Actinomycetales Infections: Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.Actinomycetales: An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.Khellin: A vasodilator that also has bronchodilatory action. It has been employed in the treatment of angina pectoris, in the treatment of asthma, and in conjunction with ultraviolet light A, has been tried in the treatment of vitiligo. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1024)Bucrylate: Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive also used to occlude blood vessels supplying neoplastic or other diseased tissue.Nocardia: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria whose species are widely distributed and are abundant in soil. Some strains are pathogenic opportunists for humans and animals.Micromonospora: A genus of gram-positive bacteria that forms a branched mycelium. It commonly occurs as a saprophytic form in soil and aquatic environments.Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Actinomyces: A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Streptomyces: A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.Corynebacterium: A genus of asporogenous bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. Its organisms appear as straight to slightly curved rods and are known to be human and animal parasites and pathogens.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.
(1/351) Case of sepsis caused by Bifidobacterium longum.

We report a case of sepsis caused by Bifidobacterium longum in a 19-year-old male who had developed high fever, jaundice, and hepatomegaly after acupuncture therapy with small gold needles. Anaerobic, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacilli were isolated from his blood and finally identified as B. longum. He recovered completely after treatment with ticarcillin and metronidazole. To our knowledge, this is the first report of incidental sepsis caused by B. longum.  (+info)

(2/351) Movement disorders in encephalitis induced by Rhodococcus aurantiacus infection relieved by the administration of L-dopa and anti-T-cell antibodies.

Mice injected with Rhodococcus aurantiacus by the intravenous (i.v.) route show neurological disorders, hemiparesis, vertical headshake and turn-round gait after day 7 postinfection (p.i.). Neurological symptoms caused by i.v. inoculation of R. aurantiacus were relieved by treatment with levodopa (l-dopa). R. aurantiacus was isolated from the brain and was found to be completely eliminated at day 7 p. i. Focal encephalitis was mainly observed in the brain stem, and T cells could be isolated from the brain after day 7 p.i. Administration of both an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and an anti-CD8 mAb suppressed neurological symptoms. These results suggest that R. aurantiacus induces movement disorders in mice, and that the symptoms are mediated by T cells infiltrating the brain, rather than directly by the bacterium.  (+info)

(3/351) Tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma are required in host resistance against virulent Rhodococcus equi infection in mice: cytokine production depends on the virulence levels of R. equi.

Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes pneumonia in foals and immunosuppressed humans. There are at least three virulence levels of R. equi and these pathogenicities are associated, in mice, with the presence of virulence plasmids. This study focused on cytokine secretion, in mice, in the course of a primary infection with sublethal doses of R. equi strains of different virulence levels (virulent, intermediately virulent and avirulent). Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were induced endogenously in mice in relation to the multiplication and clearance of virulent and intermediately virulent strains of R. equi. These cytokines were not detected in mice infected with avirulent R. equi. Deaths occurred among mice treated with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either TNF or IFN-gamma prior to sublethal dose infection with virulent and intermediately virulent strains of R. equi, but not with avirulent R. equi. These results suggested that cytokine production depended largely on the virulence levels of R. equi: TNF and IFN-gamma were required early during infection with virulent R. equi to limit replication and clearance of bacteria within the organs, but they were not necessary for limiting infection with avirulent R. equi.  (+info)

(4/351) Infection by Rhodococcus equi in a patient with AIDS: histological appearance mimicking Whipple's disease and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection.

Rhodococcus equi pneumonia with systemic dissemination is being reported increasingly in immunocompromised patients. This is the first case report of disseminated R equi infection with biopsy documented involvement of the large intestine. The patient was a 46 year old male with AIDS who was diagnosed with cavitating pneumonia involving the left lower lobe. R equi was isolated in culture from the blood and lung biopsies. Subsequently, the patient developed anaemia, diarrhoea, and occult blood in the stool. Colonoscopy revealed several colonic polyps. Histological examination of the colon biopsies showed extensive submucosal histiocytic infiltration with numerous Gram positive coccobacilli and PAS positive material in the histiocytes. Electron microscopy showed variably shaped intrahistiocytic organisms which were morphologically consistent with R equi in the specimen. Disseminated R equi infection may involve the lower gastrointestinal tract and produce inflammatory polyps with foamy macrophages which histologically resemble those seen in Whipple's disease and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection.  (+info)

(5/351) Role of the 85-kilobase plasmid and plasmid-encoded virulence-associated protein A in intracellular survival and virulence of Rhodococcus equi.

Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and a cause of pneumonia in young horses (foals) and immunocompromised people. Isolates of R. equi from pneumonic foals typically contain large, 85- or 90-kb plasmids encoding a highly immunogenic virulence-associated protein (VapA). The objective of this study was to determine the role of the 85-kb plasmid and VapA in the intracellular survival and virulence of R. equi. Clinical isolates containing the plasmid and expressing VapA efficiently replicated within mouse macrophages in vitro, while plasmid-cured derivatives of these organisms did not multiply intracellularly. An isolate harboring the large plasmid also replicated in the tissues of experimentally infected mice, whereas its plasmid-cured derivative was rapidly cleared. All foals experimentally infected with a plasmid-containing clinical isolate developed severe bronchopneumonia, whereas the foals infected with its plasmid-cured derivative remained asymptomatic and free of visible lung lesions. By day 14 postinfection, lung bacterial burdens had increased considerably in foals challenged with the plasmid-containing clinical isolate. In contrast, bacteria could no longer be cultured from the lungs of foals challenged with the isogenic plasmid-cured derivative. A recombinant, plasmid-cured derivative expressing wild-type levels of VapA failed to replicate in macrophages and remained avirulent for both mice and foals. These results show that the 85-kb plasmid of R. equi is essential for intracellular replication within macrophages and for development of disease in the native host, the foal. However, expression of VapA alone is not sufficient to restore the virulence phenotype.  (+info)

(6/351) Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in two goats.

Rhodococcus equi infection was diagnosed in two goats from the same herd. At necropsy, numerous caseating granulomas were disseminated throughout the liver, lungs, abdominal lymph nodes, medulla of right humerus, and the right fifth rib of goat No. 1, and the liver of goat No. 2. Histopathologic examination confirmed the presence of multiple caseating granulomas in these organs. Numerous gram-positive and Giemsa-positive coccobacilli were identified within the cytoplasm of macrophages. Aerobic bacterial cultures of the liver and lung from both goats yielded a pure growth of R. equi. R. equi antigens were immunohistochemically identified in caseating granulomas from both goats. However, the 15- to 17-kd virulence antigens of R. equi were not detected, suggesting possible infection by an avirulent strain of this organism.  (+info)

(7/351) TNF receptor p55 is required for elimination of inflammatory cells following control of intracellular pathogens.

The elimination of lymphocytes within inflammatory lesions is a critical component in the resolution of disease once pathogens have been cleared. We report here that signaling through the TNF receptor p55 (TNFRp55) is required to eliminate lymphocytes from lesions associated with intracellular pathogens. Thus, TNFRp55-/- mice, but not Fas-deficient mice, maintained inflammatory lesions associated with either Leishmania major or Rhodococcus equi infection, although they developed a Th1 response and controlled the pathogens. Inflammatory cells from either L. major- or R. equi-infected C57BL/6 mice were sensitive to TNF-induced apoptosis, and conversely the number of apoptotic cells in the lesions from TNFRp55-/- mice was dramatically reduced compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, in vivo depletion of TNF in wild-type mice blocked lesion regression following R. equi infection. Taken together, our results suggest that signaling through the TNFRp55, but not Fas, is required to induce apoptosis of T cells within inflammatory lesions once pathogens are eliminated, and that in its absence lesions fail to regress.  (+info)

(8/351) Modulation of cytokine response of pneumonic foals by virulent Rhodococcus equi.

The ability of Rhodococcus equi to induce pneumonia in foals depends on the presence of an 85- to 90-kb plasmid. In this study, we evaluated whether plasmid-encoded products mediate virulence by modulating the cytokine response of foals. Foals infected intrabronchially with a virulence plasmid-containing strain of R. equi had similar gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) p35 but significantly higher IL-1beta, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA expression in lung tissue compared to foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. IFN-gamma mRNA expression levels in CD4+ T lymphocytes isolated from bronchial lymph nodes (BLN) were similar for the two groups of R. equi-infected foals on day 3 postinfection. However, on day 14, in association with pneumonia and marked multiplication of virulent R. equi but with complete clearance of the plasmid-cured derivative, IFN-gamma mRNA expression in BLN CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. These results suggests an immunomodulating role for R. equi virulence plasmid-encoded products in downregulating IFN-gamma mRNA expression by CD4+ T lymphocytes.  (+info)

*  List of diseases (A)
... syndrome Acrospiroma ACTH deficiency ACTH resistance Atelectasis Actinic keratosis Actinomycetales causes anal infection ... propionic Acitretine antenatal infection Ackerman syndrome Acne rosacea Acne vulgaris; often called acne Acoustic neuroma ... syndrome Albright-Turner-Morgani syndrome Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy Albright's syndrome Alcohol antenatal infection ... neonatorum Aspiration pneumonia Asplenia Astasis Astasia-abasia Asthenia Asthma Astigmatism Astrocytoma Astrovirus infection ...
*  List of MeSH codes (C01)
... vibrio infections MeSH C01.252.400.959.347 --- cholera MeSH C01.252.410.040 --- actinomycetales infections MeSH C01.252.410.040 ... bacteroides infections MeSH C01.252.400.126 --- bartonellaceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.126.100 --- bartonella infections ... acinetobacter infections MeSH C01.252.400.610 --- mycoplasmatales infections MeSH C01.252.400.610.610 --- mycoplasma infections ... bordetella infections MeSH C01.252.400.143.740 --- whooping cough MeSH C01.252.400.155 --- borrelia infections MeSH C01.252. ...
*  Mycobacterium ulcerans
... ulcerans infection. Screening to detect early infection could guide early intervention. There are several polymerase chain ... particularly bacteria such as Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora species in the order Actinomycetales. Interestingly, a number ... Infection of two patients in Liberia". Int J Dermatol. 20 (5): 362-7. doi:10.1111/j.1365-4362.1981.tb00822.x. PMID 7239752. ... In Papua New Guinea, the infection occurs mainly in relation to the Sepik and Kumusi rivers; in the latter areas, the disease ...
*  Virginia Livingston
ISBN 0-531-09806-0. Wuerthele-Caspe, V (1955). "Neoplastic infections of man and animals". Journal of the American Medical ... attributing characteristics to Actinomycetales (the order Livingston believed P. cryptocides belonged to) shared by no other ... The microbe was classified under the order Actinomycetales. Livingston described Progenitor as an intermittently acid-fast ...
*  Siderophore
Infection leads to inflammation and the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6 ) which stimulates hepcidin expression. In humans, IL-6 ... Common Gram-positive species are those belonging to the Actinomycetales and species of the genera Bacillus, Arthrobacter and ... With bacterial vascular diseases, the infection is spread within the plants through the xylem. Once within the plant, the ... Lactoferrin is present in secretory fluids, such as sweat, tears and milk, thereby minimising bacterial infection. Ferritin is ...
*  Falcataria moluccana
Two Actinomycetales bacteria Streptomyces asiaticus and S. cangkringensis have been isolated from the rhizosphere soil ... "Initial infection of Falcataria moluccana leaves and Acacia mangium phyllodes by Uromycladium tepperianum fungi in a laboratory ...
*  Pasteur Institute
These are: Cell Biology and Infection, Developmental Biology, Genomes and Genetics, Immunology, Infection and Epidemiology, ... Having observed that most actinomycetales are saprophytes, that is able to survive outside of living organisms, with the help ... Yersin looked for the germ responsible for the infection specifically in these plague-spots, tumors caused by the inflammation ... The discovery and use of sulfonamides in treating infections was another breakthrough. Some researchers won fame by discovering ...
*  Fungus
Brakhage AA (December 2005). "Systemic fungal infections caused by Aspergillus species: epidemiology, infection process and ... Many Actinomycetales (Actinobacteria), a group with many filamentous bacteria, were also long believed to be fungi. Although ... Struck C (2006). "Infection strategies of plant parasitic fungi". In Cooke BM, Jones DG, Kaye B. The Epidemiology of Plant ... Fungi can become the target of infection by mycoviruses. Many fungi produce biologically active compounds, several of which are ...
*  Proteasome
The molecule ritonavir, marketed as Norvir, was developed as a protease inhibitor and used to target HIV infection. However, it ... Some prokaryotes, including many archaea and the bacterial order Actinomycetales also share homologs of the 20S proteasome, ... the 11S may play a role in degradation of foreign peptides such as those produced after infection by a virus. The number and ... such as infection, heat shock, or oxidative damage - heat shock proteins that identify misfolded or unfolded proteins and ...
*  Bacterial taxonomy
Lan, R; Reeves, PR (2002). "Escherichia coli in disguise: molecular origins of Shigella". Microbes and infection / Institut ... Actinomycetales, Streptomycetales, and Flexibacteriales. Migula, which was the most widely accepted system of its time and ... several orders such as Bacillales and Actinomycetales (now in the phylum Actinobacteria) Mollicutes (gram variable, e.g. ... classes Actinomycetales, Myxobacteriales, and Azotobacteriales) Algobacteriales (classes Siderobacteriales and Thiobacteriales ...
EARNEST Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics (PK) Substudy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  EARNEST Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics (PK) Substudy - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Ritonavir. ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01663168?order=209
Effect of Weight and/or Obesity on Dapsone Drug Concentrations - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  Effect of Weight and/or Obesity on Dapsone Drug Concentrations - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Dapsone. Anti- ... Current suspected or documented infection of any kind.. *Volunteers with colon resection, gastric bypass, lap band, or any ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01165840?recr=Open&cond=%22Leprosy%22&rank=7
The Evaluation of a Standard Treatment Regimen of Anti-tuberculosis Drugs for Patients With MDR-TB - Full Text View -...  The Evaluation of a Standard Treatment Regimen of Anti-tuberculosis Drugs for Patients With MDR-TB - Full Text View -...
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Moxifloxacin. ... Wells CD, Cegielski JP, Nelson LJ, Laserson KF, Holtz TH, Finlay A, Castro KG, Weyer K. HIV infection and multidrug-resistant ... by use of an in vitro pharmacodynamic infection model and mathematical modeling. J Infect Dis. 2004 Nov 1;190(9):1642-51. Epub ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02409290?term=stream
New Generation IGRA in Immunocompromised Individuals - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov  New Generation IGRA in Immunocompromised Individuals - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Kidney Diseases ... Individuals with HIV infection Individuals with HIV infection with and without active tuberculosis, with and without risk ... tuberculosis specific immune Responses as evidence of latent infection with M. tuberculosis in immunosuppressed populations. ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02639936?term=stem+cell+arthritis+AND+Arthritis&rank=69
Ear burning sensation and Voice symptoms - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Ear burning sensation and Voice symptoms - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
6. Actinomycetales infection. 7. Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene. 8. Adenocarcinoma of lung. 9. Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo- ...
more infohttp://wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/ear-burning-sensation/voice-symptoms.htm
Mouth symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com  Mouth symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com
Actinomycetales infection ... cough, coughing up blood*Actinomycosis ... pus in the mouth, jaw pain, tooth pain, swollen jaw, ... Arcobacter butzleri infection ... vomiting*Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection ... vomiting*Arcobacter infection ... vomiting* ... Acanthamoeba infection ... vomiting*Acanthamoeba infection of the central nervous system ... vomiting*Acanthocytosis ... ... Adenophorea Infections ... cough*Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anaemia due to ... breathlessness*Adenoviridae Infections ...
more infohttps://www.rightdiagnosis.com/sym/mouth_symptoms.htm
Liver symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com  Liver symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com
Actinomycetales infection ... enlarged spleen, enlarged liver*Acute adult T-Cell leukemia ... enlarged spleen, enlarged liver* ... Invasive candidiasis ... hepatosplenic infection, liver infection. J. *Joubert Syndrome 9 ... liver fibrosis. K. *Kawasaki ... Hepadnaviral infection ... jaundice*Hepadnaviruses ... jaundice*Hepadnoavirus infection ... jaundice*Hepatic amyloidosis with ... Liver infection (12 causes) *Liver cancer (40 causes) *Abnormal liver function tests (12 causes) *Liver abnormalities (23 ...
more infohttps://www.rightdiagnosis.com/sym/liver_symptoms.htm
Veltin  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki  Veltin - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki
Actinomycetales Infections. *Bacterial Infections. *Bacteroides Infections. *Endocarditis, Bacterial. *Leukemia, Promyelocytic ...
more infohttps://www.rxwiki.com/veltin/
Clindamycin  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki  Clindamycin - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki
Actinomycetales Infections. *Bacterial Infections. *Bacteroides Infections. *Endocarditis, Bacterial. *Pneumonia, Pneumocystis ... It should not be used in patients with nonbacterial infections such as most upper respiratory tract infections. C. difficile ... The recommended dose of clindamycin injection for the treatment of bacterial infections is 600 to 2700 mg per day in 2, 3, or 4 ... Clindamycin is an antibiotic and treats infection. Finish taking all of your medication as directed. Even if you feel better, ...
more infohttps://rxwiki.com/clindamycin-0
Zydaclin  - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki  Zydaclin - Side Effects, Uses, Dosage, Overdose, Pregnancy, Alcohol | RxWiki
Actinomycetales Infections. *Bacterial Infections. *Bacteroides Infections. *Endocarditis, Bacterial. *Pneumonia, Pneumocystis ... It should not be used in patients with nonbacterial infections such as most upper respiratory tract infections. C. difficile ... The recommended dose of clindamycin injection for the treatment of bacterial infections is 600 to 2700 mg per day in 2, 3, or 4 ... Clindamycin is an antibiotic and treats infection. Finish taking all of your medication as directed. Even if you feel better, ...
more infohttp://www.rxwiki.com/zydaclin
Streptomyces thermovulgaris Bacteremia in Crohns Disease Patient - Volume 10, Number 10-October 2004 - Emerging Infectious...  Streptomyces thermovulgaris Bacteremia in Crohn's Disease Patient - Volume 10, Number 10-October 2004 - Emerging Infectious...
Actinomycetales infection in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Ann Intern Med. 1985;102:203-5.PubMed ... To the Editor: Invasive infections with Streptomyces spp. are rare; in reference to two cases reported in Emerging Infectious ... Streptomyces pneumonia in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection: case report and review of the literature on ... Autopsy identified no possible focus of infection other than the patient's intestines, which were severely inflamed with ...
more infohttps://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/10/10/04-0300_article
Fatigue and Headache and Weakness - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Fatigue and Headache and Weakness - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
6. Actinomycetales infection. 7. Acute Bokhoror. 8. Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha. 9. Acute ...
more infohttp://symptoms.rightdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/fatigue/headache/weakness.htm
Cough and Pneumonia and Rib pain - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis  Cough and Pneumonia and Rib pain - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis
7. Actinomycetales infection. 8. Acute Bronchitis. 9. Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha. 10. ...
more infohttps://symptoms.rightdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/cough/pneumonia/rib-pain.htm
MYCOPLASMATALES INFECTIONS  MYCOPLASMATALES INFECTIONS
Zie ook: BACTERI LE INFECTIES BACTERIAL INFECTIONS. Zie ook: GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIAL INFECTIONS. Zie ook: ACTINOMYCETALES ... Zie ook: BACTERI LE INFECTIES BACTERIAL INFECTIONS. Zie ook: GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIAL INFECTIONS. Zie ook: ACTINOMYCETALES ... MYCOBACTERIUM INFECTIONS. MYCOBACTERIUM ULCERANS INFECTION. MYCOBACTERIUM MARINUM INFECTION. MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE. ... Zie ook: BACTERI LE INFECTIES BACTERIAL INFECTIONS. Zie ook: MYCOPLASMATALES INFECTIONS. Zie ook: MYCOPLASMA INFECTIE. Zie ook: ...
more infohttp://www.catsclem.nl/medisch/medmvz.htm
Green Mountain Couple: Over the counter Survival Antibiotics Part 2  Green Mountain Couple: Over the counter Survival Antibiotics Part 2
Streptococcus bacteria infection. Bacteroides infections. Pneumocystis Pneumonia. Actinomycetales infections. Bird Sulfa ( ... Infection of the Middle Ear by H. Influenzae Bacteria. Infection of the Middle Ear caused by Streptococcus. Infection of the ... Infection of the Urinary Tract caused by Enterococcus Infection of the Urinary Tract caused by Proteus Bacteria. Skin Infection ... Bacterial Infection. Bacterial Skin Infection. Bronchitis. Diverticulitis. Epiglottitis. Granuloma Inguinale. Infection ...
more infohttp://www.greenmountaincouple.com/2013/02/over-counter-survival-antibiotics-part-2.html
Search Articles | University of Toronto Libraries  Search Articles | University of Toronto Libraries
Actinomycetales Infections - drug therapy , Actinomycetales Infections - diagnosis , Adult , Female , Rifampin - therapeutic ... Respiratory Tract Infections - microbiology , Young Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Actinomycetales Infections - microbiology , ... INFECTIONS , STOMATOCOCCUS-MUCILAGINOSUS , NEUTROPENIC PATIENTS , Administration, Oral , Humans , Actinomycetales Infections - ... flora , Rothia mucilaginosa , neutropenia , infection , chemotherapy , bacteremia , INFECTIONS , MENINGITIS , MORBIDITY , ...
more infohttps://query.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/search/q?kw=SubjectTerms:Rothia%20mucilaginosa
Search Articles | University of Toronto Libraries  Search Articles | University of Toronto Libraries
Opportunistic Infections - drug therapy , Actinomycetales Infections - drug therapy , Actinomycetales Infections - diagnosis , ... Pneumonia, Bacterial - microbiology , Humans , Actinomycetales Infections - microbiology , Drug Therapy, Combination - ... Cytomegalovirus Infections - drug therapy , Antiviral Agents - adverse effects , Bacterial Infections - epidemiology , ... therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Bacterial - diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections - diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections - etiology ...
more infohttps://query.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/search/q?kw=Author:Gonz%C3%A1lez-Roncero,%20Francisco%20M
CATSCLEM GEZONDHEID en ZIEKTE   -   HEALTH and DISEASE  CATSCLEM GEZONDHEID en ZIEKTE - HEALTH and DISEASE
Zie ook: BACTERI LE INFECTIES BACTERIAL INFECTIONS. Zie ook: GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIAL INFECTIONS. Zie ook: ACTINOMYCETALES ... Zie ook: INFECTIES INFECTIONS. Zie ook: ADEMHALINGSAANDOENINGEN RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS. Zie ook: BORDETELLA INFECTIONS. ... eMedicine: Klebsiella Infections *Klebsiella Infections KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE MENINGITIS FRIEDL NDER BACILLUS MENINGITIS. Zie ... Zie ook: MYCOBACTERIUM INFECTIONS. Zie ook: TUBERCULOSE TUBERCULOSIS. Zie ook: LYMPH NODE TUBERCULOSIS. *Wikipedia (Eng): ...
more infohttp://www.catsclem.nl/medisch/medkim.htm
  • Clindamycin can make erythromycin less effective and usually these medications should not be combined, especially when treating serious infections. (rxwiki.com)
  • Whilst treatment with CMS appeared to have little impact on microbial community composition after infection, or the change undergone by communities in reaching that state, when Gram negative organisms (excluding Pseudomonadales) were considered together as a group there was a significant decrease in their relative proportion that was only observed in the sheep treated with CMS. (nih.gov)