Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOMYCES.
A form of ACTINOMYCOSIS characterized by slow-growing inflammatory lesions of the lymph nodes that drain the mouth (lumpy jaw), reddening of the overlying skin, and intraperitoneal abscesses.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.
Contraceptive devices placed high in the uterine fundus.
A spectrum of inflammation involving the female upper genital tract and the supporting tissues. It is usually caused by an ascending infection of organisms from the endocervix. Infection may be confined to the uterus (ENDOMETRITIS), the FALLOPIAN TUBES; (SALPINGITIS); the ovaries (OOPHORITIS), the supporting ligaments (PARAMETRITIS), or may involve several of the above uterine appendages. Such inflammation can lead to functional impairment and infertility.
'Bronchial diseases' is a broad term referring to various medical conditions that affect the bronchial tubes, including inflammation, infection, obstruction or narrowing, leading to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, and difficulty breathing.
Inflammation of the OVARY, generally caused by an ascending infection of organisms from the endocervix.
Infection involving the tissues or organs in the PELVIS.
A species of ACTINOMYCES found in the oral cavity of man and hamsters. It has been isolated from actinomycotic lesions in swine, cats, and dogs and has been identified as a causative agent of animal diseases.
Skin diseases caused by bacteria.
The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the TRANSVERSE COLON. It passes cephalad from the cecum to the caudal surface of the right lobe of the LIVER where it bends sharply to the left, forming the right colic flexure.
Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.
A group of antibiotics that contain 6-aminopenicillanic acid with a side chain attached to the 6-amino group. The penicillin nucleus is the chief structural requirement for biological activity. The side-chain structure determines many of the antibacterial and pharmacological characteristics. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1065)
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A family of bacteria including numerous parasitic and pathogenic forms.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose cells occur singly, in pairs or short chains, in V or Y configurations, or in clumps resembling letters of the Chinese alphabet. Its organisms are found in cheese and dairy products as well as on human skin and can occasionally cause soft tissue infections.

Actinomyces and nocardia infections in immunocompromised and nonimmunocompromised patients. (1/212)

A retrospective survey of nocardia and actinomyces infections in five local hospitals was conducted over a 3-year period in El Paso, Texas, a border city, in the southwestern United States. The medical records of 42 patients with suspected nocardiosis or actinomycosis were reviewed. One patient was diagnosed with actinomyces and 12 patients with nocardia. Microbiological data included morphologic characteristics, biochemical profile, and susceptibility testing. Predisposing factors included leukemia, renal insufficiency, renal transplant, and lymphoma. No predisposing factors were found in 67% (n = 8) of patients (including the patient with actinomycosis). Twenty-three percent (n = 3) of patients had disseminated disease without evidence of underlying disease or immunosuppression. The mortality and morbidity of these infections appeared to be low.  (+info)

Pathogenesis of cancrum oris (noma): confounding interactions of malnutrition with infection. (2/212)

This study showed that impoverished Nigerian children at risk for cancrum oris (noma) had significantly reduced plasma concentrations of zinc (< 10.8 micromol/L), retinol (< 1.05 micromol/L), ascorbate (< 11 micromol/L), and the essential amino acids, with prominently increased plasma and saliva levels of free cortisol, compared with their healthy counterparts. The nutrient deficiencies, in concert with previously reported widespread viral infections (measles, herpesviruses) in the children, would impair oral mucosal immunity. We postulate, subject to additional studies, that evolution of the oral mucosal ulcers including acute necrotizing gingivitis to noma is triggered by a consortium of microorganisms of which Fusobacterium necrophorum is a key component. Fusobacterium necrophorum elaborates several dermonecrotic toxic metabolites and is acquired by the impoverished children via fecal contamination resulting from shared residential facilities with animals and very poor environmental sanitation.  (+info)

Childhood actinomycosis. Report of 3 recent cases. (3/212)

Three cases of childhood actinomycosis are reported, 2 with the commonest presentation of cervicofacial abscess and the third with a rarely reported superficial chest wall abscess. The importance of prompt bacteriological diagnosis and adequate treatment with surgical drainage and chemotherapy is stressed. Though in adults males are affected more frequently than females, the sexes are probably equally affected in childhood.  (+info)

Endobronchial actinomycosis simulating endobronchial tuberculosis: a case report. (4/212)

We report a case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with mild exertional dyspnea and cough. Fiberoptic bronchoscopic findings revealed an endobronchial polypoid lesion with stenotic bronchus. The lesion was very similar to endobronchial tuberculosis. Histologic examination of the biopsy specimen demonstrated Actinomyces infection. There was a clinical response to intravenous penicillin therapy. Primary endobronchial actinomycosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of an endobronchial lesion, especially endobronchial tuberculosis in Korea.  (+info)

Actinomyces bowdenii sp. nov., isolated from canine and feline clinical specimens. (5/212)

Four strains of a previously undescribed Actinomyces-like bacterium were isolated from canine and feline clinical specimens. Phenotypic studies indicated the strains were members of the genus Actinomyces, and most closely resembled Actinomyces viscosus serotype I and Actinomyces slackii. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies demonstrated the unknown bacterium constitutes a new subline within a group of Actinomyces species, which includes Actinomyces bovis, the type species of the genus. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as Actinomyces bowdenii sp. nov. The type strain of Actinomyces bowdenii is CCUG 37421T.  (+info)

Infection of a hip prosthesis by Actinomyces naeslundii. (6/212)

We present the case of a 77-year-old woman who developed an Actinomyces naeslundii infection of a hip prosthesis. The isolate grew well aerobically with 5% CO(2). Possible diagnostic problems may arise in the microbiological laboratory because aerobic growth is not sufficiently accounted for in some of the traditional identification schemes and commercial test kits. Therefore, besides presenting an unusual pathogen in this setting, this report focuses on possible diagnostic problems in the microbiological laboratory.  (+info)

Molecular and genetic analyses of Actinomyces spp. (7/212)

Members of the genus Actinomyces are predominant primary colonizers of the oral cavity and play an important role in initiating plaque development. These bacteria have evolved unique mechanisms that favor colonization and persistence in this micro-environment. The expression of cell-surface fimbriae is correlated with the ability of these bacteria to adhere to specific receptors on the tooth and mucosal surfaces, and to interact with other plaque bacteria. The elaboration of sialidase is thought to enhance fimbriae-mediated adherence by unmasking the fimbrial receptors on mammalian cells. The presence of certain cell-associated or extracellular enzymes, including those involved in sucrose or urea metabolism, may provide the means for these bacteria to thrive under conditions when other growth nutrients are not available. Moreover, these enzyme activities may influence the distribution of other plaque bacteria and promote selection for Actinomyces spp. in certain ecological niches. The recent development of a genetic transfer system for Actinomyces spp. has allowed for studies the results of which demonstrate the existence of multiple genes involved in fimbriae synthesis and function, and facilitated the construction of allelic replacement mutants at each gene locus. Analyses of these mutants have revealed a direct correlation between the synthesis of assembled fimbriae and the observed adherence properties. Further genetic analysis of the various enzyme activities detected from strains of Actinomyces should allow for an assessment of the role of these components in microbial ecology, and their contribution to the overall success of Actinomyces spp. as a primary colonizer and a key player in oral health and disease.  (+info)

Actinomyces canis sp. nov., isolated from dogs. (8/212)

Three strains of a previously undescribed catalase-positive Actinomyces-like bacterium were isolated from dogs. Biochemical testing and PAGE analysis of whole-cell proteins indicated that the strains were phenotypically highly related to each other but different from previously described Actinomyces and Arcanobacterium species. Sequencing of 16S rRNA showed that the unknown bacterium represents a new subline within a cluster of species which includes Actinomyces hyovaginalis, Actinomyces georgiae, Actinomyces meyeri, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Actinomyces radingae and Actinomyces turicensis. On the basis of phenotypic evidence and 16S rRNA sequence divergence levels (greater than 5% with recognized Actinomyces species) it is proposed that the unknown strains from canine sources be classified as a new species with the name Actinomyces canis sp. nov. The type strain of Actinomyces canis is CCUG 41706T (= CIP 106351T).  (+info)

Actinomycosis is a type of infection caused by bacteria that are normally found in the mouth, intestines, and female genital tract. These bacteria can cause abscesses or chronic inflammation if they infect body tissues, often after trauma or surgery. The infection typically affects the face, neck, or chest, and can spread to other parts of the body over time. Symptoms may include swelling, redness, pain, and the formation of pus-filled abscesses that may discharge a characteristic yellowish granular material called "sulfur granules." Treatment typically involves long-term antibiotic therapy, often requiring high doses and intravenous administration. Surgical drainage or removal of infected tissue may also be necessary in some cases.

Cervicofacial actinomycosis is a form of actinomycosis, which is a type of infection caused by the Actinomyces species of bacteria. These bacteria are normally found in the mouth, throat, and digestive system and are usually harmless. However, they can cause an infection if they are able to penetrate the mucosal lining of these areas, such as through trauma or injury.

Cervicofacial actinomycosis specifically affects the head and neck region. It often presents as a slowly progressive, painful, indurated (hardened) mass in the cervicofacial area, which can be accompanied by symptoms such as fever, weight loss, and fatigue. The infection can spread to surrounding tissues, including bone and muscle, and can form abscesses or fistulas that drain pus.

Cervicofacial actinomycosis is typically treated with high-dose antibiotics for an extended period of time, often several months. Surgical intervention may also be necessary to remove any areas of necrotic (dead) tissue or to drain abscesses. The prognosis for cervicofacial actinomycosis is generally good with appropriate treatment, although the infection can recur if not fully treated.

Actinomyces is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are normal inhabitants of the human mouth, colon, and urogenital tract. Under certain conditions, such as poor oral hygiene or tissue trauma, these bacteria can cause infections known as actinomycosis. These infections often involve the formation of abscesses or granulomas and can affect various tissues, including the lungs, mouth, and female reproductive organs. Actinomyces species are also known to form complex communities called biofilms, which can contribute to their ability to cause infection.

An Intrauterine Device (IUD) is a long-acting, reversible contraceptive device that is inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy. It is a small T-shaped piece of flexible plastic with strings attached to it for removal. There are two types of IUDs available: hormonal and copper. Hormonal IUDs release progestin, which thickens cervical mucus and thins the lining of the uterus, preventing sperm from reaching and fertilizing an egg. Copper IUDs, on the other hand, produce an inflammatory reaction in the uterus that is toxic to sperm and eggs, preventing fertilization.

IUDs are more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy and can remain in place for several years, depending on the type. They are easily removable by a healthcare provider if a woman wants to become pregnant or choose another form of contraception. IUDs do not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs), so it is important to use condoms in addition to an IUD for protection against STIs.

In summary, Intrauterine Devices are small, T-shaped plastic devices that are inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy. They come in two types: hormonal and copper, both of which work by preventing fertilization. IUDs are highly effective, long-acting, and reversible forms of contraception.

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the reproductive organs in women, specifically the uterus, fallopian tubes, and/or ovaries. It is often caused by an infection that ascends from the cervix or vagina into the upper genital tract. The infectious agents are usually sexually transmitted bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis, but other organisms can also be responsible.

Symptoms of PID may include lower abdominal pain, irregular menstrual bleeding, vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor, fever, painful sexual intercourse, or pain in the lower back. However, some women with PID may not experience any symptoms at all. If left untreated, PID can lead to serious complications such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain.

Diagnosis of PID is typically based on a combination of clinical findings, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Treatment usually involves antibiotics to eradicate the infection and may also include pain management and other supportive measures. In some cases, hospitalization may be necessary for more intensive treatment or if complications arise.

Bronchial diseases refer to medical conditions that affect the bronchi, which are the large airways that lead into the lungs. These diseases can cause inflammation, narrowing, or obstruction of the bronchi, leading to symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and difficulty breathing.

Some common bronchial diseases include:

1. Asthma: A chronic inflammatory disease of the airways that causes recurring episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing.
2. Chronic Bronchitis: A long-term inflammation of the bronchi that leads to a persistent cough and excessive mucus production.
3. Bronchiectasis: A condition in which the bronchi become damaged and widened, leading to chronic infection and inflammation.
4. Bronchitis: An inflammation of the bronchi that can cause coughing, wheezing, and chest tightness.
5. Emphysema: A lung condition that causes shortness of breath due to damage to the air sacs in the lungs. While not strictly a bronchial disease, it is often associated with chronic bronchitis and COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease).

Treatment for bronchial diseases may include medications such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, or antibiotics, as well as lifestyle changes such as quitting smoking and avoiding irritants. In severe cases, oxygen therapy or surgery may be necessary.

Oophoritis is a medical term that refers to the inflammation of one or both ovaries. It is often caused by an infection, which can be bacterial, viral, or fungal in nature. The infection can spread to the ovaries from other parts of the reproductive system, such as the fallopian tubes or the uterus.

Oophoritis can cause symptoms such as pelvic pain, abdominal cramping, irregular menstrual bleeding, and fever. In some cases, it may lead to complications such as infertility or chronic pelvic pain. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to clear the infection, as well as pain relief medications and anti-inflammatory drugs to manage symptoms.

It is important to note that oophoritis can be a serious condition, especially if left untreated. If you are experiencing any symptoms of oophoritis, it is important to seek medical attention promptly.

A pelvic infection, also known as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), is a medical condition characterized by inflammation of the reproductive organs in females, including the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, and surrounding tissues. It is often caused by an ascending infection from the cervix or vagina, commonly due to sexually transmitted bacteria such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. However, other organisms can also cause pelvic infections.

Symptoms of pelvic infections may include lower abdominal pain, irregular menstrual bleeding, vaginal discharge with an unpleasant odor, fever, painful intercourse, and difficulty urinating. In some cases, pelvic infections may not cause any noticeable symptoms, making it challenging to diagnose the condition promptly.

If left untreated, pelvic infections can lead to serious complications such as chronic pelvic pain, infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and abscess formation in the reproductive organs. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to eradicate the infection, and in severe cases, hospitalization and surgical intervention may be necessary.

Actinomyces viscosus is a gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that is commonly found in the oral cavity and upper respiratory tract of humans. It is a normal resident of the human microbiota but can cause infections in immunocompromised individuals or when it gains access to deeper tissues, such as the pulp of teeth or the soft tissues of the head and neck.

Actinomyces viscosus has been associated with dental caries, periodontal disease, and endodontic infections. It can also cause actinomycosis, a chronic suppurative and granulomatous infection that typically affects the cervicofacial region, thorax, or abdomen.

The name "viscosus" refers to the sticky, mucoid appearance of the bacterial colonies when grown in culture. Actinomyces viscosus is closely related to other species of Actinomyces, such as A. israelii and A. gerencseriae, which can also cause actinomycosis.

Bacterial skin diseases are a type of infectious skin condition caused by various species of bacteria. These bacteria can multiply rapidly on the skin's surface when given the right conditions, leading to infection and inflammation. Some common bacterial skin diseases include:

1. Impetigo: A highly contagious superficial skin infection that typically affects exposed areas such as the face, hands, and feet. It is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria.
2. Cellulitis: A deep-skin infection that can spread rapidly and involves the inner layers of the skin and underlying tissue. It is often caused by Group A Streptococcus or Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.
3. Folliculitis: An inflammation of hair follicles, usually caused by an infection with Staphylococcus aureus or other bacteria.
4. Furuncles (boils) and carbuncles: Deep infections that develop from folliculitis when the infection spreads to surrounding tissue. A furuncle is a single boil, while a carbuncle is a cluster of boils.
5. Erysipelas: A superficial skin infection characterized by redness, swelling, and warmth in the affected area. It is typically caused by Group A Streptococcus bacteria.
6. MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) infections: Skin infections caused by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus that has developed resistance to many antibiotics, making it more difficult to treat.
7. Leptospirosis: A bacterial infection transmitted through contact with contaminated water or soil and characterized by flu-like symptoms and skin rashes.

Treatment for bacterial skin diseases usually involves the use of topical or oral antibiotics, depending on the severity and location of the infection. In some cases, drainage of pus-filled abscesses may be necessary to promote healing. Proper hygiene and wound care can help prevent the spread of these infections.

The ascending colon is the first part of the large intestine, which is the portion of the digestive system that follows the small intestine. It is called "ascending" because it travels upward from the right side of the abdomen toward the underside of the liver. The primary function of the ascending colon is to absorb water and electrolytes from digested food and prepare waste for elimination.

Lung diseases refer to a broad category of disorders that affect the lungs and other structures within the respiratory system. These diseases can impair lung function, leading to symptoms such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, and wheezing. They can be categorized into several types based on the underlying cause and nature of the disease process. Some common examples include:

1. Obstructive lung diseases: These are characterized by narrowing or blockage of the airways, making it difficult to breathe out. Examples include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchiectasis, and cystic fibrosis.
2. Restrictive lung diseases: These involve stiffening or scarring of the lungs, which reduces their ability to expand and take in air. Examples include idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, and asbestosis.
3. Infectious lung diseases: These are caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or parasites that infect the lungs. Examples include pneumonia, tuberculosis, and influenza.
4. Vascular lung diseases: These affect the blood vessels in the lungs, impairing oxygen exchange. Examples include pulmonary embolism, pulmonary hypertension, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).
5. Neoplastic lung diseases: These involve abnormal growth of cells within the lungs, leading to cancer. Examples include small cell lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and mesothelioma.
6. Other lung diseases: These include interstitial lung diseases, pleural effusions, and rare disorders such as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).

It is important to note that this list is not exhaustive, and there are many other conditions that can affect the lungs. Proper diagnosis and treatment of lung diseases require consultation with a healthcare professional, such as a pulmonologist or respiratory therapist.

Penicillins are a group of antibiotics derived from the Penicillium fungus. They are widely used to treat various bacterial infections due to their bactericidal activity, which means they kill bacteria by interfering with the synthesis of their cell walls. The first penicillin, benzylpenicillin (also known as penicillin G), was discovered in 1928 by Sir Alexander Fleming. Since then, numerous semi-synthetic penicillins have been developed to expand the spectrum of activity and stability against bacterial enzymes that can inactivate these drugs.

Penicillins are classified into several groups based on their chemical structure and spectrum of activity:

1. Natural Penicillins (e.g., benzylpenicillin, phenoxymethylpenicillin): These have a narrow spectrum of activity, mainly targeting Gram-positive bacteria such as streptococci and staphylococci. However, they are susceptible to degradation by beta-lactamase enzymes produced by some bacteria.
2. Penicillinase-resistant Penicillins (e.g., methicillin, oxacillin, nafcillin): These penicillins resist degradation by certain bacterial beta-lactamases and are primarily used to treat infections caused by staphylococci, including methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).
3. Aminopenicillins (e.g., ampicillin, amoxicillin): These penicillins have an extended spectrum of activity compared to natural penicillins, including some Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. However, they are still susceptible to degradation by many beta-lactamases.
4. Antipseudomonal Penicillins (e.g., carbenicillin, ticarcillin): These penicillins have activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other Gram-negative bacteria with increased resistance to other antibiotics. They are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanate or tazobactam to protect them from degradation.
5. Extended-spectrum Penicillins (e.g., piperacillin): These penicillins have a broad spectrum of activity, including many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. They are often combined with beta-lactamase inhibitors to protect them from degradation.

Penicillins are generally well-tolerated antibiotics; however, they can cause allergic reactions in some individuals, ranging from mild skin rashes to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Cross-reactivity between different penicillin classes and other beta-lactam antibiotics (e.g., cephalosporins) is possible but varies depending on the specific drugs involved.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

Actinomycetaceae is a family of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are characterized by their filamentous growth and the production of branching hyphae. These bacteria are often found in soil and water, and some species can cause disease in humans and animals. They are classified as aerobic or facultatively anaerobic organisms, meaning they can grow with or without oxygen.

The name "Actinomycetaceae" comes from the Greek words "aktis," meaning "ray" or "beam," and "mykes," meaning "fungus." This reflects the filamentous, fungus-like growth of these bacteria.

Some species of Actinomycetaceae are known to produce various antibiotics, including streptomycin, neomycin, and tetracycline. These antibiotics have been widely used in medicine to treat a variety of bacterial infections.

In humans, some species of Actinomycetaceae can cause actinomycosis, a chronic infection that typically affects the face, neck, and mouth. Symptoms of actinomycosis include swelling, pain, and the formation of abscesses or fistulas. Treatment usually involves long-term antibiotic therapy and sometimes surgical drainage of any abscesses.

Overall, Actinomycetaceae is an important family of bacteria with both beneficial and harmful effects on humans and other organisms.

Propionibacterium is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found on the skin and in the mouth, intestines, and genitourinary tract of humans and animals. They are named after their ability to produce propionic acid as a major metabolic end product. Some species of Propionibacterium, such as P. acnes, are associated with skin conditions like acne vulgaris, where they contribute to the inflammatory response that leads to the formation of pimples and lesions. Other species, such as P. freudenreichii, are used in the food industry for the production of dairy products like Swiss cheese and yogurt. Propionibacterium species are generally considered to be non-pathogenic or opportunistic pathogens, meaning that they can cause infection under certain circumstances, such as when the immune system is compromised.

The Norwegian painter Halfdan Egedius died from actinomycosis on 2 February 1899. Actinomycosis occurs rarely in humans, but ... Actinomycosis is a rare infectious bacterial disease caused by Actinomyces species. The name refers to ray-like appearance of ... Actinomycosis abscesses grow larger as the disease progresses, often over months. In severe cases, they may penetrate the ... Actinomycosis is primarily caused by any of several members of the bacterial genus Actinomyces. These bacteria are generally ...
... is a chronic disease that affects the deep subcutaneous tissue of the skin. Caused by an anaerobic, ... Roy D, Roy PG, Misra PK (2003). "An interesting case of primary cutaneous actinomycosis". Dermatology Online Journal. 9 (5): 17 ... "Primary cutaneous actinomycosis". International Journal of Dermatology. 47 (12): 1271-3. doi:10.1111/j.1365-4632.2008.03854.x. ...
Although actinomycosis is more common in cattle, it can also be found in horses, sheep, swine, dogs, deer, and humans. In ... Actinomycosis is a common condition in weaned calves, young bulls, and heifers. The disease has a chronic course, and the ... Actinomycosis is an infection caused by a bacterium of the genus Actinomyces, usually Actinomyces bovis; the disease it causes ... Actinomycosis can be contracted via simple injuries and wounds. The bacteria are common soil and commensal organisms in humans ...
Cope, V. Z. (1949). "Visceral Actinomycosis". BMJ. 2 (4640): 1311-6. doi:10.1136/bmj.2.4640.1311. PMC 2052075. PMID 15407913. ... Visceral Actinomycosis 1948 Lionel E.C. Norbury, Proctology throughout the Ages 1947 Sir Cecil Wakeley, Vogue and Fashion in ...
eds.). Actinomycosis in: Baron's Medical Microbiology (4th ed.). Univ of Texas Medical Branch. ISBN 978-0-9631172-1-2. (via ... Brook, I (Oct 2008). "Actinomycosis: diagnosis and management". Southern Medical Journal. 101 (10): 1019-23. doi:10.1097/SMJ. ... Mabeza, GF; Macfarlane J (March 2003). "Pulmonary actinomycosis". European Respiratory Journal. 21 (3): 545-551. doi:10.1183/ ...
"Pediatric Actinomycosis". Medscape. Retrieved 22 May 2016. Actinomyces naeslundii MG1 Genome Page Type strain of Actinomyces ... Many species of the genus Actinomyces, including A. naeslundii, cause a chronic disease called actinomycosis, which is ...
Briney RR (November 1965). "Primary cutaneous actinomycosis". JAMA. 194 (6): 679-80. doi:10.1001/jama.1965.03090190101037. PMID ...
He also discovered actinomycosis. Johann Peter Müller (b. 1709 in Rutsweiler an der Lauter; d. 1796 in Ephrata, Pennsylvania, ...
Actinomycosis mimicking metastatic lung cancer. Infect in Med 1997; (14)10: 791-98 Lynch CM, Pinelli DM, Cruse CW, Spellacy WN ...
nov., an Agent of Canine Actinomycosis". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. 34 (4): 439-443. doi:10.1099/ ...
Mouth actinobacillosis of cattle must be differentiated from actinomycosis that affects bone tissues of the maxilla. When only ... actinomycosis Actinobacillus suis "Merck Veterinary Manual". "Dorlands Medical Dictionary:actinobacillosis".[permanent dead ...
2003). "Periapical actinomycosis: a clinicopathologic study". Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and ...
Actinomycosis is most frequently caused by A. israelii. It is a normal colonizer of the vagina, colon, and mouth. Infection is ... Known to live commensally on and within humans, A. israelii is an opportunistic pathogen and a cause of actinomycosis. Many ... "Actinomycosis: Causes, types, symptoms, and diagnosis". Medical News Today. 25 September 2018. Retrieved 2019-07-04. Valour, ... Russo, Thomas A. (2014), Kasper, Dennis; Fauci, Anthony; Hauser, Stephen; Longo, Dan (eds.), "Actinomycosis and Whipple's ...
Lumpy jaw (actinomycosis) in cattle can present itself in two main ways. One is as soft-tissue abscesses in the mouth and on ... In Ethiopia, actinomycosis accounted for 1.34% of condemnations. L Pine; A Howell; SJ Watson (1960). "Studies of the ... Masand, A. (2015). "Actinomycosis (lumpy Jaw) in Cow: A Case Report". Comparative Clinical Pathology. 24 (3): 541-543. doi: ... Masand, A (2015). "Actinomycosis (lumpy Jaw) in Cow: A Case Report". Comparative Clinical Pathology. 24 (3): 541-543. doi: ...
Primary Cutaneous Actinomycosis David M. Morens. Fifth Disease: Still Hazy After All These Years Dictionary of Virology St. ...
2020 Micrograph of actinomycosis, H&E stain Micrograph of actinomycosis, GMS stain Micrograph of actinomycosis, Gram stain Harz ... Another form of actinomycosis is thoracic disease, which is often misdiagnosed as a neoplasm, as it forms a mass that extends ... Actinomycosis may be considered when a patient has chronic progression of disease across tissue planes that is mass-like at ... Treatment for actinomycosis consists of antibiotics such as penicillin or amoxicillin for 5 to 12 months, as well as surgery if ...
It is, therefore, a form of actinomycosis. Mycetoma is a broad term which includes actinomycetoma and eumycetoma under it. ...
... actinomycosis, and other animal diseases". The institute also tested water and food. Of the 30 water samples examined for ...
Clinical contributions to the knowledge of actinomycosis in humans). Berlin 1885. Ueber Reincultur des Actinomyces und seine ... Schultheiss, Dirk (March 2008). "James Israel (1848-1926): Discoverer of actinomycosis and pioneer of kidney surgery". Aktuelle ... "Actinomycosis of the Knee". JAMA Surgery. 60 (4). 1950. Nicoladoni-Israel-Branham sign @ Who Named It This article incorporates ... he provided the first description of actinomycosis in humans, caused by a pathogen that was later given the name Actinomyces ...
... is a human pathogen and can cause actinomycosis. List of Streptomyces species LPSN bacterio.net ...
1886). "A Case of So-Called Actinomycosis of the Liver". Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 69: 135-155. doi:10.1177/ ...
He died in August 1931 of a bacterial infection, actinomycosis. He was succeeded by his son Edward. In his capacity as former ... Deaths from actinomycosis, High Sheriffs of Anglesey, Progressive Party (London) politicians, People educated at Eton College) ...
He died from actinomycosis, which he had contracted in Africa. His African collections are housed at the Naturhistorisches ...
The eight edition (1955) erroneously listed actinomycosis as a fungal disease. In the ninth edition, arthropod-borne viral ...
nov.-A Novel Actinomyces species Isolated from a Patient with Pelvic Actinomycosis". Systematic and Applied Microbiology. 26 (4 ...
Other diseases for which BAE is effective include lung abscess and pulmonary actinomycosis. As for lung cancer, hemoptysis is ... "A case of recurrent hemoptysis caused by pulmonary actinomycosis diagnosed using transbronchial lung biopsy after bronchial ...
... in plants § Fungi Actinomycosis Climate change and infectious diseases Johnstone RB (2017). "25. Mycoses and ...
The cause of death was actinomycosis, a bacterial infection that attacked the internal organs. He was buried in the churchyard ... Deaths from actinomycosis, 19th-century Norwegian painters, 19th-century male artists). ...
A tooth had become infected with actinomycosis and the often fatal disease progressed into his throat; his English doctors were ...
Previously, these holes had been explained by the bacterious bone infection Actinomycosis or by intraspecific attacks. A ...
The Norwegian painter Halfdan Egedius died from actinomycosis on 2 February 1899. Actinomycosis occurs rarely in humans, but ... Actinomycosis is a rare infectious bacterial disease caused by Actinomyces species. The name refers to ray-like appearance of ... Actinomycosis abscesses grow larger as the disease progresses, often over months. In severe cases, they may penetrate the ... Actinomycosis is primarily caused by any of several members of the bacterial genus Actinomyces. These bacteria are generally ...
Actinomycosis is a long-term (chronic) bacterial infection that commonly affects the face and neck. ... Actinomycosis is a long-term (chronic) bacterial infection that commonly affects the face and neck. ... Actinomycosis is usually caused by the bacterium called Actinomyces israelii. This is a common organism found in the nose and ... Brook I. Actinomycosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap ...
Actinomycosis is a subacute-to-chronic bacterial infection caused by filamentous, gram-positive, non-acid-fast, anaerobic-to- ... In women, pelvic actinomycosis is possible.. For additional information on actinomycosis, see the articles Actinomycosis ( ... Actinomycosis is rare. During the 1970s, the reported annual incidence of actinomycosis in the Cleveland area was 1 case per ... Actinomycosis of the abdomen and pelvis. Actinomycosis of the abdomen and pelvis accounts for 10-20% of reported cases. ...
This paper describes a case of asymptomatic multifocal actinomycosis of the greater omentum which was detected accidentally in ... whether the remaining part of omentum was affected by microscopic actinomycosis.. Ključne riječi. actinomycosis; greater ... M. Milojković, M. Mrčela, M. Rubin i M. Pajtler, "The Case of Asymptomatic Primary Actinomycosis of the Greater Omentum in the ... Milojković M, Mrčela M, Rubin M, Pajtler M. The Case of Asymptomatic Primary Actinomycosis of the Greater Omentum in the ...
Actinomycosis is not Frequent in the.pdf. 3,11 MB. Adobe PDF. View/Open. ... Periapical actinomycosis caused by a gram-positive anaerobic pathogen characterizes a typical extra-radicular infection. This ... Seven cases (0.3%) fulfill the criteria for diagnosis of periapical actinomycosis. All of cases were therapy-resistant and did ... Actinomycosis is not Frequent in the Periapex But is a Persistent Lesion. ...
Actinomycosis is a subacute-to-chronic bacterial infection caused by filamentous, gram-positive, non-acid-fast, anaerobic-to- ... encoded search term (Actinomycosis) and Actinomycosis What to Read Next on Medscape ... Actinomycosis Medication. Updated: Jul 28, 2015 * Author: Jason F Okulicz, MD, FACP, FIDSA; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze ... Actinomycosis in HIV infection: a review of a rare complication. Int J STD AIDS. 2000 Jun. 11(6):349-55. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. ...
CARNEIRO, Gleicy Gabriela Vitória Spínola et al. Cervicofacial actinomycosis: a case report. Rev. cir. traumatol. buco-maxilo- ... Palavras-chave : Actinomycosis [diagnosis]; Actinomyces; Infection; Infection Control. · resumo em Português · texto em ... The purpose of the present article is to report a case of cervicofacial actinomycosis, describing and discussing its methods of ... This clinical case of cervicofacial actinomycosis reported here emphasizes the importance of this condition and the need for an ...
Actinomycosis - Learn about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis & treatment from the MSD Manuals - Medical Consumer Version. ... Prognosis for Actinomycosis If actinomycosis is diagnosed early and treated appropriately, most people recover fully. ... Symptoms of Actinomycosis Actinomycosis has several forms. All cause abscesses, scar tissue, and fistulas. ... Doctors suspect actinomycosis in people who have abscesses, scar tissue, and fistulas suggestive of actinomycosis. ...
This paper describes a case of facial actinomycosis initially thought to be a cutaneous tumor. How was it accurately diagnosed? ... Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous infection that commonly occurs in the cervicofacial region.[1] It can also occur in ... Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous infection that commonly occurs in the cervicofacial region. Although Actinomcyes is an ... The authors report a case of facial actinomycosis, which mimicked a cutaneous tumor both clinically and surgically in a 44-year ...
Endobronchial actinomycosis associated with broncholithiasis: CT findings for nine patients. Tae Sung Kim, Joungho Han, Won ... Dive into the research topics of Endobronchial actinomycosis associated with broncholithiasis: CT findings for nine patients ...
Actinomycosis. Standard. n/a. Not transmitted from person to person.. Adenovirus infection (see agent-specific guidance under ...
Actinomycosis. Actinomycosis - Ovary. Actinomycosis - Ovary. Actinomycosis - Ovary. Xanthogranulomatous Oophoritis. ...
Actinomycosis. Mild: 2-4 g/day PO divided q6hr for 8 weeks ...
Actinomycosis is a slowly progressive bacterial infection most commonly caused by actinomyces israelii. These bacteria normally ...
actinomycosis 039.1. *. anthrax 022.1. [484.5. ]. *. aspergillosis 117.3. [484.6. ]. *. candidiasis 112.4. *. ...
Categories: Actinomycosis Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 363 ...
Actinomycosis Red Book Atlas of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Adenovirus Infections Red Book Atlas of Pediatric Infectious ...
Actinomycosis. *Bacterial Infections. *Bites, Human. *Dysentery, Bacillary. *Endocarditis, Bacterial. *Escherichia Coli ...
Actinomyces israelii: Actinomycosis. *Legionella pneumophila: Legionaires disease. *Thermoactinomyces sacchari: Farmers lung ...
Prevalence: Infective granulomatous orchitis is very rare and can be caused by tuberculosis, brucellosis, and actinomycosis [69 ...
Abdominal actinomycosis 43894001. Actinomycotic cervicitis 237085007. SNOMED CT Concept 138875005. Clinical finding 404684003. ...
actinomycosis + asphyxia neonatorum + autosomal recessive cutis laxa type IC Ciliary Motility Disorders + ...
Diagnostic Dilemma with a Case of Primary Bronchopulmonary Actinomycosis Causing Unilateral Destroyed Lung: A Case Report and ...
Discover effective homeopathic strategies to treat mouth ulcer symptoms and enhance well-being. Get holistic relief from mouth ulcers with homeopathy.
Actinomycosis is a rare infection caused by bacteria of the genus Actinomyces sp. which are important constituents of the ... This study aims to report the case of a 76-year-old patient with actinomycosis mimicking laryngeal neoplasm, through the ... Relato de caso: actinomicose mimetizando neoplasia laríngea / Case report: actinomycosis mimicking laryngeal neoplasia / Caso ...
cervicofacial actinomycosis (s) (noun), cervicofacial actinomycoses (pl) A form of actinomycosis, a chronic local or systemic ... granulomatous infection, an inflammatory lesion which is caused by a fungus; lumpy jaw: Cervicofacial actinomycosis is ...
Actinomycosis Infrequent; Found in normal flora of Surgery, prolonged None -- worldwide oral cavity chemotherapy Acquired ...
  • Actinomycosis is a rare infectious bacterial disease caused by Actinomyces species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actinomycosis is primarily caused by any of several members of the bacterial genus Actinomyces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actinomyces bacteria are generally sensitive to penicillin, which is frequently used to treat actinomycosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actinomycosis is usually caused by the bacterium called Actinomyces israelii . (medlineplus.gov)
  • The frequency of periapical actinomycosis was low, and this lesion should be included in the differential diagnosis of PL. The size of the Actinomyces colonies seemed to contribute to increase the size of the periapical lesion. (ufba.br)
  • Actinomycosis is a chronic infection caused mainly by the anaerobic bacteria Actinomyces israelii . (msdmanuals.com)
  • Cervicofacial actinomycosis is the most common type of the infection, comprising 50-70% of reported cases. (medscape.com)
  • Cervicofacial actinomycosis is characterized in the initial stages by soft-tissue swelling of the perimandibular area. (medscape.com)
  • 6 mo) has been reported, especially in cervicofacial actinomycosis. (medscape.com)
  • The purpose of the present article is to report a case of cervicofacial actinomycosis, describing and discussing its methods of diagnosis, clinical course and treatment. (bvsalud.org)
  • This clinical case of cervicofacial actinomycosis reported here emphasizes the importance of this condition and the need for an early diagnosis with a view to improving the quality of life of patients affected. (bvsalud.org)
  • Cervicofacial actinomycosis is characterized by slow-growing inflammatory lesions of the lymph nodes that drain the mouth and reddens the overlying skin and causes intraperitoneal abscesses. (wordinfo.info)
  • thus, abdominal actinomycosis can occur following removal of the appendix. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common clinical forms of actinomycosis are cervicofacial (ie, lumpy jaw), thoracic, and abdominal. (medscape.com)
  • Actinomycosis is a long-term (chronic) bacterial infection that commonly affects the face and neck. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The infection can sometimes occur in the chest ( pulmonary actinomycosis ), abdomen, pelvis, or other areas of the body. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Actinomycosis is a subacute-to-chronic bacterial infection caused by filamentous, gram-positive, non-acid-fast, anaerobic-to-microaerophilic bacteria. (medscape.com)
  • Furthermore, actinomycosis is generally a polymicrobial infection, with isolates numbering as many as 5-10 bacterial species. (medscape.com)
  • Periapical actinomycosis caused by a gram-positive anaerobic pathogen characterizes a typical extra-radicular infection. (ufba.br)
  • Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous infection that commonly occurs in the cervicofacial region. (medscape.com)
  • The authors report a case of facial actinomycosis, which mimicked a cutaneous tumor both clinically and surgically in a 44-year-old woman with chronic renal failure and Hepatitis C viral infection. (medscape.com)
  • Any part of the cervicofacial site can be affected by actinomycosis infection. (medscape.com)
  • The authors describe an unusual case of a 44-year-old woman with chronic renal failure and Hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection having primary cutaneous actinomycosis (PCA) of the left cheek. (medscape.com)
  • In women, pelvic actinomycosis is possible. (medscape.com)
  • Pelvic actinomycosis most commonly ascends from the uterus in association with intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs). (medscape.com)
  • Thoracic actinomycosis accounts for 15-20% of cases. (medscape.com)
  • Occasionally, thoracic actinomycosis results from the introduction of organisms via esophageal perforation, by direct spread from an actinomycotic process of the neck or abdomen, or via hematogenous spread from a distant lesion. (medscape.com)
  • Thoracic actinomycosis commonly presents as a pulmonary infiltrate or mass, which, if left untreated, can spread to involve the pleura, pericardium, and chest wall, ultimately leading to the formation of sinuses that discharge sulfur granules. (medscape.com)
  • Useful in moderately severe to severe forms of cervicofacial and thoracic actinomycosis. (medscape.com)
  • Pulmonary actinomycosis is a severe clinical condition that may cause death if unrecognized. (erdogan.edu.tr)
  • However, in some cases actinomycosis can be locally destructive and progress to generalized infections, causing complications including abscess formation with risk of rupture, fistula formation, or spread to neighboring and distant organs. (medscape.com)
  • Actinomycosis abscesses grow larger as the disease progresses, often over months. (wikipedia.org)
  • For additional information on actinomycosis, see the articles Actinomycosis (dermatology focus), Actinomycosis (pediatrics focus), and Actinomycosis (ophthalmology focus). (medscape.com)
  • The diagnosis of actinomycosis can be a difficult one to make. (wikipedia.org)
  • Seven cases (0.3%) fulfill the criteria for diagnosis of periapical actinomycosis. (ufba.br)
  • Treatment of actinomycosis usually requires antibiotics for several months to a year. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Actinomycosis of the abdomen and pelvis accounts for 10-20% of reported cases. (medscape.com)
  • This study determined the frequency and correlated the content of bacteria colonies with the of periapical actinomycosis size. (ufba.br)
  • These recommendations were developed at a time when patients with actinomycosis typically presented late in the course of illness with large lesions, often receiving intermittent antibiotic therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Contexte: Pour contrôler la propagation de la maladie à coronavirus 19 (COVID-19) causée par le syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère coronavirus-2 (SRAS-CoV-2), il est nécessaire d'identifier et d'isoler de manière adéquate les patients infectieux, en particulier sur le lieu de travail. (bvsalud.org)
  • Méthodologie: Entre septembre 2021 et février 2022, des écouvillonnages oropharyngés et/ou nasopharyngés de travailleurs symptomatiques COVID-19 et apparemment en bonne santé sélectionnés consécutivement du site minier de Wahgnion dans le sud-ouest du Burkina Faso qui ont consenti à l'étude ont été prélevés selon les deux programme de quart de semaines et testé pour le SRAS-CoV-2 à l'aide d'un test RT-PCR. (bvsalud.org)
  • Because of the bacteria's normal location in the nose and throat, actinomycosis most commonly affects the face and neck. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The patient had an intensive antibiotic therapy prescribed (Penicillin) in order to prevent a disease relapse because we could not be sure whether the remaining part of omentum was affected by microscopic actinomycosis. (srce.hr)
  • High-dose penicillin administered over a prolonged period (6 months to 1 year) is the cornerstone of therapy for actinomycosis. (medscape.com)
  • Hematogenous dissemination to distant organs may occur in any stage of actinomycosis, whereas lymphatic dissemination is unusual. (medscape.com)
  • The use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) has increased incidence of genitourinary actinomycosis in females. (wikipedia.org)
  • In rare cases, meningitis can develop from actinomycosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Abnormal vaginal flora was found in 4.8% of cases, Candida albicans in 1.2%, Tri- chomonas vaginalis in 0.9% and actinomycosis in 1 case. (who.int)
  • This paper describes a case of asymptomatic multifocal actinomycosis of the greater omentum which was detected accidentally in a patient who was suspected of uterus myoma. (srce.hr)
  • Specifically, they may be responsible for the early manifestations of actinomycosis and for treatment failures. (medscape.com)
  • DOC for treatment of actinomycosis. (medscape.com)
  • Good oral hygiene and regular dentist visits may help prevent some forms of actinomycosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Actinomycosis has several forms. (msdmanuals.com)
  • An affected human often has recently had dental work, poor oral hygiene, periodontal disease, radiation therapy, or trauma (broken jaw) causing local tissue damage to the oral mucosa, all of which predispose the person to developing actinomycosis. (wikipedia.org)