Digoxin: A cardiotonic glycoside obtained mainly from Digitalis lanata; it consists of three sugars and the aglycone DIGOXIGENIN. Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in ATRIAL FIBRILLATION and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p666)Digitoxin: A cardiac glycoside sometimes used in place of DIGOXIN. It has a longer half-life than digoxin; toxic effects, which are similar to those of digoxin, are longer lasting. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p665)Cardenolides: C(23)-steroids with methyl groups at C-10 and C-13 and a five-membered lactone at C-17. They are aglycone constituents of CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES and must have at least one double bond in the molecule. The class includes cardadienolides and cardatrienolides. Members include DIGITOXIN and DIGOXIN and their derivatives and the STROPHANTHINS.Cardiotonic Agents: Agents that have a strengthening effect on the heart or that can increase cardiac output. They may be CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES; SYMPATHOMIMETICS; or other drugs. They are used after MYOCARDIAL INFARCT; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES; in SHOCK; or in congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Cardiac Glycosides: Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 5- or 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. Plants they come from have long been used in congestive heart failure. They increase the force of cardiac contraction without significantly affecting other parameters, but are very toxic at larger doses. Their mechanism of action usually involves inhibition of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE and they are often used in cell biological studies for that purpose.Medigoxin: A semisynthetic digitalis glycoside with the general properties of DIGOXIN but more rapid onset of action. Its cardiotonic action is prolonged by its demethylation to DIGOXIN in the liver. It has been used in the treatment of congestive heart failure (HEART FAILURE).Eleutherococcus: A plant genus in the family ARALIACEAE, order Apiales, subclass Rosidae. It is best known as an adaptogen and a substitute for PANAX GINSENG.Nerium: A plant genus of the family APOCYNACEAE. It is a very poisonous plant that contains cardioactive agents.Digitalis Glycosides: Glycosides from plants of the genus DIGITALIS. Some of these are useful as cardiotonic and anti-arrhythmia agents. Included also are semi-synthetic derivatives of the naturally occurring glycosides. The term has sometimes been used more broadly to include all CARDIAC GLYCOSIDES, but here is restricted to those related to Digitalis.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Drug Interactions: The action of a drug that may affect the activity, metabolism, or toxicity of another drug.Ouabain: A cardioactive glycoside consisting of rhamnose and ouabagenin, obtained from the seeds of Strophanthus gratus and other plants of the Apocynaceae; used like DIGITALIS. It is commonly used in cell biological studies as an inhibitor of the NA(+)-K(+)-EXCHANGING ATPASE.Radioimmunoassay: Classic quantitative assay for detection of antigen-antibody reactions using a radioactively labeled substance (radioligand) either directly or indirectly to measure the binding of the unlabeled substance to a specific antibody or other receptor system. Non-immunogenic substances (e.g., haptens) can be measured if coupled to larger carrier proteins (e.g., bovine gamma-globulin or human serum albumin) capable of inducing antibody formation.P-Glycoprotein: A 170-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein from the superfamily of ATP-BINDING CASSETTE TRANSPORTERS. It serves as an ATP-dependent efflux pump for a variety of chemicals, including many ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS. Overexpression of this glycoprotein is associated with multidrug resistance (see DRUG RESISTANCE, MULTIPLE).Heart Failure: A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Digitalis: A genus of toxic herbaceous Eurasian plants of the Plantaginaceae which yield cardiotonic DIGITALIS GLYCOSIDES. The most useful species are Digitalis lanata and D. purpurea.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Cardiomyopathy, Dilated: A form of CARDIAC MUSCLE disease that is characterized by ventricular dilation, VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION, and HEART FAILURE. Risk factors include SMOKING; ALCOHOL DRINKING; HYPERTENSION; INFECTION; PREGNANCY; and mutations in the LMNA gene encoding LAMIN TYPE A, a NUCLEAR LAMINA protein.Peritoneal Dialysis: Dialysis fluid being introduced into and removed from the peritoneal cavity as either a continuous or an intermittent procedure.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Bufanolides: Cyclopentanophenanthrenes with a 6-membered lactone ring attached at the 17-position and SUGARS attached at the 3-position. They are found in BUFONIDAE and often possess cardiotonic properties.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Infusions, Intravenous: The long-term (minutes to hours) administration of a fluid into the vein through venipuncture, either by letting the fluid flow by gravity or by pumping it.Drug Packaging: Containers, packaging, and packaging materials for drugs and BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS. These include those in ampule, capsule, tablet, solution or other forms. Packaging includes immediate-containers, secondary-containers, and cartons. In the United States, such packaging is controlled under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act which also stipulates requirements for tamper-resistance and child-resistance. Similar laws govern use elsewhere. (From Code of Federal Regulations, 21 CFR 1 Section 210, 1993) DRUG LABELING is also available.Infusions, Parenteral: The administration of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through some other route than the alimentary canal, usually over minutes or hours, either by gravity flow or often by infusion pumping.Hyperkalemia: Abnormally high potassium concentration in the blood, most often due to defective renal excretion. It is characterized clinically by electrocardiographic abnormalities (elevated T waves and depressed P waves, and eventually by atrial asystole). In severe cases, weakness and flaccid paralysis may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)Medication Reconciliation: The formal process of obtaining a complete and accurate list of each patient's current home medications including name, dosage, frequency, and route of administration, and comparing admission, transfer, and/or discharge medication orders to that list. The reconciliation is done to avoid medication errors.Hypokalemia: Abnormally low potassium concentration in the blood. It may result from potassium loss by renal secretion or by the gastrointestinal route, as by vomiting or diarrhea. It may be manifested clinically by neuromuscular disorders ranging from weakness to paralysis, by electrocardiographic abnormalities (depression of the T wave and elevation of the U wave), by renal disease, and by gastrointestinal disorders. (Dorland, 27th ed)Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors: A class of drugs whose main indications are the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. They exert their hemodynamic effect mainly by inhibiting the renin-angiotensin system. They also modulate sympathetic nervous system activity and increase prostaglandin synthesis. They cause mainly vasodilation and mild natriuresis without affecting heart rate and contractility.Potassium: An element in the alkali group of metals with an atomic symbol K, atomic number 19, and atomic weight 39.10. It is the chief cation in the intracellular fluid of muscle and other cells. Potassium ion is a strong electrolyte that plays a significant role in the regulation of fluid volume and maintenance of the WATER-ELECTROLYTE BALANCE.Cardiac Output, Low: A state of subnormal or depressed cardiac output at rest or during stress. It is a characteristic of CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, including congenital, valvular, rheumatic, hypertensive, coronary, and cardiomyopathic. The serious form of low cardiac output is characterized by marked reduction in STROKE VOLUME, and systemic vasoconstriction resulting in cold, pale, and sometimes cyanotic extremities.Cardiac Output: The volume of BLOOD passing through the HEART per unit of time. It is usually expressed as liters (volume) per minute so as not to be confused with STROKE VOLUME (volume per beat).Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Milrinone: A positive inotropic cardiotonic agent with vasodilator properties. It inhibits cAMP phosphodiesterase type 3 activity in myocardium and vascular smooth muscle. Milrinone is a derivative of amrinone and has 20-30 times the inotropic potency of amrinone.Hydrazones: Compounds of the general formula R:N.NR2, as resulting from the action of hydrazines with aldehydes or ketones. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Pulmonary Heart Disease: Hypertrophy and dilation of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart that is caused by PULMONARY HYPERTENSION. This condition is often associated with pulmonary parenchymal or vascular diseases, such as CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE and PULMONARY EMBOLISM.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias: A group of interstitial lung diseases with no known etiology. There are several entities with varying patterns of inflammation and fibrosis. They are classified by their distinct clinical-radiological-pathological features and prognosis. They include IDIOPATHIC PULMONARY FIBROSIS; CRYPTOGENIC ORGANIZING PNEUMONIA; and others.Hypertrophy, Right Ventricular: Enlargement of the RIGHT VENTRICLE of the heart. This increase in ventricular mass is often attributed to PULMONARY HYPERTENSION and is a contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Pseudolymphoma: A group of disorders having a benign course but exhibiting clinical and histological features suggestive of malignant lymphoma. Pseudolymphoma is characterized by a benign infiltration of lymphoid cells or histiocytes which microscopically resembles a malignant lymphoma. (From Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 26th ed)Megacolon, Toxic: An acute form of MEGACOLON, severe pathological dilatation of the COLON. It is associated with clinical conditions such as ULCERATIVE COLITIS; CROHN DISEASE; AMEBIC DYSENTERY; or CLOSTRIDIUM ENTEROCOLITIS.Emergencies: Situations or conditions requiring immediate intervention to avoid serious adverse results.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Emergency Service, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.
In the acute phase, supportive therapy, including bed rest, is indicated. In people with symptoms, digoxin and diuretics may ... In 2013, about 1.5 million cases of acute myocarditis occurred. While people of all ages are affected, the young are most often ... Hia, CP; Yip, WC; Tai, BC; Quek, SC (June 2004). "Immunosuppressive therapy in acute myocarditis: an 18 year systematic review ... Aziz, KU; Patel, N; Sadullah, T; Tasneem, H; Thawerani, H; Talpur, S (October 2010). "Acute viral myocarditis: role of ...
Combination with ciclosporin can lead to reduced kidney function, and to acute renal failure in rare cases. Lornoxicam can also ... increase the adverse effects of lithium, methotrexate and digoxin and its derivatives. The effect of diuretics, ACE inhibitors ...
Wattanasuwan, N.; Khan, IA; Mehta, NJ; Arora, P; Singh, N; Vasavada, BC; Sacchi, TJ (2001). "Acute Ventricular Rate Control in ... Atrial Fibrillation : IV Combination of Diltiazem and Digoxin vs IV Diltiazem Alone". Chest. 119 (2): 502-06. doi:10.1378/chest ...
Acute digitalis overdose such as digoxin toxicity may cause hyperkalemia through the inhibition of sodium-potassium-ATPase pump ... Acute hyperkalemia in infants is also rare even though their body volume is small, with accidental ingestion of potassium salts ... Some textbooks suggest that calcium should not be given in digoxin toxicity as it has been linked to cardiovascular collapse in ... This is especially pronounced in acute kidney injury where the glomerular filtration rate and tubular flow are markedly ...
... diltiazem is superior to intravenous amiodarone or digoxin for achieving ventricular rate control in patients with acute ... Onalan O, Crystal E, Daoulah A, Lau C, Crystal A, Lashevsky I (2007). "Meta-analysis of magnesium therapy for the acute ... Paciaroni M, Agnelli G, Micheli S, Caso V (2007). "Efficacy and safety of anticoagulant treatment in acute cardioembolic stroke ... digoxin) - have limited use, apart from in the sedentary elderly patient In addition to these agents, amiodarone has some AV ...
"Pharmacokinetics of digoxin cross-reacting substances in patients with acute yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana) poisoning, ... 2000). "Anti-digoxin Fab fragments in cardiotoxicity induced by ingestion of yellow oleander: a randomised controlled trial". ... These cardenolides are not destroyed by drying or heating and they are very similar to digoxin from Digitalis purpurea. They ... Antidotes for treatment include atropine and digoxin immune fabs (antibodies) and treatment may include oral administration of ...
Ouabain Digoxin Myocardial infarction Toxicity Detoxification Muscle contraction Cardiac glycosides 新药研发咨询中心. "k-Strophanthidin ... Bolognesi R, Cucchini F, Javernaro A, Zeppellini R, Manca C, Visioli O (January 1992). "Effects of acute K-strophantidin ... Song H, Karashima E, Hamlyn JM, Blaustein MP (March 2014). "Ouabain-digoxin antagonism in rat arteries and neurones". The ... Bolognesi R, Cucchini F, Giaroli P, Manca C (July 1991). "Different effects of acute intravenous administration of k- ...
... for acute myocardial infarction, digoxin poisoning, cardioversion, or cardiac catheterization) if amiodarone is not available ... especially acute intermittent porphyria; lidocaine has been classified as porphyrogenic because of the hepatic enzymes it ... J Trauma Acute Care Surg. doi:10.1097/TA.0000000000001615. PMID 28598907. "Lidocaine/prilocaine spray for premature ejaculation ...
Uncommon but potentially severe side effects included acute pancreatitis (in 0.3% of patients) and hypersensitivity reactions ( ... digoxin, and oral contraceptives). Nonetheless, since albiglutide slows gastric emptying, it could conceivably increase ...
It was used in emergency medicine, cardiology, and other specialties throughout the 1980s-1990s for the acute management of ... It is contraindicated in patients with AV (atrioventricular) heart block or digoxin toxicity. Bretylium should be used only in ...
In response to postmarketing reports of acute pancreatitis in patients using exenatide, the FDA added a warning to the labeling ... and digoxin, although this has not been proven to alter the effectiveness of these other medications. ...
These combination also contraindicated in renal disease which may also result from conditions, e.g., acute myocardial ... Pioglitazone/metformin may interact with furosemide, nifedipine, cationic drugs (e.g., amiloride, digoxin, morphine, ... infarction, septicemia, acute or chronic metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, with or without coma. ...
If the patient's symptoms have an acute onset, then drugs, toxins, and infections are likely. In contrast, a long-standing ... Anorexia and bulimia nervosa Depression Other Post-operative vomiting Drugs Chemotherapy Antibiotics Antiarrhythmics Digoxin ... Gastrointestinal infection is one of the most common causes of acute nausea and vomiting. Chronic nausea may be the ... and food poisoning are the two most common causes of acute nausea and vomiting. Side effects from medications (3%) and ...
... can be detected alongside digoxin using luminescent oxygen channelling technology-based digoxin assay LOCI which ... Similar to digitalis, it is mainly used for acute and chronic heart failure.[medical citation needed] ... "Rapid Detection of the Active Cardiac Glycoside Convallatoxin of Lily of the Valley Using LOCI Digoxin Assay". American Journal ...
However, in acute necrotizing eosinophilic myocarditis, echocardiography usually gives diagnostically helpful evidence of a non ... Other drugs: digoxin, ranitidine, lenalidomide, methyldopa, interleukin 2, dobutamine, acetazolamide. Contaminants: ... In its most extreme form, however, eosinophilic myocarditis can present as acute necrotizing eosinophilic myocarditis, i.e. ... acute onset of a skin rash; lymphadenopathy; fever; neuralgia; and involvement of at least one internal organ such as the liver ...
... is often divided into acute or chronic toxicity. In both of these toxicity, cardiac effects are of the ... The primary treatment of digoxin toxicity is digoxin immune fab, which is an antibody made up of anti-digoxin immunoglobulin ... Digoxin toxicity, also known as digoxin poisoning, is a type of poisoning that occurs in people who take too much of the ... The level of digoxin for treatment is typically 0.5-2 ng/mL. Since this is a narrow therapeutic index, digoxin overdose can ...
... digoxin Fab. A case series of 147 patients showed that not all cases of acute digoxin overdose require anti‐digoxin Fab, nor ... Digoxin immune fab or Digoxin-specific antibody is an antidote for overdose of digoxin. It is made from immunoglobulin ... In contrast, a higher mortality (7.6%) was noted in a case series of acute and chronic digoxin and digitoxin poisoning despite ... Case series have reported benefits from anti‐digoxin Fab, but data regarding the response in acute or chronic poisoning are ...
"Rapid Detection of Oleander Poisoning by Digoxin III, a New Digoxin Assay: Impact on Serum Digoxin Measurement". American ... Teas made of leaves or root of N. oleander give rise to a more acute onset, while eating raw leaves causes a slower onset of ... Oleandrin resembles very much other glycosides like ouabain and digoxin but has less effect than digoxin. It is however, just ... This test is slower and has a lower sensitivity than digoxin immunoassay (Digoxin III). A direct analytic technique like liquid ...
"Effects of digoxin on acute, atrial fibrillation-induced changes in atrial refractoriness" (pdf). Circulation. 102 (20): 2503- ... Digoxin is a 3rd line therapy.[14]. OtherEdit. Digoxin is also used intrafetally or amniotically during abortions in the late ... All] tablets of Caraco brand Digoxin, USP, 0.125 mg, and Digoxin, USP, 0.25 mg, distributed prior to March 31, 2009, which are ... U.S. National Library of Medicine: Drug Information Portal - Digoxin. *Commonly used website to calculate empiric digoxin doses ...
... use of nitrates and use of digoxin if indicated for the heart failure and if arrhythmic. Supplemental oxygen may be ... Acute myocardial infarction can precipitate acute decompensated heart failure and will necessitate emergent revascularization ... Opioids Opioids have traditionally been used in the treatment of the acute pulmonary edema that results from acute ... A jugular venous distension is the most sensitive clinical sign for acute decompensation. In acute decompensated heart failure ...
... vision yellow or green vision ECG changes AV block SA block diarrhea thrombocytopenia electrolyte imbalances with acute digoxin ... Patients taking digoxin should avoid taking hawthorn. Side effects can become pronounced due to the interactions of digoxin and ... Evidence of van Gogh's digoxin use is supported by multiple self-portraits that include the foxglove plant, from which digoxin ... These factors increase the likelihood of developing side effects of digoxin and digoxin toxicity. Often lowering the dose is ...
Therefore, can be acute or chronic as follows: Play media Acute aortic insufficiency In acute AI, as may be seen with acute ... Other rather conservative medical treatments for stable and asymptomatic cases include low sodium diet, diuretics, digoxin, ... Acute AI usually presents as florid congestive heart failure, and will not have any of the signs associated with chronic AI ... Severe acute aortic insufficiency is considered a medical emergency. There is a high mortality rate if the individual does not ...
Effects of digoxin on acute, atrial fibrillation-induced changes in atrial refractoriness» (pdf)։ Circulation 102 (20): 2503- ... Digoxin»։ International Drug Price Indicator Guide։ Վերցված է 8 December 2016 *↑ Hamilton Richart (2015)։ Tarascon Pocket ... Digoxin comes from Digitalis lanata»։ BMJ (Clinical research ed.) 312 (7035): 912։ PMC 2350584։ PMID 8611904։ doi:10.1136/bmj. ... Urgent Digitek Digoxin Recall»։ U.S. Recall News։ 2008-04-28։ Արխիվացված օրիգինալից 2008-05-04-ին։ Վերցված է 2009-07-25 ...
For example, Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis usually occurs within 4 days of starting the culprit drug. Drug ... digoxin, aluminum hydroxide, multivitamins, acetaminophen, bisacodyl, aspirin, thiamine, prednisone, atropine, codeine, ... Cohen PR (2007). "Sweet's syndrome--a comprehensive review of an acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis". Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2 ... erythroderma and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These severe cutaneous drug eruptions are categorized as ...
... digoxin and prednisolone. Voriconazole is well absorbed orally with a bioavailability of 96%, allowing patients to be switched ... acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary edema, inflamed lips, swollen face, stomach upset, constipation, gingivitis, ...
Digoxin (a mildly positive inotrope and negative chronotrope), once used as first-line therapy, is now reserved for control of ... Nesiritide, a recombinant form of B-natriuretic peptide, is indicated for use in patients with acute decompensated heart ... There is no evidence that digoxin reduces mortality in CHF, although some studies suggest a decreased rate in hospital ... Massari, F; Mastropasqua, F; Iacoviello, M; Nuzzolese, V; Torres, D; Parrinello, G (March 2012). "The glucocorticoid in acute ...
These include treatment of acute and chronic illnesses, preventive care and health education for all ages and both sexes. ... digoxin, vinca alkaloids,[58] taxol, hyoscine, etc.).[59] Vaccines were discovered by Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur. ... Emergency medicine is concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of acute or life-threatening conditions, including trauma, ... and was the first to categorize illnesses as acute, chronic, endemic and epidemic, and use terms such as, "exacerbation, ...
... aVL with acute inferior myocardial infarction) ST segment depression and T-wave changes may be seen in patients with unstable ... Side effect of digoxin Hypokalemia Right or left ventricular hypertrophy Intraventricular conduction abnormalities (e.g., right ... ischemia Non Q-wave myocardial infarction Reciprocal changes in acute Q-wave myocardial infarction (e.g., ST depression in ...
Digoxin and furosemide were discontinued. His clinical condition was significantly improved. CT scan of the chest showed ... BACKGROUND: Acute cor pulmonale is a clinical syndrome with signs of right-sided heart failure resulting from sudden increase ... Following the results of the CT scan of the chest with a final diagnosis of LIP and acute cor pulmonale and AIDS due to mather- ... Acute cor pulmonale is a clinical syndrome characterized by signs of right heart failure (right ventricular hypertrophy) of ...
McRae S. Elevated serum digoxin levels in a patient taking digoxin and Siberian ginseng. CMAJ. 1996;155:293-295. ... A double blind, placebo-controlled study of Andrographis paniculata fixed combination Kan Jang in the treatment of acute upper ... Digoxin: Eleutherococcus may interfere with blood tests designed to measure digoxin level. ... One report suggests that Eleutherococcus may alter the results of a test for the medication digoxin.11 However, it is not clear ...
digoxin toxicity related potassium levels. acute digoxin toxicity treatment guidelines. digoxin therapeutic classification ...
BET 2: ARE CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS SUPERIOR TO DIGOXIN FOR CONTROLLING THE VENTRICULAR RATE IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ATRIAL ... BET 2: ARE CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS SUPERIOR TO DIGOXIN FOR CONTROLLING THE VENTRICULAR RATE IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ATRIAL ... A short-cut review was carried out to establish whether calcium channel blockers are superior to digoxin for controlling the ... ventricular rate in patients with acute atrial fibrillation. Five studies were directly relevant to the question. The author, ...
... in the acute and chronic decompensated states, is commonly encountered in the emergency department. An understanding of the ... Digoxin (Lanoxin). *View full drug information. DOC in rate control of atrial fibrillation. Cardiac glycoside with direct ... encoded search term (Acute Mitral Regurgitation) and Acute Mitral Regurgitation What to Read Next on Medscape. Related ... Acute Mitral Regurgitation Medication. Updated: Dec 28, 2015 * Author: Daniel DiSandro, MD; Chief Editor: Barry E Brenner, MD, ...
Use in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction. Digoxin should be used with caution in patients with acute myocardial ... DIGOXIN (UNII: 73K4184T59) (DIGOXIN - UNII:73K4184T59). DIGOXIN. 100 ug in 1 mL. ... Plasma digoxin concentration profiles in patients with acute hepatitis generally fell within the range of profiles in a group ... The metabolism of digoxin is not dependent upon the cytochrome P-450 system, and digoxin is not known to induce or inhibit the ...
... order digoxin online, signs and symptoms of digoxin toxicity in elderly, signs and symptoms of digoxin toxicity in infants, ... Acute digoxin toxicity treatment guidelines. By Nate Murray , Published: Sep 5, 2015 ...
Digoxin is not recommended in patients with acute myocardial infarction because digoxin may increase myocardial oxygen demand ... Digoxin Solution. Digoxin Solution:Each 1 mL of clear, colorless Digoxin Oral Solution contains 0.05 mg (50 mcg). The Digoxin ... Digoxin injection USP is a sterile solution of digoxin for intravenous or intramuscular injection. Each mL contains: digoxin ... Switching from Intravenous Digoxin to Oral Digoxin. When switching from intravenous to oral digoxin formulations, make ...
Plasma digoxin concentrations in patients with acute hepatitis generally fall within the range of profiles in a group of ... Digoxin Serum Concentration Increase Digoxin AUC Increase Recommendations Amiodarone. 70%. NA. Measure serum digoxin ... 2.6 Switching from Intravenous Digoxin to Oral Digoxin. When switching from intravenous to oral digoxin formulations, make ... Digoxin concentrations increased less than 50% Atorvastatin. 22%. 15%. Measure serum digoxin concentrations before initiating ...
At therapeutic digoxin doses (0.5 to 0.9 nanograms/mL), the ECG typically shows PR-interval prolongati... ... Can be acute or chronic, intentional, or accidental. Typically presents with components of GI, constitutional, and/or ... Can be acute or chronic, intentional, or accidental. Typically presents with components of GI, constitutional, and/or ... Digoxin toxicity is a clinical diagnosis that relies in part on ECG findings such as signs of increased automaticity and AV ...
Acute Kidney Injury Annals of Internal Medicine; 167 (9): ITC66-ITC80 View MoreView Less ... Review: Digoxin does not affect all-cause mortality but reduces hospital admissions Annals of Internal Medicine; 163 (12): JC11 ... Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis of Tritiated Digoxin GEORGE L. ACKERMAN, M.D., F.A.C.P.; JAMES E. DOHERTY, M.D., F.A.C.P ... Peritoneal Dialysis and Hemodialysis of Tritiated Digoxin. Ann Intern Med. 1967;67:718-723. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-67-4-718 ...
Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is one of the porphyrias, a group of diseases involving defects in heme metabolism and that ... encoded search term (Acute Intermittent Porphyria) and Acute Intermittent Porphyria What to Read Next on Medscape. Related ... Treatment of Hypertension in a Patient With Acute Intermittent Porphyria? * Acute Intermittent Porphyria With Seizure and ... Kauppinen R, Mustajoki P. Prognosis of acute porphyria: occurrence of acute attacks, precipitating factors, and associated ...
Digoxin - In a study of 15 healthy people administered digoxin daily to steady state, a single Forteo dose did not alter the ... Respiratory System: Acute dyspnea, chest pain. *Musculoskeletal: Muscle spasms of the leg or back ... Digoxin. A single Forteo dose did not alter the effect of digoxin on the systolic time interval (from electrocardiographic Q- ... Especially tell your doctor if you take medicines that contain digoxin (Digoxin∗, Lanoxicaps∗, Lanoxin∗). ...
Patient information for DIGIFAB 40MG/VIAL DIGOXIN IMMUNE FAB POWDER FOR SOLUTION FOR INFUSION Including dosage instructions and ... Is (i) the amount of digoxin ingested known or is (ii) the serum. concentration of digoxin known?. Step 1 (i) Acute digoxin ... Decide if digoxin poisoning is (i) acute, (ii) acute-on-chronic or (iii). chronic.. Step 2. Is the patient (i) an adult or a ... Step 1 (ii) Acute-on-chronic digoxin poisoning. A full neutralisation dose of DigiFab® can be given if the amount of digoxin ...
Diarrhea, Acute.. Diarrhea, Chronic-Cats.. Diarrhea, Chronic-Dogs.. Dietary Intolerance.. Digoxin Toxicity.. Discolored Tooth/ ... Acute Abdomen.. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.. Adenocarcinoma, Anal Sac/Perianal.. Adenocarcinoma, Lung.. Adenocarcinoma ... Vomiting, Acute.. Vomiting, Chronic.. Von Willebrand Disease.. Weight Loss and Cachexia.. Whipworms (Trichuriasis).. Wobbler ... Renal Failure, Acute.. Renal Failure, Chronic.. Renal Tubular Acidosis.. Renomegaly.. Reovirus Infections.. Respiratory ...
Find information on Digoxin (Lanoxin) in Daviss Drug Guide including dosage, side effects, interactions, nursing implications ... Metabolic: electrolyte imbalances with acute digoxin toxicity. * CAPITALS indicate life-threatening.. Underline indicate most ... High Alert: Digoxin has a narrow therapeutic range. Medication errors associated with digoxin include miscalculation of ... Amiodarone may ↑ levels and lead to toxicity; ↓ digoxin dose by 50%.. *Cyclosporine, itraconazole, propafenone, quinine, ...
Digoxin Look for signs of toxicity. Treatment - Pharmacological:. Chest pain. Clinical symptoms and signs associated with acute ... Decreases likelihood of acute coronary syndrome. Unreliable predictors of acute coronary syndrome. Abbot et al, Australian ... Useful in the acute treatment of MI. Also useful for long term use post-MI even in the absence of heart failure. Similar ... Digoxin. Rate Control - AF Management 4. Students may love free food and drink but it would be illegal for drug companies to ...
Digoxin: increased peak and trough digoxin levels. Ergot alkaloid derivatives (such as dihydroergotamine, ergotamine): acute ... In patients receiving drug concurrently with digoxin, monitor peak and trough digoxin levels periodically, and stay alert for ... Relief of moderate to severe acute pain. Adults ages 18 and older: 50 mg, 75 mg, or 100 mg (immediate-release) P.O. q 4 to 6 ... Other: superinfection, hypersensitivity reactions including angioedema and anaphylaxis (rare), acute myasthenia gravis ...
Acute coronary syndromes are associated with an S4 gallop because of ischemia leading to noncompliance of the left ventricle. ... 5. Rate control of atrial fibrillation with digoxin, beta blockers, or diltiazem/ verapamil ... ST elevation in leads II, Ill, and aVF is consistent with an acute myocardial infarc-tion, but of the inferior wall. Untreated ... ST seg-ment elevation most often signifies an acute myocardial infarction. With an AWMI, mortality untreated is closer to 30% ...
Digoxin has positive inotropic and negative chronotropic activity. It is used to control ventricular rate in atrial ... Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) / Myelodysplastic Syndromes. 1. 2. Active Not Recruiting. Basic Science. Cancer, Breast. ... Digoxin 250 mcg tablet. 0.22USD tablet. DrugBank does not sell nor buy drugs. Pricing information is supplied for informational ... Digoxin. Solution. 0.05 mg/1mL. Oral. West-Ward Pharmaceuticals Corp.. 2004-08-26. Not applicable. US. ...
Study Acute Heart Failure flashcards from Victor Redmon ... Digoxin toxicity. *Renal insufficiency. *Muscle cramps - due to ... Identify the etiology of acute heart failure. *Appropriately treat acute heart failure to achieve a stable hemodynamic ... What are some exacerbating factors in acute heart failure associated with increased heart rate? ... What are some exacerbating factors in acute heart failure associated with changes in afterload? ...
The role of intravenous digoxin, given its acute hemodynamic effects in patients with acute heart failure syndromes, remains to ... The role of serum digoxin concentration in digoxin therapy is now well established; major practice guidelines for heart failure ... digoxin may reduce rates of death from heart failure,10,11 and that the effects of digoxin in systolic and diastolic heart ... digoxin appears to be safe in the treatment of diastolic heart failure. The effect of digoxin in such patients is similar to ...
... clinicaltrials.gov We propose a pilot clinical trial lasting 12 weeks of digoxin in patients with hypoxic response-related ... Acute myocardial infarction due to polycythemia vera.. We report the clinical case of a patient presenting with an acute ... A cardiac glycoside sometimes used in place of DIGOXIN. It has a longer half-life than digoxin; toxic effects, which are ... A cardenolide which is the aglycon of digoxin. Can be obtained by hydrolysis of digoxin or from Digitalis orientalis L. and ...
... digoxin Fab. A case series of 147 patients showed that not all cases of acute digoxin overdose require anti‐digoxin Fab, nor ... Digoxin immune fab or Digoxin-specific antibody is an antidote for overdose of digoxin. It is made from immunoglobulin ... In contrast, a higher mortality (7.6%) was noted in a case series of acute and chronic digoxin and digitoxin poisoning despite ... Case series have reported benefits from anti‐digoxin Fab, but data regarding the response in acute or chronic poisoning are ...
An acute myocardial infarction was ruled out. Because his admission medication regimen did not include an angiotensin- ... Digoxin (acute overdose). Hyperkalemia following acute overdose. predicts poor outcome. Heparin. Can occur with prophylactic ... An acute. myocardial infarction was ruled out. Because his admission. medication regimen did not include an angiotensin- ...
  • 4 The effect of digoxin on neurohormones is believed to be more favourable at low dosages that result in low serum digoxin concentrations. (cmaj.ca)
  • These data suggest that an exacerbation or enhancement of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury may occur in the presence of clinically observable serum digoxin concentrations. (biomedsearch.com)
  • NOTE: In patients with undetectable serum digoxin concentrations, the total loading dose should be based on lean body weight and clinical response, and divided into several doses administered at 4- to 8-hour intervals. (pdr.net)
  • It demonstrated that use of digoxin, a digitalis glycoside, was associated with a significant 7.9% absolute reduction (34.7% in the placebo group v. 26.8% for patients receiving digoxin) and 28% relative reduction (risk ratio [RR] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.66-0.79) in heart failure-related hospital admissions among patients who were also receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and diuretics. (cmaj.ca)
  • Objectives To assess whether a double therapy combination consisting of diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers with addition of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and the triple therapy combination of two of the aforementioned antihypertensive drugs to which NSAIDs are added are associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury. (bmj.com)
  • Overall, current use of a double therapy combination containing either diuretics or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers with NSAIDs was not associated with an increased rate of acute kidney injury. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions A triple therapy combination consisting of diuretics with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers and NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury. (bmj.com)
  • Loop diuretics, such as furosemide, should be used in acute heart failure or in the lowest effective dose for maintenance treatment of chronic heart failure. (yumpu.com)
  • Confusion, nausea and vomiting, altered vision and an acute abdominal syndrome resembling mesenteric artery obstruction are all more common features of digoxin toxicity in the elderly than in the young. (yumpu.com)
  • Anatomic myocardial infarct size, expressed as a percentage of the areas at risk of infarction and as a percentage of the total left ventricle were: 20.2 +/- 3.3% control vs 35.4 +/- 6.2% digoxin-pretreated (p less than 0.05) and 8.6 +/- 1.3% control vs 14.7 +/- 2.5% digoxin-pretreated (p less than 0.05), respectively (2.04 +/- 0.37 ng/ml serum digoxin). (biomedsearch.com)
  • Acute cor pulmonale is a clinical syndrome with signs of right-sided heart failure resulting from sudden increase of pulmonary vascular resistance. (scielo.br)
  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-B3, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP), and acute cor pulmonale. (scielo.br)
  • Acute cor pulmonale is a clinical syndrome characterized by signs of right heart failure (right ventricular hypertrophy) of sudden onset and results from the abrupt increase of pulmonary vascular resistance due to diseases that affect the function and/or the structure of the lung, of which pulmonary embolism is the most common cause. (scielo.br)
  • Proper interpretation of the ECG in these patients will assist the clinician in arriving at the correct diagnosis-in effect, separating acute coronary syndrome from the non-ischaemic, more "benign" causes of STD. (bmj.com)
  • Case 1) ST segment depression attributable to myocardial ischaemia (non-infarction)-ECG demonstrated NSR with ST segment depression in the anterolateral leads (V2 to V6) consistent with a non-infarction acute coronary ischaemic syndrome. (bmj.com)
  • We present a case of mirror syndrome where the mother's course was complicated by EKG changes and acute kidney injury (AKI). (soap.org)
  • Digoxin inhibits the Na-K-ATPase membrane pump, resulting in an increase in intracellular sodium. (drugbank.ca)
  • Digoxin inhibits the Na+/K+ ATPase, which indirectly raises intracellular Ca2+ concentration, thus increasing the force of contractility in cardiac myocytes (heart cells). (yourhealthbase.com)
  • Digoxin inhibits cytochrome p450 are treated by acting anti- emetic stim- uli, neutropenia. (musicaenlamochila.net)
  • The overall incidence of adverse reactions with digoxin has been reported as 5-20%, with 15-20% of adverse events considered serious. (nih.gov)
  • Acute heart failure with low cardiac output: can we develop a short-term inotropic agent that does not increase adverse events? (biomedsearch.com)
  • Recent trial evidence demonstrates that low-dose colchicine (2 tablets followed by 1 tablet 1 hour later) is effective when prescribed within 12 hours of onset of an acute gout flare, with a low incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects ( Table 1 ). (nps.org.au)
  • Adverse reactions to drugs remain an important cause of acute kidney injury. (bmj.com)
  • In contrast, predicted proximal tubule concentration of digoxin was only sensitive to changes in the transporter expression/ million proximal tubule cells. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Known hypersensitivity to digoxin (reactions seen include unexplained rash, swelling of the mouth, lips or throat or a difficulty in breathing). (wikidoc.org)
  • Each glass vial of DigiFab® contains 40 mg of digoxin immune Fab (ovine) protein as a sterile, lyophilized, off white powder. (drugs.com)
  • Each vial of DigiFab , which will bind approximately 0.5 mg digoxin, contains 40 mg of digoxin immune Fab, 75 mg (approx) of mannitol USP, and 2 mg (approx) sodium acetate USP as a buffering agent. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 , 7 In the DIG trial, digoxin concentrations of 0.8-2.5 ng/mL in serum were considered therapeutic. (cmaj.ca)
  • In high doses, digoxin increases sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system (CNS). (nih.gov)
  • Comparisons of the systemic availability and equivalent doses for preparations of digoxin are shown in Table 1. (nih.gov)
  • At therapeutic digoxin doses (0.5 to 0.9 nanograms/mL), the ECG typically shows PR-interval prolongation and a scooped ST segment. (bmj.com)
  • The aim of this trial is to investigate the effect of multiple doses of flibanserin on the single dose pharmacokinetics of digoxin in healthy female and male volunteers. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Risk Predictors for Postcontrast Acute Kidney Injury. (nih.gov)
  • Main outcome measures Rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals of acute kidney injury associated with current use of double and triple therapy combinations of antihypertensive drugs with NSAIDs. (bmj.com)
  • Results During a mean follow-up of 5.9 (SD 3.4) years, 2215 cases of acute kidney injury were identified (incidence rate 7/10 000 person years). (bmj.com)
  • In contrast, current use of a triple therapy combination was associated with an increased rate of acute kidney injury (rate ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.53). (bmj.com)
  • Although drug related acute kidney injury is commonly associated with the use of individual classes of drugs (such as antiretroviral drugs, aminoglycoside antibiotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)), 9 10 11 12 13 little is known about the effects of drug-drug interactions on this outcome. (bmj.com)
  • Serum digoxin concentration (SDC) is usually greater than the therapeutic range of 0.5 to 0.9 nanograms/mL, but may not be elevated. (bmj.com)
  • New evidence illustrates that low-dose colchicine is effective for acute gout, and highlights the risk of serious interactions with some commonly prescribed medicines. (nps.org.au)
  • The results suggest that long-term therapy with digoxin is an independent risk factor for death in patients with AF without CHF. (springer.com)
  • ORLANDO, Fla. - Scientists have identified digoxin as a possible therapy for prostate cancer, using a combination of laboratory science and epidemiology that is unprecedented in its cooperative nature. (healthcanal.com)
  • Digoxin is a 3rd line therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers then divided this pool of similar patients into two groups, one that had received digoxin therapy and a second that had not. (redorbit.com)
  • The association did not change when adjusted for age, hormone replacement therapy, other drugs, medical history (reason for prescribing digoxin), and mammography exposure. (yourhealthbase.com)
  • Fetal heart rate decreased with digoxin therapy but progressed to heart block with dropped beats every 4-7 beats. (soap.org)
  • PGP Inducers/Inhibitors: Drugs that induce or inhibit PGP have the potential to alter digoxin pharmacokinetics. (nih.gov)
  • Patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute chest pain potentially of ischaemic origin are evaluated with three principal tools: the history of the event, the 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), and cardiac enzymes and other serum markers of myocardial injury. (bmj.com)
  • Data also support outcomes of acute digoxin poisoning without use of anti‐digoxin Fab. (wikipedia.org)