Capsaicin: An alkylamide found in CAPSICUM that acts at TRPV CATION CHANNELS.Cosmetics: Substances intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions. Included in this definition are skin creams, lotions, perfumes, lipsticks, fingernail polishes, eye and facial makeup preparations, permanent waves, hair colors, toothpastes, and deodorants, as well as any material intended for use as a component of a cosmetic product. (U.S. Food & Drug Administration Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition Office of Cosmetics Fact Sheet (web page) Feb 1995)Ginsenosides: Dammarane type triterpene saponins based mainly on the aglycones, protopanaxadiol and protopanaxatriol.Plant Extracts: Concentrated pharmaceutical preparations of plants obtained by removing active constituents with a suitable solvent, which is evaporated away, and adjusting the residue to a prescribed standard.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Sensory System Agents: Drugs that act on neuronal sensory receptors resulting in an increase, decrease, or modification of afferent nerve activity. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p367)Drugs, Chinese Herbal: Chinese herbal or plant extracts which are used as drugs to treat diseases or promote general well-being. The concept does not include synthesized compounds manufactured in China.Drug Labeling: Use of written, printed, or graphic materials upon or accompanying a drug container or wrapper. It includes contents, indications, effects, dosages, routes, methods, frequency and duration of administration, warnings, hazards, contraindications, side effects, precautions, and other relevant information.Multi-Ingredient Cold, Flu, and Allergy Medications: A broad category of multi-ingredient preparations that are marketed for the relief of upper respiratory symptoms resulting from the COMMON COLD; ALLERGIES; or HUMAN INFLUENZA. While the majority of these medications are available as OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUGS some of them contain ingredients that require them to be sold as PRESCRIPTION DRUGS or as BEHIND-THE COUNTER DRUGS.Nonprescription Drugs: Medicines that can be sold legally without a DRUG PRESCRIPTION.Panax: An araliaceous genus of plants that contains a number of pharmacologically active agents used as stimulants, sedatives, and tonics, especially in traditional medicine. Sometimes confused with Siberian ginseng (ELEUTHEROCOCCUS).Patient Medication Knowledge: Patient health knowledge related to medications including what is being used and why as well as instructions and precautions.Chemistry, Pharmaceutical: Chemistry dealing with the composition and preparation of agents having PHARMACOLOGIC ACTIONS or diagnostic use.Gardening: Cultivation of PLANTS; (FRUIT; VEGETABLES; MEDICINAL HERBS) on small plots of ground or in containers.Dosage Forms: Completed forms of the pharmaceutical preparation in which prescribed doses of medication are included. They are designed to resist action by gastric fluids, prevent vomiting and nausea, reduce or alleviate the undesirable taste and smells associated with oral administration, achieve a high concentration of drug at target site, or produce a delayed or long-acting drug effect.Insecticides: Pesticides designed to control insects that are harmful to man. The insects may be directly harmful, as those acting as disease vectors, or indirectly harmful, as destroyers of crops, food products, or textile fabrics.TRPV Cation Channels: A subgroup of TRP cation channels named after vanilloid receptor. They are very sensitive to TEMPERATURE and hot spicy food and CAPSAICIN. They have the TRP domain and ANKYRIN repeats. Selectivity for CALCIUM over SODIUM ranges from 3 to 100 fold.Capsules: Hard or soft soluble containers used for the oral administration of medicine.Herbicides: Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.Plants, Medicinal: Plants whose roots, leaves, seeds, bark, or other constituent parts possess therapeutic, tonic, purgative, curative or other pharmacologic attributes, when administered to man or animals.Pyrethrins: The active insecticidal constituent of CHRYSANTHEMUM CINERARIIFOLIUM flowers. Pyrethrin I is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemummonocarboxylic acid and pyrethrin II is the pyretholone ester of chrysanthemumdicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester.Spermatocidal Agents: Chemical substances that are destructive to spermatozoa used as topically administered vaginal contraceptives.Medicine, East Asian Traditional: Medical practice or discipline that is based on the knowledge, cultures, and beliefs of the people in EAST ASIA.Balsams: Resinous substances which most commonly originate from trees. In addition to resins, they contain oils, cinnamic acid and BENZOIC ACID.Pest Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of noxious, destructive, or dangerous plants, insects, or other animals. This includes control of plants that serve as habitats or food sources for animal pests.Phytotherapy: Use of plants or herbs to treat diseases or to alleviate pain.Powders: Substances made up of an aggregation of small particles, as that obtained by grinding or trituration of a solid drug. In pharmacy it is a form in which substances are administered. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Lubrication: The application of LUBRICANTS to diminish FRICTION between two surfaces.Salvia: A genus in the mint family (LAMIACEAE).Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Gaultheria: A plant genus of the family ERICACEAE. The common name of "wintergreen" is also used for PYROLA and "snowberry" is also used for SYMPHORICARPOS.Pharmaceutical Preparations: Drugs intended for human or veterinary use, presented in their finished dosage form. Included here are materials used in the preparation and/or formulation of the finished dosage form.Consumer Product SafetyPharmacognosy: The science of drugs prepared from natural-sources including preparations from PLANTS, animals, and other organisms as well as MINERALS and other substances included in MATERIA MEDICA. The therapeutic usage of plants is PHYTOTHERAPY.Pharmaceutic Aids: Substances which are of little or no therapeutic value, but are necessary in the manufacture, compounding, storage, etc., of pharmaceutical preparations or drug dosage forms. They include SOLVENTS, diluting agents, and suspending agents, and emulsifying agents. Also, ANTIOXIDANTS; PRESERVATIVES, PHARMACEUTICAL; COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS; OINTMENT BASES.Salvia officinalis: A plant species of the Salvia genus known as a spice and medicinal plant.Plant Preparations: Material prepared from plants.Lonicera: A plant genus of the family CAPRIFOLIACEAE. Members contain iridoid glucosides.Excipients: Usually inert substances added to a prescription in order to provide suitable consistency to the dosage form. These include binders, matrix, base or diluent in pills, tablets, creams, salves, etc.Permethrin: A pyrethroid insecticide commonly used in the treatment of LICE INFESTATIONS and SCABIES.Counterfeit Drugs: Drugs manufactured and sold with the intent to misrepresent its origin, authenticity, chemical composition, and or efficacy. Counterfeit drugs may contain inappropriate quantities of ingredients not listed on the label or package. In order to further deceive the consumer, the packaging, container, or labeling, may be inaccurate, incorrect, or fake.Salvia miltiorrhiza: A plant species which is known as an Oriental traditional medicinal plant.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Administration, Topical: The application of drug preparations to the surfaces of the body, especially the skin (ADMINISTRATION, CUTANEOUS) or mucous membranes. This method of treatment is used to avoid systemic side effects when high doses are required at a localized area or as an alternative systemic administration route, to avoid hepatic processing for example.Insect Repellents: Substances causing insects to turn away from them or reject them as food.Dronabinol: A psychoactive compound extracted from the resin of Cannabis sativa (marihuana, hashish). The isomer delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is considered the most active form, producing characteristic mood and perceptual changes associated with this compound.Ginger: Deciduous plant rich in volatile oil (OILS, VOLATILE). It is used as a flavoring agent and has many other uses both internally and topically.Nelumbo: A plant genus of the family NELUMBONACEAE. The common name of lotus is also for LOTUS and NYMPHAEA.Hibiscus: A plant genus of the family MALVACEAE. Members contain CITRIC ACID; MALATES; ANTHOCYANINS; FLAVONOIDS; GLYCOSIDES; DIETARY FIBER; and LIGNANS. Hibiscus sabdariffa is common constituent of HERBAL TEAS. Hibiscus cannabinus is a source of hemp fiber for TEXTILES.Saponins: A type of glycoside widely distributed in plants. Each consists of a sapogenin as the aglycone moiety, and a sugar. The sapogenin may be a steroid or a triterpene and the sugar may be glucose, galactose, a pentose, or a methylpentose.Drug Contamination: The presence of organisms, or any foreign material that makes a drug preparation impure.Curcumin: A yellow-orange dye obtained from tumeric, the powdered root of CURCUMA longa. It is used in the preparation of curcuma paper and the detection of boron. Curcumin appears to possess a spectrum of pharmacological properties, due primarily to its inhibitory effects on metabolic enzymes.Curcuma: A plant genus of the family ZINGIBERACEAE that contains CURCUMIN and curcuminoids.Neurons, Afferent: Neurons which conduct NERVE IMPULSES to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Legislation, Drug: Laws concerned with manufacturing, dispensing, and marketing of drugs.Drug Compounding: The preparation, mixing, and assembling of a drug. (From Remington, The Science and Practice of Pharmacy, 19th ed, p1814)United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Receptors, Drug: Proteins that bind specific drugs with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Drug receptors are generally thought to be receptors for some endogenous substance not otherwise specified.Quality Control: A system for verifying and maintaining a desired level of quality in a product or process by careful planning, use of proper equipment, continued inspection, and corrective action as required. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Nociceptors: Peripheral AFFERENT NEURONS which are sensitive to injuries or pain, usually caused by extreme thermal exposures, mechanical forces, or other noxious stimuli. Their cell bodies reside in the DORSAL ROOT GANGLIA. Their peripheral terminals (NERVE ENDINGS) innervate target tissues and transduce noxious stimuli via axons to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Medicine, Chinese Traditional: A system of traditional medicine which is based on the beliefs and practices of the Chinese culture.Chlorogenic Acid: A naturally occurring phenolic acid which is a carcinogenic inhibitor. It has also been shown to prevent paraquat-induced oxidative stress in rats. (From J Chromatogr A 1996;741(2):223-31; Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1996;60(5):765-68).Antidiarrheals: Miscellaneous agents found useful in the symptomatic treatment of diarrhea. They have no effect on the agent(s) that cause diarrhea, but merely alleviate the condition.Substance P: An eleven-amino acid neurotransmitter that appears in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. It is involved in transmission of PAIN, causes rapid contractions of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle, and modulates inflammatory and immune responses.Diterpenes, Clerodane: A group of DITERPENES cyclized into 2-rings with a side-chain.Cannabis: The plant genus in the Cannabaceae plant family, Urticales order, Hamamelidae subclass. The flowering tops are called many slang terms including pot, marijuana, hashish, bhang, and ganja. The stem is an important source of hemp fiber.Rats, Sprague-Dawley: A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Calcitonin gene-related peptide. A 37-amino acid peptide derived from the calcitonin gene. It occurs as a result of alternative processing of mRNA from the calcitonin gene. The neuropeptide is widely distributed in neural tissue of the brain, gut, perivascular nerves, and other tissue. The peptide produces multiple biological effects and has both circulatory and neurotransmitter modes of action. In particular, it is a potent endogenous vasodilator.Irritants: Drugs that act locally on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces to produce inflammation; those that cause redness due to hyperemia are rubefacients; those that raise blisters are vesicants and those that penetrate sebaceous glands and cause abscesses are pustulants; tear gases and mustard gases are also irritants.Disinfectants: Substances used on inanimate objects that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. Disinfectants are classed as complete, destroying SPORES as well as vegetative forms of microorganisms, or incomplete, destroying only vegetative forms of the organisms. They are distinguished from ANTISEPTICS, which are local anti-infective agents used on humans and other animals. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Emulsions: Colloids formed by the combination of two immiscible liquids such as oil and water. Lipid-in-water emulsions are usually liquid, like milk or lotion. Water-in-lipid emulsions tend to be creams. The formation of emulsions may be aided by amphiphatic molecules that surround one component of the system to form MICELLES.Hypericum: Genus of perennial plants in the family CLUSIACEAE (sometimes classified as Hypericaceae). Herbal and homeopathic preparations are used for depression, neuralgias, and a variety of other conditions. Hypericum contains flavonoids; GLYCOSIDES; mucilage, TANNINS; volatile oils (OILS, ESSENTIAL), hypericin and hyperforin.Anti-Infective Agents, Local: Substances used on humans and other animals that destroy harmful microorganisms or inhibit their activity. They are distinguished from DISINFECTANTS, which are used on inanimate objects.Catechin: An antioxidant flavonoid, occurring especially in woody plants as both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin (cis) forms.Cough: A sudden, audible expulsion of air from the lungs through a partially closed glottis, preceded by inhalation. It is a protective response that serves to clear the trachea, bronchi, and/or lungs of irritants and secretions, or to prevent aspiration of foreign materials into the lungs.Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid: Liquid chromatographic techniques which feature high inlet pressures, high sensitivity, and high speed.Drug Stability: The chemical and physical integrity of a pharmaceutical product.SesquiterpenesTriterpenesCannabinoids: Compounds having the cannabinoid structure. They were originally extracted from Cannabis sativa L. The most pharmacologically active constituents are TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL; CANNABINOL; and CANNABIDIOL.Skin Absorption: Uptake of substances through the SKIN.Drug Approval: Process that is gone through in order for a drug to receive approval by a government regulatory agency. This includes any required pre-clinical or clinical testing, review, submission, and evaluation of the applications and test results, and post-marketing surveillance of the drug.Drug Industry: That segment of commercial enterprise devoted to the design, development, and manufacture of chemical products for use in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, disability, or other dysfunction, or to improve function.Artemisinins: A group of SESQUITERPENES and their analogs that contain a peroxide group (PEROXIDES) within an oxepin ring (OXEPINS).Delayed-Action Preparations: Dosage forms of a drug that act over a period of time by controlled-release processes or technology.Capsicum: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. The hot peppers yield CAPSAICIN, which activates VANILLOID RECEPTORS. Several varieties have sweet or pungent edible fruits that are used as vegetables when fresh and spices when the pods are dried.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Drug Combinations: Single preparations containing two or more active agents, for the purpose of their concurrent administration as a fixed dose mixture.Lethal Dose 50: The dose amount of poisonous or toxic substance or dose of ionizing radiation required to kill 50% of the tested population.Surface-Active Agents: Agents that modify interfacial tension of water; usually substances that have one lipophilic and one hydrophilic group in the molecule; includes soaps, detergents, emulsifiers, dispersing and wetting agents, and several groups of antiseptics.Diterpenes: Twenty-carbon compounds derived from MEVALONIC ACID or deoxyxylulose phosphate.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Antipruritics: Agents, usually topical, that relieve itching (pruritus).Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Antimalarials: Agents used in the treatment of malaria. They are usually classified on the basis of their action against plasmodia at different stages in their life cycle in the human. (From AMA, Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1585)Skin: The outer covering of the body that protects it from the environment. It is composed of the DERMIS and the EPIDERMIS.Mosquito Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.Antitussive Agents: Agents that suppress cough. They act centrally on the medullary cough center. EXPECTORANTS, also used in the treatment of cough, act locally.Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.Nerve Fibers, Unmyelinated: A class of nerve fibers as defined by their nerve sheath arrangement. The AXONS of the unmyelinated nerve fibers are small in diameter and usually several are surrounded by a single MYELIN SHEATH. They conduct low-velocity impulses, and represent the majority of peripheral sensory and autonomic fibers, but are also found in the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Neurokinin A: A mammalian neuropeptide of 10 amino acids that belongs to the tachykinin family. It is similar in structure and action to SUBSTANCE P and NEUROKININ B with the ability to excite neurons, dilate blood vessels, and contract smooth muscles, such as those in the BRONCHI.Antioxidants: Naturally occurring or synthetic substances that inhibit or retard the oxidation of a substance to which it is added. They counteract the harmful and damaging effects of oxidation in animal tissues.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Ganglia, Spinal: Sensory ganglia located on the dorsal spinal roots within the vertebral column. The spinal ganglion cells are pseudounipolar. The single primary branch bifurcates sending a peripheral process to carry sensory information from the periphery and a central branch which relays that information to the spinal cord or brain.Pest Control, Biological: Use of naturally-occuring or genetically-engineered organisms to reduce or eliminate populations of pests.Injections, Intradermal: The forcing into the skin of liquid medication, nutrient, or other fluid through a hollow needle, piercing the top skin layer.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Nerve Fibers: Slender processes of NEURONS, including the AXONS and their glial envelopes (MYELIN SHEATH). Nerve fibers conduct nerve impulses to and from the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Animal Feed: Foodstuff used especially for domestic and laboratory animals, or livestock.Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry: A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Hyperalgesia: An increased sensation of pain or discomfort produced by mimimally noxious stimuli due to damage to soft tissue containing NOCICEPTORS or injury to a peripheral nerve.Ruthenium Red: An inorganic dye used in microscopy for differential staining and as a diagnostic reagent. In research this compound is used to study changes in cytoplasmic concentrations of calcium. Ruthenium red inhibits calcium transport through membrane channels.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Reference Standards: A basis of value established for the measure of quantity, weight, extent or quality, e.g. weight standards, standard solutions, methods, techniques, and procedures used in diagnosis and therapy.Mustard Plant: Any of several BRASSICA species that are commonly called mustard. Brassica alba is white mustard, B. juncea is brown or Chinese mustard, and B. nigra is black, brown, or red mustard. The plant is grown both for mustard seed from which oil is extracted or used as SPICES, and for its greens used as VEGETABLES or ANIMAL FEED. There is no relationship to MUSTARD COMPOUNDS.Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal: Anti-inflammatory agents that are non-steroidal in nature. In addition to anti-inflammatory actions, they have analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions.They act by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins by inhibiting cyclooxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to cyclic endoperoxides, precursors of prostaglandins. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis accounts for their analgesic, antipyretic, and platelet-inhibitory actions; other mechanisms may contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.Polyunsaturated Alkamides: Amides composed of unsaturated aliphatic FATTY ACIDS linked with AMINES by an amide bond. They are most prominent in ASTERACEAE; PIPERACEAE; and RUTACEAE; and also found in ARISTOLOCHIACEAE; BRASSICACEAE; CONVOLVULACEAE; EUPHORBIACEAE; MENISPERMACEAE; POACEAE; and SOLANACEAE. They are recognized by their pungent taste and for causing numbing and salivation.Tachykinins: A family of biologically active peptides sharing a common conserved C-terminal sequence, -Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2, where X is either an aromatic or a branched aliphatic amino acid. Members of this family have been found in mammals, amphibians, and mollusks. Tachykinins have diverse pharmacological actions in the central nervous system and the cardiovascular, genitourinary, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems, as well as in glandular tissues. This diversity of activity is due to the existence of three or more subtypes of tachykinin receptors.Anti-Inflammatory Agents: Substances that reduce or suppress INFLAMMATION.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Afferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a peripheral part toward a nerve center.Food Handling: Any aspect of the operations in the preparation, processing, transport, storage, packaging, wrapping, exposure for sale, service, or delivery of food.Flavonoids: A group of phenyl benzopyrans named for having structures like FLAVONES.Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet: Determination of the spectra of ultraviolet absorption by specific molecules in gases or liquids, for example Cl2, SO2, NO2, CS2, ozone, mercury vapor, and various unsaturated compounds. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Neurogenic Inflammation: Inflammation caused by an injurious stimulus of peripheral neurons and resulting in release of neuropeptides which affect vascular permeability and help initiate proinflammatory and immune reactions at the site of injury.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Menthol: An alcohol produced from mint oils or prepared synthetically.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Receptors, Neurokinin-2: A class of cell surface receptors for tachykinins that prefers neurokinin A; (NKA, substance K, neurokinin alpha, neuromedin L), neuropeptide K; (NPK); or neuropeptide gamma over other tachykinins. Neurokinin-2 (NK-2) receptors have been cloned and are similar to other G-protein coupled receptors.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.United StatesAnalgesics: Compounds capable of relieving pain without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Sensory Receptor Cells: Specialized afferent neurons capable of transducing sensory stimuli into NERVE IMPULSES to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Sometimes sensory receptors for external stimuli are called exteroceptors; for internal stimuli are called interoceptors and proprioceptors.Hot Temperature: Presence of warmth or heat or a temperature notably higher than an accustomed norm.Perfume: A substance, extract, or preparation for diffusing or imparting an agreeable or attractive smell, especially a fluid containing fragrant natural oils extracted from flowers, woods, etc., or similar synthetic oils. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Tachyphylaxis: Rapidly decreasing response to a drug or physiologically active agent after administration of a few doses. In immunology, it is the rapid immunization against the effect of toxic doses of an extract or serum by previous injection of small doses. (Dorland, 28th ed)Health Food: A non-medical term defined by the lay public as a food that has little or no preservatives, which has not undergone major processing, enrichment or refinement and which may be grown without pesticides. (from Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Bradykinin: A nonapeptide messenger that is enzymatically produced from KALLIDIN in the blood where it is a potent but short-lived agent of arteriolar dilation and increased capillary permeability. Bradykinin is also released from MAST CELLS during asthma attacks, from gut walls as a gastrointestinal vasodilator, from damaged tissues as a pain signal, and may be a neurotransmitter.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists: Compounds that inhibit or block the activity of NEUROKININ-1 RECEPTORS.Taste: The ability to detect chemicals through gustatory receptors in the mouth, including those on the TONGUE; the PALATE; the PHARYNX; and the EPIGLOTTIS.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena: Nutritional physiology of animals.Flour: Ground up seed of WHEAT.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Mucuna: A plant genus of the family FABACEAE that is the source of mucuna gum.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Endocannabinoids: Fatty acid derivatives that have specificity for CANNABINOID RECEPTORS. They are structurally distinct from CANNABINOIDS and were originally discovered as a group of endogenous CANNABINOID RECEPTOR AGONISTS.Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Rats, Wistar: A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.Trigeminal Ganglion: The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.Digestion: The process of breakdown of food for metabolism and use by the body.Plant Oils: Oils derived from plants or plant products.Benzodioxoles: Compounds based on benzene fused to oxole. They can be formed from methylated CATECHOLS such as EUGENOL.Receptors, Tachykinin: Cell surface proteins that bind TACHYKININS with high affinity and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Three classes of tachykinin receptors have been characterized, the NK-1; NK-2; and NK-3; which prefer, respectively, SUBSTANCE P; NEUROKININ A; and NEUROKININ B.Functional Food: Components of the usual diet that may provide health benefits beyond basic nutrients. Examples of functional foods include soy, nuts, chocolate, and cranberries (From NCCAM Backgrounder, March 2004, p3).Denervation: The resection or removal of the nerve to an organ or part. (Dorland, 28th ed)Guaiacol: An agent thought to have disinfectant properties and used as an expectorant. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p747)Receptors, Neurokinin-1: A class of cell surface receptors for TACHYKININS with a preference for SUBSTANCE P. Neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors have been cloned and are members of the G protein coupled receptor superfamily. They are found on many cell types including central and peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, acinar cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and immune cells.Pain Threshold: Amount of stimulation required before the sensation of pain is experienced.Food Analysis: Measurement and evaluation of the components of substances to be taken as FOOD.Guinea Pigs: A common name used for the genus Cavia. The most common species is Cavia porcellus which is the domesticated guinea pig used for pets and biomedical research.Piperidines: A family of hexahydropyridines.Vagotomy: The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.Pruritus Ani: Intense chronic itching in the anal area.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Trigeminal Caudal Nucleus: The caudal portion of the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), a nucleus involved with pain and temperature sensation.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Food-Processing Industry: The productive enterprises concerned with food processing.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Nodose Ganglion: The inferior (caudal) ganglion of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. The unipolar nodose ganglion cells are sensory cells with central projections to the medulla and peripheral processes traveling in various branches of the vagus nerve.Isoindoles: Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number two carbon, in contrast to INDOLES which have the nitrogen adjacent to the six-membered ring.Antineoplastic Agents: Substances that inhibit or prevent the proliferation of NEOPLASMS.Medicine, Kampo: System of herbal medicine practiced in Japan by both herbalists and practitioners of modern medicine. Kampo originated in China and is based on Chinese herbal medicine (MEDICINE, CHINESE TRADITIONAL).Skin Irritancy Tests: Tests or bioassays that measure the skin sensitization potential of various chemicals.Flavoring Agents: Substances added to foods and medicine to improve the quality of taste.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Food Additives: Substances which are of little or no nutritive value, but are used in the processing or storage of foods or animal feed, especially in the developed countries; includes ANTIOXIDANTS; FOOD PRESERVATIVES; FOOD COLORING AGENTS; FLAVORING AGENTS; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS (both plain and LOCAL); VEHICLES; EXCIPIENTS and other similarly used substances. Many of the same substances are PHARMACEUTIC AIDS when added to pharmaceuticals rather than to foods.Technology, Pharmaceutical: The application of scientific knowledge or technology to pharmacy and the pharmaceutical industry. It includes methods, techniques, and instrumentation in the manufacture, preparation, compounding, dispensing, packaging, and storing of drugs and other preparations used in diagnostic and determinative procedures, and in the treatment of patients.Rhizotomy: Surgical interruption of a spinal or cranial nerve root. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
"Active Ingredient Fact Sheets" (PDF). npic.orst.edu. New Mexico State University - College of Agriculture and Home Economics ( ... The lack of capsaicin in bell peppers is due to a recessive gene that eliminates capsaicin and, consequently, the "hot" taste ... The seeds themselves do not produce any capsaicin, although the highest concentration of capsaicin can be found in the white ... Most of the capsaicin in a pungent (hot) pepper is concentrated in blisters on the epidermis of the interior ribs (septa) that ...
The active ingredients in RUB A535 are camphor, eucalyptus oil, menthol, and methyl salicylate. Some formulations also contain ... capsaicin and triethanolamine. Currently, RUB A535 has been released in a variety of products: Originally, it was produced in a ... "Ingredient Search". webprod.hc-sc.gc.ca. "What are counterirritants? - RUB·A535™". www.ruba535.com. "Buy A535 13.300 % Online ...
It is an ultrapotent analogue of capsaicin, the active ingredient in chili peppers. Having a score of 16 billion Scoville units ... It is currently the most potent TRPV1 agonist known, with ~500x higher binding affinity for TRPV1 than capsaicin, the active ... Szallasi A, Blumberg PM (1989). "Resiniferatoxin, a phorbol-related diterpene, acts as an ultrapotent analogue of capsaicin, ... 1996). "Similarities and Differences in the Structure-Activity Relationships of Capsaicin and Resiniferatoxin Analogues". J. ...
Capsaicin, the active ingredient in chilli pepper was first isolated over a century ago. In 1919 the exact chemical structure ... Capsaicin has been used as an analgesic for decades, but the therapeutic potential of capsaicin was first recognized as early ... When capsaicin was found to have analgesic effects in preclinical studies much emphasis was put into the research of the ... Capsaicin and RTX, elicit burning pain by activating a non-selective cation channel expressed on sensory nerve endings. ...
Active ingredient: Capsicum extract 0.025% as Capsaicin Air Salonpas - OTC pain relief aerosol spray. Active ingredients: ... Active ingredient: Menthol 1.25% Salonpas Gel-Patch - Menthol and capsaicin jelly patch-Active ingredients: Capsicum extracts ... Active ingredients: Methyl Salicylate 10%, Menthol 3% Salonpas - Versatile sized OTC pain relief patch. Active ingredients: ... Active ingredients: Methyl Salicylate 15%, Menthol 7% Salongsip Aqua-Patch - Menthol jelly patch-Jelly type OTC pain relief ...
The active ingredient is on the label and is 1% to 2% Capsaicin and related Capsaicinoids. Keep bear spray in sleeping, cooking ... Bear spray typically contains higher levels of major capsaicinoids (the key active ingredients) than pepper sprays intended for ... of the active ingredient, while the concentration for humans is typically 0.2-1.3%). Mark Matheny claims to have developed the ... Bear spray is a type of pepper spray or capsaicin deterrent that is used to deter aggressive bears, typically in wilderness ...
... blocks the painful sensation of heat caused by capsaicin (the active ingredient of chilli pepper) which activates ... Capsazepine is a synthetic antagonist of capsaicin. It is used as a biochemical tool in the study of TRPV ion channels. ... It was found by modification of the chemical backbone of capsaicin. By incorporation of an azobenzene unit, a photoswitchable ... June 1994). "The discovery of capsazepine, the first competitive antagonist of the sensory neuron excitants capsaicin and ...
... methyl salicylate and capsaicin as active ingredients have the potential to cause such burns. The active ingredients vary by ... The manufacturer recommends storing the product between 20⁰ and 25⁰C (68⁰ and 77⁰F). Methyl salicylate is an active ingredient ... This was a rare occurrence, in which the person had "more than six times the safe amount of the ingredient in her body." Bengay ...
It is believed to neutralize capsaicin, the active (hot) ingredient of peppers, jalapeños, habaneros, and other chili peppers. ...
Some of them include capsaicin, the active component of chili peppers. Other ingredients are: propylene glycol, alcohol, herbal ... Warming lubricant is a personal lubricant with the warming effect created due to added ingredients. The warming thermoception ... is achieved on the contact with skin or by natural body moisture.[citation needed] The main ingredient of the majority of ...
It is found in species of the genus Capsicum, which includes chilies and habaneros and it is the active ingredient that ... Capsaicin: Capsaicin (IUPAC nomenclature 8-methyl-N-vanillyl-trans-6-nonenamide) is structurally different from nicotine and ... When capsaicin comes into contact with these mucosae, it causes a burning sensation little different from a burn caused by fire ... Capsaicin extract is used to make pepper spray, a useful deterrent against aggressive mammals. Even though members of the ...
The active ingredient in pepper spray is capsaicin, which is a chemical derived from the fruit of plants in the Capsicum genus ... Some manufacturers may show a very high percentage of OC and, although OC is the active ingredient within the formulation, it ... Just allowed with no more than % 0.67 capsaicin content It must be purchased in person (i.e., cannot be purchased by mail-order ... A method using the capsaicin and related capsaicinoids (CRC) content of the product is unreliable as well, because there are ...
The active ingredient in pepper-spray is capsaicin, which is a chemical derived from the fruit of plants in the Capsicum genus ... Active denial systems (ADS) are a non-lethal, directed-energy weapon developed by the U.S. military. The ADS directs ... A synthetic analogue of capsaicin, pelargonic acid vanillylamide (desmethyldihydrocapsaicin), is used in another version of ... capsaicin II) pepper. The launchers are often slightly modified .68 caliber paintball guns. Stink bombs are devices designed to ...
... such as the Fabrique Nationale Herstal FN 303 or as the active ingredient in most pepper sprays - in both applications, the ... Mammalian TRPV1 is activated by heat and capsaicin, but the avian form is insensitive to capsaicin. Nonivamide is used (under ... and in the pharmaceutical industry in some formulations as a cheaper alternative to capsaicin. Like capsaicin, it can deter ... It is more heat-stable than capsaicin. Ointment sold under trade name Finalgon is used to relieve arthritis and muscle pain. A ...
DART can detect active ingredients in medicine in a tablet form; there is no need for sample preparation such as crushing or ... The analyte of interest was capsaicin, a natural ingredient of a red pepper pod that is responsible for the burning sensation ... The spectrum obtained revealed that the highest concentration of capsaicin is in the membrane. DART has been used in the study ...
Many medicinal and recreational drugs, such as tetrahydrocannabinol (active ingredient in cannabis), caffeine, morphine and ... capsaicin), and in medicine as pharmaceuticals as in opium from opium poppies. ... Diffusion, osmosis, and active transport and mass flow are all different ways transport can occur. Examples of elements that ... as a filter material and adsorbent and as an artist's material and is one of the three ingredients of gunpowder. Cellulose, the ...
... in military use Oleoresin capsaicin or oleoresin capsicum, the active ingredient in pepper spray and OC gas OC Spray, also ...
A specialized paintball, called a "pepperball", is filled with liquid or powdered capsaicin, the active ingredient in pepper ... The active ingredient in pepper spray is oleoresin capsicum (OC), an acrid irritant chemical derived from cayenne pepper plants ... The Active Denial System is a non-lethal, directed-energy weapon developed by the U.S. military, designed for area denial, ... The Active Denial System (ADS) weapon system is a dish that projects electromagnetic radiation just powerful enough to ...
The methyl salicylate that is the active analgesic ingredient in some heat-rub products can be toxic if they are used in excess ... or capsaicin. They produce a feeling of warmth within the muscle of the area they are applied to, typically acting as ... as the added warmth may cause overabsorption of the active ingredients. Opodeldoc is a formulation invented by the Renaissance ... Horse liniment ingredients such as menthol, chloroxylenol, or iodine are also used in different formulas in products used by ...
"Buckley's Mixture Active Ingredients". "Buckley's Mixture Herbal Ingredients". "Buckley's DM Ingredients". ... Capsaicin, for instance, is known to act as an analgesic with long-term use, which could help dull the pain of a sore throat. ... Taken as a liquid, Buckley's DM contains the antitussive dextromethorphan as a hydrobromide salt as an active ingredient. This ... Noted for its strongly unpleasant taste (hence its slogan), its ingredients include ammonium carbonate, potassium bicarbonate, ...
Insect repellents containing one of the following active ingredients are recommended: DEET, catnip oil extract (nepetalactone ... Hydrogen peroxide and capsaicin cream has also been effective. Another good way to relieve itching is to apply heat-either by ...
"Capsaicin, an active ingredient in pepper sprays, increases the lethality of cocaine". Forensic Toxicology. ISSN 1860-8973 ...
The main active ingredients in modern antiperspirants are aluminum chloride, aluminum chlorohydrate, aluminum zirconium ... Hot and spicy foods also leads to mild gustatory sweating in the face, scalp and neck: capsaicin (the compound that makes spicy ... The number of active sweat glands varies greatly among different people, though comparisons between different areas (ex. ... groin) show the same directional changes (certain areas always have more active sweat glands while others always have fewer). ...
The first pesticide product using solely capsaicin as the active ingredient was registered with the U.S. Department of ... Capsaicin (/kæpˈseɪ.ɪsɪn/ (INN); 8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is an active component of chili peppers, which are plants ... "capsaicin" in 1876.[8] Karl Micko isolated capsaicin in its pure form in 1898.[9][10] Capsaicin's chemical composition was ... Capsaicinoids are also an active ingredient in riot control and personal defense pepper spray agents.[47][48][49] When the ...
The isolation and total synthesis of the active ingredients have been reported. Extracts were bioassayed against yellow fever ... In addition to capsaicin, allyl isothiocyanate, and cinnamaldehyde, spilanthol is also reported to affect the catecholamine ... "LC-MS profiling of N-alkylamides in Spilanthes acmella extract and the transmucosal behavior of its main bio-active spilanthol ... The most important taste-active molecules present are fatty acid amides such as spilanthol, which is responsible for the ...
Mu opioid (mostly via its active metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol) and SNRI.. IM, IV, PO, rectal.. Bioavailability = 70-75% ( ... Opium poppies such as this one provide ingredients for the class of analgesics called opiates ... capsaicin also is used topically. Lidocaine, an anesthetic, and steroids may be injected into joints for longer-term pain ... Multiple; inhibits prostaglandin synthesis in the CNS, an active metabolite, AM404, is an anandamide reuptake inhibitor.. PO, ...
... Axsain cream contains the active ingredient capsaicin, which is the substance found naturally in red ... Axsain cream contains the active ingredient capsaicin, which is the substance found naturally in red chilli peppers that gives ... Capsaicin works by desensitising nerve cells to pain. It does this by binding to sensory receptors called nociceptors that are ... This medicine should not be used if you are allergic to one or any of its ingredients. Please inform your doctor or pharmacist ...
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety. Ingredient Name. Basis of Strength. Strength. CAPSAICIN (UNII: S07O44R1ZM) (CAPSAICIN - UNII: ... CAPSAICIN- capsaicin cream To receive this label RSS feed. Copy the URL below and paste it into your RSS Reader application. ... Capsaicin 0.025% Cream 50 grams NDC: 50488-1025-5. Manufactured for: Alexso, Inc. 2317 Cotner Avenue Los Angeles, CA 90064. Tel ... Inactive ingredients Aqua (Deionized Water), Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Boswellia Serrata Extract, Cetearyl Alcohol, ...
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety. Ingredient Name. Basis of Strength. Strength. CAMPHOR (SYNTHETIC) (UNII: 5TJD82A1ET) (CAMPHOR ... CAPSAICIN (UNII: S07O44R1ZM) (CAPSAICIN - UNII:S07O44R1ZM) CAPSAICIN. 2.88 mg. METHYL SALICYLATE (UNII: LAV5U5022Y) (SALICYLIC ... INGREDIENTS AND APPEARANCE YUNNAN BAIYAO ARTHRITIS PAIN RELIEF camphor, capsaicin, methyl salicylate plaster. ... INACTIVE INGREDIENT Inactive ingredients Peppermint oil, petrolatum, lanolin, rosin, and zinc oxide, on a natural latex rubber ...
Capsaicin. Capsaicin is the heat-producing active ingredient in chili peppers. It is thought to ease arthritis-related pain. ... Curcumin is the active ingredient in turmeric. It works by blocking the substances that cause inflammation and helps reduce ... You shouldnt use capsaicin if you take any medications containing zucapsaicin or if you take any antiarrhythmic drugs, such as ... Capsaicin causes a pain transmitter called substance P to be released and depleted. Regular use prevents substance P from ...
Find treatment reviews for Capsaicin Patch from other patients. Learn from their experiences about effectiveness, side effects ... Capsaicin is an active ingredient commonly found in peppers. Capsaicin patches are used in the treatment of nerve pain ... Currently taking Capsaicin Patch Duration. Patients. Percentage. This item is relevant to you: 10 years or more 1 * 100% ... Stopped taking Capsaicin Patch Duration. Patients. Percentage. This item is relevant to you: 1 - 6 months 1 * 50% ...
Capsaicin is the active ingredient of chili peppers. It has medicinal properties and is used elsewhere in medicine, for example ... Capsaicin for non-allergic rhinitis. Review question Is capsaicin applied into the nose (intranasal) effective in the ... Capsaicin, the active component of chili peppers, delivered intranasally, is considered a treatment option for non-allergic ... Two studies compared capsaicin with placebo. One study reported that capsaicin resulted in an improvement of overall nasal ...
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety. Ingredient Name. Basis of Strength. Strength. CAPSAICIN (CAPSAICIN). CAPSAICIN. 0.025 g in 100 ... Inactive ingredients. acrylates/C10-30 alkyl acrylate crosspolymer, cetyl acetate, methylparaben, PPG-20 methyl glucose ether ... Diclofenac, the active component of diclofenac sodium topical solution has anti-inflammatory, anti-nociception, and antipyretic ... In addition diclofenac sodium topical solution contains the following inactive ingredients: dimethyl sulfoxide USP (DMSO, 45.5 ...
Vanilloids are a class of small organic compounds; the most familiar of which is capsaicin, the active ingredient in hot pepper ... Capsaicin, the ingredient in chili peppers that makes them hot, belongs to a class of drugs called vanilloids, which have ... Capsaicin to Control Pain Following Third Molar Extraction. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... Capsaicin. Acute Pain. Orofacial. Vanilloid Receptor (VR). Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Wisdom Teeth. Third Molar Extraction. ...
Antiphlogistine Rub A-535 Capsaicin indications, usages and related health products lists ... Antiphlogistine Rub A-535 Capsaicin information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Church & Dwight, ... Pharmaceutical active ingredients:. *Capsaicin. Available forms, composition and doses of Antiphlogistine Rub A-535 Capsaicin: ... Find online pharmacy, drugstore, pharma or beauty shop where to order or buy Antiphlogistine Rub A-535 Capsaicin brand or ...
Capsina information about active ingredients, pharmaceutical forms and doses by Bioglan, Capsina indications, usages and ... Pharmaceutical active ingredients:. *Capsaicin. Available forms, composition and doses of Capsina:. *N / A. ...
Contains 15percent Capsaicin, Odor free high potency and deep penetrating at Office Depot & OfficeMax. Now One Company. ... Compare to the active ingredients found in Capzasin™ No-Mess Applicator. .odgrid_12 #footerWrapper{border-top: 1px solid # ... Contains 15% Capsaicin. * Used for the temporary relief of minor aches and pains of muscle joints associated with arthritus, ... Contains 15% Capsaicin.. *Used for the temporary relief of minor aches and pains of muscle joints associated with arthritus, ...
Capsaicin is the active ingredient in chili peppers that makes them hot. Capsaicin is used in medicated creams and lotions to ... Icy Hot with Capsaicin, Menthac Arthritis Cream with Capsaicin, Qutenza, Salonpas Gel-Patch, Salonpas Pain Patch with Capsaicin ... It is not known whether capsaicin topical passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not apply capsaicin ... Capsaicin used on the body causes a sensation of heat that activates certain nerve cells. With regular use of capsaicin, this ...
Chilli, capsaicin and hallucinations. The active ingredient in chilli is capsaicin (pronounced kap-say-sin). Capsaicin ... Capsaicin doesnt dissolve in water, so water wont help much, but it does dissolve in alcohol and vegetable oils. Beer is not ... Milk contains casein, a fat-loving substance that essentially has a detergent effect on the capsaicin, just like soap has on ... Without getting too into the chemistry, capsaicin has a long hydrocarbon tail, meaning it binds strongly with lipoprotein ...
Capsaicin is used in medicated creams and lotions to relieve muscle or joint pain. Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti- ... Capsaicin is the active ingredient in chili peppers that makes them hot. ... What is capsaicin and diclofenac?. Capsaicin is the active ingredient in chili peppers that makes them hot. Capsaicin is used ... To make sure capsaicin and diclofenac is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:. *heart disease, high blood pressure, high ...
Spicy peppers are the only plants that contain capsaicin, to my knowledge. The active ingredient in pepper spray is capsaicin. ... CAPSAICIN. Capsaicin is an alkaloid found in hot peppers. We hear a lot about capsaicin supposedly having anti-inflammatory ... Capsaicin receptors have been found in arthritic joints. When they inject capsaicin into mouse knee joints, it reduces blood ... Capsaicin depletes substance P. Although this study was reported as showing a beneficial role for capsaicin, the proper ...
Capsaicin. Capsaicin is the active ingredient in chili peppers. One study in human subjects indicates that capsaicin offers ... This test detects active presence of H. pylori infection. Other serological tests, which may be readily available in a ... This test detects active presence of H. pylori infection. Other serological tests, which may be readily available in a ... There is some evidence that berberine is active against H. pylori.. *Chamomile . Chamomile contains apigenin, a bioflavonoid ...
21 CFR § 310.545 - Drug products containing certain active ingredients offered over-the-counter (OTC) for certain uses. * CFR ... a) A number of active ingredients have been present in OTC drug products for various uses, as described below. However, based ... Any oral bronchodilator active ingredient (e.g., ephedrine, ephedrine hydrochloride, ephedrine sulfate, racephedrine ... b) Any OTC drug product that is labeled, represented, or promoted for the uses specified and containing any active ingredient(s ...
Capsaicin cream is an all natural remedy for chronic pain that can be very effective for decreasing the severity some types of ... Capsaicin cream for back pain provides relief using the active ingredient found in hot chili peppers. ... Capsaicin is the active ingredient in hot peppers. It the chemical that creates the sensation of heat in these food items. ... This dialog examines capsaicin as an active ingredient in topical pain relieving products, such as gels, ointments, balms, ...
Active Ingredients. *Capsicum 4X (capsaicin). Inactive Ingredients. *Purified Water. *Eucalyptus Oil. *Aloe Vera Extract ... Sinol Allergy uses Capsaicin, an ingredient that comes from the pepper plant. This natural ingredient has been harnessed into a ... Ingredients. : Capsicum 4X (capsaicin) HPUS, Eucalyptus Oil 3X HPUS, Aloe Vera Extract 6X HPUS, Purified Water, Rosemary ... Sinol M Fast Headache Relief Nasal Spray with Capsaicin 15 ml Sovereign Silver 2 oz (59 ml) Silver Hydrosol - Fine Mist ...
Capsaicin comes from pepper plants and may be a natural remedy for fibromyalgia pain relief. Its the active ingredient in a ... Capsaicin has been used for chronic pain in diabetes, cancer, and cluster headaches. It may also temporarily be used for ... When applied to a painful area of the body, capsaicin stimulates the release of a body chemical called substance P. As ...
Capsaicin is used in medicated creams and lotions to relieve muscle or joint pain. Capsaicin used on the body causes a ... With regular use of capsaicin, this heating effect reduces the amount of... ... Capsaicin is the active ingredient in chili peppers that makes them hot. ... What is capsaicin topical?. Capsaicin is the active ingredient in chili peppers that makes them hot. Capsaicin is used in ...
Capsaicin is a naturally occurring irritant active ingredient found in hot peppers. It is a ligand for transient receptor ... Capsaicin 8% patches are applied to the most painful areas of healthy skin and allowed to remain for 60 minutes. Treatment can ... Capsaicin 8% has been licensed for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia pain in recent years. A single application of high- ... To manage local pain from capsaicin application, the skin is pretreated with a local anesthetic such as topical lidocaine or an ...
The first pesticide product using solely capsaicin as the active ingredient was registered with the U.S. Department of ... Capsaicin (/kæpˈseɪ.ɪsɪn/ (INN); 8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is an active component of chili peppers, which are plants ... "capsaicin" in 1876.[8] Karl Micko isolated capsaicin in its pure form in 1898.[9][10] Capsaicins chemical composition was ... Capsaicinoids are also an active ingredient in riot control and personal defense pepper spray agents.[47][48][49] When the ...
What is it? The active ingredient extracted from chillies.. How might it work? Several studies show capsaicin can reduce pain. ... Verdict: Capsaicin rated highly as a treatment because its all natural, safe to use and is readily available on prescription ...
Its made using the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. Some people prefer to wear rubber gloves while applying the cream. ... Capsaicin Cream. Common brand name: Zostrix. Capsaicin cream is rubbed on the skin of an affected joint to relieve the pain and ... The effect of etanercept on work productivity in patients with early active rheumatoid arthritis: results from the COMET study ...
  • The side effects of using capsaicin in the nose include irritation, burning, sneezing and coughing, however there are no known long-term side effects of capsaicin use. (cochrane.org)
  • There is ongoing research into the effects of capsaicin on these mechanisms and its clinical uses. (cochrane.org)
  • The effects of capsaicin (CAPS) on protein glycation and the subsequent formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) were assessed. (elsevier.com)
  • The effects of capsaicin on neural function, whether applied systemically or locally, have been categorized into various stages in animal studies and range from conduction block with reversible ultrastructural changes in peripheral nociceptive endings to irreversible degeneration of nociceptive neurons and their processes ( Szolcsányi, 1993 ). (jneurosci.org)
  • The experimental patches will be identical to placebo patches except will contain capsaicin 0.1% (500 mcg). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Many popular "fat-burning" supplements on the market contain capsaicin, as the substance may significantly increase metabolic activity for over 20 minutes after it's eaten. (sixwise.com)
  • At various times after capsaicin injection, nerve fibers were visualized immunohistochemically in skin biopsies and were quantified. (jneurosci.org)
  • There was nearly complete degeneration of epidermal nerve fibers and the subepidermal neural plexus in capsaicin-treated skin, as indicated by the loss of immunoreactivity for PGP 9.5 and CGRP. (jneurosci.org)
  • A study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition determined that capsaicin - a potent metabolism-booster - can reduce hunger and increase the feeling of fullness in order to help you eat less. (oxygenmag.com)
  • Capsaicin has potent antibacterial properties that fight and prevent chronic sinus infections , or sinusitis. (sixwise.com)
  • RTX is a capsaicin analog, only it's between 500 and 1,000 times more potent. (wired.com)
  • Surprisingly, most of the work on pain-induced by capsaicin had concentrated on mammals, with very little work on gustatory responses in birds. (sindark.com)
  • You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to capsaicin or diclofenac, or if you have ever had an asthma attack or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin or an NSAID. (cigna.com)