesso E, Chiumello D, Quintel M. Ventilator-related causes of lung injury: the mechanical power. Intensive Care Med. 2016 Oct;42(10):1567-75.. 5. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network: Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. N Engl J Med 2000, 342:1301-1308.. 6. Putensen C, Theuerkauf N, Zinserling J, Wrigge H, Pelosi P. ...
This study by the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network supports the use of low tidal volumes in acute lung injury and ARDS, and is consistent with a previous trial.1 It differs from 3 previous negative trials2-4 by having a larger difference in tidal volumes between groups, and by having a more aggressive approach to correcting acidosis. This study provides important information about tidal volume size; however, further research is still needed to determine the importance of concurrent strategies such as positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP).. In this study, an equation based on sex and height was used to calculate a predicted body weight, which was then used to set tidal volumes. Obesity is a common problem; the use of measured body weight can inadvertently lead to the use of high tidal volume ventilation. Tidal volumes should be based on ideal versus measured body weight.. This information is relevant to nurses who care for mechanically ventilated patients. Through continuous ...
TY - CHAP. T1 - ROS signaling in the pathogenesis of Acute Lung Injury (ALI) and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). AU - Kellner, Manuela. AU - Noonepalle, Satish. AU - Lu, Qing. AU - Srivastava, Anup. AU - Zemskov, Evgeny. AU - Black, Stephen M.. PY - 2017/1/1. Y1 - 2017/1/1. N2 - The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role for the maintenance of cellular processes and functions in the body. However, the excessive generation of oxygen radicals under pathological conditions such as acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leads to increased endothelial permeability. Within this hallmark of ALI and ARDS, vascular microvessels lose their junctional integrity and show increased myosin contractions that promote the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and the transition of solutes and fluids in the alveolar lumen. These processes all have a redox component, and this chapter focuses on the role played ...
Although the etiology of TRALI has not been fully delineated, two hypotheses have been postulated. The antibody-mediated hypothesis proposes that antibodies react with a corresponding antigen triggering capillary leak. Identified antibodies include antibodies to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II antigens and human neutrophil antigen (HNA). In this hypothesis, antibodies bind to recipient neutrophils. The antibody bound neutrophils are then sequestered in the lungs where activation of complement results in endothelial damage, capillary leak, and ALI. In most of these cases, the antibody is found in the donor with the corresponding antigen identified on the recipients neutrophils. Most donors associated with cases of TRALI are multiparous women who become alloimmunized during pregnancy. One notable case supporting the antibody mediated hypothesis describes a patient who underwent lung transplantation and developed dyspnea and hypoxia after receiving a transfusion of two units of packed ...
talk , contribs)‎ . . (4,715 bytes) (+12)‎ . . (/* Lung Protective FiO2 and PEEP ScaleThe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. The Acute Respirat...) ...
This study was accepted to be presented for an award at the 25th Argentine Congress of Intensive Therapy. In December, 2015, this study received the "2015 Award for Best Scientific Study" from the Sanatorio Anchorena Teaching and Research Committee. Conflict of interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest associated with this publication. Bibliography 1. The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network. Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. N Engl J Med 2000; 342: 1301-1308. 2. Protti A, Cressoni M, Santini A, et al. Lung stress and strain during mechanical ventilation: any safe threshold? Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2011; 183: 1354-1362. 3. Brochard L, Rauss A, Benito S, et al. Comparison of three methods of gradual withdrawal from ventilatory support during weaning from mechanical ventilation. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 1994; 150: 896-903. 4. Esteban A, Frutos F, ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Validation of an electronic surveillance system for acute lung injury. AU - Herasevich, Vitaly. AU - Yilmaz, Murat. AU - Khan, Hasrat. AU - Hubmayr, Rolf D.. AU - Gajic, Ognjen. PY - 2009/6/1. Y1 - 2009/6/1. N2 - Objective: Early detection of acute lung injury (ALI) is essential for timely implementation of evidence-based therapies and enrollment into clinical trials. We aimed to determine the accuracy of computerized syndrome surveillance for detection of ALI in hospitalized patients and compare it with routine clinical assessment. Design: Using a near-real time copy of the electronic medical records, we developed and validated a custom ALI electronic alert (ALI "sniffer") based on the European-American Consensus Conference Definition and compared its performance against provider-derived documentation. Patients and setting: A total of 3,795 consecutive critically ill patients admitted to nine multidisciplinary intensive care units (ICUs) of a tertiary care teaching institution ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Neurogenic pulmonary edema. T2 - Another multiple-hit model of acute lung injury. AU - Gajic, Ognjen. AU - Manno, Edward M.. PY - 2007/8/1. Y1 - 2007/8/1. KW - Acute lung injury. KW - Complications. KW - Head injury. KW - Outcome assessment. KW - Pulmonary edema. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34547657611&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34547657611&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1097/01.CCM.0000277254.12230.7D. DO - 10.1097/01.CCM.0000277254.12230.7D. M3 - Editorial. C2 - 17667244. AN - SCOPUS:34547657611. VL - 35. SP - 1979. EP - 1980. JO - Critical Care Medicine. JF - Critical Care Medicine. SN - 0090-3493. IS - 8. ER - ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Functional genomic assessment of phosgene-induced acute lung injury in mice. AU - Leikauf, George D.. AU - Concel, Vincent J.. AU - Bein, Kiflai. AU - Liu, Pengyuan. AU - Berndt, Annerose. AU - Martin, Timothy M.. AU - Ganguly, Koustav. AU - Jang, An Soo. AU - Brant, Kelly A.. AU - Dopico, Richard A.. AU - Upadhyay, Swapna. AU - Cario, Clinton. AU - Peter Di, Y. P.. AU - Vuga, Louis J.. AU - Kostem, Emrah. AU - Eskin, Eleazar. AU - You, Ming. AU - Kaminski, Naftali. AU - Prows, Daniel R.. AU - Knoell, Daren L.. AU - Fabisiak, James P.. PY - 2013/9/1. Y1 - 2013/9/1. N2 - In this study, a genetically diverse panel of 43 mouse strains was exposed to phosgene and genome-wide association mapping performed using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assembly. Transcriptomic analysis was also used to improve the genetic resolution in the identification of genetic determinants of phosgene-induced acute lung injury (ALI). We prioritized the identified genes based on whether ...
Authors: Wang, Bing , Wu, Bin , Ran, Yan-Ni Article Type: Research Article Abstract: OBJECTIVE: This study aims to explore whether positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) guided by esophageal pressure is better than the acute respiratory distress syndrome network (ARDSNet) during the treatment of traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients. SUGGESTIONS: The use of the oxygenation method of inhaled oxygen concentration titration PEEP is suggested. METHODS: This study takes traumatic ARDS patients as the research object. The data of 23 patients were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the esophageal pressure titration PEEP group (n = …12), and the ARDSNet (PEEP-FiO 2 table) titration PEEP group (n = 11). All patients were given mechanical ventilation, and changes in oxygenation index, respiratory mechanics, hemodynamics and inflammatory reaction index were recorded when titrating the best PEEP with the two methods on the current day of ...
The overall aim of the present thesis was to study aspects of patient safety in critically ill patients with special focus on airway management, respiratory complications and nursing procedures. Study I describes a method called pharyngeal oxygen administration during intubation in an experimental acute lung injury model. The study showed that pharyngeal oxygenation prevented or considerably increased the time to life-threatening hypoxemia at shunt fractions by at least up to 25% and that this technique could be implemented in airway algorithms for the intubation of hypoxemic patients. In study II, we investigated short-term disconnection of the expiratory circuit from the ventilator during filter exchange in critically ill patients. We demonstrated that when using pressure modes in the ventilator, there was no indication of any significant deterioration in the patients lung function. A bench test suggests that this result is explained by auto-triggering with high inspiratory flows during the ...
Today we will be discussing TRALI, or transfusion-related acute lung injury. TRALI accounts for almost half of all transfusion-related fatalities in the United States.. Although several mechanisms exist, one of the major causes of TRALI is donor antibodies to white blood cells, such as human leukocyte antigen and human neutrophil antigen, or commonly referred to as HLA and HNA.. Dr. AuBuchon who wrote an editorial in TRANSFUSION comments:. "Blood collectors in the United States have taken steps over the last half-dozen years to reduce the risk of TRALI through plasma, and, in many cases, also apheresis platelets. This has primarily involved women who have previously been pregnant, either deferring the use of their plasma or testing them to identify those lacking HLA antibodies. These steps have resulted in a reduction of TRALI risk by about three-quarters.". Dr. Vandekerckhove and his colleagues in Belgium screened 77 male plateletpheresis donors with a history of transfusions and 942 female ...
Research outputs, collaborations and relationships for Acute Lung Injury (ALI) / Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) Center of Excellence, Pitt published between 1 June 2019 - 31 May 2020 as tracked by the Nature Index.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Simvastatin attenuates vascular leak and inflammation in murine inflammatory lung injury. AU - Jacobson, Jeffrey R.. AU - Barnard, Joseph W.. AU - Grigoryev, Dmitry N.. AU - Ma, Shwu Fan. AU - Tuder, Rubin M.. AU - Garcia, Joe G N. PY - 2005/6. Y1 - 2005/6. N2 - Therapies to limit the life-threatening vascular leak observed in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) are currently lacking. We explored the effect of simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor that mediates endothelial cell barrier protection in vitro, in a murine inflammatory model of ALL C57BL/6J mice were treated with simvastatin (5 or 20 mg/kg body wt via intraperitoneal injection) 24 h before and again concomitantly with intratracheally administered LPS (2 μg/g body wt). Inflammatory indexes [bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) myeloperoxidase activity and total neutrophil counts assessed at 24 h with histological confirmation] were markedly increased after LPS alone but significantly ...
Acute lung injury (ALI) is a prevalent and devastating condition in the intensive care unit. Although pulmonary artery catheters (PAC) provide clinicians with important data about a patients haemodynamic status, doubts about their clinical benefit and worries about safety have raised questions about their usefulness. This study was designed to address this issue, with 1000 patients recruited in 20 North American centres. Patients were recruited after being diagnosed with ALI and were managed haemodynamically according to a standardised management protocol. 513 patients were randomised to have a PAC and 487 to have a standard central venous catheter (CVC).. Both the PAC and CVC groups had similar rates of death during the first 60 days (27.4% and 26.3% respectively, p = 0.69). Mean (SE) ventilator-free days were also similar (13.2 (0.5) and 13.5 (0.5), p = 0.58), as were the number of days not spent in the intensive care unit up to day 28 (12.0 (0.4) and 12.5 (0.5), p = 0.40). Using a PAC did ...
Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life threatening respiratory failure due to lung injury from a variety of precipitants. Pathologically ARDS is characterised by diffuse alveolar damage, alveolar capillary leakage, and protein rich pulmonary oedema leading to the clinical manifestation of poor lung compliance, severe hypoxaemia, and bilateral infiltrates on chest radiograph. Several aetiological factors associated with the development of ARDS are identified with sepsis, pneumonia, and trauma with multiple transfusions accounting for most cases. Despite the absence of a robust diagnostic definition, extensive epidemiological investigations suggest ARDS remains a significant health burden with substantial morbidity and mortality. Improvements in outcome following ARDS over the past decade are in part due to improved strategies of mechanical ventilation and advanced support of other failing organs. Optimal treatment involves judicious fluid management, protective lung ventilation with ...
The Acute Lung Injury (ALI) Center of Excellence, under the direction of Rama Mallampalli, MD, is focused on the investigation of fundamental mechanisms underlying the development and repair of lung injury, and the translational and clinical implications. The program utilizes state-of-the-art tools in molecular, biochemical, translational, and clinical investigation. Investigators within the Center are supported by the National Institutes of Health through 12 R01 grants and a Program Project Grant, by the Department of Veterans Affairs with two VA Merit awards, and by several philanthropic societies through seven investigator-initiated grant awards. Collaborative interactions exist with investigators in the Departments of Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine, Environmental and Occupational Health, Pathology, and Surgery. In addition to cutting-edge basic and translational science, investigators in the Center are currently establishing and participating in clinical trials with mesenchymal stem ...
Severe trauma, caused by flame burn and smoke (B + S) inhalation induces acute lung injury (ALI) and results in the loss of pulmonary function. A cascade of molecular and cellular events initiates the formation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that in turn drives an inflammatory response and consequently cell death through hyper-activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1). The purpose of this study was to investigate and counteract pulmonary dysfunction associated with nitrosative stress generated after B + S inhalation injury in an ovine and murine model of ALI. \r\nIn our time course experiment, sheep were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 hours post B + S injury. From 4 through 24 hours, there was a progressive increase in airway obstruction and lung edema formation. Furthermore, injury was associated with increased ROS/RNS generation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and neutrophil accumulation. Additionally, PARP-1 enzymatic activity increased in parallel with ...
Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans and animals. In traditional and modern medicines, Nigella sativa extract, thymoquinone (TQ) has several benefits. Here, we examined the counter effects of TQ in ALI induced by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Tissue sections and serum samples were collected from the following groups of rats: i) none treated control, ii) TQ only, iii) intratracheally (I.T) installed with LPS 200 µg/rat once, iv) TQ protected received intraperitoneally (I.P) 1 mg/rat for one week. Samples were subjected to histopathology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and electron microscopy. TQ-treated rats revealed reduction in peribronchial, perivascular and interstitial inflammatory edema, thickening of interalveolar septa, inflammatory exudates in the lumens of airways and alveoli, hypertrophied smooth muscles of pulmonary blood vessels and airways and hyperplasia of bronchial associated lymphoid tissue (BALT). Electron microscopy revealed highly activated
In this study, we designed and synthesized 48 CAPE derivatives and evaluated their anti-inflammatory activities in mouse primary peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) activated by LPS. The most active compound, 10s, was found to bind with MD2 with high affinity, which prevented formation of the LPS/MD2/TLR4 complex. The binding mode of 10s revealed that the major interactions with MD2 were established via two key hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, 10s showed remarkable protective effects against LPS-caused ALI (acute lung injury) in vivo ...
Albumin and furosemide therapy improves fluid balance, oxygenation, and hemodynamics in hypoproteinemic patients with acute lung injury. Determining the effect of this simple therapy on cost, outcomes, and other patient populations requires further study.
Scientists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham shed new light on mechanisms of acute lung injury in a paper published December 2012 o...
Hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (HALI) is a key contributor to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in neonates, for which no specific preventive or therapeutic agent is available. Here we show that lung micro-RNA (miR)-34a levels are significantly increased in lungs of neonatal mice exposed to hyperoxia. Deletion or inhibition of miR-34a improves the pulmonary phenotype and BPD-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in BPD mouse models, which, conversely, is worsened by miR-34a overexpression. Administration of angiopoietin-1, which is one of the downstream targets of miR34a, is able to ameliorate the BPD pulmonary and PAH phenotypes. Using three independent cohorts of human samples, we show that miR-34a expression is increased in type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in neonates with respiratory distress syndrome and BPD. Our data suggest that pharmacologic miR-34a inhibition may be a therapeutic option to prevent or ameliorate HALI/BPD in neonates.
Transfusion-associated acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome that is similar to Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), ... "Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives". Korean Journal of Anaesthesiology. 68 (2): 101-105. doi:10.4097/ ... Acute hemolytic reactions are defined according to Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) as "fever and other symptoms/signs of ... Kidney injury may occur because of the effects of the hemolytic reaction (pigment nephropathy).[29] The severity of the ...
Acute lung injury may also cause pulmonary edema through injury to the vasculature and parenchyma of the lung. Acute lung ... Transfusion associated Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) is a specific type of blood-product transfusion injury that occurs when the ... Lower RT/lung disease. (including LRTIs). Bronchial/. obstructive. acute. Acute bronchitis. chronic. COPD Chronic bronchitis. ... "Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI)". Professional Education. 2016-06-17. Retrieved 2016-12-03.. ...
A 2006 Awake! highlighted dangers from transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).[94] ... Heart-Lung Machine, a method in which blood is diverted to an artificial heart-lung machine and directed back into the patient. ...
"Female Plasma May Not Increase Risk for Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury". Medscape. October 23, 2007. Retrieved 2011-07- ... because of concerns about transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and female donors who may have higher leukocyte ...
Neutrophils also play a key role in the development of most forms of acute lung injury. Here, activated neutrophils release the ... Experiments have shown that a reduction in the number of neutrophils lessens the effects of acute lung injury, but treatment by ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) Abraham E (April 2003). "Neutrophils and acute lung injury". Crit. Care Med. 31 ... "Neutrophil activation and acute lung injury". Curr Opin Crit Care. 7 (1): 1-7. doi:10.1097/00075198-200102000-00001. PMID ...
... transfusion-related acute lung injury donor strategies and the impact on the onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury: a ... "Pathogenesis of non-antibody mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury from bench to bedside". Blood Reviews. 29 (1): 51- ... "Antibody-mediated transfusion-related acute lung injury; from discovery to prevention". British Journal of Haematology. 170 (5 ... infections through better skin cleansing procedures and the incidence of life-threatening transfusion-related acute lung injury ...
This gaseous product can cause acute lung injury. Chronic exposure, for example, from the air at swimming pools where chlorine ...
... the definition of acute lung injury), or. *arterial partial-pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) , 65 torr (20 mmHg) over ... Lungs: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (PaO2/FiO2 ratio, 300), different ratio in pediatric acute respiratory ... Increased permeability of the lung vessels causes leaking of fluids into alveoli, which results in pulmonary edema and acute ... Starches also carry an increased risk of acute kidney injury,[53][54] and need for blood transfusion.[55][56] Various colloid ...
A 2006 Awake! highlighted dangers from transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Opposition to the Watch Tower doctrines ... Heart-Lung Machine, a method in which blood is diverted to an artificial heart-lung machine and directed back into the patient ...
... especially in the context of ARDS and acute lung injury. This is commonly referred to as lung protective ventilation. There are ... Krishnan JA, Brower RG (2000). "High-frequency ventilation for acute lung injury and ARDS". Chest. 118 (3): 795-807. doi: ... Jet ventilation has been shown to reduce ventilator induced lung injury by as much as 20%. Usage of high frequency jet ... High frequency ventilation is thought to reduce ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), ...
Kawabata K, Hagio T, Matsuoka S (September 2002). "The role of neutrophil elastase in acute lung injury". European Journal of ... Moraes TJ, Chow CW, Downey GP (April 2003). "Proteases and lung injury". Critical Care Medicine. 31 (4 Suppl): S189-94. doi: ... acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cystic fibrosis. A recent study shows that patients with CTSG gene polymorphisms have ... ischemic reperfusion injury, and bone metastasis. It is also implicated in a variety of infectious inflammatory diseases, ...
The presence of this virus in acute lung injury and exacerbations of idiopathic lung fibrosis has been reported. Increased ... Viral infection in acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. Maggi F, Pifferi M, ...
Brochard LJ (November 2009). "Tidal volume during acute lung injury: let the patient choose?". Intensive Care Medicine. 35 (11 ... As a result, the pressure in the airway drops, causing an inflow of air into the lungs. With NAVA, the electrical activity of ... Del Sorbo L, Slutsky AS (February 2010). "Ventilatory support for acute respiratory failure: new and ongoing pathophysiological ... March 2010). "Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist increases respiratory variability and complexity in acute respiratory ...
Ventilator-associated lung injury - Ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) refers to acute lung injury that occurs during ... Ventilation with lower Tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute respiratory ... One of the primary complications that presents in patients mechanically ventilated is acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory ... It is clinically indistinguishable from acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). Diaphragm - ...
"Angiotensin II and the fibroproliferative response to acute lung injury". Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. Royal Free and ... Marshall and co-workers also found that angiotensin II was associated with cytokine-mediated lung injury and suggested a role ... If a cytokine storm occurs in the lungs, for example, fluids and immune cells such as macrophages may accumulate and eventually ... Wang and co-workers published data that cytokine-mediated pulmonary damage (apoptosis of lung epithelial cells) in response to ...
He X, Han B, Liu M (2007). "Long pentraxin 3 in pulmonary infection and acute lung injury". Am. J. Physiol. Lung Cell Mol. ... PTX3 behaves as an acute phase response protein, as the blood levels of PTX3, low in normal conditions (about 25 ng/mL in the ... Lee GW, Goodman AR, Lee TH, Vilcek J (1994). "Relationship of TSG-14 protein to the pentraxin family of major acute phase ... is a novel member of the pentaxin family of acute phase proteins". J. Immunol. 150 (5): 1804-12. PMID 7679696. Alles VV, ...
Workers may develop acute and/or chronic lung disease, musculoskeletal injuries, and may catch ( zoonotic) infections from the ...
... "acute lung injury" or ALI, as the term was commonly being misused to characterize a less severe degree of lung injury. Instead ... acute. Acute bronchitis. chronic. COPD Chronic bronchitis. Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Acute exacerbation of ... "Acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome in the injured patient". Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, ... acute lung injury, and acute respiratory distress syndrome: time for a reevaluation". Critical Care Medicine. 28 (1): 232-235. ...
The National Certification Corporation Cheifetz IM (2011). "Management of acute lung injury: sharing data between adults and ... They practice in acute care facilities, long-term acute care facilities, skilled nursing facilities, assisted-living centers, ... Scientific research also takes place to look for causes and possible treatment in diseases such as asthma and lung cancer. The ... Outpatient clinical practice Respiratory therapists are also primary clinicians in conducting tests to measure lung function ...
"Platelets induce neutrophil extracellular traps in transfusion-related acute lung injury". The Journal of Clinical ... specifically in the lung capillaries and liver sinusoids). Intra-vascular NET formation is tightly controlled and is regulated ... in flow chambers in vitro and intravital microscopy demonstrated that bacterial trapping occurs in the liver sinusoids and lung ...
His initial research focused on animal models of acute lung injury. Montaner initially planned on returning to Argentina after ... Montaner, J.G.; Russel, J.; Lawson, L.; Ruedy, J. (1989). "Acute Respiratory Failure Secondary to Pneumocystis Carinii ...
"Endogenous sulfur dioxide protects against oleic acid-induced acute lung injury in association with inhibition of oxidative ... oxidative stress and inflammation during an experimental lung damage. Conversely, a successful lung damage caused a significant ... It was shown that endogenous sulfur dioxide plays a role in diminishing an experimental lung damage caused by oleic acid. ... Moreover, blockade of an enzyme that produces endogenous SO2 significantly increased the amount of lung tissue damage in the ...
In the case of non-allergic acute lung injury, standard or recommended approaches to treatment have not been defined. The ... "Chemical Pneumonitis and Acute Lung Injury Caused by Inhalation of Nickel Fumes". Internal Medicine. 50 (18): 2035-8. doi: ... Patients may present with wheezing or crackles in the lungs. They typically have an increased white blood cell count, and urine ... When respiratory symptoms are prominent, metal fume fever may be confused with acute bronchitis or pneumonia. The diagnosis is ...
TACO and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) are often difficult to distinguish in the acute situation. TACO is ... "Distinguishing between transfusion related acute lung injury and transfusion associated circulatory overload". Current Opinion ... Transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload by M. A. Popovsky. Skeate, Robert C; ... These draft criteria are: acute onset or worsening respiratory distress during or up to 12 hours after transfusion, plus two or ...
2005). "Phosphodiesterase 2 inhibition diminished acute lung injury in murine pneumococcal pneumonia". Critical Care Medicine. ...
Acute graft-versus-host disease typically occurs in the first 3 months after transplantation and may involve the skin, ... Severe liver injury can result from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD). Elevated levels of bilirubin, hepatomegaly and fluid ... The injury of the mucosal lining of the mouth and throat is a common regimen-related toxicity following ablative HSCT regimens ... However, it is less effective in rapidly growing acute leukemias.[38] If cancer relapses after HSCT, another transplant can be ...
HISTOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF ACUTE LUNG INJURY. Areas of cell infiltration and oedema were taken as an indication of acute lung ... acute lung injury. Bleomycin-induced lung injury in rats is a common experimental model used to examine inflammatory and ... on experimental bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rats.. METHODS Bleomycin-induced lung injury was assessed by light ... Bleomycin (BLM) often induces interstitial lung fibrosis following acute lung injury. A study was undertaken to investigate the ...
De Backer D, Creteur J, Zhang H, Norrenberg M, Vincent J: Lactate production by the lungs in acute lung injury. Am J Respir ... Acute lung injury is characterized by impaired gas exchange caused by maldistribution of ventilation:perfusion ratios. The ... In the current article, we report the use of almitrine in 25 consecutive patients with acute lung injury (ALI). Almitrine was ... Intravenous Almitrine Bismesylate Reversibly Induces Lactic Acidosis and Hepatic Dysfunction in Patients with Acute Lung Injury ...
Functional genomic assessment of phosgene-induced acute lung injury in mice. George D. Leikauf, Vincent J. Concel, Kiflai Bein ... Functional genomic assessment of phosgene-induced acute lung injury in mice. / Leikauf, George D.; Concel, Vincent J.; Bein, ... Functional genomic assessment of phosgene-induced acute lung injury in mice. American journal of respiratory cell and molecular ... title = "Functional genomic assessment of phosgene-induced acute lung injury in mice", ...
Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury. In: American journal of ... Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury. American journal of ... Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury. / Ueno, Hiroshi; Matsuda, ... title = "Contributions of high mobility group box protein in experimental and clinical acute lung injury", ...
Acute Lung Injury Treatment Market is expected to grow healthy rate in near future; Acute lung injury is observed as a part of ... Acute Lung Injury Treatment Market report presents a detailed overview of the present scope of growth for companies operating; ... systemic inflammatory process wherein the lung manifests symptoms similar to other tissues such as destruction in capillary ... Global Acute Lung Injury Market: Snapshot. Acute lung injury, a common condition characterized by acute severe hypoxia without ...
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the incidence ... This book provides an overview of acute lung injury and repair, describes current animal models to study lung injury and ... Bacterial infections Hyperoxia LPS and bacterial pneumonia Transfusion-related acute lung injury Ventilator-induced lung injury ... Acute Lung Injury and Repair: Scientific Fundamentals and Methods is a useful resource for physicians and scientists who are ...
... reperfusion injury or acute lung injury (ALI) [1].. ALI and its more severe form acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are ... M. Cepkova and M. A. Matthay, "Pharmacotherapy of acute lung injury and the acute respiratory distress syndrome," Journal of ... One pathological hallmark of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome is the uncontrolled transmigration of ... "Sequential recruitment of neutrophils into lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in LPS-induced acute lung injury," American ...
Clinical acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients. There is ... Cytokine-mediated inflammation in acute lung injury.. Goodman RB1, Pugin J, Lee JS, Matthay MA. ... and anti-inflammatory cytokines play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory-induced lung injury from sepsis, ... A recent multi-center clinical trial found that a lung-protective ventilatory strategy reduces mortality by 22% in patients ...
Studies were searched in PUBMED by using the terms "extravascular lung water" (EVLW) and "acute lung injury" (ALI) or "acute ... Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury. Ritesh Maharaj. Division of Intensive Care Medicine, Kings College Hospital, ... F. Michard, V. Zarka, S. Alaya, S. Sakka, and M. Klein, "Better characterization of acute lung injury/ARDS using lung water," ... Both experimental and clinical studies were searched in PUBMED using the term "extravascular lung water" and "acute lung injury ...
Alternatives to animal research in acute lung injury BMJ 2014; 349 :g4171 ... Alternatives to animal research in acute lung injury. BMJ 2014; 349 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.g4171 (Published 10 July ...
Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) has been an upcoming cause of transfusion related mortality. It is characterized ... Acute Kidney Injury : Acute Liver Injury. 1419 Words , 6 Pages * Blood Transfusion And Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury. ... Acute Treatment Of Acute Kidney Injury. 967 Words , 4 Pages Acute kidney injury (AKI, previously referred to as acute renal ... Acute Kidney Injury : Acute Liver Injury. 1419 Words , 6 Pages Prerenal Acute Kidney Injury Pathophysiology The human body has ...
Studies of HPA axis activation and the role of relative adrenal insufficiency on the outcome of patients with acute lung injury ... relative adrenal insufficiency in patients with acute lung injury/ARDS is unknown. It is also unclear whether such a response, ... The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institutes ARDS Network currently is testing the use of methylprednisolone in late ARDS. ... Previous Document: Mechanisms of pulmonary edema clearance during acute hypoxemic respiratory failure: role of the Na,K.... ...
NIOSH-Author; Toxic-effects; Laboratory-animals; Leather-finishing; Chemical-composition; Fluorocarbons; Lung-disease; ...
Find facts about lung diseases, such as lung cancer, COPD, asthma. ... Learn how to improve your lung health. Make efforts towards clean air and smokefree living. ... What is LUNG FORCE?. LUNG FORCE unites women and their loved ones across the country to stand together in the fight against ... American Lung Association , 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872)1-800-LUNGUSA , Submit A Question , Live Chat ...
... has shown that adult stem cells from bone marrow can help treat acute lung injury. Acute lung ... Acute lung injury? Stem cell therapy may help - Oct 30, 2009. *Bone marrow stem-cell therapy could treat acute lung injury: ... Acute lung injury (ALI) can be caused by any major inflammation or injury to the lungs and is a major cause of death in ... Tags: acute lung injury, adult stem cells, air sacs, blood vessels, bone marrow, cause of death, cd34, cell population, chicago ...
Acute Lung Injury. Lung Injury. Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract Diseases. Respiration Disorders. Infant, Premature, Diseases. ... Critical Illness Sleep Acute Lung Injury Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Drug: Dexmedetomidine Drug: Midazolam and Fentanyl ... Critically ill patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) who receive mechanical ... on sleep and inflammation in critically ill patients with Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Disorder Syndrome (ALI/ARDS ...
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... associated acute lung injury (ALI) accounts for about 70% mortality of SAP patients. However, there are no precise biomarkers ... Gamma-enolase predicts lung damage in severe acute pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury. ... Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) associated acute lung injury (ALI) accounts for about 70% mortality of SAP patients. However, ... Severe acute pancreatitis-induced acute lung injury Alpha-enolase Gamma-enolase Sprague-Dawley rats ...
Reduction of the edema of acute hyperoxic lung injury by granulocyte depletion.. Shasby DM, Fox RB, Harada RN, Repine JE. ... Increased numbers of granulocytes are found in lungs acutely injured by hyperoxia, but their contribution to lung injury ... exposure to hyperoxia for 72 h resulted in fewer granulocytes in lung lavages and less edematous lung injury. In contrast, when ... increased numbers of granulocytes were found in lung lavages and the degree of edematous lung injury increased to levels not ...
Acute lung injury Open lung strategy Ventilation-induced lung injury This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check ... Krishnan, JA, Brower, RG 2000High-frequency ventilation for acute lung injury and ARDSChest118795807PubMedCrossRefGoogle ... Network2000Ventilation with lower tidal volumes as compared with traditional tidal volumes for acute lung injury and the acute ... Cardiovascular responses to high-frequency oscillatory ventilation during acute lung injury in sheep. ...
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2004 Jan;286(1):L156-64. Epub 2003 May 16. Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt ... Angiotensin II and the fibroproliferative response to acute lung injury.. Marshall RP1, Gohlke P, Chambers RC, Howell DC, ... After bleomycin-induced lung injury, an increase in lung ANG II concentration was observed by day 3 that preceded increases in ... We hypothesized that, after lung injury, ANG II would stimulate fibroblast procollagen synthesis and promote lung collagen ...
Wounds and Injuries. Lung Injury. Acute Lung Injury. Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult. Lung Diseases. Respiratory Tract ... Acute Lung Injury After Aortic Valve Surgery. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the ... The purpose of this prospective, randomized clinical trial is to understand and measure lung injuries caused by CPB in aortic ... Is there any correlation between oxyhaemodynamic parameters and lung injury degree?. *Is there any correlation between ...
Caloric restriction failed to improve outcomes in ventilator-dependent patients with acute lung injury, results of an NIH- ... The findings came from the Early Versus Delayed Enteral Feeding to Treat People with Acute Lung Injury or Acute Respiratory ... The EDEN Study involved 1,000 adults with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress requiring ventilator support. ... Source Reference: Rice TW, et al "Initial trophic vs full enteral feeding in patients with acute lung injury. The EDEN ...
Adult stem cells from bone marrow can help treat acute lung injury, a new mice study by researchers at the University of ... Acute lung injury (ALI) can be caused by any major inflammation or injury to the lungs and is a major cause of death in ... Adult stem cells from bone marrow can help treat acute lung injury, a new mice study by researchers at the University of ... The researchers hope to explore the possibility of using stem cell therapy in human acute lung injury. Their results are ...
The association between body mass index and clinical outcomes in acute lung injury.. Morris AE1, Stapleton RD, Rubenfeld GD, ... was to determine the association between BMI and outcomes in a population-based cohort of patients with acute lung injury (ALI ...
  • 50% of the total lung surface, as judged by four independent, blinded observers by chest roentgenography and computed tomographic assessment of parenchymal consolidation. (asahq.org)
  • This study aimed to investigate how the pulmonary microcirculation is distorted in sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and reveal the underlying cellular pathophysiologic mechanism. (ersjournals.com)
  • Acute lung injury is a part of the systemic inflammatory process where the lung demonstrates symptoms similar to other tissues such as extravascation of protein rich fluid, destruction in capillary endothelium, and interstitial edema. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Bleomycin (BLM) often induces interstitial lung fibrosis following acute lung injury. (bmj.com)
  • The acronym chILD is used for this group of diseases and is derived from the English name, Children's Interstitial Lung Diseases - chILD. (wikipedia.org)
  • Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is interstitial lung disease for which no obvious cause can be identified (idiopathic), and is associated with typical findings both radiographic (basal and pleural based fibrosis with honeycombing) and pathologic (temporally and spatially heterogeneous fibrosis, histopathologic honeycombing and fibroblastic foci). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2013 interstitial lung disease affected 595,000 people globally. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interstitial lung diseases can be classified according to radiologic patterns. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data from experimental studies suggest that EVLW on chest radiography may only be detectable when the lung water increases by more than 35% [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • In the present study, Praeruptorin A, C, D and E (PA, PC, PD and PE), four pyranocoumarins extracted from this herb, have been investigated for the pharmacological effects in experimental lung injury mouse models. (nih.gov)
  • 2014. Protective effects of melatonin and quercetin on experimental lung injury induced by carbon tetrachloride in rats. (springer.com)
  • Experimental Lung Research 40 (2): 59-65. (springer.com)
  • Furthermore, there is experimental evidence that lung vascular permeability increases after short-term exposure to IL-1 protein, although the exact mechanism is unknown. (nih.gov)
  • A study was undertaken to investigate the effects of erythromycin (EM) on experimental bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in rats. (bmj.com)
  • Bleomycin-induced lung injury in rats is a common experimental model used to examine inflammatory and fibrotic changes in the lung interstitium. (bmj.com)
  • The experimental nature of these studies poses great difficulty to the extrapolation of the results to humans, and the demonstration of the alterations or injury, if any, caused by the ventilator to normal human lung presents significant methodological difficulties. (ersjournals.com)
  • Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, has been generally used in an experimental lung injury model [ 4 , 5 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Washington, Oct 29 (ANI): A new study in mice, conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, has shown that adult stem cells from bone marrow can help treat acute lung injury. (thaindian.com)
  • Praeruptorin D and E attenuate lipopolysaccharide/hydrochloric acid induced acute lung injury in mice. (nih.gov)
  • In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged mice, PA and PC did not show protective effect against lung injury at the dose of 80 mg/kg. (nih.gov)
  • We also extended our study to acid-induced acute lung injury and found that these two compounds protected mice from hydrochloric acid (HCl)-induced lung injury by inhibiting PMNs influx, IL-6 release and protein exudation. (nih.gov)
  • The agent was significantly activated ex vivo in lung sections from ALI but not from control mice, and this activation was ablated by the specific inhibitor sivelestat. (hindawi.com)
  • Treatment with the specific inhibitor sivelestat significantly reduced lung signal in mice with ALI. (hindawi.com)
  • All experiments had appropriate controls such as MVs isolated from the BALF from mice without injury or the supernatant from the washing steps during the isolation of the MVs as well as low and high doses of LPS to ensure the inflammatory response was specific to the MVs, not contaminants. (bmj.com)
  • B and C, Extravascular plasma equivalents (EPE) ( μ L) and excess lung water (ELW) ( μ L) were measured in mouse lung after recombinant adenovirus (2.5×10 8 plaque-forming units) expressing human IL-1 β (Ad-hIL-1 β ), control adenovirus, or PBS was instilled intratracheally into wild-type mice (C57BL/6J). (nih.gov)
  • In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of artesunate on LPS-induced lung injury in mice. (springer.com)
  • Here, we profiled the response to VILI in mice with genetic deletions of each of the 4 adenosine receptors (ARs) and found that deletion of the A2BAR gene was specifically associated with reduced survival time and increased pulmonary albumin leakage after injury. (jci.org)
  • This study was conducted to determine whether delivery to the lungs, initially via the intratracheal (IT) route of administration, would deliver efficacious levels of a recombinant AAT (rAAT) to the site of action in the lungs in mice. (hindawi.com)
  • We investigated the mechanisms involved in the effect of anti-IL17 in a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. (frontiersin.org)
  • Priming mice with LPS restored lung injury with mAb challenge. (jci.org)
  • The effects of S -ethyl cysteine (SEC) and S -methyl cysteine (SMC) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in mice were examined. (mdpi.com)
  • The present study was conducted to examine whether heat-processed Scutellariae Radix has an ameliorative effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury in mice. (hindawi.com)
  • Another 2012 study found similar anti-inflammatory effects from an even smaller dose of CBD when treating acute pancreatitis in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • This sort of research has been of particular benefit to premature newborns, for whom treatment for underdeveloped lungs (and associated complications) is often a matter of life and death. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cellular impairments lead to increased susceptibility to the serious complications from lung disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute liver failure is the appearance of severe complications rapidly after the first signs of liver disease (such as jaundice), and indicates that the liver has sustained severe damage (loss of function of 80-90% of liver cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • Immunoglobulin therapy is also used in some treatment protocols for secondary immunodeficiencies such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), some autoimmune disorders (such as immune thrombocytopenia and Kawasaki disease), some neurological diseases (multifocal motor neuropathy, stiff person syndrome, multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis) some acute infections and some complications of organ transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Complications that can occur in the short and long term after injury include muscle atrophy, pressure sores, infections, and respiratory problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polyclonal antibody to rat C5a was used to define the requirements for C5a in neutrophil-dependent inflammatory lung injury after systemic activation of complement by cobra venom factor (CVF) or after intrapulmonary deposition of IgG immune complexes. (jci.org)
  • We developed a neutrophil elastase-specific near-infrared fluorescence imaging agent, which, combined with fluorescence molecular tomographic imaging, allowed us to detect and quantify neutrophil elastase activity in vivo , in real time, and noninvasively in an acute model of lung injury (ALI). (hindawi.com)
  • The wild type protein is a major elastase inhibitor within the lung [ 2 ], where its primary physiological role is to inhibit neutrophil elastase (NE) [ 3 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The accompanying AAT plasma deficiency leaves the lungs exposed to neutrophil elastase, resulting in premature emphysema [ 7 ], which can be relieved by IV infusion of human plasma-derived AAT [ 8 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • CONCLUSION Erythromycin exhibits a prophylactic effect on acute lung injury induced by intratracheal administration of bleomycin, which is possibly associated with a downregulation of neutrophil-derived elastase. (bmj.com)
  • LPS increased lung myeloperoxidase activity, neutrophil counts and edema. (mdpi.com)
  • The results showed that ILG significantly inhibited LPS-induced lung histopathological changes and the MPO activity. (springer.com)
  • Silicosis is a lung disease caused by inhalation of crystalline free silica dust. (medindia.net)
  • 2004. Pathophysiology of acute lung injury in combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. (springer.com)
  • Administration of AAT by inhalation rather than by the IV route is a potential alternative means of therapy that may reduce the dose required for efficacy while improving the convenience of treatment, because it would capitalize on the enormous surface area of the lung as a potential absorptive surface through which AAT could gain access to the pulmonary interstitium. (hindawi.com)
  • IRV is a strategy (method or style) of ventilating the lungs in such a way that the amount of time the lungs are in inhalation is greater than the amount of time they are in exhalation, allowing for a constant inflation of the lungs, ensuring they remain "recruited" (meaning they participate in gas exchange and are not allowed to deflate to get stuck together or tighten up). (wikipedia.org)
  • Tidal volume (symbol VT or TV) is the lung volume representing the normal volume of air displaced between normal inhalation and exhalation when extra effort is not applied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute inhalation injury may result from frequent and widespread use of household cleaning agents and industrial gases (including chlorine and ammonia). (wikipedia.org)
  • The airways and lungs receive continuous first-pass exposure to non-toxic and irritant or toxic gases via inhalation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The September 11 attacks in 2001 and forest fires in U.S. states such as California and Nevada are examples of incidents that have caused smoke inhalation injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polymer fume fever or fluoropolymer fever, also informally called Teflon flu, is an inhalation fever caused by the fumes released when polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, known under the trade name Teflon) reaches temperatures of 300 °C (572 °F) to 450 °C (842 °F). When PTFE is heated above 450 °C the pyrolysis products are different and inhalation may cause acute lung injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • While alpha-enolase was universally expressed, gamma-enolase was expressed only in damaged lung tissues. (springer.com)
  • Gamma-enolase was detected in lung tissues, BALF, and serum as early as 3 h post-surgery when physical pathological damage was not apparent. (springer.com)
  • Meanwhile, it attenuated the wet/dry (W/D) ratio in the lung tissues. (springer.com)
  • Arterial blood, pancreas, lung, and intestinal tissues were collected for detecting the inflammatory factors and histopathology. (hindawi.com)
  • While it was originally proposed that NETs would be formed in tissues at a site of bacterial/yeast infection, NETs have also been shown to form within blood vessels during sepsis (specifically in the lung capillaries and liver sinusoids). (wikipedia.org)
  • The lung is the main site of SFTPA2 synthesis, but SFTPA2 mRNA expression has also been detected in the trachea, prostate, pancreas, thymus, colon, eye, salivary gland and other tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • In medicine, it refers to excess oxygen in the lungs or other body tissues, which can be caused by breathing air or oxygen at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to infection causes injury to its own tissues and organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Participation of autophagy in lung ischemia-reperfusion injury in vivo," Journal of Surgical Research , vol. 182, no. 2, pp. e79-e87, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and impaired physical function after hospital discharge, but the longitudinal epidemiology and risk factors for these conditions have not been fully evaluated. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Survivors of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI) and other critical illnesses frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and impaired physical functioning, with associated decrements in quality of life ( 1 - 9 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Symptoms seen in acute lung injury include severe shortness of breath, confusion, low blood pressure, and extreme tiredness. (emailwire.com)
  • Venesection is used in severe secondary polycythemia (because of hypoxia), which improves symptoms though survival rate has not been proven to increase.Finally, transplantation of single/double lung in extreme cases of cor pulmonale is also an option. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a type of acute coronary syndrome, which describes a sudden or short-term change in symptoms related to blood flow to the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • The antigen-antibody reaction activates neutrophils in the lung microcirculation, releasing oxidases and proteases that damage blood vessels and make them leak. (transfusion.com.au)