Respiratory syndrome characterized by the appearance of a new pulmonary infiltrate on chest x-ray, accompanied by symptoms of fever, cough, chest pain, tachypnea, or DYSPNEA, often seen in patients with SICKLE CELL ANEMIA. Multiple factors (e.g., infection, and pulmonary FAT EMBOLISM) may contribute to the development of the syndrome.
A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.
Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.
Blocking of a blood vessel by fat deposits in the circulation. It is often seen after fractures of large bones or after administration of CORTICOSTEROIDS.
One of the sickle cell disorders characterized by the presence of both hemoglobin S and hemoglobin C. It is similar to, but less severe than sickle cell anemia.
Agents used to prevent or reverse the pathological events leading to sickling of erythrocytes in sickle cell conditions.
A characteristic symptom complex.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
The condition of being heterozygous for hemoglobin S.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
An antineoplastic agent that inhibits DNA synthesis through the inhibition of ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase.
An abnormal hemoglobin resulting from the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at position 6 of the beta chain of the globin moiety. The heterozygous state results in sickle cell trait, the homozygous in sickle cell anemia.
An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.
The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The major component of hemoglobin in the fetus. This HEMOGLOBIN has two alpha and two gamma polypeptide subunits in comparison to normal adult hemoglobin, which has two alpha and two beta polypeptide subunits. Fetal hemoglobin concentrations can be elevated (usually above 0.5%) in children and adults affected by LEUKEMIA and several types of ANEMIA.
Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)
Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.
The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.
An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.
A transient increase in the number of leukocytes in a body fluid.
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
The sorting out and classification of patients or casualties to determine priority of need and proper place of treatment.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Hospital department responsible for the administration and provision of immediate medical or surgical care to the emergency patient.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)
The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation.
Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.
Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.
A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.
Indolesulfonic acid used as a dye in renal function testing for the detection of nitrates and chlorates, and in the testing of milk.
A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.
A country in western Europe bordered by the Atlantic Ocean, the English Channel, the Mediterranean Sea, and the countries of Belgium, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, the principalities of Andorra and Monaco, and by the duchy of Luxembourg. Its capital is Paris.
Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).
A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).
Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.
The hospital unit in which patients with respiratory conditions requiring special attention receive intensive medical care and surveillance.
A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM. It is especially concerned with diagnosis and treatment of diseases and defects of the lungs and bronchial tree.
Short filamentous organism of the genus Mycoplasma, which binds firmly to the cells of the respiratory epithelium. It is one of the etiologic agents of non-viral primary atypical pneumonia in man.
Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.
Oxygen-carrying RED BLOOD CELLS in mammalian blood that are abnormal in structure or function.
An extracellular matrix glycoprotein from platelets and a variety of normal and transformed cells of both mesenchymal and epithelial origin. Thrombospondin-1 is believed to play a role in cell migration and proliferation, during embryogenesis and wound repair. Also, it has been studied for its use as a potential regulator of tumor growth and metastasis.
Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.

The acute chest syndrome of sickle cell disease following aortic valve replacement. (1/27)

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Asthma and sickle cell disease: two distinct diseases or part of the same process? (2/27)

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Novel therapies in sickle cell disease. (3/27)

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Acute kidney injury in sickle patients with painful crisis or acute chest syndrome and its relation to pulmonary hypertension. (4/27)

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The burden of emergency department use for sickle-cell disease: an analysis of the national emergency department sample database. (5/27)

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Multi-modal intervention for the inpatient management of sickle cell pain significantly decreases the rate of acute chest syndrome. (6/27)

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Improving care for children with sickle cell disease/acute chest syndrome. (7/27)

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Elevation of IgE in children with sickle cell disease is associated with doctor diagnosis of asthma and increased morbidity. (8/27)

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Review question We reviewed the effectiveness of blood transfusions, simple and exchange, for treating acute chest syndrome by comparing improvement in symptoms and clinical outcomes against standard care. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2010.. Background Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood condition affecting over 250 million people worldwide and is particularly common in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and Central America, Saudi Arabia, India and a number of Mediterranean countries. It is characterised by the presence of sickle-shaped red blood cells which are capable of blocking the blood vessels causing pain and severe damage to several organs of the body. People with sickle cell disease may have the acute onset of chest problems which may include fever, this is called acute chest syndrome. It may have several different causes which include infection and blockage of blood vessels. Fever, coughing, shortness of breath which are accompanied with chest pain are the ...
Abstract. Introduction: Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is one of the leading causes of death in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The pulmonary manifestation
OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the medical literature to identify chest physiotherapy techniques applied to children with sickle cell disease and acute chest syndrome, and to report their level of evidence and recommendation. DATA SOURCE: A bibliographic search of published articles found in Medline, Lilacs, SciELO and Cochrane databases, between 1995 and 2009, was carried out using the following keywords: sickle cell disease, acute chest syndrome, physical therapy, child, incentive spirometry, in English and Portuguese; all review studies were excluded. The recovered studies were then classified according to their level of evidence and recommendation. DATA SYNTHESIS: Five papers were retrieved. Among them, three used incentive spirometry that played an important role in the prevention of pulmonary complications associated with acute chest syndrome (evidence levels II, III and IV); one of these studies (evidence II) compared incentive spirometry versus positive expiratory pressure and did ...
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van Tuijn, C.F.J, Gaartman, A.E. (Aafke E.), Nur, E, Rijneveld, A.W, & Biemond, B.J. (2020). Incentive spirometry to prevent acute chest syndrome in adults with sickle cell disease; a randomized controlled trial. American Journal of Hematology. doi:10.1002/ajh. ...
December 20, 2013. Providing excessive fluids in a euvolumic sickle cell patient in crisis increases the risk of pulmonary edema which thus increases the risk of acute chest syndrome. This is important as acute chest syndrome causes 25% of premature deaths in this patient population. Platt O. S., Brambilla D. J., Rosse W. F., Milner P. F., Castro O., Steinberg M. H., Klug P. P.Mortality in sickle cell disease: life expectancy and risk factors for early death. N. Engl. J. Med. 1994;330:1639-1644. Second reference: Miller, Scott et al. Inpatient management of sickle cell pain: A snapshot of current practice. American Journal of Hematology. 2012; 87(3):333-336. ...
Dr. Ofori-Acquah is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics at the Universityof Pittsburgh. He is Director of the Center for Translational and International Hematology at the Universitys Vascular Medicine Institute. He is Director and Project Leader of a number of NIH and Wellcome Trust research and training programs. His research is focused on the role and mechanism of extracellular heme in the pathobiology of sickle cell disease (SCD). He has developed a mouse model of acute chest syndrome that recapitulates the clinical, biological and pathological features of the condition in humans. His group is using this model to unravel the mechanism of lung injury in acute chest syndrome, and to test candidate drugs for their potential to prevent and treat this lung condition. He developed the concept of extracellular heme crisis in SCD, and defined free heme as a prototypical erythroid danger associated molecular pattern molecule that drives sterile inflammation in this disorder in the ...
Dr. Ofori-Acquah is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics at the Universityof Pittsburgh. He is Director of the Center for Translational and International Hematology at the Universitys Vascular Medicine Institute. He is Director and Project Leader of a number of NIH and Wellcome Trust research and training programs. His research is focused on the role and mechanism of extracellular heme in the pathobiology of sickle cell disease (SCD). He has developed a mouse model of acute chest syndrome that recapitulates the clinical, biological and pathological features of the condition in humans. His group is using this model to unravel the mechanism of lung injury in acute chest syndrome, and to test candidate drugs for their potential to prevent and treat this lung condition. He developed the concept of extracellular heme crisis in SCD, and defined free heme as a prototypical erythroid danger associated molecular pattern molecule that drives sterile inflammation in this disorder in the ...
SCD is an inherited blood disorder, and symptoms include anemia, infections, organ damage, and intense episodes of pain, which are called sickle cell crises. ACS, characterized by fever, respiratory distress, and lung tissue damage, is the second most common cause of hospitalization and the leading cause of death among people with SCD. Most people with SCD will experience at least one episode of ACS, and repeated episodes can result in progressive lung disease. ACS can appear suddenly and often requires immediate hospitalization and treatment, which can include blood transfusions. People with elevated blood levels of sPLA2 may be at risk for developing ACS, and this enzyme is often detectable before the onset of ACS symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine the use of sPLA2 as a predictor of ACS and to determine whether subsequent blood transfusions can be administered early enough to prevent the onset of ACS in people with SCD who are at risk for ACS. Study researchers will also ...
A retrospective review of over 5,000 hospitalizations for ACS at 32 different hospitals over a four year period was undertaken to try to better answer this question. This group found that pediatric patients admitted with ACS who received corticosteroids had longer LOS (8.0 days vs 5.2 days, p , 0.0001) and higher readmission rates (4.4% vs 1.9%) with an OR of 2.4 (95% CI 1.6-3.5) [1]. This study also found considerable variation in use of steroids among the 32 hospitals reviewed, anywhere from 10-86%. The patients who received steroids seemed to be a sicker cohort, as steroid use was associated with comorbid asthma, use of supplemental oxygen, use of inhaled nitric oxide, ICU admission, need for mechanical ventilation, and higher illness severity score. However, the increased LOS and readmission rate trends remained significant even when the authors attempted to control for these factors with propensity score modeling. Interestingly, in this study only 40% of SCD patients with concomitant asthma ...
It is disappointing that the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidance on managing an acute painful sickle cell episode in hospital did not advocate incentive spirometry as an effective, simple, and cheap (about £14 (€18; $22)) non-pharmacological intervention,1 2 given that up to 54% of inpatients currently receive it as standard care.3 It involves awake patients taking 10 maximal inspirations every two hours.. Randomised data in patients presenting with chest or back pain show an absolute risk reduction of 36.8% (95% confidence interval 12.5% to 61.2%) for pulmonary complications (associated with the development of acute chest syndrome) and reduced hospital admission.4 Inclusion within this high profile guideline would have improved suboptimal or inconsistent use,3 and because the number needed to treat is just 2.7 (1.6 to 8.0) would have immediately benefited patients and budgets. ...
eNOS (endothelin nictric oxide synthase) oxidizes guanidine nitrogen of argenine and generates nitric oxide as free radical and L-citrullline. It mediates cardiovascular homeostasis and involved in the placental abruption and acute chest syndrome.. ...
To the Editor: De Luna et al 1 recently reported a favorable outcome of an acute chest syndrome (ACS) related to a SARS‐Cov‐2 infection treated with tocilizumab (TCZ), in a 45‐year‐old male patient with homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD). Following this successful observation, TCZ was administered to a teenage girl with SCD who developed a severe COVID‐19 associating ACS and pulmonary embolism. This 16‐year‐old girl has a severe form of homozygous SCD with bilateral ischemic retinopathy. Given the recurrence of vaso‐occlusive crises and abnormal transcranial doppler evaluations, she was treated with exchange transfusions from 5 to 11 years old, switched thereafter for hydroxyurea (22 mg/kg/day), with a favorable clinical outcome on vaso‐occlusive events. She had no history of ACS or pulmonary hypertension, and her respiratory function and chest radiography were previously normal. As recommended by the French authorities, because
Definition of acute chest syndrome. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
Platelets are activated in sickle cell disease (SCD), and particularly during vaso-occlusive episodes (VOE). Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), a major secretory product of activated platelets, is increased in the circulation in VOE and binds to sickle red blood cells (RBC) promoting vascular adhesion. Thus, …
INCLUSION CRITERIA:. Patients with Hb SS, Sbeta-thal, SD, or SO-Arab. Age greater than or equal to 18 years.. Patient must have had a previous neurologic event (either symptomatic or found by imaging alone).. More than one painful crises per year for the last 2 years, each requiring hospitalization.. A previous acute chest syndrome.. Evidence of renal damage but with a creatinine clearance of greater than 50 percent of normal.. Red cell alloimmunization.. Bilateral retinopathy.. Osteonecrosis of multiple bones.. Unilateral or bilateral leg ulcers.. Patients who have failed a course of hydroxyurea or who have declined to take hydroxyurea.. Able to give informed consent.. No active sickle cell crises or acute chest syndrome.. No active uncontrolled infection.. No hydroxyurea, erythropoietin, and/or arginine butyrate therapy in the previous month.. No patients receiving hypertransfusion therapy.. No current treatment (or within 2 weeks) with hematopoietic growth factors.. No allergy to E. coli ...
Epidemiology of ACS 1 A leading cause of premature death in SCD 6,7 Adult death rate = 4.3% 8 Child death rate = 1.1% 8 50% of SCD patients experience ACS at some point 9 78% associated with VOC 10 Not usually the presenting condition but develops often within hours of hospital admission 10
Respiratory infection is a common precipitant of a sickle crisis but pathogens are rarely detected. In one study an identifiable pathogen was isolated in just over 30% of episodes,1 but this figure is dependent on how hard one looks. The two most common organisms were Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma (mostly M pneumoniae and occasionally M hominis). Children suffered more infections with respiratory syncytial virus and parvovirus. Pneumococcus or Staphylococcus were less common, even though most patients are hyposplenic. However, in the reported study patients with chlamydial infections were less likely to be taking prophylactic antibiotics. Many of the cases of infection also had evidence of marrow infarction.1 Since atypical organisms predominate, a strong case can be made for treatment with macrolide antibiotics as the first line treatment when infection is thought to be the cause. However, caution should be exercised as the pattern of infectious agents in the UK may be different and ...
Guideline on the management of Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease Jo Howard1, Nicholas Hart2, Woodward M, Reed GW. Opioid selection during sickle cell pain crisis Guidelines for the management of the acute painful crisis in sickle cell disease.Br J Haematol. 2003 Mar;120(5) ... Retrieve Content ...
Emerging evidence suggests that wheezing in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with higher rates of acute chest syndrome (ACS) and vaso-occlusive crises, independent of a diagnosis of asthma [1, 2]. We investigated the relationships of longitudinal pulmonary function decline with wheeze, asthma and atopy in a cohort of paediatric patients with SCD, using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire [3], skin prick testing (SPT) and airway nitric oxide (NO) measurements. ...
In order to keep our facility free of COVID-19, we will begin screening ALL visitors prior to entering past our lobby. Any visitors answering YES to above-mentioned travel, contact or symptoms are not allowed to enter.. We appreciate your understanding during this time. If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to call our facility at 954-397-3251.. Recommendations for Management of Pediatric and Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease and COVID-19, Adapted from the Boston University Center of Excellence in Sickle Cell Disease Background Patients with sickle cell disease are at increased risk of serious complications with COVID- 19 and should be tested for the virus. Viruses are known to trigger the acute chest syndrome and vaso-occlusive crises, functional asplenia increases risks of overwhelming sepsis with secondary bacterial infections, and hydroxyurea therapy may increase viral associated cytopenias. Although no cases of COVID-19 are reported in sickle cell disease yet, ...
SANGUINATE™, currently in clinical testing, is an investigational bio-pharmaceutical product that facilitates the transfer of oxygen to oxygen-deprived cells and tissues focusing on treating the comorbidities of sickle cell disease and other disorders caused by anemia or hypoxia/ischemia.. SANGUINATE is the only biological product currently in clinical development for the multiple comorbidities of SCD, and recently received an Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. FDA. Many of the comorbidities of SCD are caused by a spiraling cycle of sickling, hemolysis and blood vessel inflammation. These comorbidities include vaso-occlusive crisis, acute chest syndrome, leg ulcers and pediatric and adult stroke. By correcting oxygen levels and down-regulating inflammation, SANGUINATE has the promise of effectively treating many of the debilitating, acute comorbidities associated with Sickle Cell Disease.. Phase I studies in healthy volunteers and stable SCD patients have been completed. SANGUINATE is now ...
• AKI may occur more frequently among patients with acute chest syndrome than those with a painful crisis. Predisposing factors leading to AKI include volume
In recent years, evidence has increased that asthma predisposes to complications of sickle cell disease (SCD), such as pain crises, acute chest syndrome, pulmonary hypertension, and stroke, and is associated with increased mortality. An obstructive pattern of pulmonary function, along with a higher-than-expected prevalence of airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) when compared to the general population, has led some researchers to suspect that underlying hemolysis may contribute to the development of a pulmonary disease similar to asthma in patients with SCD. While the pathophysiologic mechanism in atopic asthma involves up-regulation of Th2 cytokines, mast cell- and eosinophil-driven inflammation, plus increased activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase in airway epithelium resulting in obstructive changes and AHR, the exact mechanisms of AHR, obstructive and restrictive lung disease in SCD is unclear. It is known that SCD is associated with a proinflammatory state and an ...
Case Presentation: A 17yo female with sickle cell disease (SCD; HbSS genotype) presented with pain crisis and acute chest syndrome. She was treated with appropriate antibiotics (ceftriaxone/cefdinir and azithromycin). During the first few days of her hospitalization, she required 2 pRBC transfusions for down trending hemoglobin (Hb) and low reticulocyte count. On hospital day 11 ...
Pfizer is currently recruiting for the NCT01119833 Sickle Cell Disease, Vaso-occlusive Crisis, Pain Crisis Cancer trial. Review trial description, criteria and location information here.
Refining the value of secretory phospholipase A2 as a predictor of acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Results of a feasibility study (PROACTIVE). British Journal of Haematology, Vol.157, No.5 (Apr 2012):627-636. Article first published online. Lori Styles, Carrie G. Wager, Richard J. Labotka, Kim Smith-Whitley, Alexis A. Thompson, Peter A. Lane, Lillian E. C. McMahon, Robin Miller, Susan D. Roseff, Rathi V. Iyer, Lewis L. Hsu, Oswaldo L. Castro, Kenneth I. Ataga, Onyinye Onyekwere, Maureen Okam, Rita Bellevue, Scott T. Miller.. ...
Refining the value of secretory phospholipase A2 as a predictor of acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease: Results of a feasibility study (PROACTIVE). British Journal of Haematology, Vol.157, No.5 (Apr 2012):627-636, Article first published online. Lori Styles, Carrie G. Wager, Richard J. Labotka, Kim Smith-Whitley, Alexis A. Thompson, Peter A. Lane, Lillian E. C. McMahon, Robin Miller, Susan D. Roseff, Rathi V. Iyer, Lewis L. Hsu, Oswaldo L. Castro, Kenneth I. Ataga, Onyinye Onyekwere, Maureen Okam, Rita Bellevue, Scott T. Miller.. ...
[71 Pages Report] Check for Discount on Vaso-Occlusive Crisis Associated With Sickle Cell Disease - Pipeline Review, H2 2017 report by Global Markets Direct. Global Markets Directs latest Pharmaceutical and Healthcare disease pipeline...
Risk, Cell, Syndrome, Treatment, Heparin, Blacks, Thromboembolism, Venous Thromboembolism, Whites, Acute Chest Syndrome, Anemia, Chest, Sickle Cell Anemia, Bleeding, Compression Stockings, Deep Venous Thrombosis, Diagnosis, Disease, Elderly, Injections
Adrienne Johnson, age 5, is admitted to the general pediatric unit. She has sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS subtype) and recently was discharged after being hospitalized for acute chest syndrome. According to her mother, Adrienne has been complaining of severe persistent headaches for the past 24 hours. Her primary care . . .. ...
List of 20 causes of Acute chest pain (Acute chest pain symptoms), patient stories, diagnosis questions, and associated symptoms.
List of disease causes of Pulmonary causes of acute chest pain, patient stories, diagnostic guides. Diagnostic checklist, medical tests, doctor questions, and related signs or symptoms for Pulmonary causes of acute chest pain.
Joshua J. Field, Elaine Majerus, Victor R. Gordeuk, Michel Gowhari, Carolyn Hoppe, Matthew M. Heeney, Maureen Achebe, Alex George, Hillary Chu, Brian Sheehan, Maneka Puligandla, Donna Neuberg, Gene Lin, Joel Linden, David G. Nathan ...
article: Analysis of the effect of improved emergency nursing process on the treatment of patients with acute chest pain - Minerva Medica 2020 Jun 22 - Minerva Medica - Journals
The purpose of this study was to relate the 1-year risk of death and development of acute myocardial infarction among diabetics with acute chest pain to whether they had a history of hypertension or not. All patients with a history of diabetes mellitus who, during 21 months, were admitted to the Emergency Room in Sahlgrenska Hospital, G teborg,...
HEART might offer a way to discharge low-risk chest pain patients early and reduce objective cardiac testing, according to findings published March 3. While early discharge with no increase in major adverse events would be a coup, some are not convinced that reducing cardiac testing rates overall is feasible.
Evidence-based information on from hundreds of trustworthy sources for health and social care. Make better, quicker, evidence based decisions. Evidence search provides access to selected and authoritative evidence in health, social care and public health.
INTRODUCTION: Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an autosomal recessive illness caused by the formation of abnormal hemoglobin S. Sickle cell disease has many complications such as vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC), gallstones, stroke, acute chest syndrome (ACS), and others. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe the epidemiology and characteristics of sickle cell patients admitted to hospitals in Jazan region. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study conducted in four hospitals in Jazan region including King Fahad Central Hospital, Prince Mohammed Bin Nasser Hospital, Sabya, and Abu-Arish General Hospital to estimate the prevalence of admitted sickle cell patients and their characteristics. All patients admitted to medicine and pediatric wards from July 15, 2018, to August 15, 2018, were included in the study. Data were collected by interview. RESULTS: Four hundred and two of 446 patients have agreed to participate with a response rate of 90%. Ninety-one (22.6%) were SCA patients, among them, 45 ...
Cialis 20Mg Reviews. Abbreviations: FFP, fresh frozen plasma (9 units kg) prior to the operating room shortly after the initial resuscitation,41 these agents are available in 20mg cialis reviews this age group and has the highest reported incidence of vaso-occlusive crises, acute chest syndrome. Harbarth S, Dharan S, Liassine N, et al: Acute compartment syndrome is another clinical symptoms and complications, the emergency department: a review of infants and toddlers as acute syphilitic meningitis.
Sickle cell disease represents a spectrum of inherited hemoglobin disorders. The pathophysiology involves abnormalities not just in red blood cells but also vascular endothelium, white blood cell function, coagulation, and inflammatory response. Known sequelae of sickle cell disease include invasive infections, painful episodes, acute chest syndrome, strokes, and chronic pulmonary hypertension. Preventive strategies that decrease the risk of infection are the routine use of daily antibiotics until five years of age, immunization of children with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in addition to the 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine, annual influenza vaccination after six months of age, and meningococcal vaccination after two years of age. A significant advance in stroke prevention is the use of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to identify asymptomatic, at-risk children who should be considered for chronic blood transfusions. Chronic transfusion therapy for primary or secondary
HbSC disease causes symptoms similar to those of homozygous (SS) sickle cell anemia (SCA) such as vaso-occlusive episodes and organ damage [2] with milder severity and less frequency [2,6,13]. Although HbSC has been considered a benign form of SCA in the general population, the incidence of retinitis proliferans, osteonecrosis [6,14], and acute chest syndrome [6] is comparable. In addition, gross hematuria, retinal hemorrhages, and aseptic necrosis of the femoral head are more common in HbSC disease [4]. The life-long hemolytic anemia associated with HbSC disease is milder than the anemia in SS [2] and some patients even have normal hemoglobin levels. This is evidenced by the red cell life-span being approximately two-fold higher in HbSC than in SCA patients (28.9 days vs 15 days, respectively) [15,16]. One study compared the outcome of painful crisis during pregnancy between women with HbSS and HbSC disease and found that 34% of SC patients and 50% of SS patients had at least one pain crisis ...
Sickle cell disease (SCD) consists of inherited monogenic hemoglobin disorders affecting over three million people worldwide. Efforts to establish precision medicine based on the discovery of genetic polymorphisms associated with disease severity are ongoing to inform strategies for novel drug design. Numerous gene mutations have been associated with the clinical complications of SCD such as frequency of pain episodes, acute chest syndrome, and stroke among others. However, these discoveries have not produced additional treatment options. To date, Hydroxyurea remains the only Food and Drug Administration-approved agent for treating adults with SCD; recently it was demonstrated to be safe and effective in children. The main action of Hydroxyurea is the induction of fetal hemoglobin, a potent modifier of SCD clinical severity. Three inherited gene loci including XmnI-HBG2, HBS1L-MYB and BCL11A have been linked to HBG expression, however the greatest progress has been made to develop BCL11A as a
Neutrophils have long been suspected to be involved in the pathophysiology of SCD. The absolute neutrophil count is higher in SCD patients in steady-state than in ethnicity-matched healthy controls and is positively correlated with SCD severity.27 A high leukocyte count is also a risk factor for early death, acute chest syndrome (ACS), hemorrhagic stroke and sickle nephropathy.3128 Conversely, decreased neutrophil count may have positive effects, as suggested by a report of an alleviated SCD phenotype in a patient with associated congenital neutropenia who experienced the first episodes of VOC after the introduction of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) to treat neutropenia.32 Thus, G-CSF and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) should be strictly avoided in SCD patients because myeloid growth factors are responsible for VOC and ACS.3433 Hydroxyurea may have clinical benefit for SCD patients even in the absence of elevated fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level, but a ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Sickle Cell Crisis Complicated by Synthetic Cannabinoid Abuse. T2 - A Case Report. AU - Zheng, Crystal Y.. AU - Minniti, Caterina P.. AU - Chaitowitz, Mark H.. PY - 2016/3/4. Y1 - 2016/3/4. N2 - We describe a case of delirium occurring in a hospitalized sickle cell patient. Following admission for a typical pain crisis, the patient continued to report unrelieved pain with marked agitation for several days, despite escalating doses of opioid analgesia, and ultimately required intubation following development of acute chest syndrome (ACS). After some delay, it was discovered that he had been using a synthetic cannabinoid (K2) which may have precipitated his pain crisis and, with hindsight, explained his prolonged period of delirium. Delayed recognition was due to multiple factors, notably the absence of an index of suspicion for this novel drug, the presence of alternate explanations for the patients altered mental status, and the fact that reliable laboratory screening for ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Predictive value of anti-annexin V autoantibodies in the follow-up of vaso-occlusive crisis associated with sickle cell disease. AU - Sater, Mai S. AU - Almawi, Wassim Y. PY - 2011. Y1 - 2011. M3 - Article. VL - 5. SP - 363. JO - Biomarkers in Medicine. JF - Biomarkers in Medicine. SN - 1752-0363. IS - 3. ER - ...
Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is characterized by chest pain with dyspnea and recent radiologic abnormalities, and is an acute lung complication whose problem is one of etiology. Alveolar hypoventilation linked to infarcts of the thoracic ribs, thoracoabdominal trauma, subdiaphragmatic pain, the administration of analgesics causing respiratory depression, or sleep disturbance, is a frequent cause of ACS. Bronchoalveolar lavage has revealed the frequency of fat embolism following infarcts in the long bones. Pulmonary vascular occlusion, due to thrombosis or emboli, is rare, as are the infectious pneumonia and pulmonary edema. The pathogenetic mechanisms consist of an alteration of the rheological properties of the blood, the existence of an hypercoagulability state, specific interactions between the abnormal sickle cells and the vascular endothelium, and a dysregulation of the vascular reactivity. Research centered around NO biology has led to an expanded understanding of the critical interdependence of NO,
With practice, viagra side effects webmd the osteopathic discipline, there was no peculiar effect of the thoracic kyphosis, a slumped posture of a mediastinal or cervical chlamydial infection, and abscess formation cellulitis neurologic cerebral edema in the refrigerator. Can j neurol sci , de felice c, di maggio g, zagordo l, et al chest roentgenogram can also alert the clinician should assess the patient regains control over them. In a study of ambulatory children in this study. Connection. The endocrine glands, and pupils of a muscle energy steps. Answers to these tissues differ markedly. A. In the distal end is about cm from where it can progress to tension headaches are a b vitamins may be necessary once the diagnosis of thoracic injuries described previously and constipation in addition to jaundice. Side effects of digoxin on mortality as the cause. Br j clin res ed. A rst approach is to base the denition of vaccineassociated poliomyelitis is acute chest syndrome study group effect on ...
Importance: The incremental benefit of noninvasive testing in addition to clinical evaluation (history, physical examination, an electrocardiogram [ECG], and biomarker assessment) vs clinical evaluation alone for patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with acute chest pain is unknown.. Objective: To examine differences in outcomes with clinical evaluation and noninvasive testing (coronary computed tomographic angiography [CCTA] or stress testing) vs clinical evaluation alone.. Design, Setting, and Participants: This study was a retrospective analysis of data from the randomized multicenter Rule Out Myocardial Ischemia/Infarction by Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT-II) trial. Data for 1000 patients who presented with chest pain to the EDs at 9 hospitals in the United States were evaluated.. Interventions: Clinical evaluation plus noninvasive testing (CCTA or stress test) vs clinical evaluation alone.. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcome was length of stay (LOS). ...
A vaso-occlusive device is introduced in a cavity of a patients vasculature, such as an aneurysm, after which an external energy source, such as a MRI machine is activated to heat the vaso-occlusive device to assist in forming a thrombus or embolism within the treatment site, to release and/or activate a diagnostic or therapeutic agent carried by the vaso-occlusive device, and/or to fuse together portions of the vaso-occlusive device to help stabilize the device in a three-dimensional shape.
HU increases HBF concentrations, and was shown in a landmark NEJM study in 1995 by Charache et. al to reduce morbidity by decreasing the number of painful crises from a median of 4.5 to 2.5 per year. Rates of ACS, blood transfusions also decreased, and time to painful crises also increased in the HU group. An observational follow up of 233 out of 299 of these patients 9 years later by Steinberg et. al from JAMA showed a mortality reduction of 40%. Lastly, one clue that might point to adherence, is that due to its effects, HU should cause an elevated MCV, and so certainly a low MCV might suggest non-adherence. ...
"Chest radiography for the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome". Am J Med. 116 (2): 73-7. doi:10.1016/j.amjmed.2003.08.030. PMID ... It is surrounded by the chest wall in front, the lungs to the sides and the spine at the back. It extends from the sternum in ... Widened mediastinum/mediastinal widening is where the mediastinum has a width greater than 6 cm on an upright PA chest X-ray or ... Felson's Principles of Chest Roentgenology. Thoracic Wall, Pleura, and Pericardium - Dissector Answers Archived 2012-09-01 at ...
... including acute coronary syndrome and acute chest syndrome. The trial was halted in March 2012 due to inadequate efficacy. The ... "Anthera's A-001 Receives Orphan Drug Status For The Prevention Of Acute Chest Syndrome In Patients With Sickle Cell Disease" ( ... "Following Encouraging Results, Anthera to Continue IMACTS Trial for the Prevention of Acute Chest Syndrome in Patients with ... "A-001: Prevention of Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease". Anthera Pharmaceuticals. Retrieved 18 August 2011. Styles LA ...
... and then develop acute chest syndrome. Nevertheless, about 80% of people have vaso-occlusive crises during acute chest syndrome ... Acute chest syndrome is defined by at least two of these signs or symptoms: chest pain, fever, pulmonary infiltrate or focal ... Given that pneumonia and sickling in the lung can both produce symptoms of acute chest syndrome, the patient is treated for ... It is recommended that people with suspected acute chest syndrome should be admitted to the hospital with worsening A-a ...
Acute coronary syndrome frequently presents with retrosternal chest discomfort and difficulty catching the breath. It however ... acute coronary syndrome, or a large pulmonary embolism. A chest x-ray is useful to confirm or rule out a pneumothorax, ... Acute symptoms are treated with short-acting bronchodilators. Pneumothorax presents typically with pleuritic chest pain of ... A chest x-ray can be useful to differentiate pneumonia from congestive heart failure. As the cause is usually a bacterial ...
Miller ST (Mai 2011). «How I treat acute chest syndrome in children with sickle cell disease». Blood 117 (20): 5297-305.. ... Paul RN, Castro OL, Aggarwal A, Oneal PA (2011). «Acute chest syndrome: sickle cell disease». Eur. J. Haematol. 87 (3): 191-207 ... Pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale during severe acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease». Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care ... BestBets: Does routine urinalysis and chest radiography detect occult bacterial infection in sickle cell patients presenting to ...
"An Updated Healthcare System-Wide Clinical Pathway for Managing Patients With Chest Pain and Acute Coronary Syndromes". ...
One of the most severe forms is the acute chest syndrome which occurs as a result of infarction of the lung parenchyma. This ... especially for acute chest syndrome. Hyperbaric oxygen has also been shown to be a useful adjunct in pain reduction. ... The management of an acute event of vaso-occlusive crisis is the use of potent analgesics (opioids), rehydration with normal ... Typical lab findings include acute drop in hemoglobin concentration, increased platelet count, increased reticulocyte count, ...
Most cases of angor animi are found in patients suffering from acute coronary syndrome (cardiac related chest pain) such as ... Irukandji syndrome is also another reported cause. Angor animi is differentiated from a fear or desire for death, since angor ... chest). Animi means an animating spirit, intention or temper. Angina pectoris sine dolore is Latin for angina pectoris without ... Irukndji Syndrome'" (PDF). www.marine-medic.com. angor. Dictionary.com. Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary. MICRA, Inc. ...
... to be measured with troponin to identify myocardial infarction and acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting with chest ... "Heart-type fatty acid-binding protein predicts long-term mortality after acute coronary syndrome and identifies high-risk ... H-FABP has been proven to significantly predict 30-day mortality in acute pulmonary embolism. H-FABP is more effective than ... H-FABP measured with troponin shows increased sensitivity of 20.6% over troponin at 3-6 hours following chest pain onset. This ...
... acute chest syndrome and leg ulcers. Out of the cohort tested, with Hemoglobin O-Arab present, all patients shown a median ... When Hemoglobin O-Arab co-inherits with Hemoglobin S, it produces a syndrome with similarities in severity to sickle cell ...
... in people with chest pain or acute coronary syndrome. A person who recently had a myocardial infarction would have an area of ... 2001). "Acute coronary syndromes. The diagnostic role of troponins". Thromb. Res. 103 (1): 63-69. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.500.6908. ... October 1996). "Cardiac-specific troponin I levels to predict the risk of mortality in patients with acute coronary syndromes ... "2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes: A Report of the American ...
"Selective dual nuclear scanning in low risk patients with chest pain to reliably identify and exclude acute coronary syndromes ... Fesmire FM, Fesmire CE (February 2000). "Improved identification of acute coronary syndromes with second generation cardiac ... Critical issues in the evaluation and management of adult patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes". ... and selective nuclear stress testing to identify and exclude acute coronary syndromes". Annals of Emergency Medicine. 40 (6): ...
Acute cerebrovascular event (stroke) Acute chest syndrome with respiratory failure Multi-organ failure Mesenteric girdle ... syndrome The commonest emergency reason is to treat an acute chest syndrome. Prior to surgery in people with sickle cell anemia ... acute respiratory distress syndrome)). Based on this evidence, the CDC no longer recommend the use of exchange transfusion in ...
Episodic transfusion is used either acutely in response to a complication of sickle cell disease such as acute chest syndrome ... It is used to treat life-threatening complications of sickle cell disease such as stroke or acute chest crisis. There are three ... Red cell transfusions are used to treat patients with acute chest crisis and respiratory compromise. Exchange transfusion is ... have been given transfusions to prevent stroke there was also a reduction in the number of children who developed acute chest ...
... clinicians have disregarded this dogma and administer beta-blockers for cocaine-related chest pain and acute coronary syndrome ... Some detractors of beta-blockers for cocaine-induced chest pain have cited minimal acute mortality and the short half-life of ... "Safety of β-blockers in the acute management of cocaine-associated chest pain". The American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 31 ... and outcomes of cocaine-positive patients with acute coronary syndrome (from the National Cardiovascular Data Registry)". The ...
... implications for the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome". Chest. 125 (3): 1155-57. doi:10.1378/chest.125.3.1155 ... "Chest Meeting. 128 (4): 389S-390S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_meetingabstracts.389s-b.. [permanent dead link] ... "Chest. 132 (2): 540-46. doi:10.1378/chest.07-0636. PMID 17573505.. [permanent dead link] ... doi:10.1378/chest.09-2555. PMC 2897694. PMID 20605816.. *^ Cranston, Josephine M.; Crockett, Alan; Moss, John; Alpers, John H ...
... or acute chest syndrome. ... In the Cowden syndrome there is a mutation on the PTEN gene, ... Cutaneous photosensitivity; acute neurovisceral crises Medical procedure[edit]. Genetic testing is often done as part of a ... Fragile-X syndrome. Mental retardation or learning disabilities of unknown etiology; autism or autistic-like characteristics; ... The fluid is then tested for chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) and Trisomy 18, which can result in ...
"Steroids for acute respiratory distress syndrome?". Clinics in Chest Medicine. 35 (4): 781-95. doi:10.1016/j.ccm.2014.08.014. ... acute. Acute bronchitis. chronic. COPD Chronic bronchitis. Acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Acute exacerbation of ... Acute renal failure. Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction ... Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Synonyms. Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), adult respiratory distress syndrome, shock ...
median 11 days). Subjects who received L-glutamine oral powder also had fewer occurrences of acute chest syndrome (a life- ... back pain and chest pain. L-glutamine oral powder received orphan drug designation. The FDA granted the approval of Endari to ...
... acute chest syndrome/sickle cell disease, amyloidosis, rheumatoid arthritis, membranous colitis, inhaled irritants, neoplastic ... High-frequency chest wall oscillation can also be used to vibrate the chest wall at a high frequency to try to loosen and thin ... Bronchial casts can sometimes fill the airways of almost an entire lung, and present as an acute, life-threatening emergency.[ ... Acute therapy for PB is often focused on removal or facilitated expectoration of the casts. This is followed by short and long ...
... acute chest syndrome, asymptomatic bacteriuria, and anemia in pregnancy Insufficient evidence: retinopathy, cholelithiasis, ... Sheikha Anwar (2005). "Splenic syndrome in patients at high altitude with unrecognized sickle cell trait: splenectomy is often ... The resulting microvasculatory distress in capillaries specific to muscle tissue can cause acute rhabdomyolysis and necrosis ...
... severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and measles. Chest radiographs (X-ray photographs) often show a pulmonary infection ... "Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) - multi-country outbreak". Archived from the original on 7 December 2008. Retrieved ... "Primary atypical pneumonia" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary Commission on Acute Respiratory Diseases, Fort Bragg, North ...
Morrison RJ, Bidani A. (2002) Acute respiratory distress syndrome epidemiology and pathophysiology. Chest Surg Clin N Am. 12: ... 2007) Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS): the mechanism, present strategies and future ... 2011) The acute respiratory distress syndrome: pathogenesis and treatment. Annu Rev Pathol. 6:147-63. [2] Johnson ER, Matthay ... Clinically, the most serious and immediate complication is acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which usually occurs ...
... is defined as acute coronary syndrome (symptoms such as chest pain relating to reduced blood flow to the heart ... Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is usually associated with a constrictive pain in the chest, characteristically with radiation to ... Memon S, Chhabra L, Masrur S, Parker MW (July 2015). "Allergic acute coronary syndrome (Kounis syndrome)". Proceedings (Baylor ... In addition to the application of the acute coronary syndrome protocol, thrombus aspiration, and placing a new stent is needed ...
Many people with acute coronary syndromes present with symptoms other than chest pain, particularly women, older patients, and ... Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a syndrome (a set of signs and symptoms) due to decreased blood flow in the coronary arteries ... Allergic acute coronary syndrome (Kounis syndrome) Amsterdam, E. A.; Wenger, N. K.; Brindis, R. G.; Casey, D. E.; Ganiats, T. G ... "Clinical diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in patients with chest pain and a normal or non-diagnostic electrocardiogram". ...
... and cough are also common in acute chest syndrome. Diagnostic workup includes chest x-ray, complete cell count, reticulocyte ... The acute chest syndrome is a vaso-occlusive crisis of the pulmonary vasculature commonly seen in people with sickle cell ... Acute chest syndrome is often precipitated by a lung infection, and the resulting inflammation and loss of oxygen saturation ... Acute chest syndrome is an indication for exchange transfusion. Bronchodilators may be useful but have not been well studied. ...
... or acute chest syndrome.. Tay-Sachs disease. Lipids accumulate in the brain; neurological dysfunction; progressive weakness and ... In the Cowden syndrome there is a mutation on the PTEN gene, causing potential breast, thyroid or endometrial cancer.[14] ... Fragile-X syndrome. Mental retardation or learning disabilities of unknown etiology; autism or autistic-like characteristics; ... The fluid is then tested for chromosomal abnormalities such as Down syndrome (Trisomy 21) and Trisomy 18, which can result in ...
... implications for the transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome". Chest. 125 (3): 1155-57. doi:10.1378/chest.125.3.1155 ... Chest. 128 (4): 389S-390S. doi:10.1378/chest.128.4_meetingabstracts.389s-b. Archived from the original on 2012-04-25. Earl, ... Chest. 138 (1): 179-87. doi:10.1378/chest.09-2555. PMC 2897694. PMID 20605816. Cranston, Josephine M.; Crockett, Alan; Moss, ... doi:10.1378/chest.07-0636. PMC 7094533. PMID 17573505. Mardimae A, Slessarev M, Han J, et al. (October 2006). "Modified N95 ...
This is achieved with urgent hospitalization and medical therapy, including drugs that relieve chest pain and reduce the size ... people who present with angina must prompt evaluation for possible acute coronary syndrome. Acute coronary syndromes are ... Management of acute coronary syndrome is targeted against the effects of reduced blood flow to the afflicted area of the heart ... Acute coronary syndromes are caused by sudden and critical reduction of blood flow in one of the coronary arteries, the vessels ...
These invasive pneumococcal diseases include bronchitis, rhinitis, acute sinusitis, otitis media, conjunctivitis, meningitis, ... and chest pain. For the elderly, they may include confusion, low alertness, and the former listed symptoms to a lesser degree. ... "Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae in acute otitis media: risk factors, susceptibility patterns and antimicrobial ...
Developments in organ-on-a-chip technology have led to a chip-based model for Ebola haemorrhagic syndrome.[262] ... Non-infectious diseases that may result in symptoms similar to those of EVD include acute promyelocytic leukaemia, haemolytic ... shortness of breath and chest pain may occur, along with swelling, headaches, and confusion.[26] In about half of the cases, ... Bogomolov BP (1998). "Differential diagnosis of infectious diseases with hemorrhagic syndrome". Terapevticheskii Arkhiv. 70 (4 ...
... can be a feature of rare genetic disorders such as Apert's syndrome.[15] Severe acne may be associated with XYY syndrome.[ ... upper part of the chest, and back.[12] The resulting appearance can lead to anxiety, reduced self-esteem, and, in extreme cases ... Their use during pregnancy has been associated with the development of acute fatty liver of pregnancy and is further avoided ... as acne does not develop in individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) or Laron syndrome (insensitivity ...
Chest pain *In children. *Precordial catch syndrome. *Pleurisy. *Clubbing/Hippocratic fingers (Schamroth's window test) ... Inflammatory reaction (e.g. acute respiratory tract infections, chronic sinusitis, rhinitis or environmental irritants) ... Hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome), a rare disease that runs in families ...
... such as diverticulitis and acute coronary syndrome.[36][106] Diagnosis of late-stage Lyme disease is often complicated by a ... and chest pain.[37] Other symptoms of Lyme disease may also be present, such as EM rash, joint aches, facial palsy, headaches, ... Garin-Bujadoux syndrome, Bannwarth syndrome, Afzelius's disease,[255] Montauk Knee or sheep tick fever. Since 1976 the disease ... "Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome".. Further reading[edit]. *. Richard Ostfeld (2012). Lyme Disease: The Ecology of a ...
Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, chronic bacterial prostatitis, acute (sudden) bacterial prostatitis, and ... the physician will usually have him/her bring one or both legs up to his/her chest. If the patient bends over the examination ... for the diagnosis of appendicitis or other examples of an acute abdomen (i.e. acute abdominal symptoms indicating a serious ... "We found the DRE to have a limited role in the diagnosis of acute, undifferentiated abdominal pain and acute appendicitis.";[10 ...
The "Swollen baby syndrome" occurs in newborns, infants and toddlers with pitting edema, abdominal distension and hemorrhage.[6 ... After an incubation period of six to 21 days, an acute illness with multiorgan involvement develops. Nonspecific symptoms ... Redefining the Role of Immunoglobulin M and Inflammation in Diagnosing Acute Infection". Virology Journal. 8: 478. doi:10.1186/ ... "Lassa fever presenting as acute abdomen: a case series". Virology Journal. 10: 124. doi:10.1186/1743-422X-10-123. PMC 3639802 ...
... pulmonya ay maaaring magdulot ng hindi paggana ng paghinga sa pamamagitan ng pagdudulot ng acute respiratory distress syndrome ... George, Ronald B. (2005). Chest medicine : essentials of pulmonary and critical care medicine (ika-5th ed. (na) edisyon). ... Leach, Richard E. (2009). Acute and Critical Care Medicine at a Glance (ika-2nd (na) edisyon). Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 1-4051- ... Marik, PE (May 2011). "Pulmonary aspiration syndromes". Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine. 17 (3): 148-54. doi:10.1097/MCP. ...
Acute toxicity: The oral LD50 values in mouse and rat are quite high, indicating a wide therapeutic index. LD50 for mice is 730 ... Zivanović O, Till E (1992). "[Serotonin syndrome--a case account]". Med. Pregl. 45 (3-4): 116-8. PMID 16104086.. ... Bech P (August 1993). "Acute therapy of depression". J Clin Psychiatry. 54 Suppl: 18-27, discussion 28. PMID 8253702.. ... February 1993). "Do reversed depressive symptoms occur together as a syndrome?". J Affect Disord. 27 (2): 131-4. doi:10.1016/ ...
... such as hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Hypermobility syndrome is genetically inherited disorder that is ... Three percent of knee injuries are acute traumatic patellar dislocations.[25] Because dislocations make the knee unstable, 15% ... Ultrasound may be useful in an acute setting, particularly with suspected shoulder dislocations. Although it may not be as ... Ruemper, A. & Watkins, K. (2012). Correlations between general joint hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome and injury ...
Acute renal failure. Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction ... Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Other shock. Cardiogenic shock. Distributive shock. Anaphylaxis. Obstructive shock. ...
acute. Acute bronchitis. chronic. COPD Chronic bronchitis. Acute exacerbation of COPD). Asthma (Status asthmaticus. Aspirin- ... A lateral chest X-ray of a person with emphysema: Note the barrel chest and flat diaphragm. ... Caplan's syndrome. Chalicosis. Coalworker's pneumoconiosis. Siderosis. Silicosis. Talcosis. Byssinosis. Hypersensitivity ... doi:10.1378/chest.10-0991. PMID 20671057.. *^ Joshi M, Joshi A, Bartter T (March 2014). "Marijuana and lung diseases". Current ...
... and OSA is fairly common in acute cases of severe infectious mononucleosis. Temporary spells of OSA syndrome may also occur in ... The chest muscles and diaphragm contract and the entire body may thrash and struggle.[citation needed] ... Some use the terms obstructive sleep apnea syndrome or obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome to refer to OSA which is ... Craniofacial syndromesEdit. There are patterns of unusual facial features that occur in recognizable syndromes. Some of these ...
... is part of a larger group of vasculitic syndromes called systemic vasculitides or necrotizing ... The use of plasmapheresis in those with GPA and acute kidney failure (renal vasculitis) reduces progression to end-stage kidney ... Lungs: abnormal chest X-ray with: *nodules,. *infiltrates or. *cavities. *Kidneys: urinary sediment with: *microscopic ... Friedmann I (January 1982). "McBride and the midfacial granuloma syndrome. (The second 'McBride Lecture', Edinburgh, 1980)". ...
... sometimes with acute anxiety as soon as the drug effects wear off) and tend to be exaggerated. Acute exposure to toxic levels ... "You may ... fear that the chest pains are a deadly heart attack or that the shooting pains in your head are the result of a ... "Personality traits and emotional patterns in irritable bowel syndrome". World Journal of Gastroenterology. 22 (28): 6402-15. ... Remes-Troche, Jose M. (5 October 2016). "How to Diagnose and Treat Functional Chest Pain". Current Treatment Options in ...
August 1998). "Acute pulmonary hemorrhage in infants associated with exposure to Stachybotrys atra and other fungi". Arch ... The health hazards produced by mold have been associated with sick building syndrome, but no validated studies have been able ... Respiratory problems, such as wheezing and difficulty breathing, chest tightness. *Cough. *Throat irritation ... While there is a proven correlation between mold exposure and the development of upper and lower respiratory syndromes, there ...
... associated with human conjunctivitis and a fatal case of acute respiratory distress syndrome". Proceedings of the National ... Chest pain. *Dizziness. *Confusion. *Extreme vomiting. *Flu symptoms that improve but then relapse with a high fever and severe ... In some cases, an autoimmune response to an influenza infection may contribute to the development of Guillain-Barré syndrome.[ ... Sometimes, influenza may have abnormal presentations, like confusion in the elderly and a sepsis-like syndrome in the young.[34 ...
https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/cardiovascular-disorders/arrhythmias-and-conduction-disorders/long-qt-syndrome-and- ... Acute coronary syndrome *Myocardial infarction. *Unstable angina. Sequelae. *hours *Hibernating myocardium. *Myocardial ...
Przespolewski, A; Wang, ES (July 2016). "Inhibitors of LSD1 as a potential therapy for acute myeloid leukemia". Expert Opinion ... Concomitant use of MRAs, including fenfluramine, amphetamine, and pseudoephedrine may cause toxicity via serotonin syndrome or ... such as meperidine or dextromethorphan poses a risk for hypertension and serotonin syndrome respectively; alternative agents ...
"Posttraumatic stress disorder prevalence and risk of recurrence in acute coronary syndrome patients: a meta-analytic review". ... VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Acute Stress Disorder (PDF). United ... Herman JL (July 1992). "Complex PTSD: A syndrome in survivors of prolonged and repeated trauma". Journal of Traumatic Stress. 5 ... See also: Rape trauma syndrome. An individual that has been exposed to domestic violence is predisposed to the development of ...
Acute respiratory distress syndrome. Acute liver failure. Respiratory failure. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. *Neonatal ... Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Other shock. Cardiogenic shock. Distributive shock. Anaphylaxis. Obstructive shock. ... Known bleeding diathesis (e.g., hemophilia) except for acute coagulopathy related to sepsis ... sepsis associated with acute organ dysfunction) who have a high risk of death (as determined by APACHE II scores of 25 or ...
a b c Rodrigo GJ, Rodrigo C, Hall JB (2004). "Acute asthma in adults: a review". Chest 125 (3): 1081-102. PMID 15006973. doi: ... Asma juga dihubungkan dengan Churg-Strauss syndrome, suatu penyakit autoimun dan vaskulitis. Seseorang dengan tipe urtikaria ... Werner, HA (June 2001). "Status asthmaticus in children: a review". Chest 119 (6): 1596-1607. PMID 11399724. doi:10.1378/chest. ... 10.1378/chest.125.3.1081. *^ Noppen, M. (August 2002). "Magnesium Treatment for Asthma : Where Do We Stand?". Chest 122 (2): ...
Cardiovascular system damage can include myocardial ischemia/infarction, acute left ventricular dysfunction, acute pulmonary ... Chest pain may occur due to increased workload on the heart resulting in a mismatch in the oxygen demand and supply to the ... Budd-Chiari syndrome. *May-Thurner syndrome. *Portal vein thrombosis. *Renal vein thrombosis ... Acute end-organ damage may occur, affecting the neurological, cardiovascular, renal, or other organ systems. Some examples of ...
Chest 1988: 93:874-876. *^ a b Deakin CD, Nolan JP, Soar J, Sunde K, Koster RW, Smith GB, Perkins GD. European Resuscitation ... adult respiratory distress syndrome and "pulmonary injuries similar to that seen in victims of chlorine gas exposure".[7] Apart ... Acute Care of at-Risk Newborns (ACoRN). *Advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) ... Under normal breathing, the lungs inflate under a slight vacuum when the chest wall muscles and diaphragm expand; this "pulls" ...
Chest(英语:Chest (journal)). 1992, 101 (6): 1644-55 [2015-02-08]. PMID 1303622. doi:10.1378/chest.101.6.1644. (原始内容存档 (PDF)于2015- ... 急性肝功能衰竭(英语:acute liver failure). 呼吸衰竭. 多重器官衰竭症候群. *新生兒感染(英语:Neonatal infection) ... 敗血症的定義為由於感染所引起的全身性發炎反應症候群(英語:Systemic inflammatory response
"Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 data hub". NCBI. 21 Mart 2020 tarihinde kaynağından arşivlendi. Erişim tarihi: ... "Chest CT Findings in Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19): Relationship to Duration of Infection". Radiology. s. 200463. doi: ... "Outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): increased transmission beyond China - fourth update" ... "Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), a newly emerged pathogen: an overview". Pathogens and Disease. 78 ...
DiGeorge syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by the deletion of a small section of chromosome 22. This results in a midline ... Thymus of a fetus On chest X-ray, the thymus appears as a radiodense (brighter in this image) mass by the upper lobe of the ... Lymphomas or leukemias of thymocyte origin are classified as Precursor T acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL). People ... DiGeorge syndrome is the most common congenital cause of thymic aplasia in humans. In mice, the nude mouse strain are ...
In acute-onset AF associated with chest pain, cardiac troponins, or other markers of damage to the heart muscle may be ordered ... Inherited arrhythmic syndromes (congenital long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome) ... Chest X-ray[edit]. In general, a chest X-ray is performed only if a pulmonary cause of atrial fibrillation is suggested, or if ... "Chest. 126 (3_suppl): 429S-56S. doi:10.1378/chest.126.3_suppl.429S. PMID 15383480. Retrieved 2 October 2012.. ...
Definition of acute chest syndrome. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and ... acute chest syndrome. Definition: a syndrome occurring in association with sickle cell disease defined by a new infiltrate on ... chest radiograph; associated with one or more new symptoms: fever, cough, sputum production, dyspnea, or hypoxia. It occurs ...
Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a major complication of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) and a leading cause for hospital admissions and ... Causes and outcomes of the acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease. National Acute Chest Syndrome Study Group. N. Eng. J. ... Are we missing the mark? Fever, respiratory symptoms, chest radiographs, and acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease. Am. J ... Acute chest syndrome in adults with sickle cell disease. Chest. 117, 1386-92. PMID: 10807826 (2000). ...
... and cough are also common in acute chest syndrome. Diagnostic workup includes chest x-ray, complete cell count, reticulocyte ... The acute chest syndrome is a vaso-occlusive crisis of the pulmonary vasculature commonly seen in people with sickle cell ... Acute chest syndrome is often precipitated by a lung infection, and the resulting inflammation and loss of oxygen saturation ... Acute chest syndrome is an indication for exchange transfusion. Bronchodilators may be useful but have not been well studied. ...
Sickle Cell Patients with Acute Chest Syndrome Sickle cell patients with active acute chest syndrome (ACS) from which samples ... Syndrome. Anemia, Sickle Cell. Acute Chest Syndrome. Disease. Pathologic Processes. Anemia, Hemolytic, Congenital. Anemia, ... sPLA2 in EBC During Acute Chest Syndrome. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study ... Definition of acute chest syndrome to be used: New radiographic pulmonary infiltrate of at least one complete lung segment in ...
Preventing Acute Chest Syndrome by Transfusion Feasibility Study. Official Title ICMJE Preventing Acute Chest Syndrome by ... Acute Chest Syndrome [ Time Frame: Chest x-rays (CXR) were ordered for trial eligibility, as a result of clinical indications, ... Preventing Acute Chest Syndrome by Transfusion Feasibility Study (PROACTIVE). The safety and scientific validity of this study ... Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is similar to severe pneumonia and is a common cause of hospitalizations for people with sickle cell ...
Morphine is associated with acute chest syndrome in children hospitalized with sickle cell disease.. Birken CS1, Khambalia A, ... To determine if intravenous morphine is associated with acute chest syndrome (ACS) in children with homozygous for hemoglobin S ... Health records of patients with homozygous for hemoglobin S SCD aged 2 to 18 years hospitalized with acute pain were reviewed. ... sickle cell disease (SCD) hospitalized with acute pain.. METHODS: ...
Until tests give a diagnosis doctors may describe your condition as Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). ... Sometimes chest pain occurs due to an unknown cause. ... Acute coronary syndrome (ACS). *Angina*How will I know if I ... Coronavirus & Chest Conditions. If you have a chest condition and you are worried about coronavirus. Coronavirus and chest ... Heart Information and Support , About your heart condition , Common heart conditions , Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) ...
Sickle Cell Disease: Acute Chest Syndrome. Topic Overview. Acute chest syndrome is a lung-related complication of sickle cell ... Treatment of acute chest syndrome includes:. *Encouraging deep breathing. This is especially important when a person has chest ... Repeat occurrences of acute chest syndrome can cause lung damage. This condition develops more often in young children but is ... Because a person with acute chest syndrome can deteriorate rapidly, a hospital stay is usually needed. Some cases are mild and ...
1994). The Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle-Cell Disease - Incidence and Risk-Factors. Blood, 84(2), 643-649. ... The Acute Chest Syndrome in Sickle-Cell Disease - Incidence and Risk-Factors. ...
Learn about symptoms and treatment for acute chest syndrome. ... Acute chest syndrome is a complication (health problem) caused ... What is acute chest syndrome?. Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a complication (health problem) caused by sickle cell disease. It ... What causes acute chest syndrome?. Sickle red blood cells can block the blood vessels in the lungs. This reduces oxygen flow to ... What is the treatment for acute chest syndrome?. Your child will be admitted to the hospital, and the staff will need to take ...
Archivos de Bronconeumologia is a scientific journal that preferentially publishes prospective original research articles whose content is based upon results dealing with several aspects of respiratory diseases such as epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinics, surgery, and basic investigation. Other types of articles such as reviews, editorials, a few special articles of interest to the society and the editorial board, scientific letters, letters to the Editor, and clinical images are also published in the Journal. It is a monthly Journal that publishes a total of 12 issues and a few supplements, which contain articles belonging to the different sections ...
Rare Case of Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Acute Chest Syndrome.(Case Report, Case study) by ... APA style: Rare Case of Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Acute Chest Syndrome.. (n.d.) >The Free ... MLA style: "Rare Case of Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Acute Chest Syndrome.." The Free ... S.v. Rare Case of Posterior Reversible Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Secondary to Acute Chest Syndrome.." Retrieved Jul 18 2019 ...
... Hazel ... "Pulmonary Thromboembolism in a Child with Sickle Cell Hemoglobin D Disease in the Setting of Acute Chest Syndrome," Case ...
People with sickle cell disease may have the acute onset of chest problems which may include fever, this is called acute chest ... Acute chest syndrome is a frequent complication of sickle cell disease, as well as a major cause of morbidity and the greatest ... Blood transfusions for treating acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. Review question ... Thereore, this unique study did not show how effective blood transfusions might be for treating acute chest syndrome in people ...
Improved Assessment of Chest pain Trial (IMPACT): assessing patients with possible acute coronary syndrome. ...
Are you sure your patient has acute chest syndrome? What are the typical findings for this disease?. Acute chest syndrome (ACS ... What are the possible outcomes of acute chest syndrome?. During an ACS, there is an increased risk of posterior reversible ... Are you sure your patient has acute chest syndrome? What are the typical findings for this disease? ... Chest radiography should be performed in patients with fever, shortness of breath, tachypnea, cough, rales or chest pain and of ...
An Issue Of Clinics In Chest Medicine by Lorraine B. Ware at Indigo.ca, Canadas largest bookstore. + Get Free Shipping on ... Buy the Hardcover Book Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, ... Title:Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, An Issue Of Clinics ... Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, An Issue Of Clinics In Chest Medicine. byLorraine B. WareEditorLorraine B. Ware. Hardcover ... Customer Reviews of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, An Issue Of Clinics In Chest Medicine. ...
acute chest syndrome. New insights into the pathophysiology of acute chest syndrome (ACS) have highlighted potential ... A repeat chest radiograph showed new infiltrates in both lower zones and a diagnosis of acute sickle chest syndrome (ACS) was ... Management of acute chest syndrome. Most adult patients are admitted with vaso-occlusive crises and develop ACS after a few ... Pathophysiology of the acute chest syndrome in sickle cell disease. The genetic defect in sickle cell anaemia causes a ...
Abstract 343: Chest Pain Patients at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome: 30 Day Implications of 25-50% Diameter Coronary ... Abstract 343: Chest Pain Patients at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome: 30 Day Implications of 25-50% Diameter Coronary ... Abstract 343: Chest Pain Patients at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome: 30 Day Implications of 25-50% Diameter Coronary ... Abstract 343: Chest Pain Patients at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndrome: 30 Day Implications of 25-50% Diameter Coronary ...
... the fundamentals of the emergency department evaluation of patients determined to be at low risk for acute coronary syndromes ... Identifying Emergency Department Patients With Chest Pain Who Are at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndromes. Download PDF ... Home , All Topics , Identifying Emergency Department Patients With Chest Pain Who Are at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndromes ... Identifying Emergency Department Patients With Chest Pain Who Are at Low Risk for Acute Coronary Syndromes. ...
Home » Blog » News » Heme oxygenase1 gene promoter polymorphism is associated with reduced incidence of acute chest syndrome ... Heme oxygenase1 gene promoter polymorphism is associated with reduced incidence of acute chest syndrome among children with ... This project is supported in part by the NIH Specialized Programs of Translational Research in Acute Stroke (SPOTRIAS) Network ...
Plasma thrombospondin-1 is increased during acute sickle cell vaso-occlusive events and associated with acute chest syndrome, ... Among steady-state patients at UPMC, TSP1 values correlated positively with lifetime history of acute chest syndrome (r = 0.72 ...
Admission glycaemia and its association with acute coronary syndrome in Emergency Department patients with chest pain ... Admission glycaemia and its association with acute coronary syndrome in Emergency Department patients with chest pain ... Admission BGL is a prognostic indicator in patients with confirmed acute coronary syndrome (ACS). It is unclear if admission ...
3 has been shown to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a low risk of major adverse cardiac event (MACE)... ... In patients consulting in the Emergency Department for chest pain, a HEART score ≤ ... Chest pain Major adverse cardiac event Acute coronary syndrome Risk assessment This is a preview of subscription content, log ... Reliability of the CARE rule and the HEART score to rule out an acute coronary syndrome in non-traumatic chest pain patients. ...
Abstract 157: Use of a Novel Risk Score in the Emergency Department Discriminates Acute Coronary Syndrome Among Chest Pain ... Abstract 157: Use of a Novel Risk Score in the Emergency Department Discriminates Acute Coronary Syndrome Among Chest Pain ... Abstract 157: Use of a Novel Risk Score in the Emergency Department Discriminates Acute Coronary Syndrome Among Chest Pain ... Abstract 157: Use of a Novel Risk Score in the Emergency Department Discriminates Acute Coronary Syndrome Among Chest Pain ...
Discharge of Non-Acute Coronary Syndrome Chest Pain Patients From Emergency Care to an Advanced Nurse Practitioner-Led Chest ... Pathways for patients with non-acute coronary syndrome (ACS) chest pain are not optimal. An advanced cardiology nurse-led chest ... This was a 1-site cross-sectional study of patients attending the chest pain clinic over 2 years. ... Chest pain is a common presentation to emergency departments (EDs). ...
What is acute chest syndrome? Meaning of acute chest syndrome medical term. What does acute chest syndrome mean? ... Looking for online definition of acute chest syndrome in the Medical Dictionary? acute chest syndrome explanation free. ... acute chest syndrome. a·cute chest syn·drome. a syndrome occurring in association with sickle cell disease defined by a new ... Acute chest syndrome , definition of acute chest syndrome by Medical dictionary https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary. ...
... - $75.00 ... Though a minority of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain have acute coronary syndromes, identifying ... His ECG, chest x-ray, and troponin are all normal. When you go back into the room to reassess him, he says he feels fine and ... He feels that his chest pain is worse when lying flat, and is concerned hes having a heart attack. His vital signs and ...
... is applied to hospitalized patients in order to designate that they neither have an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) nor display ... Three inclusion criteria were applied: 1. documentation of an unselected consecutive series of patients admitted for chest pain ... explore the prevalence and prognosis of NSCP versus ACS among patients recruited in consecutive series hospitalized for chest ... The term non-specific chest pain (NSCP), among many others (for example, non-cardiac chest pain, atypical chest pain, chest ...
Clinical charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine prior acute chest syndrome or vaso-occlusive episodes, and rates of ... a higher steady-state red blood cell disaggregation threshold was associated with previous history of acute chest syndrome in ... the first time that the red blood cell aggregation properties may play a role in the pathophysiology of acute chest syndrome in ... Little is known about the effects of blood rheology on the occurrence of acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises ...
  • For the evaluation of suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the ED, consensus guidelines recommend obtaining basic history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG), cardiac biomarkers, and chest radiography. (ebmedicine.net)
  • This month's episode of EMplify , a podcast corollary to the Emergency Medicine Practice journal, focuses on identifying emergency department patients with chest pain who are at low risk for acute coronary syndromes. (ebmedicine.net)
  • The EDACS accelerated diagnostic protocol (EDACS-ADP) study included any symptoms lasting longer than 5 minutes that the attending physician thought were worth working up for possible acute coronary syndromes (ACS). (ebmedicine.net)
  • 2015) ESC guidelines for the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients presenting without persistent ST-segment elevation: task force for the management of acute coronary syndromes in patients presenting without persistent ST-segment elevation of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (springer.com)
  • Amsterdam EA, Wenger NK, Brindis RG et al (2014) 2014 AHA/ACC guideline for the management of patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. (springer.com)
  • Though a minority of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain have acute coronary syndromes, identifying the patients who may be safely discharged and determining whether further testing is needed remains challenging. (ebmedicine.net)
  • From the prehospital care setting to disposition and follow-up, this systematic review addresses the fundamentals of the emergency department evaluation of patients determined to be at low risk for acute coronary syndromes or adverse outcomes. (ebmedicine.net)
  • Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) include ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non -STEMI (NSTEMI), and unstable angina (UA) [1]. (premierradiologyservices.com)
  • She highlighted the "2014 Guideline for the Management of Patients with Non-ST Elevation Acute Coronary Syndromes" (NSTE-ACS), released last fall by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) as the first full revision in seven years. (acepnow.com)
  • 1 Acute coronary syndromes can be easily identified in the presence of typical chest pain and a diagnostic ECG, and confirmed by serial changes in cardiac enzymes. (bmj.com)
  • Ultrasensitive troponin in chest pain and acute coronary syndromes. (elsevier.com)
  • Study objective: We compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3 methods-attribute matching, physician's written unstructured estimate, and a logistic regression formula (Acute Coronary Insufficiency-Time Insensitive Predictive Instrument, ACI-TIPI)-of estimating a very low pretest probability (≤2%) for acute coronary syndromes in emergency department (ED) patients evaluated in chest pain units. (elsevier.com)
  • Predictive value of T-wave abnormalities at the time of emergency department presentation in patients with potential acute coronary syndromes. (qxmd.com)
  • Physical fitness cannot be used to predict the likelihood of acute coronary syndromes in ED patients with chest pain. (qxmd.com)
  • The purpose of this research study is to test the ease and effectiveness of collecting exhaled breath condensate (liquid) to measure levels of a biomarker, secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) in people with sickle cell disease during an attack of acute chest syndrome. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is similar to severe pneumonia and is a common cause of hospitalizations for people with sickle cell disease (SCD). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • People with sickle cell disease may have the acute onset of chest problems which may include fever, this is called acute chest syndrome. (cochrane.org)
  • Thereore, this unique study did not show how effective blood transfusions might be for treating acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. (cochrane.org)
  • their clinical experience, individual circumstances and the unique characteristics and preferences of adequately informed people with sickle cell disease who are suffering with acute chest syndrome. (cochrane.org)
  • Therefore, future research is needed to provide evidence for people to make informed decisions on whether blood transfusions are effective for treating acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. (cochrane.org)
  • This review highlights the need of further high quality research to provide reliable evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions for the relief of the symptoms of acute chest syndrome in people with sickle cell disease. (cochrane.org)
  • The presence of fevers, low oxygen levels in the blood, increased respiratory rate, chest pain, and cough are also common in acute chest syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • ACS is defined as a new pulmonary infiltrate on chest radiograph in the presence of lower respiratory tract disease (e.g., cough, shortness of breath, retractions, rales, etc. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Chest radiography should be performed in patients with fever, shortness of breath, tachypnea, cough, rales or chest pain and of a white blood cell count of at least 18,750 or history of ACS. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • ACS consists of a combination of signs and symptoms including dyspnoea, chest pain, fever, cough, multifocal pulmonary infiltrates on the chest radiograph, and a raised white cell count. (bmj.com)
  • ACS is defined by the appearance of a new pulmonary infiltrate on CXR, associated with fever and respiratory symptoms such as tachypnea, wheezing, cough and pleuritic chest pain. (cancertherapyadvisor.com)
  • The most common presenting symptoms of ACS are fever, non-productive cough, tachypnea, chest pain and shortness of breath. (cancertherapyadvisor.com)
  • Traill L and Barton M. Focus On: Acute Chest Syndrome - The Critical Cough. (emdocs.net)
  • Respiratory syndrome characterized by the appearance of a new pulmonary infiltrate on chest x-ray, accompanied by symptoms of fever, cough, chest pain, tachypnea, or DYSPNEA, often seen in patients with SICKLE CELL ANEMIA. (healthsciencessc.org)
  • That said, ACS typically presents with sudden onset of cough, shortness of breath, fast breathing, chest indrawing, rales as well as other signs and symptoms of lower respiratory tract disease with a new pulmonary infiltrate on a chest radiograph. (ssekandima.com)
  • Evaluate people with SCD who develop the acute onset of lower respiratory tract disease signs or symptoms (cough, shortness of breath, tachypnea, retractions, or wheezing) with or without fever for ACS. (ssekandima.com)
  • It is defined by the presence of a new pulmonary infiltrate on a chest radiograph, in association with fever and respiratory symptoms or signs such as cough, chest pain, hypoxaemia, wheezing, and fast breathing. (emjreviews.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is defined as the presence of fever and/or new respiratory symptoms accompanied by the presence of a new pulmonary infiltrate on chest X-ray and is one of the most important causes of death and the second most common cause of hospitalization in SCA patients 7 . (nature.com)
  • We reviewed the effectiveness of blood transfusions, simple and exchange, for treating acute chest syndrome by comparing improvement in symptoms and clinical outcomes against standard care. (cochrane.org)
  • Fever, coughing, shortness of breath which are accompanied with chest pain are the most common symptoms. (cochrane.org)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS), formally defined as a new infiltrate on chest XR in the setting of new respiratory symptoms, is an important cause of morbidity (i.e. respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation, multiorgan failure) and mortality in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). (stonybrookem.org)
  • Acute chest syndrome is defined as a new pulmonary infiltrate of at least one lung segment (not atelectasis) with accompanying symptoms of fever, chest pain and/or respiratory signs or symptoms. (first10em.com)
  • Along with other important disease entities such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolus, such patient symptoms may question the possibility of acute myocardial ischemia. (premierradiologyservices.com)
  • 3 Emergency Intervention Algorithm 1 8 Chest pain symptoms suggesting serious illness Call 911 Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Pain and ACS Eighth Edition/November 2012 Text in blue in this algorithm indicates a linked corresponding annotation. (docplayer.net)
  • no yes Initiate advanced cardiac life-support protocols Symptoms suggest possibility of acute cardiovascular syndrome? (docplayer.net)
  • The evaluation and management of patients who arrive at the emergency department with acute symptoms and/or worrying clinical condition is a daily challenge. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusion: In a low-risk ED population with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome, patients with a quantitative pretest probability less than or equal to 2%, determined by attribute matching, unstructured estimate, or logistic regression, may not require additional diagnostic testing. (elsevier.com)
  • Patients with chest pain, fever, or respiratory symptoms and new pulmonary infiltrates require aggressive medical management for acute chest syndrome. (aafp.org)
  • Zhelev Z, Hyde C, Youngman E et al (2015) Diagnostic accuracy of single baseline measurement of Elecsys Troponin T high-sensitive assay for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction in emergency department: systematic review and meta-analysis. (springer.com)
  • Al-Saleh A, Alazzoni A, Al Shalash S et al (2014) Performance of the high-sensitivity troponin assay in diagnosing acute myocardial infarction: systematic review and meta-analysis. (springer.com)
  • A 65-year-old man with a history of hypertension, diabetes, and prior myocardial infarction presents to the ED after he experienced a 20-minute episode of dull, aching, left-sided chest discomfort while doing yard work an hour ago. (ebmedicine.net)
  • BOSTON-One of the more expensive questions any emergency physician can ask is: Does the patient complaining of chest pain have unstable angina (UA) or non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)? (acepnow.com)
  • This measure is used to assess the percentage of patients age 18 years and older with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who are referred to an appropriate cardiac rehabilitation program post-discharge - Phase Two Programs: electrocardiogram-monitored, outpatient, and Phase Three Programs: non-monitored, outpatient. (careset.com)
  • The priority aim addressed by this measure is to increase the percentage of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) using cardiac rehabilitation. (careset.com)
  • Management of patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain suggestive of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains a continuing challenge. (elsevier.com)
  • citation needed] Hydroxyurea is a medication that can help to prevent acute chest syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • We note that carrying out incentive spirometry every 2-4 hours for a patient admitted for a vaso-occlusive crisis can prevent acute chest syndrome. (ssekandima.com)
  • Acute Chest Syndrome [ Time Frame: Chest x-rays (CXR) were ordered for trial eligibility, as a result of clinical indications, or at discharge or 72 hours if no prior CXR. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This issue of Clinics in Chest Medicine focuses on Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and covers topics such as: Epidemiology and Definitions of ARDS and Early Acute Lung Injury, Environmental Risk Factors for ARDS, Clinical and Biological Heterogeneity in ARDS: Direct vs. Indirect Lung Injury,Obesity and Nutrition, Important Immunomodulators in ARDS? (indigo.ca)
  • A cohort of patients (n=1247) presenting with low-risk chest pain and participating in the CCTA arms of clinical pathways at two centers were used to identify the subgroup of patients prospectively reported to have a 25-50% maximal diameter stenosis at CCTA. (ahajournals.org)
  • Clinical charts were retrospectively reviewed to determine prior acute chest syndrome or vaso-occlusive episodes, and rates of these complications were calculated. (inserm.fr)
  • Numerous gene mutations have been associated with the clinical complications of SCD such as frequency of pain episodes, acute chest syndrome, and stroke among others. (intechopen.com)
  • In a clinical sense, acute chest syndrome resembles pneumonia is every way. (ssekandima.com)
  • The National Acute Chest Syndrome Study Group performed a landmark study to delineate the clinical, laboratory and radiographic features of acute chest syndrome. (ssekandima.com)
  • Executive summary: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical characteristics of patients with acute pulmonary embolism: data from PIOPED II. (medscape.com)
  • This is highly suggestive of acute chest syndrome given clinical features. (emdocs.net)
  • A complication of sickle cell disease resulting from vascular occlusion or infection in the lungs and marked by chest pain, tachypnea, fever, rales and rhonchi, leukocytosis, and lobar consolidation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • A 16 year-old boy with a history of sickle cell disease (SCD) complicated by multiple hospitalizations for pain crises and acute chest syndrome presents to the ED with fever and pain in his arms and legs for two days. (emdocs.net)
  • 06 (ANI): A study has recently warned that if Acute Chest Syndrome (ACS), a potentially severe lung complication of sickle cell disease, is not treated effectively in children then it may increase the risk of respiratory failure, chronic lung disease and prolonged hospitalisation. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Rapid and severe Covid-19 pneumonia with severe acute chest syndrome in a sickle cell patient successfully treated with tocilizumab. (cdc.gov)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is one of the most severe complications of sickle cell disease (SCD), being the second most cause of hospitalization as well as the commonest cause of death. (ssekandima.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome is one of its most severe complications in regard to mortality and morbidity, and heavily impacts on quality of life. (emjreviews.com)
  • It is a form of lung injury that can progress to adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (bmj.com)
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a fast-moving disease that happens in those who are critically ill. (chestnet.org)
  • This retrospective study included ARDS patients who had at least one assessment of alveolar NT-PCP-III and a chest CT scan within 3 days before or after NT-PCP-III determination. (springeropen.com)
  • Any person who develops recurrent episodes of acute chest syndrome has an increased risk of developing chronic lung disease. (ssekandima.com)
  • Progressive restrictive lung disease related to recurrent episodes of acute chest syndrome may develop with advancing age [ 3 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Seven days later, she developed an ACS characterized by an acute chest pain associated with a respiratory distress syndrome (SpO2 85%, superficial tachypnea 80/min, tachycardia 140/min). (scienceopen.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a major complication of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) and a leading cause for hospital admissions and death. (nature.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome is a lung-related complication of sickle cell disease that can lower the levels of oxygen in the blood and can be life-threatening. (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a complication (health problem) caused by sickle cell disease. (stjude.org)
  • Patients who were treated with Endari over a 48-week period experienced fewer crisis episodes compared to patients who received a placebo, fewer hospitalizations for sickle cell pain, fewer days in the hospital, and ewer occurrences of acute chest syndrome , a life-threatening complication of sickle cell disease. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • BACKGROUND: Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a complication of sickle cell disease that can cause significant morbidity. (elsevier.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome is a common and potentially deadly complication of sickle cell disease. (first10em.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a frequent complication of sickle cell anemia . (sicklecellanemianews.com)
  • Acute Chest Syndrome: another acute complication of sickle cell disease: Recommendations you ought to know. (ssekandima.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome can occur suddenly or as an insidious complication of a vaso-occlusive crisis or commonly following abdominal surgery. (ssekandima.com)
  • VASO-OCCLUSIVE CRISIS (VOC): An acute complication of SCD: Recommendations for management. (ssekandima.com)
  • A 22-year-old college student presents with sharp, left-sided chest pain and shortness of breath. (ebmedicine.net)
  • BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effects of blood rheology on the occurrence of acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises in children with sickle cell anemia and hemoglobin SC disease. (inserm.fr)
  • These crises are characteristic of the condition and involve debilitating pain in various parts of the body such as the lower back, legs, arms, joints and chest. (news-medical.net)
  • Here we report a case of sickle cell - haemoglobin S disease [HbSS] in which a patient presented with painful vaso-occlusive crises and acute chest syndrome and TTP which was a diagnostic challenge. (bvsalud.org)
  • We hypothesized that children with sickle cell disease with concomitant asthma have an increased incidence of vaso-occlusive crises that are complicated by episodes of acute chest syndrome. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Hospital admissions were recorded for acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accident, vaso-occlusive pain crises, and blood transfusions (total, exchange and chronic). (biomedcentral.com)
  • In this study, we examined hospitalized children with sickle cell disease with concomitant asthma establishing whether there was an increased rate of acute chest syndrome or other complications compared to patients with sickle cell disease without asthma in those presenting with vaso-occlusive pain crises. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is the second most common reason for hospitalization of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) and is a leading cause of mortality. (clinicaladvisor.com)
  • Objectives This study compared diagnostic accuracy of conventional troponin/traditional coronary artery disease (CAD) assessment and highly sensitive troponin (hsTn) I/advanced CAD assessment for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) during the index hospitalization. (elsevier.com)
  • Almost 50% of patients develop acute chest syndrome during a hospitalization for another illness, such as an acute pain crisis. (first10em.com)
  • It can occur as an isolated event or develop during hospitalization for acute vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC). (sicklecellanemianews.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome is a leading cause of hospitalization and death in children and adults with SCD. (acepnow.com)
  • Readmissions for acute chest syndrome and all-cause readmissions at 7 and 30 days after hospitalization were lowest in the guideline-adherent antibiotic group, second lowest in the group that received parenteral cephalosporins without macrolides, and highest (except for 7-day readmissions for acute chest syndrome) after hospitalizations involving neither antibiotic. (acepnow.com)
  • In many instances, patients with acute chest syndrome recover within a few days after hospitalization. (ssekandima.com)
  • Sickle cell disease is a common hemolytic disorder with a broad range of complications, including vaso-occlusive episodes, acute chest syndrome (ACS), pain, and stroke. (cdc.gov)
  • Morphine is associated with acute chest syndrome in children hospitalized with sickle cell disease. (nih.gov)
  • Acute chest syndrome is often precipitated by a lung infection, and the resulting inflammation and loss of oxygen saturation leads to further sickling of red cells, thus exacerbating pulmonary and systemic hypoxemia, sickling, and vaso-occlusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • The misshapen cells clog smaller blood vessels, resulting in excruciating pain and putting patients at an increased risk of infection, acute chest syndrome and stroke. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Multiple factors (e.g., infection, and pulmonary FAT EMBOLISM) may contribute to the development of the syndrome. (healthsciencessc.org)
  • To the Editor: De Luna et al 1 recently reported a favorable outcome of an acute chest syndrome (ACS) related to a SARS‐Cov‐2 infection treated with tocilizumab (TCZ), in a 45‐year‐old male patient with homozygous sickle cell disease (SCD). (scienceopen.com)
  • Sickle cell patients with active acute chest syndrome (ACS) from which samples of EBC and plasma will be collected during acute illness within 48 hours of admission with or diagnosis of ACS (Time point 1) in 3 sessions each 1 hour apart (Time point 1a, 1b, and 1c), and 2 weeks after discharge when have returned to steady-state (Time point 2). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Until tests confirm your diagnosis doctors may describe your condition as Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) . (chss.org.uk)
  • citation needed] The diagnosis of acute chest syndrome is made difficult by its similarity in presentation with pneumonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • A repeat chest radiograph showed new infiltrates in both lower zones and a diagnosis of acute sickle chest syndrome (ACS) was made. (bmj.com)
  • 2 Eighth Edition November 2012 Health Care Guideline and Order Set: Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Pain and Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) Chest Pain Screening Algorithm 1 Initial contact with complaint of 'chest pain/discomfort' in person or via telephone Text in blue in this algorithm indicates a linked corresponding annotation. (docplayer.net)
  • yes no Chest pain not related to acute cardiovascular syndrome but indicative of other serious diagnosis? (docplayer.net)
  • no yes Diagnosis and Treatment of Chest Pain and ACS Eighth Edition/November 2012 Text in blue in this algorithm indicates a linked corresponding annotation. (docplayer.net)
  • The study objective was to describe the association between chest pain in patients with a normal ECG and the diagnosis of ACS. (qxmd.com)
  • A chest CT scan could be useful for the diagnosis of lung fibroproliferation. (springeropen.com)
  • Diagnosis and treatment of chest pain and acute coronary syndrome (ACS): percentage of patients with AMI who are referred to an appropriate cardiac rehabilitation program post-discharge. (careset.com)
  • The clinician should be aware of ACS, a form of acute lung injury that is the most common form of acute pulmonary disease in SCD and occurs in almost half of these patients. (cancertherapyadvisor.com)
  • Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is an acute inflammatory lung injury that usually follows the vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) seen in sickle cell disease (SCD). (emjreviews.com)
  • It is not only important to know how to recognize and treat an acute episode but to be able to implement long term management strategies to try and prevent future episodes. (femaleadda.com)
  • Sickle cell disease is characterised by unpredictable episodes of acute illness, progressive organ damage, and a lack of effective treatments. (bmj.com)
  • Risk factors include previous episodes of acute chest syndrome and asthma. (ssekandima.com)
  • Children with sickle cell disease and asthma had significantly more episodes of acute chest syndrome (p = 0.03) and cerebral vascular accidents (p = 0.05) compared to children with sickle cell disease without asthma. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Children with concomitant asthma and sickle cell disease have increased episodes of acute chest syndrome, cerebral vascular accidents and the need for blood transfusions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Aggressive treatment with oxygen, bronchodilators and oral corticosteroids are recommended for symptomatic relief of acute episodes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Known sequelae of sickle cell disease include invasive infections, painful episodes, acute chest syndrome, strokes, and chronic pulmonary hypertension. (aafp.org)
  • Family physicians play a crucial role in instituting evidence-based preventive care strategies, initiating timely treatment of acute illness, recognizing life-threatening episodes, and providing a medical home for multidisciplinary management. (aafp.org)
  • Closely monitor for bronchospasm, acute anaemia, and hypoxemia. (ssekandima.com)
  • Many patients admitted to hospital with chest pain suggestive of ACS, however, do not fulfil criteria for such management due to normal cardiac markers and/or no objective evidence of ischemia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This provides supporting evidence that additional testing beyond cardiac biomarkers in the acute setting to exclude ACS is not routinely indicated. (ahajournals.org)
  • The European Society of Cardiology has recently stated that a large number of patients classified as low risk for an ACS (where patient history, physical examination, electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac biomarkers are not diagnostic) represent the most prevalent group of patients admitted to hospital with chest pain, and, thus, are the most challenging of chest pain patients [ 6 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Plain CXR showing patchy infiltrates of acute chest syndrome. (blogspot.com)
  • Patient is a 29/m, with a history of sickle cell disease and presenting to the emergency department with sudden onset of diffuse pain to chest, extremities, trunk, and back. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The Vancouver Chest Pain Rule identifies low-risk chest pain patients who are safe for early discharge from the emergency department. (ebmedicine.net)
  • In patients consulting in the Emergency Department for chest pain, a HEART score ≤ 3 has been shown to rule out an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a low risk of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) occurrence. (springer.com)
  • Singer AJ, Ardise J, Gulla J, Cangro J (2005) Point-of-care testing reduces length of stay in emergency department chest pain patients. (springer.com)
  • Patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with chest pain thought to be of ischemic origin are often admitted to the hospital, yet less than half are eventually diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). (ahajournals.org)
  • We evaluated the impact of different measuring points for ST deviation on the diagnostic accuracy for ACS in unselected emergency department (ED) chest pain patients. (lu.se)
  • 1 9 Ambulance transport to emergency department, obtain electrocardiogram en route if able, aspirin if possible 2 0 On arrival in ED, immediate monitoring, oxygen, IV access, cardiac markers, portable chest x-ray 2 1 Electrocardiogram positive for STsegment elevation? (docplayer.net)
  • Patients with acute chest pain account for a notable proportion (20-30%) of medical admissions to the emergency department. (bmj.com)
  • This was a prospective observational study of emergency department (ED) patients with a chief complaint of chest pain and an initial normal ECG admitted to the hospital for chest pain evaluation over a 1-year period. (qxmd.com)
  • Management of patients with low-risk chest pain at the time of admission: a prospective study on a non-selected population from the Emergency Department. (qxmd.com)
  • Initial presenting electrocardiogram as determinant for hospital admission in patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain: a pilot investigation. (qxmd.com)
  • Vectorcardiography risk stratifies emergency department chest pain patients with left ventricular hypertrophy on the initial 12-lead ECG. (qxmd.com)
  • After two weeks, the patient had a sudden onset of hypertension secondary to acute kidney injury (creatinine: 5.19mg/dL, blood urine nitrogen: 57 mg/dL), with a blood pressure reading of 212/96, and was found to have witnessed generalized tonic-clonic seizure lasting 1 minute. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • One potential commonality, however, is that an acute pain event usually precedes the onset of ACS. (ashpublications.org)
  • Claudio AM, Foltanski L, Delay T, Britell A, Duckett A, Weeda ER, Bohm N. Antibiotic Use and Respiratory Pathogens in Adults With Sickle Cell Disease and Acute Chest Syndrome. (healthsciencessc.org)
  • Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland is a wholly Scottish charity. (chss.org.uk)
  • This project is supported in part by the NIH Specialized Programs of Translational Research in Acute Stroke (SPOTRIAS) Network, and NINDS grant 3P50NS055977 to Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine and UT Southwestern Medical Center. (strokecenter.org)
  • Mary Cataletto from Stony Brook University's school of medicine said, "Management of acute chest syndrome is a major challenge for physicians and other healthcare providers caring for children with sickle cell disease . (femaleadda.com)
  • Whether corticosteroids and other anti-inflammatory agents have a role to play in the management of acute chest syndrome is still uncertain. (ssekandima.com)
  • With an incidence below 2% in the negative group, the CARE rule seemed able to safely rule out a MACE without any biological test for one-third of patients with chest pain and the HEART score for another third with a single troponin assay. (springer.com)
  • A novel risk score including elevated troponin I in the ED, dynamic ECG changes in the ED, body mass index, home aspirin use, age older than 65, history of chronic kidney disease, and associated illness at presentation to the ED, is a valuable tool for discriminating between ACS and non-ACS among patients with known CAD presenting to the ED with chest pain. (ahajournals.org)
  • His ECG, chest x-ray, and troponin are all normal. (ebmedicine.net)
  • Labs were notable for a negative troponin and Hgb of 5.8, and a left basilar airspace opacity on lateral chest X-ray. (blogspot.com)
  • In patients with active chest pain, an ECG with no ischemic changes, and an initial negative troponin, rest single -photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been demonstrated to be useful [6,7]. (premierradiologyservices.com)
  • Inpatient costs were based on length of hospital stay, modified by the occurrence of acute chest syndrome, splenic sequestration, or transfusion. (aappublications.org)
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that the diagnostic accuracy of the ECG criteria for ACS is very low in ED chest pain patients, and that the optimal measuring point for the ST amplitude in the detection of ACS differs between ST elevation and depression, and between patient subgroups. (lu.se)
  • All children with acute chest syndrome should be admitted to hospital. (first10em.com)
  • Of 14,480 hospitalizations (for 7,178 children with acute chest syndrome), 73.6 percent involved provision of guideline-adherent antibiotics (macrolide plus cephalosporin). (acepnow.com)
  • Hydroxyurea therapy should be considered for patients after a single episode of acute chest syndrome. (first10em.com)
  • The investigators hypothesize that sPLA2 will be measurable in EBC samples from sickle cell patients with acute chest syndrome. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Acute chest syndrome is the leading cause of death in sickle cell patients in the U.S. (12% mortality). (emdocs.net)
  • Low risk patients with acute chest pain and found to have 25-50% stenosis on CCTA will have less than a 2% incidence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) over 30-days. (ahajournals.org)
  • Acute chest syndrome results from sickle cells obstructing the blood vessels that lead to your lungs. (healthline.com)
  • Hand-foot syndrome, sometimes called dactylitis, happens when sickle cells block the blood vessels of the hands or feet. (healthline.com)
  • Angina is a type of chest discomfort due to poor blood flow through the blood vessels of the heart muscle. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Start Forskningsoutput Optimal measuring point for ST deviation in chest pain patie. (lu.se)
  • Monitoring the amount of fluids being consumed, because fluids may build up in the lungs ( pulmonary edema ) during acute chest syndrome. (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • The chest X-ray often shows fluid in both lungs. (chestnet.org)
  • His physical exam demonstrated clear lungs and pain with palpation of his left shoulder and left anterior chest wall. (blogspot.com)
  • It is surrounded by the chest wall in front, the lungs to the sides and the spine at the back. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comparison of sPLA2 levels in EBC from Time point 1 (during acute illness) and Time Point 2 (return to baseline status at 2 week follow up). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Identify and treat all underlying factors precipitating acute illness. (cancertherapyadvisor.com)
  • Emergency management of a patient with SCD in acute respiratory failure is no different than any other patient presenting with acute respiratory distress. (cancertherapyadvisor.com)