Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Lice Infestations: Parasitic attack or subsistence on the skin by members of the order Phthiraptera, especially on humans by Pediculus humanus of the family Pediculidae. The hair of the head, eyelashes, and pubis is a frequent site of infestation. (From Dorland, 28th ed; Stedman, 26th ed)Ectoparasitic Infestations: Infestations by PARASITES which live on, or burrow into, the surface of their host's EPIDERMIS. Most ectoparasites are ARTHROPODS.Tick Infestations: Infestations with soft-bodied (Argasidae) or hard-bodied (Ixodidae) ticks.Flea Infestations: Parasitic attack by members of the order SIPHONAPTERA.Pediculus: Lice of the genus Pediculus, family Pediculidae. Pediculus humanus corporus is the human body louse and Pediculus humanus capitis is the human head louse.Scalp DermatosesInsect Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous insects through chemical, biological, or other means.Myiasis: The invasion of living tissues of man and other mammals by dipterous larvae.Acaricides: A pesticide or chemical agent that kills mites and ticks. This is a large class that includes carbamates, formamides, organochlorines, organophosphates, etc, that act as antibiotics or growth regulators.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Triatoma: A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Several species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.Bedbugs: Bugs of the family CIMICIDAE, genus Cimex. They are flattened, oval, reddish insects which inhabit houses, wallpaper, furniture, and beds. C. lectularius, of temperate regions, is the common bedbug that attacks humans and is frequently a serious pest in houses, hotels, barracks, and other living quarters. Experiments have shown that bedbugs can transmit a variety of diseases, but they are not normal vectors under natural conditions. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p272)Ctenocephalides: A genus of FLEAS in the family Pulicidae. It includes the cat flea (Ctenocephalides felis), one of the most common species on earth.Sarcoptes scabiei: A species of mite that causes SCABIES in humans and sarcoptic mange in other animals. Specific variants of S. scabiei exist for humans and animals, but many have the ability to cross species and cause disease.Tungiasis: An infestation with the flea TUNGA PENETRANS causing inflammation, pruritus, and pain, in both humans and other mammals. There is a high incidence of secondary infections such as BACTEREMIA and TETANUS.Tunga: A genus of parasitic fleas in the family Pulicidae. They are found mainly in Africa, South America, and Central America.Mites: Any arthropod of the subclass ACARI except the TICKS. They are minute animals related to the spiders, usually having transparent or semitransparent bodies. They may be parasitic on humans and domestic animals, producing various irritations of the skin (MITE INFESTATIONS). Many mite species are important to human and veterinary medicine as both parasite and vector. Mites also infest plants.Rhipicephalus: A genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, widespread in Africa. Members of the genus include many important vectors of animal and human pathogens.Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.Housing: Living facilities for humans.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.Eye Infections, Parasitic: Mild to severe infections of the eye and its adjacent structures (adnexa) by adult or larval protozoan or metazoan parasites.Ivermectin: A mixture of mostly avermectin H2B1a (RN 71827-03-7) with some avermectin H2B1b (RN 70209-81-3), which are macrolides from STREPTOMYCES avermitilis. It binds glutamate-gated chloride channel to cause increased permeability and hyperpolarization of nerve and muscle cells. It also interacts with other CHLORIDE CHANNELS. It is a broad spectrum antiparasitic that is active against microfilariae of ONCHOCERCA VOLVULUS but not the adult form.Siphonaptera: An order of parasitic, blood-sucking, wingless INSECTS with the common name of fleas.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Skin Diseases, Parasitic: Skin diseases caused by ARTHROPODS; HELMINTHS; or other parasites.Rhodnius: A genus of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Rhodnius prolixus is a vector for TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.Phthiraptera: An order of small, wingless parasitic insects, commonly known as lice. The suborders include ANOPLURA (sucking lice); AMBLYCERA; ISCHNOCERA; and Rhynchophthirina (elephant and warthog lice).Pest Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous plants, insects, or other animals. This includes control of plants that serve as habitats or food sources for animal pests.Chagas Disease: Infection with the protozoan parasite TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, a form of TRYPANOSOMIASIS endemic in Central and South America. It is named after the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, who discovered the parasite. Infection by the parasite (positive serologic result only) is distinguished from the clinical manifestations that develop years later, such as destruction of PARASYMPATHETIC GANGLIA; CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY; and dysfunction of the ESOPHAGUS or COLON.ArgentinaPermethrin: A pyrethroid insecticide commonly used in the treatment of LICE INFESTATIONS and SCABIES.Rodent Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous rodents through chemical, biological, or other means.Copepoda: A huge subclass of mostly marine CRUSTACEA, containing over 14,000 species. The 10 orders comprise both planktonic and benthic organisms, and include both free-living and parasitic forms. Planktonic copepods form the principle link between PHYTOPLANKTON and the higher trophic levels of the marine food chains.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Pyrethrins: The active insecticidal constituent of CHRYSANTHEMUM CINERARIIFOLIUM flowers. Pyrethrin I is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemummonocarboxylic acid and pyrethrin II is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester.Ixodidae: A family of hardbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include DERMACENTOR and IXODES among others.Diptera: An order of the class Insecta. Wings, when present, number two and distinguish Diptera from other so-called flies, while the halteres, or reduced hindwings, separate Diptera from other insects with one pair of wings. The order includes the families Calliphoridae, Oestridae, Phoridae, SARCOPHAGIDAE, Scatophagidae, Sciaridae, SIMULIIDAE, Tabanidae, Therevidae, Trypetidae, CERATOPOGONIDAE; CHIRONOMIDAE; CULICIDAE; DROSOPHILIDAE; GLOSSINIDAE; MUSCIDAE; TEPHRITIDAE; and PSYCHODIDAE. The larval form of Diptera species are called maggots (see LARVA).Triatominae: A subfamily of assassin bugs (REDUVIIDAE) that are obligate blood-suckers of vertebrates. Included are the genera TRIATOMA; RHODNIUS; and PANSTRONGYLUS, which are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI, the agent of CHAGAS DISEASE in humans.Rodenticides: Substances used to destroy or inhibit the action of rats, mice, or other rodents.Nymph: The immature stage in the life cycle of those orders of insects characterized by gradual metamorphosis, in which the young resemble the imago in general form of body, including compound eyes and external wings; also the 8-legged stage of mites and ticks that follows the first moult.Cestode Infections: Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.Facial DermatosesTicks: Blood-sucking acarid parasites of the order Ixodida comprising two families: the softbacked ticks (ARGASIDAE) and hardbacked ticks (IXODIDAE). Ticks are larger than their relatives, the MITES. They penetrate the skin of their host by means of highly specialized, hooked mouth parts and feed on its blood. Ticks attack all groups of terrestrial vertebrates. In humans they are responsible for many TICK-BORNE DISEASES, including the transmission of ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; TULAREMIA; BABESIOSIS; AFRICAN SWINE FEVER; and RELAPSING FEVER. (From Barnes, Invertebrate Zoology, 5th ed, pp543-44)Pentastomida: A subclass of CRUSTACEA comprising the tongue worms which are obligatory parasites of reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans.Aphids: A family (Aphididae) of small insects, in the suborder Sternorrhyncha, that suck the juices of plants. Important genera include Schizaphis and Myzus. The latter is known to carry more than 100 virus diseases between plants.Entomology: A discipline or occupation concerned with the study of INSECTS, including the biology and the control of insects.Muscidae: A family of the order DIPTERA with over 700 species. Important species that may be mechanical vectors of disease include Musca domesticus (HOUSEFLIES), Musca autumnalis (face fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Haematobia irritans (horn fly) and Fannia spp.Parasitic Diseases: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. They are often contracted through contact with an intermediate vector, but may occur as the result of direct exposure.Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic: Infections of the INTESTINES with PARASITES, commonly involving PARASITIC WORMS. Infections with roundworms (NEMATODE INFECTIONS) and tapeworms (CESTODE INFECTIONS) are also known as HELMINTHIASIS.Host-Parasite Interactions: The relationship between an invertebrate and another organism (the host), one of which lives at the expense of the other. Traditionally excluded from definition of parasites are pathogenic BACTERIA; FUNGI; VIRUSES; and PLANTS; though they may live parasitically.Acari: A large, subclass of arachnids comprising the MITES and TICKS, including parasites of plants, animals, and humans, as well as several important disease vectors.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Population Density: Number of individuals in a population relative to space.Mortuary Practice: Activities associated with the disposition of the dead. It excludes cultural practices such as funeral rites.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Thelazioidea: A superfamily of parasitic nematodes which includes three genera: Thelazia, Spirocerca, and GNATHOSTOMA. Only Thelazia and GNATHOSTOMA occasionally occur in man.ToluidinesRhipicephalus sanguineus: A species of tick (TICKS) in the family IXODIDAE, distributed throughout the world but abundant in southern Europe. It will feed on a wide variety of MAMMALS, but DOGS are its preferred host. It transmits a large number of diseases including BABESIOSIS; THEILERIASIS; EHRLICHIOSIS; and MEDITERRANEAN SPOTTED FEVER.Aedes: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.Ixodes: The largest genus of TICKS in the family IXODIDAE, containing over 200 species. Many infest humans and other mammals and several are vectors of diseases such as LYME DISEASE, tick-borne encephalitis (ENCEPHALITIS, TICK-BORNE), and KYASANUR FOREST DISEASE.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Herbivory: The act of feeding on plants by animals.Cockroaches: Insects of the order Dictyoptera comprising several families including Blaberidae, BLATTELLIDAE, Blattidae (containing the American cockroach PERIPLANETA americana), Cryptocercidae, and Polyphagidae.Malathion: A wide spectrum aliphatic organophosphate insecticide widely used for both domestic and commercial agricultural purposes.Luffa: A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE known for the fruit which is the source of the luffa sponge and the seeds which contain luffin.Panstrongylus: A genus of cone-nosed bugs of the subfamily TRIATOMINAE. Its species are vectors of TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI.Varroidae: A family of MITES in the subclass ACARI. It includes the single genus Varroa.Ascariasis: Infection by nematodes of the genus ASCARIS. Ingestion of infective eggs causes diarrhea and pneumonitis. Its distribution is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation and where human feces are used for fertilizer.Methoprene: Juvenile hormone analog and insect growth regulator used to control insects by disrupting metamorphosis. Has been effective in controlling mosquito larvae.BrazilHair Preparations: Hair grooming, cleansing and modifying products meant for topical application to hair, usually human. They include sprays, bleaches, dyes, conditioners, rinses, shampoos, nutrient lotions, etc.Spirurida Infections: Infections with nematodes of the order SPIRURIDA.Aquaculture: Cultivation of natural faunal resources of water. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Trematode Infections: Infections caused by infestation with worms of the class Trematoda.Trombiculidae: Family of MITES in the superfamily Trombiculoidea, suborder Prostigmata, which attack humans and other vertebrates, causing DERMATITIS and severe allergic reactions. Chiggers, red bugs, and harvest mites commonly refer to the larval stage of Trombiculid mites, the only parasitic stage of the mite's life cycle.Beetles: INSECTS of the order Coleoptera, containing over 350,000 species in 150 families. They possess hard bodies and their mouthparts are adapted for chewing.Fish Diseases: Diseases of freshwater, marine, hatchery or aquarium fish. This term includes diseases of both teleosts (true fish) and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates).Eyelashes: The hairs which project from the edges of the EYELIDS.Blepharitis: Inflammation of the eyelids.4-Hydroxycoumarins: Substances found in many plants, containing the 4-hydroxycoumarin radical. They interfere with vitamin K and the blood clotting mechanism, are tightly protein-bound, inhibit mitochondrial and microsomal enzymes, and are used as oral anticoagulants.Rodent Diseases: Diseases of rodents of the order RODENTIA. This term includes diseases of Sciuridae (squirrels), Geomyidae (gophers), Heteromyidae (pouched mice), Castoridae (beavers), Cricetidae (rats and mice), Muridae (Old World rats and mice), Erethizontidae (porcupines), and Caviidae (guinea pigs).Arecaceae: The palm family of order Arecales, subclass Arecidae, class Liliopsida.Helminthiasis, Animal: Infestation of animals with parasitic worms of the helminth class. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Parasite Load: Measure of the number of the PARASITES present in a host organism.Nitro Compounds: Compounds having the nitro group, -NO2, attached to carbon. When attached to nitrogen they are nitramines and attached to oxygen they are NITRATES.Insect Bites and Stings: Bites and stings inflicted by insects.Cat Diseases: Diseases of the domestic cat (Felis catus or F. domesticus). This term does not include diseases of the so-called big cats such as CHEETAHS; LIONS; tigers, cougars, panthers, leopards, and other Felidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Tick Control: Chemical, biological, or medical measures designed to prevent the spread of ticks or the concomitant infestations which result in tick-borne diseases. It includes the veterinary as well as the public health aspects of tick and mite control.Parasitic Diseases, Animal: Infections or infestations with parasitic organisms. The infestation may be experimental or veterinary.Hemiptera: A large order of insects characterized by having the mouth parts adapted to piercing or sucking. It is comprised of four suborders: HETEROPTERA, Auchenorrhyncha, Sternorrhyncha, and Coleorrhyncha.Ancylostomiasis: Infection of humans or animals with hookworms of the genus ANCYLOSTOMA. Characteristics include anemia, dyspepsia, eosinophilia, and abdominal swelling.Cattle Diseases: Diseases of domestic cattle of the genus Bos. It includes diseases of cows, yaks, and zebus.Ischnocera: A suborder of chewing lice, in the order PHTHIRAPTERA, that are parasites of birds and mammals.Rodentia: A mammalian order which consists of 29 families and many genera.Insect Repellents: Substances causing insects to turn away from them or reject them as food.Antinematodal Agents: Substances used in the treatment or control of nematode infestations. They are used also in veterinary practice.Plant Diseases: Diseases of plants.Household Articles: Various material objects and items in the home. It includes temporary or permanent machinery and appliances. It does not include furniture or interior furnishings (FURNITURE see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS; INTERIOR FURNISHINGS see INTERIOR DESIGN AND FURNISHINGS).Enterobiasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus ENTEROBIUS; E. vermicularis, the pinworm of man, causes a crawling sensation and pruritus. This condition results in scratching the area, occasionally causing scarification.GuatemalaOxyuriasis: Infection with nematodes of the superfamily OXYUROIDEA.Anthelmintics: Agents destructive to parasitic worms. They are used therapeutically in the treatment of HELMINTHIASIS in man and animal.Pupa: An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.Disease Reservoirs: Animate or inanimate sources which normally harbor disease-causing organisms and thus serve as potential sources of disease outbreaks. Reservoirs are distinguished from vectors (DISEASE VECTORS) and carriers, which are agents of disease transmission rather than continuing sources of potential disease outbreaks.Rural Population: The inhabitants of rural areas or of small towns classified as rural.Sheep Diseases: Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.Coccidia: A subclass of protozoans commonly parasitic in the epithelial cells of the intestinal tract but also found in the liver and other organs. Its organisms are found in both vertebrates and higher invertebrates and comprise two orders: EIMERIIDA and EUCOCCIDIIDA.Opisthorchiasis: Infection with flukes of the genus Opisthorchis.Arachnid Vectors: Members of the class Arachnida, especially SPIDERS; SCORPIONS; MITES; and TICKS; which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Trypanosoma cruzi: The agent of South American trypanosomiasis or CHAGAS DISEASE. Its vertebrate hosts are man and various domestic and wild animals. Insects of several species are vectors.Dermacentor: A widely distributed genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, including a number that infest humans and other mammals. Several are vectors of diseases such as TULAREMIA; ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; COLORADO TICK FEVER; and ANAPLASMOSIS.Stenella: A genus comprised of spinner, spotted, and striped DOLPHINS, in the family Delphinidae. Schools of Stenella, that may number in the thousands, often associate with schools of TUNA, and are thus vulnerable to accidental harvesting.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.Parasite Egg Count: Determination of parasite eggs in feces.Necator: A genus of intestinal parasite worms which includes one of the most important hookworms of man, NECATOR AMERICANUS. The only other known species, N. suillus, has been recovered from pigs.Trematoda: Class of parasitic flukes consisting of three subclasses, Monogenea, Aspidogastrea, and Digenea. The digenetic trematodes are the only ones found in man. They are endoparasites and require two hosts to complete their life cycle.Weed Control: The prevention of growth and or spread of unwanted plants.Ascaris lumbricoides: A species of parasitic nematode that is the largest found in the human intestine. Its distribution is worldwide, but it is more prevalent in areas of poor sanitation. Human infection with A. lumbricoides is acquired by swallowing fully embryonated eggs from contaminated soil.Dirofilariasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus DIROFILARIA, usually in animals, especially dogs, but occasionally in man.Ear Canal: The narrow passage way that conducts the sound collected by the EAR AURICLE to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE.Weevils: BEETLES in the family Curculionidae and the largest family in the order COLEOPTERA. They have a markedly convex shape and many are considered pests.Strongyloidiasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus STRONGYLOIDES. The presence of larvae may produce pneumonitis and the presence of adult worms in the intestine could lead to moderate to severe diarrhea.Larva Migrans: Infections caused by nematode larvae which never develop into the adult stage and migrate through various body tissues. They commonly infect the skin, eyes, and viscera in man. Ancylostoma brasiliensis causes cutaneous larva migrans. Toxocara causes visceral larva migrans.Hookworm Infections: Infection of humans or animals with hookworms other than those caused by the genus Ancylostoma or Necator, for which the specific terms ANCYLOSTOMIASIS and NECATORIASIS are available.Nematode Infections: Infections by nematodes, general or unspecified.Dimethylpolysiloxanes: Silicone polymers which consist of silicon atoms substituted with methyl groups and linked by oxygen atoms. They comprise a series of biocompatible materials used as liquids, gels or solids; as film for artificial membranes, gels for implants, and liquids for drug vehicles; and as antifoaming agents.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Oxyuroidea: A superfamily of parasitic nematodes consisting of several genera. ENTEROBIUS, which occurs in humans, and Oxyuris, which occurs in horses, are two of the most common. Other genera are: Skrjabinema, Passalurus, Dermatoxys, and Probstmayria.MexicoHelminthiasis: Infestation with parasitic worms of the helminth class.Cysticercosis: Infection with CYSTICERCUS, the larval form of the various tapeworms of the genus Taenia (usually T. solium in man). In humans they penetrate the intestinal wall and invade subcutaneous tissue, brain, eye, muscle, heart, liver, lung, and peritoneum. Brain involvement results in NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS.Mosquito Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.Trichuriasis: Infection with nematodes of the genus TRICHURIS, formerly called Trichocephalus.PeruHousing, AnimalEchinococcus granulosus: A species of hydatid tapeworm (class CESTODA) in the family Taeniidae, whose adult form infects the DIGESTIVE TRACT of DOGS, other canines, and CATS. The larval form infects SHEEP; PIGS; HORSES; and may infect humans, where it migrates to various organs and forms permanent HYDATID CYSTS.Cuba: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)Platyhelminths: A phylum of acoelomate, bilaterally symmetrical flatworms, without a definite anus. It includes three classes: Cestoda, Turbellaria, and Trematoda.Sanitation: The development and establishment of environmental conditions favorable to the health of the public.Cestoda: A subclass of segmented worms comprising the tapeworms.Enterobius: A genus of intestinal nematode worms which includes the pinworm or threadworm Enterobius vermicularis.Mebendazole: A benzimidazole that acts by interfering with CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM and inhibiting polymerization of MICROTUBULES.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Tetranychidae: Family of spider MITES, in the superfamily Tetranychoidea, suborder Trombidiformes.Strongyloides stercoralis: A species of parasitic nematode widely distributed in tropical and subtropical countries. The females and their larvae inhabit the mucosa of the intestinal tract, where they cause ulceration and diarrhea.Lindane: An organochlorine insecticide that has been used as a pediculicide and a scabicide. It has been shown to cause cancer.Bites and StingsOviposition: The process of laying or shedding fully developed eggs (OVA) from the female body. The term is usually used for certain INSECTS or FISHES with an organ called ovipositor where eggs are stored or deposited before expulsion from the body.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Echinococcosis, Pulmonary: Helminth infection of the lung caused by Echinococcus granulosus or Echinococcus multilocularis.Ophiostomatales: An order of fungi in the phylum ASCOMYCOTA that are important plant pathogens.Clonorchiasis: Infection of the biliary passages with CLONORCHIS SINENSIS, also called Opisthorchis sinensis. It may lead to inflammation of the biliary tract, proliferation of biliary epithelium, progressive portal fibrosis, and sometimes bile duct carcinoma. Extension to the liver may lead to fatty changes and cirrhosis. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Rosacea: A cutaneous disorder primarily of convexities of the central part of the FACE, such as FOREHEAD; CHEEK; NOSE; and CHIN. It is characterized by FLUSHING; ERYTHEMA; EDEMA; RHINOPHYMA; papules; and ocular symptoms. It may occur at any age but typically after age 30. There are various subtypes of rosacea: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular (National Rosacea Society's Expert Committee on the Classification and Staging of Rosacea, J Am Acad Dermatol 2002; 46:584-7).ParaguayTick Paralysis: Paralysis caused by a neurotropic toxin secreted by the salivary glands of ticks.Oxylipins: Eighteen-carbon cyclopentyl polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID via an oxidative pathway analogous to the EICOSANOIDS in animals. Biosynthesis is inhibited by SALICYLATES. A key member, jasmonic acid of PLANTS, plays a similar role to ARACHIDONIC ACID in animals.El SalvadorBird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Manihot: A plant genus of the family EUPHORBIACEAE that is perennial with conspicuous, almost palmate leaves like those of RICINUS but more deeply parted into five to nine lobes. It is a source of a starch after removal of the cyanogenic glucosides. The common name of Arrowroot is also used with Maranta (MARANTACEAE). The common name of yuca is also used for YUCCA.Paleopathology: The study of disease in prehistoric times as revealed in bones, mummies, and archaeologic artifacts.Korea: Former kingdom, located on Korea Peninsula between Sea of Japan and Yellow Sea on east coast of Asia. In 1948, the kingdom ceased and two independent countries were formed, divided by the 38th parallel.Endemic Diseases: The constant presence of diseases or infectious agents within a given geographic area or population group. It may also refer to the usual prevalence of a given disease with such area or group. It includes holoendemic and hyperendemic diseases. A holoendemic disease is one for which a high prevalent level of infection begins early in life and affects most of the child population, leading to a state of equilibrium such that the adult population shows evidence of the disease much less commonly than do children (malaria in many communities is a holoendemic disease). A hyperendemic disease is one that is constantly present at a high incidence and/or prevalence rate and affects all groups equally. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3d ed, p53, 78, 80)Morbillivirus Infections: Infections with viruses of the genus MORBILLIVIRUS, family PARAMYXOVIRIDAE. Infections mainly cause acute disease in their hosts, although in some cases infection is persistent and leads to degenerative conditions.Echinococcosis: An infection caused by the infestation of the larval form of tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. The liver, lungs, and kidney are the most common areas of infestation.Liver Diseases, Parasitic: Liver diseases caused by infections with PARASITES, such as tapeworms (CESTODA) and flukes (TREMATODA).Argasidae: A family of softbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include ARGAS and ORNITHODOROS among others.Albendazole: A benzimidazole broad-spectrum anthelmintic structurally related to MEBENDAZOLE that is effective against many diseases. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p38)Bees: Insect members of the superfamily Apoidea, found almost everywhere, particularly on flowers. About 3500 species occur in North America. They differ from most WASPS in that their young are fed honey and pollen rather than animal food.Helminths: Commonly known as parasitic worms, this group includes the ACANTHOCEPHALA; NEMATODA; and PLATYHELMINTHS. Some authors consider certain species of LEECHES that can become temporarily parasitic as helminths.Animals, Domestic: Animals which have become adapted through breeding in captivity to a life intimately associated with humans. They include animals domesticated by humans to live and breed in a tame condition on farms or ranches for economic reasons, including LIVESTOCK (specifically CATTLE; SHEEP; HORSES; etc.), POULTRY; and those raised or kept for pleasure and companionship, e.g., PETS; or specifically DOGS; CATS; etc.Bithionol: Halogenated anti-infective agent that is used against trematode and cestode infestations.VenezuelaCities: A large or important municipality of a country, usually a major metropolitan center.Metastrongyloidea: A superfamily of nematodes of the order STRONGYLIDA. Characteristics include a fluid-filled outer layer of cuticle and a reduced mouth and bursa.Praziquantel: An anthelmintic used in most schistosome and many cestode infestations.Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Ancylostoma: A genus of nematode intestinal parasites that consists of several species. A. duodenale is the common hookworm in humans. A. braziliense, A. ceylonicum, and A. caninum occur primarily in cats and dogs, but all have been known to occur in humans.Giardiasis: An infection of the SMALL INTESTINE caused by the flagellated protozoan GIARDIA LAMBLIA. It is spread via contaminated food and water and by direct person-to-person contact.Fasciolidae: A family of flukes of the class Trematoda occurring primarily in the liver of animals and man. There are six genera: Fasciola, Fasciolopsis, Fascioloides, Tenuifasciola, Parafasciolopsis, and Protofasciola. The adult form of Fasciolopsis occurs in the intestines of pigs and man.Clonorchis sinensis: A species of trematode flukes of the family Opisthorchidae. Many authorities consider this genus belonging to Opisthorchis. It is common in China and other Asiatic countries. Snails and fish are the intermediate hosts.Deer: The family Cervidae of 17 genera and 45 species occurring nearly throughout North America, South America, and Eurasia, on most associated continental islands, and in northern Africa. Wild populations of deer have been established through introduction by people in Cuba, New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, and other places where the family does not naturally occur. They are slim, long-legged and best characterized by the presence of antlers. Their habitat is forests, swamps, brush country, deserts, and arctic tundra. They are usually good swimmers; some migrate seasonally. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1362)Cyclopentanes: A group of alicyclic hydrocarbons with the general formula R-C5H9.Arthropod Vectors: Arthropods, other than insects and arachnids, which transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Siloxanes: Silicon polymers that contain alternate silicon and oxygen atoms in linear or cyclic molecular structures.Dirofilaria immitis: A filarial parasite primarily of dogs but occurring also in foxes, wolves, and humans. The parasite is transmitted by mosquitoes.Filarioidea: A superfamily of nematodes of the suborder SPIRURINA. Its organisms possess a filiform body and a mouth surrounded by papillae.Filariasis: Infections with nematodes of the superfamily FILARIOIDEA. The presence of living worms in the body is mainly asymptomatic but the death of adult worms leads to granulomatous inflammation and permanent fibrosis. Organisms of the genus Elaeophora infect wild elk and domestic sheep causing ischemic necrosis of the brain, blindness, and dermatosis of the face.Animals, Inbred Strains: Animals produced by the mating of progeny over multiple generations. The resultant strain of animals is virtually identical genotypically. Highly inbred animal lines allow the study of certain traits in a relatively pure form. (Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Slovakia: Created 1 January 1993 as a result of the division of Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.Capillaria: A genus of trichuroid nematodes parasitic in the liver and intestines of many mammals and birds. Two species, C. hepatica and C. philippinensis, produce often fatal infections in man.Baths: The immersion or washing of the body or any of its parts in water or other medium for cleansing or medical treatment. It includes bathing for personal hygiene as well as for medical purposes with the addition of therapeutic agents, such as alkalines, antiseptics, oil, etc.Phosphines: Inorganic or organic compounds derived from phosphine (PH3) by the replacement of H atoms. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Pinus: A plant genus in the family PINACEAE, order Pinales, class Pinopsida, division Coniferophyta. They are evergreen trees mainly in temperate climates.Animal DiseasesBedding and Linens: Articles of cloth, usually cotton or rayon and other synthetic or cotton-blend fabrics, used in households, hospitals, physicians' examining rooms, nursing homes, etc., for sheets, pillow cases, toweling, gowns, drapes, and the like.Blattellidae: A family of insects in the order Dictyoptera (COCKROACHES), including genera Blattella, Parcoblatta, and Symploce.
Homes or other buildings near fields or woods are particularly prone to infestation.[26] ...
There are now fears of a widespread infestation.". *^ Campbell Brittany E.; Koehler Philip G.; Buss Lyle J.; Baldwin Rebecca W ... Bed bug infestations have resurged since the 1980s[50] for reasons that are not clear, but contributing factors may be ... Diagnosis of an infestation involves both finding bed bugs and the occurrence of compatible symptoms.[6] Treatment involves the ... Bed bugs occur around the world.[68] Rates of infestations in developed countries, while decreasing from the 1930s to the 1980s ...
For infections and infestations[edit]. antibiotics, antifungals, antileprotics, antituberculous drugs, antimalarials, ...
Infestation. {{Arthropod infestations}}. Medicine. Infectious diseases - Parasitic disease: ectoparasitic infestation / ... Infestation. {{Human lice}}. Medicine. Human lice and pediculosis. (none). Footer. Pathology. Infestation. {{Acari-borne ... Infestation. {{Helminthiases}}. Medicine. Infectious diseases · Parasitic disease: helminthiases (B65-B83, 120-129). Infectious ...
Only specialized laboratories can adequately diagnose Babesia infection in humans, so Babesia infections are considered highly under-reported. It develops in patients who live in or travel to an endemic area or receive a contaminated blood transfusion within the preceding 9 weeks, so this aspect of the medical history is vital.[9] Babesiosis may be suspected when a person with such an exposure history develops persistent fevers and hemolytic anemia. The definitive diagnostic test is the identification of parasites on a Giemsa-stained thin-film blood smear.[9] So-called "Maltese cross formations" on the blood film are diagnostic (pathognomonic) of babesiosis, since they are not seen in malaria, the primary differential diagnosis.[8] Careful examination of multiple smears may be necessary, since Babesia may infect less than 1% of circulating red blood cells, thus be easily overlooked.[10] Serologic testing for antibodies against Babesia (both IgG and IgM) can detect low-level infection in cases ...
I. persulcatus ticks transmit Lyme disease, babesiosis, and Siberian (TBEV-Sib) and Far Eastern (TBEV-FE) tick-borne encephalitis,[1][4] and probably human granulocytic anaplasmosis as well.[5] A recent study of the northernmost tick-borne encephalitis focus in Simo, Finnish Lapland, found I. persulcatus ticks in scattered foci along the western coast, including the Kokkola archipelago and Närpes municipality, demonstrating a northward movement of foci and an unusual combination of the TBEV-Eur strain and I. persulcatus ticks in an area with no evidence of cocirculation of tick species or TBEV subtypes.[1] ...
From 1995 to 2013, 228 cases of CCHF were reported in the Republic of Kosovo, with a case-fatality rate of 25.5%.[21] Between 2002-2008 the Ministry of Health of Turkey reported 3,128 CCHF cases, with a 5% death rate.[citation needed] In July 2005, authorities reported 41 cases of CCHF in central Turkey's Yozgat Province, with one death.[clarification needed] As of August 2008, a total of 50 deaths were reported for the year thus far in various cities in Turkey due to CCHF.[clarification needed] In September 2010, an outbreak was reported in Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. Poor diagnosis and record keeping caused the extent of the outbreak to be uncertain, though some reports indicated over 100 cases, with a case-fatality rate above 10%.[citation needed] In January 2011, the first human cases of CCHF in India was reported in Sanand, Gujarat, India, with 4 reported deaths, which included the index patient, treating physician and nurse.[22] As of May 2012[update], 71 people were reported ...
Weed infestation. Low. High Resistance in vicinity. Unknown. Common Approaches to treating resistant weeds[edit]. Alternative ...
For a person or companion animal to acquire a tick-borne disease requires that that individual gets bitten by a tick and that that tick feeds for a sufficient period of time. The feeding time required to transmit pathogens differs for different ticks and different pathogens. Transmission of the bacterium that causes Lyme disease is well understood to require a substantial feeding period.[3] For an individual to acquire infection, the feeding tick must also be infected. Not all ticks are infected. In most places in the US, 30-50% of deer ticks will be infected with Borrelia burgdorferi (the agent of Lyme disease). Other pathogens are much more rare. Ticks can be tested for infection using a highly specific and sensitive qPCR procedure. Several commercial labs provide this service to individuals for a fee. The Laboratory of Medical Zoology (LMZ), a nonprofit lab at the University of Massachusetts, provides a comprehensive TickReport [4] for a variety of human pathogens and makes the data available ...
However, infestation by adults can occur at any time of the year when conditions are suitable, even in mid-winter. Only in the ... Repeated infestation with the larva, as occurs in rural and wooded suburban areas where bandicoots are common, rapidly leads to ... In southeast Queensland a 'maddening rash' (known locally as 'scrub itch') is caused by infestation by many tick larvae. This ... Part 3: Arthropod Infestations (Ticks and Mites). Serv Publ Dep Hlth Vet Hyg 7: 68 ...
Bernardeschi, C (2013 Jan 22). "Bed bug infestation". BMJ (Clinical research ed.). 346: f138. PMID 23341545.. Unknown parameter ...
Others[who?] disagree, believing the type of duckweed to be native to Florida and Texas and thus the infestation is a result of ...
For infections and infestationsEdit. antibiotics, antifungals, antileprotics, antituberculous drugs, antimalarials, ...
"Tumbu fly infestation" (PDF). CDR Weekly Communicable Disease Report. 6 March 1992. ISSN 0144-3186. Archived from the original ... as human movements carry infestation outside endemic areas.[7] ...
larval infestation. Criodrilus lacuum Hoffmeister, 1845 also has prodigious regenerative capacity with 'head' regeneration from ...
... worm infestation; rheumatic arthritis; and mental and nervous disorders. This morbidity profile indicates that it can be ...
Halvorson, CR (October 2012). "An approach to the evaluation of delusional infestation". Cutis. 90 (4): E1-4. PMID 24005827. ... Shmidt, E; Levitt, J (February 2012). "Dermatologic infestations". International Journal of Dermatology. 51 (2): 131-41. doi: ... Freudenmann, RW; Lepping, P (October 2009). "Delusional infestation". Clinical Microbiology Reviews. 22 (4): 690-732. doi: ... "Delusional Infestation: State of the Art". Acta dermato-venereologica. 96 (217): 58-63. doi:10.2340/00015555-2412. PMID ...
... such as scabies and infestation with Demodex, in which a skin infestation is present and identifiable by a physician through ... Delusional parasitosis is a mental disorder characterized by a fixed, false belief that a skin infestation exists, which is in ... The study failed to find evidence of skin infestation despite doing skin biopsies and examining specimens provided by the ... Delusory cleptoparasitosis is a form of delusion of parasitosis where the person believes the infestation is in their dwelling ...
"Rhododendron Infestation". Archived from the original on 7 February 2007. Retrieved 1 July 2007. Erfmeier, Alexandra; Helge ...
"HFS Infestation". tidbits.com. Retrieved 2017-11-17. Thompson, Jim (1 April 1999). "Talkback: MonkInTouch". Linux Today. ...
Mandatory controls apply to infestations. Mealybugs have white hairs covered with a mealy coating. They are up to 8 mm across ...
Camels are prone to severe infestation and wild animals such as foxes may die from sarcoptes infestation. One genus of mites, ... Dense infestations of a poultry house cause much biting stress and loss of production to the birds, and human workers in the ... Infestation of the outer skin is typically caused by psoroptic mites. Psoroptes ovis is an example, it infests sheep and cattle ... Diagnosis of mite infestations can be difficult because of the small size of most mites, but understanding how mites are ...
"Silverfish - Pest Control Infestation.ca".. *^ a b Yates, Julian R. III (December 1992). "Silverfish". University of Hawaii. ...
Their first EP, "Putrefactive Infestation" was released in 2011 on 12" vinyl containing 4 tracks. They then released a ... "NO CLEAN SINGING >> NECROWRETCH: "PUTREFACTIVE INFESTATION"". nocleansinging.com. 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2014-03-02. "Century ... Putrefactive Infestation (2011) Now You're In Hell (2012) Even Death May Die (2014) Demos Rising From Purulence (2009) ...
Wavyleaf basketgrass infestation. Habitat: closed-canopy mesic forest in Maryland, United States. Leaves of the perennial ... Photo shows winter appearance of non-native infestation in Maryland, United States. Invasive wavyleaf basketgrasss collected ...
Bed bug infestations can have an adverse effect on health and quality of life in the general population, particularly among ... This study determined the extent of reemerging bed bug infestations in homeless shelters and other locations in Toronto, Canada ... Toronto Public Health documented complaints of bed bug infestations from 46 locations in 2003, most commonly apartments (63%), ... Bed bug infestations were reported at 20 (31%) of 65 homeless shelters. At 1 affected shelter, 4% of residents reported having ...
It has been described as an obnoxious sweetness, and is characteristic of a bedroom with a heavy infestation. It is highly ... Nobody counts them or keeps national records of infestation rates. There are hardly any 20th-century baseline measures that ... the infestation of new council houses has become a matter of concern to Local Authorities who are responsible for their ...
So, how can you prevent the hell of a bedbug infestation?. Rupert has many suggestions and as a person who still has PTSD from ... According to Rupert, it is most likely safe to stay at the hotel because most infestations are room by room, not the entire ... Batzner has four dogs "on staff," who are sent onsite to sniff out infestations and to assure people the bugs are gone after ... Compared to all the horrors and real problems in the world, a bedbug infestation might seem insignificant. That is, until it ...
To keep ahead of a possible infestation, Cooper recommends taking the following steps to stop bedbugs in your home:. 1. Get ... The key is to catch an infestation when its relatively new -- which is easier said than done. ...
"infestation" at Dorlands Medical Dictionary "Infestation - Definition and More from the Free Merriam-Webster Dictionary". ... "infestation" is often reserved only for external ectoparasitic infestations while the term infection refers to internal ... Infestation is the state of being invaded or overrun by pests or parasites. It can also refer to the actual organisms living on ... Infestations can be classified as either external or internal with regards to the parasites location in relation to the host. ...
A tick infestation is a condition where a tick acts as an ectoparasite. It is sometimes thought of as an animal disease. In ... Still, in certain populations, it is possible for tick infestation to be clinically significant. There is some evidence that ... Faulde MK, Robbins RG (February 2008). "Tick infestation risk and Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. infection-induced increase in host- ... Ixodes ricinus infected with Borrelia burgdorferi may become more efficient at infestation. Home remedies (such as vaseline or ...
Intestinal tapeworm infestation frequently occurs without symptoms; occasionally there is abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, ... The most serious tapeworm infestation in humans is caused by the ingestion of T. solium eggs through fecal contamination, which ... The cysts produced by these embryos are called hydatid cysts, and the infestation of the liver is called hydatid disease. ... The presence of tapeworm proglottids in clothing, bedding, or feces is the usual sign of infestation. Treatment is typically ...
Infestation: Worms are crawling everywhere. Four hours. Thats how long it took for a glamorous tennis player to become the ...
Infestations of body lice are caused by Pediculosis humanus corporis,an organism that is similar in size to head lice. Body ... Infestations of body lice can also be treated by washing the patients clothes or bedding in boiling water, ironing seams with ... This type of infestation is associated by wearing the same clothing for long periods of timewithout laundering, as may happen ... Lice infestations (pediculosis) are infections of the skin, hair, or genitalregion caused by lice living directly on the body ...
The best way to prevent a rodent infestation and contact with rodents is to remove the food sources, water, and items that ...
8 districts of a total of 10 have reported infestation of African Armyworm, a deleterious pest of crops and rangeland herbage. ... identified large breeding areas in rangelands which pose immediate threats of secondary outbreaks and future infestations. ...
... Females can lay 2,000 eggs without ever mating. NY Post - November 30, 2018 ...
Widow spiders shut down four schools in London amid infestation. USA Today NetworkJosh Hafner, USA TODAY Published 5:24 p.m. ET ... Venemous spiders prompted the shutdown of four east London schools as officials relayed news of the infestations to parents, ... Widow spiders shut down four schools in London amid infestation. Noble false widow spiders forced Londons Ellen Wilkinson ... Star Lane headteacher Lisle Von Buchenroder told parents staff believes the "infestation is outside the building" and needs to ...
infestation. David Geiser dgeiser at nospam.uclink4.berkeley.edu Thu Nov 6 20:36:00 EST 1997 *Previous message: infection vs. ... Perhaps even infestation is inappropriate: that sounds as though the soil somehow doesnt like having Fusarium present. Hope ...
This is a close-up picture of lice egg sacks (nits) on the hair. They cling to individual hair shafts. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.)
You may be able to determine if you have a termite infestation by identifying swarming behavior, finding mud tunnels, and by ... How to Identify a Termite Infestation. Co-authored by wikiHow Staff , Reader-Approved , 12 References Updated: March 29, 2019 ... If you can identify pieces of soil around the edges of these holes, then you are dealing with an infestation.[8] *Buckling ... A professional will examine your house, confirm that you have an infestation, and advise you on what steps to take next.[11] * ...
The data reflects verified instances of bedbug infestations in multifamily residential rental buildings. ... and there is more and better information available to the general public regarding how to prevent and deal with infestations," ... there have been 381 violations issued for bedbug infestations at rental buildings since October 2013, compared to 846 ...
infestation synonyms, infestation pronunciation, infestation translation, English dictionary definition of infestation. tr.v. ... infestation. [ˌɪnfɛˈsteɪʃən] n (by insects, rats) → infestation f. infestation. n → Verseuchung f; an infestation of rats → ... infestation. Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.. Related to infestation: flea infestation in·fest. (ĭn ... infestation. n infestación f; - with infestación de or por; infestation of the scalp with lice..infestación de piojos en la ...
To prevent head lice re-infestation, all household members and contacts of a patient should be examined and treated at the same ... encoded search term (How is pediculosis (lice infestation) re-infestation prevented?) and How is pediculosis (lice infestation ... Drugs & Diseases , Infectious Diseases , Pediculosis and Pthiriasis (Lice Infestation) Q&A How is pediculosis (lice infestation ... Generalized infestation of a 3 1/2-year-old girl with the pubic louse. Pediatr Dermatol. 1994 Mar. 11(1):26-8. [Medline]. ...
An infestation occurs when certain types of lice invade the body and clothing. ... What is body lice infestation?. An infestation of body lice occurs when a certain type of lice invade the body and clothing. ... How is body lice infestation diagnosed?. An infestation by body lice is typically diagnosed by looking at the skin and clothing ... In general, infestations of body lice are limited to people who live in unhygienic or crowded living conditions and who dont ...
Signs of infestation. n Gnaw marks. New gnawing or holes tend to be rough, whereas, old gnawings are smooth from wear.. n ... n Take precautions when cleaning rodent infestations by not stirring dust when sweeping or vacuuming up droppings, urine or ...
P pubis infestation may be acquired from an infested parent or during sexual exposure or abuse; the child should be examined ... Drugs & Diseases , Infectious Diseases , Pediculosis and Pthiriasis (Lice Infestation) Q&A How is pthiriasis (lice infestation ... Generalized infestation of a 3 1/2-year-old girl with the pubic louse. Pediatr Dermatol. 1994 Mar. 11(1):26-8. [Medline]. ... Head louse infestations: the "no nit" policy and its consequences. Int J Dermatol. 2006 Aug. 45(8):891-6. [Medline]. ...
Delusions of Infestation Arent as Rare as Youd Think. More people are turning to entomologists to identify parasites they ... For many sufferers of such delusions, the infestation takes the form of insects or mites, usually tiny and often described as ... In 2012, Davis and his colleagues reported on 147 cases of delusional infestation seen at the Mayo Clinic over seven years. He ... Blogs and websites about various infestations, many of which are devoted to conspiracy theories and biologically impossible ...
Arthritis and arthralgia associated with toxocaral infestation Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 283 :560 ... Arthritis and arthralgia associated with toxocaral infestation. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed) 1981; 283 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/ ...
I have recently moved into a home which has a beautiful mature grapefruit tree in the yard. It is March and the blossoms are just about to open. I noticed upon inspection of the leaves, two distinct problems. There is a black powdery substance on many leaves, and there is also some white patchy areas as well. I would like to know what I can use to treat these problems and keep them from returning, and if I can do it now at this pre blooming stage. I want the tree to do well since there is an abundance of flower buds getting ready to open. Thank you in advance for your help ...
  • The survey documented the number of bed bug-related calls received, the number of treatments provided by pest control operators in 2003, and the types of insecticides used to treat bed bug infestations. (cdc.gov)
  • To protect the confidentiality of persons and establishments affected by bed bugs, we asked each pest control operator to report the number of different locations treated for bed bug infestations by general type (e.g., apartment, single-family dwelling, shelter) and not by specific name or address. (cdc.gov)
  • In North America and Western Europe, bed bug infestations became rare during the second half of the 20th century and have been viewed as a condition that occurs in travelers returning from developing countries ( 4 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Infestations are common in the developing world, occurring in settings of unsanitary living conditions and severe crowding ( 2 , 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • There have been hundreds of products developed to kill flea infestation and most of those are either harmful to humans or do not effectively get rid of fleas. (articlealley.com)
  • A lot of cat parents prefer to treat their feline pets with natural home remedies for fleas, as flea infestation of cats seems to be a never-ending story. (articlealley.com)
  • It is important to understand that when you have flea infestation, you need to synchronize and coordinate the flea extermination activities with both your home and your pet, else all efforts will surely come to naught. (articlealley.com)
  • Fecal examination for tapeworm eggs, which can be secondary to flea infestation, may be recommended. (petplace.com)
  • Flea prevention is recommended when there is a reasonable chance of flea infestation or in a flea-allergic pet living in an area infested by fleas. (petplace.com)
  • Other skin disorders can cause similar signs of flea infestation and should be ruled out before appropriate treatment can be given. (petplace.com)
  • The best way to prevent a rodent infestation and contact with rodents is to remove the food sources, water, and items that provide shelter for rodents. (cdc.gov)
  • Inspection, disinfection, and possible replacement of hoses, ductwork, other filters, fans, or other components of the system may be necessary if the rodent infestation is extensive. (cdc.gov)
  • If you happen to see a termite fly out from under your porch, patio, or foundation, then this is a sure sign of an infestation. (wikihow.com)
  • The most obvious sign of an infestation is the appearance of large numbers of ladybug beetles on the outside surfaces of structures, congregated in the cracks and gaps of the siding and inside the building on the walls and ceilings. (orkin.com)
  • As opposed to just a few years ago, people are now considerably more vigilant, and there is more and better information available to the general public regarding how to prevent and deal with infestations," HPD spokesperson Eric Bederman told The Post. (nypost.com)
  • The best way to deal with infestations is to prevent them from happening in the first place. (howstuffworks.com)
  • According to the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, there have been 381 violations issued for bedbug infestations at rental buildings since October 2013, compared to 846 violations that were issued during the height of the epidemic during the 2010 fiscal year. (nypost.com)
  • The data reflects verified instances of bedbug infestations in multifamily residential rental buildings. (nypost.com)
  • We don't investigate bedbug infestations because they're considered a nuisance and not a health problem. (colorado.gov)
  • The presence of tapeworm proglottids in clothing, bedding, or feces is the usual sign of infestation. (infoplease.com)
  • The most serious tapeworm infestation in humans is caused by the ingestion of T. solium eggs through fecal contamination, which results in the person serving as the intermediate, rather than the primary, host. (infoplease.com)
  • Widow spiders shut down four schools in London amid infestation Noble false widow spiders forced London's Ellen Wilkinson Primary School, Star Primary School, Lister Community School and Rokeby School to close. (usatoday.com)
  • Two schools in East London have been forced to evacuate hundreds of students after the discovery of an infestation of false widow spiders. (rt.com)
  • Pest control teams are currently on the premises of both schools, dealing with the infestation of false widow spiders. (rt.com)
  • AUGUSTA - City councilors were told Thursday that there are several methods the city can employ to fight an infestation of beetle grubs eating away much of the grass in many parks and other public areas. (pressherald.com)
  • A photo of the beetle infestation in SE Portland in August 2015. (kptv.com)
  • Washington, March 31, 2014 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) together with the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) today announced its 2014 plans for the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) infestation in Clermont County, Ohio. (usda.gov)
  • Ants are most likely to enter homes in cold, wet conditions, typically in the winter in Northern California," they write, noting that a smaller peak in the level of infestation occurs during hot, dry conditions -- typically in August and September. (stanford.edu)
  • In North America and Western Europe, bed bug infestations became rare during the second half of the 20th century and have been viewed as a condition that occurs in travelers returning from developing countries (4). (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The rash caused by scabies infestation is readily distinguishable from other skin maladies due to the appearance of track-like burrows in the skin, which are created when female mites tunnel under the surface of the skin. (mlive.com)
  • The move comes after 39 prisoners were found to have the infestation amid a year-long rash outbreak. (mlive.com)
  • The closure came after 39 prisoners were found to have the infestation amid a year-long rash outbreak at the prison, Michigan Department of Corrections spokesman Chris Gautz said in January. (mlive.com)
  • She had a 2-month history of presumed worm infestation and persistent complaints of anal and vaginal pruritus despite multiple courses of an anthelminthic. (mja.com.au)
  • In addition the mission identified large breeding areas in rangelands which pose immediate threats of secondary outbreaks and future infestations. (fao.org)
  • Lister Community School, a secondary campus in London's Plaistow district, told parents Thursday in a letter it would "make the very difficult decision to close the school" after confirming "a false widow spider infestation. (usatoday.com)
  • An internal (or endoparasitic) infestation is a condition in which organisms live within the host and includes those involving worms (though swimmer's itch stays near the surface). (wikipedia.org)