Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Health Personnel: Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Long-Term Care: Care over an extended period, usually for a chronic condition or disability, requiring periodic, intermittent, or continuous care.Healthcare Disparities: Differences in access to or availability of medical facilities and services.United StatesFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE established in 1990 to "provide indexing, abstracting, translating, publishing, and other services leading to a more effective and timely dissemination of information on research, demonstration projects, and evaluations with respect to health care to public and private entities and individuals engaged in the improvement of health care delivery..." It supersedes the National Center for Health Services Research. The United States Agency for Health Care Policy and Research was renamed Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) under the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Health Services: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Term Birth: CHILDBIRTH at the end of a normal duration of PREGNANCY, between 37 to 40 weeks of gestation or about 280 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period.Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Healthcare Financing: Methods of generating, allocating, and using financial resources in healthcare systems.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Health Care Surveys: Statistical measures of utilization and other aspects of the provision of health care services including hospitalization and ambulatory care.Personnel, Hospital: The individuals employed by the hospital.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Organizational Innovation: Introduction of changes which are new to the organization and are created by management.National Health Programs: Components of a national health care system which administer specific services, e.g., national health insurance.Health Facilities: Institutions which provide medical or health-related services.Great BritainHealth Services Needs and Demand: Health services required by a population or community as well as the health services that the population or community is able and willing to pay for.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Organizational Culture: Beliefs and values shared by all members of the organization. These shared values, which are subject to change, are reflected in the day to day management of the organization.Quality Assurance, Health Care: Activities and programs intended to assure or improve the quality of care in either a defined medical setting or a program. The concept includes the assessment or evaluation of the quality of care; identification of problems or shortcomings in the delivery of care; designing activities to overcome these deficiencies; and follow-up monitoring to ensure effectiveness of corrective steps.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Safety Management: The development of systems to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences in an institutional setting. The concept includes prevention or reduction of adverse events or incidents involving employees, patients, or facilities. Examples include plans to reduce injuries from falls or plans for fire safety to promote a safe institutional environment.Rural Health Services: Health services, public or private, in rural areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations: A private, voluntary, not-for-profit organization which establishes standards for the operation of health facilities and services, conducts surveys, and awards accreditation.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Medical Errors: Errors or mistakes committed by health professionals which result in harm to the patient. They include errors in diagnosis (DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS), errors in the administration of drugs and other medications (MEDICATION ERRORS), errors in the performance of surgical procedures, in the use of other types of therapy, in the use of equipment, and in the interpretation of laboratory findings. Medical errors are differentiated from MALPRACTICE in that the former are regarded as honest mistakes or accidents while the latter is the result of negligence, reprehensible ignorance, or criminal intent.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Health Resources: Available manpower, facilities, revenue, equipment, and supplies to produce requisite health care and services.Outcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Efficiency, Organizational: The capacity of an organization, institution, or business to produce desired results with a minimum expenditure of energy, time, money, personnel, materiel, etc.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Electronic Health Records: Media that facilitate transportability of pertinent information concerning patient's illness across varied providers and geographic locations. Some versions include direct linkages to online consumer health information that is relevant to the health conditions and treatments related to a specific patient.Hospitalization: The confinement of a patient in a hospital.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Patient Care Team: Care of patients by a multidisciplinary team usually organized under the leadership of a physician; each member of the team has specific responsibilities and the whole team contributes to the care of the patient.Hospitals: Institutions with an organized medical staff which provide medical care to patients.Diffusion of Innovation: The broad dissemination of new ideas, procedures, techniques, materials, and devices and the degree to which these are accepted and used.Delivery of Health Care, Integrated: A health care system which combines physicians, hospitals, and other medical services with a health plan to provide the complete spectrum of medical care for its customers. In a fully integrated system, the three key elements - physicians, hospital, and health plan membership - are in balance in terms of matching medical resources with the needs of purchasers and patients. (Coddington et al., Integrated Health Care: Reorganizing the Physician, Hospital and Health Plan Relationship, 1994, p7)Professional-Patient Relations: Interactions between health personnel and patients.Health Facility Administrators: Managerial personnel responsible for implementing policy and directing the activities of health care facilities such as nursing homes.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Quality Improvement: The attainment or process of attaining a new level of performance or quality.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Tertiary Healthcare: Care of a highly technical and specialized nature, provided in a medical center, usually one affiliated with a university, for patients with unusually severe, complex, or uncommon health problems.Focus Groups: A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.United States Department of Veterans Affairs: A cabinet department in the Executive Branch of the United States Government concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to VETERANS. It was established March 15, 1989 as a Cabinet-level position.Costs and Cost Analysis: Absolute, comparative, or differential costs pertaining to services, institutions, resources, etc., or the analysis and study of these costs.SingaporeAge Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.EnglandCooperative Behavior: The interaction of two or more persons or organizations directed toward a common goal which is mutually beneficial. An act or instance of working or acting together for a common purpose or benefit, i.e., joint action. (From Random House Dictionary Unabridged, 2d ed)Patient Safety: Efforts to reduce risk, to address and reduce incidents and accidents that may negatively impact healthcare consumers.Community Health Services: Diagnostic, therapeutic and preventive health services provided for individuals in the community.Models, Organizational: Theoretical representations and constructs that describe or explain the structure and hierarchy of relationships and interactions within or between formal organizational entities or informal social groups.Medical Records Systems, Computerized: Computer-based systems for input, storage, display, retrieval, and printing of information contained in a patient's medical record.State Medicine: A system of medical care regulated, controlled and financed by the government, in which the government assumes responsibility for the health needs of the population.Veterans Health: The concept covering the physical and mental conditions of VETERANS.Quality Indicators, Health Care: Norms, criteria, standards, and other direct qualitative and quantitative measures used in determining the quality of health care.Ambulatory Care: Health care services provided to patients on an ambulatory basis, rather than by admission to a hospital or other health care facility. The services may be a part of a hospital, augmenting its inpatient services, or may be provided at a free-standing facility.Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from health professional or health care worker to patients. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Practice Guidelines as Topic: Directions or principles presenting current or future rules of policy for assisting health care practitioners in patient care decisions regarding diagnosis, therapy, or related clinical circumstances. The guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by the convening of expert panels. The guidelines form a basis for the evaluation of all aspects of health care and delivery.Information Dissemination: The circulation or wide dispersal of information.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Interprofessional Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens from patients to health professionals or health care workers. It includes transmission via direct or indirect exposure to bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral agents.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Drug Costs: The amount that a health care institution or organization pays for its drugs. It is one component of the final price that is charged to the consumer (FEES, PHARMACEUTICAL or PRESCRIPTION FEES).Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Computer Communication Networks: A system containing any combination of computers, computer terminals, printers, audio or visual display devices, or telephones interconnected by telecommunications equipment or cables: used to transmit or receive information. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)EuropeTotal Quality Management: The application of industrial management practice to systematically maintain and improve organization-wide performance. Effectiveness and success are determined and assessed by quantitative quality measures.Home Care Services: Community health and NURSING SERVICES providing coordinated multiple services to the patient at the patient's homes. These home-care services are provided by a visiting nurse, home health agencies, HOSPITALS, or organized community groups using professional staff for care delivery. It differs from HOME NURSING which is provided by non-professionals.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Hospital Information Systems: Integrated, computer-assisted systems designed to store, manipulate, and retrieve information concerned with the administrative and clinical aspects of providing medical services within the hospital.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Hospitals, Public: Hospitals controlled by various types of government, i.e., city, county, district, state or federal.Gloves, Protective: Coverings for the hands, usually with separations for the fingers, made of various materials, for protection against infections, toxic substances, extremes of hot and cold, radiations, water immersion, etc. The gloves may be worn by patients, care givers, housewives, laboratory and industrial workers, police, etc.Continuity of Patient Care: Health care provided on a continuing basis from the initial contact, following the patient through all phases of medical care.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Nurses: Professionals qualified by graduation from an accredited school of nursing and by passage of a national licensing examination to practice nursing. They provide services to patients requiring assistance in recovering or maintaining their physical or mental health.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Health Care Rationing: Planning for the equitable allocation, apportionment, or distribution of available health resources.Patient-Centered Care: Design of patient care wherein institutional resources and personnel are organized around patients rather than around specialized departments. (From Hospitals 1993 Feb 5;67(3):14)Physicians: Individuals licensed to practice medicine.Canada: The largest country in North America, comprising 10 provinces and three territories. Its capital is Ottawa.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Nursing Staff: Personnel who provide nursing service to patients in an organized facility, institution, or agency.Computer Security: Protective measures against unauthorized access to or interference with computer operating systems, telecommunications, or data structures, especially the modification, deletion, destruction, or release of data in computers. It includes methods of forestalling interference by computer viruses or so-called computer hackers aiming to compromise stored data.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Regression Analysis: Procedures for finding the mathematical function which best describes the relationship between a dependent variable and one or more independent variables. In linear regression (see LINEAR MODELS) the relationship is constrained to be a straight line and LEAST-SQUARES ANALYSIS is used to determine the best fit. In logistic regression (see LOGISTIC MODELS) the dependent variable is qualitative rather than continuously variable and LIKELIHOOD FUNCTIONS are used to find the best relationship. In multiple regression, the dependent variable is considered to depend on more than a single independent variable.Biomedical Technology: The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Long QT Syndrome: A condition that is characterized by episodes of fainting (SYNCOPE) and varying degree of ventricular arrhythmia as indicated by the prolonged QT interval. The inherited forms are caused by mutation of genes encoding cardiac ion channel proteins. The two major forms are ROMANO-WARD SYNDROME and JERVELL-LANGE NIELSEN SYNDROME.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Professional Role: The expected function of a member of a particular profession.Organizational Case Studies: Descriptions and evaluations of specific health care organizations.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Disease Management: A broad approach to appropriate coordination of the entire disease treatment process that often involves shifting away from more expensive inpatient and acute care to areas such as preventive medicine, patient counseling and education, and outpatient care. This concept includes implications of appropriate versus inappropriate therapy on the overall cost and clinical outcome of a particular disease. (From Hosp Pharm 1995 Jul;30(7):596)Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Medical Informatics Applications: Automated systems applied to the patient care process including diagnosis, therapy, and systems of communicating medical data within the health care setting.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.SwedenMolecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Interdisciplinary Communication: Communication, in the sense of cross-fertilization of ideas, involving two or more academic disciplines (such as the disciplines that comprise the cross-disciplinary field of bioethics, including the health and biological sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences and law). Also includes problems in communication stemming from differences in patterns of language usage in different academic or medical disciplines.BrazilNeeds Assessment: Systematic identification of a population's needs or the assessment of individuals to determine the proper level of services needed.Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care): Evaluation procedures that focus on both the outcome or status (OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT) of the patient at the end of an episode of care - presence of symptoms, level of activity, and mortality; and the process (ASSESSMENT, PROCESS) - what is done for the patient diagnostically and therapeutically.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Product Line Management: Management control systems for structuring health care delivery strategies around case types, as in DRGs, or specific clinical services.Risk Management: The process of minimizing risk to an organization by developing systems to identify and analyze potential hazards to prevent accidents, injuries, and other adverse occurrences, and by attempting to handle events and incidents which do occur in such a manner that their effect and cost are minimized. Effective risk management has its greatest benefits in application to insurance in order to avert or minimize financial liability. (From Slee & Slee: Health care terms, 2d ed)Hospital Administration: Management of the internal organization of the hospital.Confidentiality: The privacy of information and its protection against unauthorized disclosure.Spain: Parliamentary democracy located between France on the northeast and Portugual on the west and bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea.Systems Analysis: The analysis of an activity, procedure, method, technique, or business to determine what must be accomplished and how the necessary operations may best be accomplished.Cross Infection: Any infection which a patient contracts in a health-care institution.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Patient Compliance: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in following a prescribed regimen.Health Status: The level of health of the individual, group, or population as subjectively assessed by the individual or by more objective measures.Urban Health Services: Health services, public or private, in urban areas. The services include the promotion of health and the delivery of health care.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Students, Nursing: Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.Program Development: The process of formulating, improving, and expanding educational, managerial, or service-oriented work plans (excluding computer program development).Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Self Care: Performance of activities or tasks traditionally performed by professional health care providers. The concept includes care of oneself or one's family and friends.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Nursing Homes: Facilities which provide nursing supervision and limited medical care to persons who do not require hospitalization.Quality-Adjusted Life Years: A measurement index derived from a modification of standard life-table procedures and designed to take account of the quality as well as the duration of survival. This index can be used in assessing the outcome of health care procedures or services. (BIOETHICS Thesaurus, 1994)Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Mass Screening: Organized periodic procedures performed on large groups of people for the purpose of detecting disease.Veterans: Former members of the armed services.Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Accreditation: Certification as complying with a standard set by non-governmental organizations, applied for by institutions, programs, and facilities on a voluntary basis.Hospitals, Veterans: Hospitals providing medical care to veterans of wars.Private Sector: That distinct portion of the institutional, industrial, or economic structure of a country that is controlled or owned by non-governmental, private interests.ItalyConsumer Satisfaction: Customer satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a benefit or service received.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Developing Countries: Countries in the process of change with economic growth, that is, an increase in production, per capita consumption, and income. The process of economic growth involves better utilization of natural and human resources, which results in a change in the social, political, and economic structures.Occupational Diseases: Diseases caused by factors involved in one's employment.Health Plan Implementation: Those actions designed to carry out recommendations pertaining to health plans or programs.Health Services for the Aged: Services for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the aged and the maintenance of health in the elderly.Medical Record Linkage: The creation and maintenance of medical and vital records in multiple institutions in a manner that will facilitate the combined use of the records of identified individuals.Professional Competence: The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.Medical Staff, Hospital: Professional medical personnel approved to provide care to patients in a hospital.GermanyOccupational Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents that occurs as a result of one's occupation.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Medication Adherence: Voluntary cooperation of the patient in taking drugs or medicine as prescribed. This includes timing, dosage, and frequency.IndiaNurses' Aides: Allied health personnel who assist the professional nurse in routine duties.Guideline Adherence: Conformity in fulfilling or following official, recognized, or institutional requirements, guidelines, recommendations, protocols, pathways, or other standards.Public Opinion: The attitude of a significant portion of a population toward any given proposition, based upon a measurable amount of factual evidence, and involving some degree of reflection, analysis, and reasoning.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Resource Allocation: Societal or individual decisions about the equitable distribution of available resources.Benchmarking: Method of measuring performance against established standards of best practice.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.Length of Stay: The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.
It contains 25 acute care and 23 long term care beds. The hospital employs 350 staff with 93 physicians having staff privileges ... Nonprofit funding is provided by the Canmore and Area Health Care Foundation. Emergency Diagnostic imaging (CT, Xray, ... Ultrasound) Endoscopy General surgery Inpatient medical care Laboratory Physical therapy Plastic surgery Respiratory therapy ...
The facility offers primary, acute, emergency and long-term health care. In addition to its 242 inpatient beds, the hospital ... which provides 50 beds for short-term rehabilitation patients and 100 for long-term residents. Center of Excellence for ... Specialty facilities include a New York State Department of Health designated level 3 neonatal intensive care unit and the ... There are programs in cancer care, bariatric weight loss, renal dialysis, laparoscopic surgery, orthopaedics, gerontology, and ...
SHS provides comprehensive emergency, acute, critical, outpatient and long-term/home care. SHS's integrated healthcare system ... Outpatient care is offered throughout Summit, Portage and Medina counties in several community health centers. The healthcare ... One of 2011 Health Care's Most Wired hospital organizations for achievement in the use of healthcare IT. Outstanding overall ... Summa Health System specializes in advanced bariatric care, behavioral health, cancer care, cardiovascular, neurosciences, ...
Hospitals and acute care facilities, including long term complex care, are typically directly funded. Health care organizations ... OMA "Improving health care for Canadians". Epe.lac-bac.gc.ca. Retrieved 2011-06-06. "Health Care Costs Nobody Talks About". Web ... Nonetheless, Canada's health care system covered the health care costs of those mothers affected. In 2003, the Government in ... as well as vision care, mental health, and long-term care, with a substantial portion of such services being paid for privately ...
The hospital is equipped with an emergency room, three acute care beds and eight long-term beds. The hospital has two full-time ... doctors stationed at it, alongside other healthcare professionals. The hospital is also able to provide the community with x- ...
... obese children have increased health care expenses (e.g. medications, acute care visits). In the long term, obese children tend ... "Defining and Targeting Health Care Access Barriers". Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 22 (2): 562-575. doi: ... "Preventative care services". UnitedHealthcare. Retrieved March 23, 2016.. *^ O'Grady, M. "Health-Care Cost Projections for ... Preventive Care and Quality Adjusted Life Years Health benefits of preventive care measures can be described in terms of ...
... obese children have increased health care expenses (e.g. medications, acute care visits). In the long term, obese children tend ... "Defining and Targeting Health Care Access Barriers". Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. 22 (2): 562-575. doi: ... "Preventative [sic] care services". UnitedHealthcare. Retrieved March 23, 2016.. *^ O'Grady, M. "Health-Care Cost Projections ... The Affordable Care Act and preventive healthcare. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as just the ...
Tenet Healthcare - 57 hospitals. Texas Health Resources - 12 acute-care hospitals and one long-term care hospital; corporate ... OSF Healthcare- 11 Acute care facilities headquartered in Peoria, IL. Partners HealthCare - 11 member hospitals/organizations. ... SSM Health Care - 20 hospitals of catholic health system; HQ St. Louis, MO. Steward Health Care System - 36 community hospitals ... 100 acute-care hospitals; nation's largest catholic and largest non-profit health system. HQ St. Louis, MO. Aurora Health Care ...
It owns long term acute care and inpatient rehabilitation hospitals, as well as occupational health and physical therapy ... SSM Health Care - St. Louis and Baylor Health Care System in 2011. In 2015, Select Medical completed one of its largest ... and was quickly followed by the introduction of long-term acute care in 1998. In 1999, Select Medical made one of its largest ... Company announces post-acute care partnership with Emory Healthcare June 2013: Company announces acquisition of inpatient ...
Inc purchased the facility and converted it from a general acute care hospital to a long-term acute care facility. In 2001, ... changed its name to Kindred Healthcare and continues to operate the facility today. "Our Founders' Stories - Vesper Society". ... Kindred Hospital- San Francisco Bay Area is a 99-bed long-term acute care facility in San Leandro, California, USA. Kindred ... and began operating as Vesper Memorial Hospital The Vesper Society continued to operate Vesper Memorial as a general acute care ...
... long-term acute care (LTAC) facilities, hospice, and home healthcare. SLPs may also work as part of the support structure in ... ASHA released results for the 2015 SLP Health Care Survey which placed the median salary for SLPs working within the health care ... SLPs collaborate with other health care professionals, often working as part of a multidisciplinary team. They can provide ... Missing or empty ,title= (help) "SLP Health Care Survey 2015" (PDF). "Speech Pathologist Salary (Australia)". www.payscale.com ...
... operates over 1,200 beds at its seven acute care facilities and employs over 7,000 caregivers. AHMC owns and operates the ... Alhambra Hospital Medical Center is operated under a long term agreement. List of hospitals in California "Tenet to sell 4 L.A ... AHMC Healthcare Inc. This hospital in the CA Healthcare Atlas A project by OSHPD. ... AHMC, also known as AHMC (Alhambra Hospital Medical Center) Healthcare, is a for-profit privately held hospital corporation ...
Some free clinics specialize in providing primary care (acute care), while others focus on long-term chronic health issues, and ... women's health care, and dental care. Free clinics do not function as emergency care providers, and most do not handle ... At this meeting the slogan "Health Care is a Right Not a Privilege" emerged as a theme. During the 1970s and 80s free clinics ... Free clinics are defined by the NAFC as "safety-net health care organizations that utilize a volunteer/staff model to provide a ...
... the Triumph Healthcare hospital system is the third largest long term acute care provider nationally. Four separate and ... They provide patient and preventive care, research, education, and local, national, and international community well-being. ... hospitals specializing in cancer care by U.S. News & World Report since 1990. The Menninger Clinic, a renowned psychiatric ... which contains the world's largest concentration of research and healthcare institutions. All 47 member institutions of the ...
Doctors Community Healthcare, in 2000. It was converted to a long-term acute-care nursing facility in 2001, and was renamed ... In 1980, the facility began accepted patients under the age of 60, essentially converting into an acute-care long-term care ... But in the 1970s, D.C. Village began admitting indigent and acute-care patients other nursing facilities could not care for. ... The medical center was the first healthcare clinic to open in the neighborhood. The District of Columbia provided $15 million ...
PHCNPs work in places like community healthcare centers, primary healthcare settings and long term care institutions. The main ... including annual physicals Providing care for patients in acute and critical care settings and long care facilities Performing ... health care policy, and lobbying. NPs work in hospitals, private offices, clinics, and nursing homes/long term care facilities ... Canada recognizes them in the following specialties: primary healthcare NPs (PHCNP) and acute care NPs (ACNP). NPs diagnose ...
It operated 47 acute-care hospitals, 432 outpatient facilities, 32 long-term care facilities, and numerous home health offices ... The directives guide health care facilities in making decisions about care and services in a way that is consistent with ... sold to Prime Healthcare ina $62 million bankruptcy sale. As a Catholic health care provider, Trinity Health hospitals embrace ... At the time, Trinity Health was the 10th largest health system in the nation and the fourth largest Catholic health care system ...
Select Medical "operate[s] hospitals within hospitals," and "provide[s] acute long-term care to critically ill patients." ... Rocco Ortenzio is an American businessman and philanthropist, who during his career has founded several health care companies. ... "Long-Term Care Hospitals Face Little Scrutiny", Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Diane McFarlin, retrieved 2010-02-13 "Horizon ... In 1998, Select Medical bought fellow health care provider Intensiva for approximately $110 million. In February 2010, it was ...
There are several Long term acute care hospitals and inpatient rehab facilities in the state of North Carolina. The North ... UNC Health Care and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, while Carolinas Medical Center is unaffiliated. ... "Scotland Memorial Hospital". Carolinas HealthCare System. "Statistics". WakeMed Health & Hospitals. 2016. Archived from the ... Cone expects Carolinas Healthcare contract to more than double savings". Triad Business Journal. "Member Hospitals". Mission ...
"Influenza vaccination for healthcare workers who care for people aged 60 or older living in long-term care institutions". ... "Vaccination of healthcare workers to protect patients at increased risk of acute respiratory disease: summary of a systematic ... A Long-term Study and a New Hypothesis". Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine. 58: 9-20. PMC 1898279. PMID 14267505.. ... It is still too early to determine whether the H1N1 pandemic has caused any long-term economic impacts.[215] ...
A separately owned and operated long-term acute care hospital used to be located at the facility, it has since been moved to ... There is also a FirstPlace Health Care urgent care center on site. The original building housing the first hospital at this ... "Healthcare in the Harrisburg area". harrisburgpa.gov/. 2006. Archived from the original on 2006-11-16. Retrieved 2006-12-31. " ... Originally opening in 1909 The hospital is a teaching facility providing comprehensive outpatient and specialty care services. ...
The hospital provides acute medical, outpatient, surgical, and long-term care in a secure facility. The hospital also ... "Health Care". michigan.gov. Michigan Department of Corrections. Retrieved 2015-07-27. Michigan Department of Corrections - ... Duane Leonard Waters, who worked with the Michigan Corrections Commission for 25 years to modernize health care for Michigan ... but do not require inpatient care at the hospital. List of hospitals in Michigan "World Journal of Psychosynthesis". Google ...
2011). "Transitional care of the long-term care patient". Clinics in Geriatric Medicine. 27 (2): 259-271. doi:10.1016/j.cger. ... This part of SBAR determines what is going on and why health care professionals are needed. Health care professionals become ... "Acute care toolkit 6: the medical patient at risk: recognition and care of the seriously ill or deteriorating medical patient ... a US measure to reduce rehospitalization among residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities. A few things are necessary for a ...
... sub-acute and long-term care, rehabilitation and emergency services. Sharp Grossmont Hospital is the largest health care ... Sharp HealthCare Sharp Grossmont Hospital Grossmont Healthcare District This hospital in the CA Healthcare Atlas A project by ... It is the largest health care facility in East San Diego County with a service area covering 750 square miles. It is owned by ... Sharp was the first health care provider in California and the eighth in the nation to receive this recognition. Sharp ...
Long Term Care programs are also available to provide in home support allowing elderly residents to live at home as long as ... acute medical care and outpatient services. According to the local Health Care Services, other facilities include: Chaplaincy ... and Southampton Care Centre long term care home. Social and other services for seniors are available at PARC 55+ (Port Elgin) ... Services Diagnostic Imaging Department including x-ray, ECG, Holter monitoring, ultrasound Inpatient Medical Care (Acute Care) ...
The Spanish National Health System (Spanish: Sistema Nacional de Salud, SNS) is the agglomeration of public health services that has existed in Spain since it was established through and structured by the Ley General de Sanidad (the "General Health Law") of 1986. Management of these services has been progressively transferred to the distinct autonomous communities of Spain, while some continue to be operated by the National Institute of Health Management (Instituto Nacional de Gestión Sanitaria, INGESA), part of the Ministry of Health and Social Policy (which superseded the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs-Ministerio de Sanidad y Consumo-in 2009). The activity of these services is harmonized by the Interterritorial Council of the Spanish National Health Service (Consejo Interterritorial del Servicio Nacional de Salud de España, CISNS) in order to give cohesion to the system and to guarantee the rights of citizens throughout Spain. Article 46 of the Ley General de Sanidad establishes the ...
... is one of the government's highest priorities in its scheme of development and modernization. Health and related issues are overseen by the Ministry of Health, itself represented on the executive Lhengye Zhungtshog (cabinet) by the Minister of Health. As a component of Gross National Happiness, affordable and accessible health care is central to the public policy of Bhutan. The Constitution of Bhutan charges the Royal Government with ensuring a "safe and healthy environment," and with providing "free access to basic public health services in both modern and traditional medicines". The Ministry of Health has provided universal health care in Bhutan since the 1970s. Health care infrastructure and services are planned and developed through Five Year Plans (FYP) of the Ministry of Health. The second democratically appointed Health Minister, Lyonpo Tandin Wangchuk, is the head of the Ministry of Health. Two ...
Following the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan the Ministry of Health, along with the World Health Organization and other technical partners and donors reconstructed the health sector. At the time, at least 70%[4] of the Afghan population was dependent on health services provided by the international community. Almost six million Afghans had no or very little access to medical care. In addition, 50 of the country's 330 districts had no health facilities whatsoever. The goal of the ministry is to develop the health sector to improve the health of the people of Afghanistan, especially women and children, through implementing the basic package of health services (BPHS) and the essential package of hospital services (EPHS) as the standard, agreed-upon minimum of health care to be provided at each level of the health system. It wants to reduce the high levels of mortality and morbidity by: ...
... is a level of value provided by any health care resource, as determined by some measurement. As with quality in other fields, it is an assessment of whether something is good enough and whether it is suitable for its purpose. The goal of health care is to provide medical resources of high quality to all who need them; that is, to ensure good quality of life, to cure illnesses when possible, to extend life expectancy, and so on. Researchers use a variety of quality measures to attempt to determine health care quality, including counts of a therapy's reduction or lessening of diseases identified by medical diagnosis, a decrease in the number of risk factors which people have following preventive care, or a survey of health indicators in a population who are accessing certain kinds of care. Health ...
... is a nonprofit, integrated health system based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It provides health care across the full spectrum of health care services. Fairview currently operates ten hospitals, including University of Minnesota Medical Center,[1] forty eight primary care clinics and numerous specialty clinics in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area and greater Minnesota. Fairview has 32,000 employees and 2,400 affiliated providers.. In June 2010, Thomson Reuters identified Fairview Health Services as one of the top ten health care systems in the United States.[2] The University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis was also recently recognized by U.S. News & World Report as a top hospital in the United States for treatment in six different specialties.[3] In January 2011, HealthGrades listed Fairview Ridges in Burnsville and Fairview Southdale in Edina as ...
ICD-10 is an international statistical classification used in health care and related industries. Produced by the World Health Organization, it is used in several countries around the world. Some have gone on to develop their own national enhancements, building off the international classification. Chapter XXI of ICD-10 captures factors influencing health status and contact with health services. During some health encounters it may not be appropriate to use a code from Chapters I-XIX. As such codes from this chapter can be used in the primary diagnosis field when they represent the reason for which the encounter has taken place. Situations where this may be appropriate include: when a patient receives limited care or service for an ongoing condition (for example a patient in remission undergoing maintenance chemotherapy); to donate an organ and/or tissue; to receive prophylactic immunization; to discuss a problem other than a disease or ...
The Constitution of India makes health in India the responsibility of the state governments, rather than the central federal government. It makes every state responsible for "raising the level of nutrition and the standard of living of its people and the improvement of public health as among its primary duties". The National Health Policy was endorsed by the Parliament of India in 1983 and updated in 2002. The National Health Policy is being worked upon further in 2017 and a draft for public consultation has been released. There are great inequalities in health between states. Infant mortality in Kerala is 12 per thousand live births, but in Assam it is 56. According to World Bank, the total expenditure on healthcare as a proportion of GDP in 2014 was 4.7%. According to a 2005 report, 60% of India's children below the age of three were malnourished, which was greater than the statistics of sub-Saharan African of 28%. It is considered that one in every three malnourished ...
The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[3] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[4] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a ...
The most common mode of healthcare delivery is through personal, face-to-face contact between a healthcare provider and a beneficiary (patient). There is, however, an increasing trend towards the provision of healthcare in the absence of personal contact. This limit of contact during patient care is known as 'in absentia health care'. In Absentia healthcare, or distance medicine, occurs when the patient and care giver are at different locations, but still communicate by audio and video, or sometimes without any personal contact. A face-to-face contact is often a necessary prelude to rendering health care. This, however, may not be necessary for care; in fact current technologies permit with no prior or ...
The congress is one of the world's largest medical conferences.[2] Arab Health is supported by the UAE Ministry of Health, the Abu Dhabi Health Authority, the Dubai Health Authority and the Dubai Healthcare City Authority. ...
... (GCGH) is a research initiative launched by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that, if embraced by creative thinkers around the world, might bring about real progress in the health of the developing world. The word thinkers is an important distinction because the program encourages leaders of every discipline to contribute, whether it be engineers, biologists, pharmacists, scientists, etc. The program is founded on the assumption that with increased support and funding, contemporary science and technology can contribute to the fight against diseases affecting the developing world. With the generous offering of grants for projects, proposals are welcomed as they fit one of a set of 14 challenges, categorized in groups among seven stated goals. With the targeting of specific challenges, the initiative focuses on a variety of health problems inherent in today's developing world. While the 14 challenges are direct, the scope of the project is comprehensive as ...
... is the science of how to run an Operating Room Suite. Operational operating room management focuses on maximizing operational efficiency at the facility, i.e. to maximize the number of surgical cases that can be done on a given day while minimizing the required resources and related costs. For example, what is the number of required anaesthetists or the scrub nurses that are needed next week to accommodate the expected workload or how can we minimize the cost of drugs used in the Operating Room? Strategic operating room management deals with long-term decision-making. For example, is it profitable to add two additional rooms to the existing facility? Typically, operating room management in profit-oriented health-care systems (e.g. United States) emphasizes strategic thinking whereas in countries with publicly funded health care (e.g. the UK), the focus is on operational decisions. The act of ...
旅行血栓症[4]是指旅行者形成深靜脈血栓。[5]也有使用「經濟艙綜合症」或「經濟客位綜合症」來描述這個症狀。[6]乘坐飛機遠途旅行的人通常易患旅行血栓症。深靜脈血栓可以引起肺栓塞這一嚴重併發症。. 旅行者形成血栓可能是缺乏活動、脫水和隱藏因素的共同作用。在飛行途中的環境因素也可能與此有關。[7][8]儘管和飛行有關係,但這個問題是和缺乏活動聯繫在一起的,所以乘坐巴士、火車和汽車的旅行者也有同樣的風險。[9]. 患有易形成血栓疾病(如抗磷脂綜合徵或癌症)的人患病風險會高出很多。風險最高的人群包括老人,有嚴重疾病者,例如癌症的病人、最近接受矯形外科手術(腿或膝蓋)的人以及孕婦。[10]一些研究者認為耐力類運動員也是高危人群。[11][12]. 世界衛生組織的WRIGHT(World Health Organisation Research Into Global Hazards of ...
Increasing Influenza Vaccination among Health Care Personnel in Long-term Care Settings - CDC ... Post-acute and Long-term Care Facility Toolkit: Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Personnel. Increasing Influenza ... Post-acute and Long-Term Care Facilities. Post-acute and LTCFs provide rehabilitative, restorative, and/or ongoing skilled ... Post-acute and Long-term Care Facility Toolkit: Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Personnel ...
... our LTAC wound care program addresses the needs of patients with impaired tissue integrity. ... Emory Long-Term Acute Care offers one of the most comprehensive wound care programs in Atlanta - ... Comprehensive Wound Care Program Emory Long-Term Acute Care wound care program addresses the needs of patients suffering from ... Or contact us for more details on wound care at Emory Long-Term Acute Care. ...
Commonalities are used to identify key elements for developing an integrated healthcare delivery system to manage acute medical ... provider and system factors contributing to potentially avoidable emergency room visits from long-term care homes, based on ... Healthcare Quarterly 22(2) July 2019 : 40-46.doi:10.12927/hcq.2019.25906 Effective Primary Care Keeping Long-Term Care Patients ... Integration of acute and palliative care services for long-term care (LTC) residents reduces the morbidity and mortality ...
Travel Long Term Acute Care LTAC Registered Nurse RN. GIFTED Healthcare - Tennessee. Registered Nurse (RN). LTAC Long Term ... LEAD PATIENT CARE COORDINATOR. State of Franklin Healthcare Associates - Johnson City, TN. Work is performed in a medical ... PATIENT CARE COORDINATOR. State of Franklin Healthcare Associates - Johnson City, TN. Work is performed in a medical office ... Life Care Center of Gray - Gray, TN. Must be able to perform functions of a staff nurse as required. Must maintain an active ...
Browse 105 CRITICAL CARE RN JACKSONVILLE, FL job listings from companies with openings that are hiring right now! Quickly find ... Compare salaries, browse ratings, and apply for all the Critical Care Rn jobs in Jacksonville, FL ... Travel Long Term Acute Care LTAC Registered Nurse RN. GIFTED Healthcare - United States. _Intermediate Medical Care Unit/IMCU ... Five Points Healthcare - Jacksonville, FL. Preventive health care*. Document resident care provided. Provide emergency care to ...
Approximately 4 100 000 patients are estimated to acquire a healthcare-associated infection in the EU each year. The number of ... estimated incidence and composite antimicrobial resistance index in acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities: results ... Healthcare-associated infections in long-term care facilities In Europe, most long-term care facilities are for the elderly: ... estimated incidence and composite antimicrobial resistance index in acute care hospitals and long-term care facilities: results ...
Colorado Acute Long Term Hospital Earns Wound Care Certification... Explore. More news releases in similar topics ... LifeCare Health Partners, headquartered in Plano, Texas, is a leading health care services provider dedicated to improving the ... Last year, the program implemented a new standard of care for patients weaning from ventilators to trach collars - a mask-free ... company encompasses the LifeCare Family of Hospitals as well as a variety of post-acute services including transitional care, ...
... long-term care centers and nursing homes offer quality care for your loved one ... Foursquare Healthcares short-term rehabilitation rapid recovery program, ... Incorporating the four tenants of healthcare for your short-term rehabilitation and long-term care needs. ... Long Term Care. Trust us with your loved ones. Chronic medical conditions can require the quality of continuous care only found ...
We reported 2-year mortality and compared healthcare utilisation and frailty scores in the 2-year periods before and after ICU ... hospitalisations of elderly patients with acute respiratory infection have increased, yet the long-term effects of ICU ... They also had a 2-fold increase in both healthcare utilisation and frailty score in the 2 years after hospital discharge, ... One thousand two hundred and twenty elderly survivors of acute respiratory infection in the ICU were discharged, and 988 were ...
NYSE:HCN) announced today that it has completed its previously announced sale of 28 long-term/post-acute care facilities, ... previously announced sale of 28 long-term/post-acute care facilities, master leased to Genesis Healthcare, Inc. (NYSE:GEN) (" ... Welltower Completes Sale of 28 Long-term/Post-acute Care Facilities to Cindat/Union Life Joint Venture ... Genesis continues to operate the 28 long-term/post-acute care facilities pursuant to a new lease with the Joint Venture. Under ...
Home / Information for Speech-Language Pathologists / Health Care Settings Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals What are long-term ... acute care hospitals? Long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) are facilities that specialize in the treatment of patients with ... they are able to provide more cost-effective care than if these same patients were kept in acute care facilities. ... LTACHs often are housed within the walls of an acute care hospital but function independently. LTACHs must be licensed ...
Elderly Have a Worse Prognosis at Long-Term Acute Care Hospitals Than Advanced Cancer Patients. 09/4/2019,. by Will Maddox, ... Fewer than 1-in-5 older adults who are transferred to a long-term acute care hospital are alive five years later, giving these ... lower than other medicare patients not in long-term acute care hospitals. ... The study looked at 14,072 patients admitted to the long term care hospitals, and found the average patient spent nearly two ...
1. Introduction to Health Care. 2. The Nursing Assistant. 3. Communication and Interpersonal Skills. 4. Relating to Your ... Preoperative and Postoperative Care. 22. Subacute Care. 23. Special Skills in Long-Term Care. 24. Death and Dying. Glossary. ... The Nursing Assistant: Acute, Subacute, and Long-Term Care / Edition 5. The Nursing Assistant, Fifth Edition is a concise, ... The Nursing Assistant: Acute, Subacute, and Long-Term Care / Edition 5. by JoLynn PulliamJoLynn Pulliam ...
... types of graduate healthcare administration program, and more. ... Acute Care. *Long-term Care. *Health Informatics. * ... Check out top Louisiana Healthcare Administration Degree programs that could help you jumpstart your career! Learn about salary ... Master of Science in Health Care Administration vs. MBA in Healthcare Administration. Both the MBA and MS in Healthcare ... Earning a Ph.D. in Health Care Administration could take up to seven years. Often, the program length depends on how long you ...
... types of graduate healthcare administration program, and more. ... Check out top New Hampshire Healthcare Administration Degree ... Acute Care. *Long-term Care. *Health Informatics. *Organizational Development and Leadership. *Health Policy and Management ... Master of Science in Health Care Administration vs. MBA in Healthcare Administration. Both the MBA and MS in Healthcare ... MS Management w/conc in Healthcare MS Healthcare Administration MBA w/conc in Healthcare Management IMBA w/conc in Healthcare ...
RN / LPN Long-Term Acute Care (LTAC). Interim HealthCare IN - Muncie Full-Time ... American Health Network was founded in 1994 by a group of physicians seeking a better method of delivering quality health care ... that are recognized nationally as being superior to all others in terms of patient outcomes and controlling health care costs. ... By applying to a job using CareerBuilder you are agreeing to comply with and be subject to the CareerBuilder Terms and ...
All considered influenza vaccination of HCWs, and most were conducted in long-term residential care settings. Consistency in ... We searched electronic health care databases and sources of gray literature by using a predefined strategy. Risk for bias was ... suggesting a likely protective effect for patients in residential care settings. However, evidence was insufficient for us to ... Health care workers (HCWs) may transmit respiratory infection to patients. We assessed evidence for the effectiveness of ...
... programme aims to improve community services so that they can provide modern personalised and responsive care of a consistently ... acute care closer to home; long term conditions; rehabilitation and end of life care. ... Health care. *Liberating the NHS. *Quality and Productivity. *Primary care. *Urgent and emergency care ... acute care closer to home; long term conditions; rehabilitation and end of life care. ...
Division of Acute Care Division of Healthcare Education Division of Long Term Care ... Health Care Facility Information Center. The Health Care Facility Information Center is part of the ISDH Health Care Quality ... Current: Health Care Facility Information Center. Health Care Facility Information Center. Welcome to the Indiana State ... Health Care Facility Information Center. The following are Health Care Facility Information Centers currently available. To ...
CDCs National Healthcare Safety Network is the nations most widely used healthcare-associated infection tracking system. ... 2020 Healthcare Personnel Safety Component Manual pdf icon[PDF - 1 MB]. *2018 Biovigilance Component Protocol pdf icon[PDF - 1 ... Long-term Care Facility Componentplus icon*LTCF COVID-19 Moduleplus icon*COVID-19 Module Enrollment ... Long-term Acute Care Hospitals (LTACH). ... Long-term Acute Care Facilities (LTACH). *PPS Exempt Cancer ...
Law Med Health Care. 1983;11(6):271-276.. 8. Brush BL, Capezuti E. Historical analysis of siderail use in American hospitals. J ... In the mid-1900s, many acute and long-term care facilities began routine adoption of physical restraints and bed side rails in ... 4(February 15, 2009) / Editorials: Restraining Devices for Patients in Acute and Long-Term Care Facilities ... Clinical guidance for the assessment and implementation of bed rails in hospitals, long term care facilities, and home care ...
... spiritual care, support groups, life pouches and more. ... Home Healthcare. *Dialysis Centers. *LTACH (Long Term Acute ... Care Management is a key resource in meeting those needs.. Care Management Staff. Our caring staff combines the skills of ... Care Management Care Management. While you are a patient at Medina Hospital our primary goal is to speed your return to good ... Send Us FeedbackSite MapAbout this WebsiteCopyright, Reprint & LicensingWebsite Terms of UsePrivacy PolicyNotice of Privacy ...
Medication reconciliation has been an area with increased focus among transitions of care due to associations with error rates ... Patients should also be encouraged to carry an updated medication list to improve continuity of care across health care ... In long-term care (LTC) facilities across the country, error rates of up to 21% have been reported during transitions of care ... Identifying Potential Medication Discrepancies During Medication Reconciliation in the Post-Acute Long-Term Care Setting. ...
  • The Ambulatory/Procedural RN Manager coordinates, plans, facilitates, integrates and evaluates patient care delivery, including nursing practice for specific. (simplyhired.com)
  • Individual must be able to fulfill the following responsibilities: Analyze the healthcare imaging industry policies Foster external healthcare leader relationships Create materials to organize and communicate findings Required Skills: Ability to travel 15% of the time MBA or other master s in busin. (claz.org)
  • As more responsibilities are given to LPNs in BC, the need for these healthcare professionals will grow. (cdicollege.ca)
  • We examined differences over the 2 years after discharge in mortality, healthcare utilisation and frailty score between elderly survivors of ARI in the ICU and an elderly control population. (springer.com)
  • We reported 2-year mortality and compared healthcare utilisation and frailty scores in the 2-year periods before and after ICU hospitalisation. (springer.com)
  • 13 Currently available treatment options for acute ischemic stroke focus on restoring cerebral perfusion to the affected area as quickly as possible thereby reducing or preventing brain infarction and minimizing long-term disability and stroke-related mortality. (ahrq.gov)
  • The Elderhaus Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly in North Carolina: Improving Functional Outcomes and Reducing Cost of Care: Preliminary Data. (npaonline.org)
  • The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly Model: Lessons for the Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office. (npaonline.org)
  • Success in raising the quality bar requires healthcare stakeholders understand the emerging changes in payment reform and care delivery, including how technology is being used to assist in care coordination and quality. (ahima.org)
  • One thousand two hundred and twenty elderly survivors of acute respiratory infection in the ICU were discharged, and 988 were successfully matched with controls. (springer.com)
  • Consequently, we previously demonstrated a substantial increase in hospitalisations for acute respiratory infection (ARI) over 10 years (2006-2015), with a change in the ICU admission policy for elderly patients leading to an important rise in ICU resource utilisation [ 11 ]. (springer.com)
  • Merritt Hawkins & Associates survey shows nurse anesthetist earnings comperable to primary care physicians. (jobstar.org)
  • Research shows that patients with heart failure struggle to keep doctor's appointments, don't feel comfortable with their physicians, and often suffer from neurological problems like confusion or short-term memory loss. (washingtonexaminer.com)
  • It also may lead some patients to shift from intensive life-sustaining and rehabilitative treatment to hospice care, with a focus on managing their symptoms and improving the quality of their remaining life. (dmagazine.com)
  • Various care need projections based on diverse projection methods give a detailed overview on probable future developments of the number of people in need of care, mainly for Germany. (springer.com)
  • Welltower™, a real estate investment trust (REIT), owns more than 1,400 properties in major, high-growth markets in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, consisting of seniors housing and post-acute communities and outpatient medical properties. (businesswire.com)
  • Our short-term rehabilitation guests benefit from our "homeward bound" rapid recovery program and, for our long-term care residents, we design an individual plan to address their chronic medical need. (foursquarehealthcare.com)
  • Mednax is offering an exciting career opportunity for a 5th full-time neonatologist to join our team at Covenant Medical Center in Saginaw, Michigan Our experienced neonatologists emphasize a team approach to neonatal care that covers seventeen counties in Mid Michigan. (claz.org)
  • Our healthcare attorneys are also called upon to design and implement corporate compliance programs, as well as conduct educational sessions for board members, employees and medical staff. (bipc.com)
  • Packed with colorful images and clear-as-day guidance, this friendly reference guides you through meeting documentation requirements, working with electronic medical records systems, complying with legal requirements, following care planning guidelines, and more. (dymocks.com.au)
  • The goal is to define a minimal set of terms that connect representations from well defined healthcare information & process models (such as HL7 RIM) with more expressive foundational ontologies through the use of the criteria outlined in the traditional Problem-oriented Medical Record (POMR) structure. (w3.org)
  • Upon completion of the acquisition, Owens & Minor will significantly advance its strategy of Connecting the World of Medical Products to the Point of Care TM by broadening its service offering to provider and manufacturer customers. (businesswire.com)
  • We have a long and productive history working with Medical Action as their largest channel partner and understand the organization well," said James L. Bierman, president and chief operating officer of Owens & Minor. (businesswire.com)
  • As the healthcare industry continues to move from a fee-for-service model to an outcome based model, properly trained medical review professionals are becoming more crucial. (judge.com)