Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.
An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.
A vasodilator that also has bronchodilatory action. It has been employed in the treatment of angina pectoris, in the treatment of asthma, and in conjunction with ultraviolet light A, has been tried in the treatment of vitiligo. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1024)
Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive also used to occlude blood vessels supplying neoplastic or other diseased tissue.
A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria whose species are widely distributed and are abundant in soil. Some strains are pathogenic opportunists for humans and animals.
A genus of gram-positive bacteria that forms a branched mycelium. It commonly occurs as a saprophytic form in soil and aquatic environments.
Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.
A genus of asporogenous bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. Its organisms appear as straight to slightly curved rods and are known to be human and animal parasites and pathogens.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.

Case of sepsis caused by Bifidobacterium longum. (1/351)

We report a case of sepsis caused by Bifidobacterium longum in a 19-year-old male who had developed high fever, jaundice, and hepatomegaly after acupuncture therapy with small gold needles. Anaerobic, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacilli were isolated from his blood and finally identified as B. longum. He recovered completely after treatment with ticarcillin and metronidazole. To our knowledge, this is the first report of incidental sepsis caused by B. longum.  (+info)

Movement disorders in encephalitis induced by Rhodococcus aurantiacus infection relieved by the administration of L-dopa and anti-T-cell antibodies. (2/351)

Mice injected with Rhodococcus aurantiacus by the intravenous (i.v.) route show neurological disorders, hemiparesis, vertical headshake and turn-round gait after day 7 postinfection (p.i.). Neurological symptoms caused by i.v. inoculation of R. aurantiacus were relieved by treatment with levodopa (l-dopa). R. aurantiacus was isolated from the brain and was found to be completely eliminated at day 7 p. i. Focal encephalitis was mainly observed in the brain stem, and T cells could be isolated from the brain after day 7 p.i. Administration of both an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and an anti-CD8 mAb suppressed neurological symptoms. These results suggest that R. aurantiacus induces movement disorders in mice, and that the symptoms are mediated by T cells infiltrating the brain, rather than directly by the bacterium.  (+info)

Tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma are required in host resistance against virulent Rhodococcus equi infection in mice: cytokine production depends on the virulence levels of R. equi. (3/351)

Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes pneumonia in foals and immunosuppressed humans. There are at least three virulence levels of R. equi and these pathogenicities are associated, in mice, with the presence of virulence plasmids. This study focused on cytokine secretion, in mice, in the course of a primary infection with sublethal doses of R. equi strains of different virulence levels (virulent, intermediately virulent and avirulent). Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were induced endogenously in mice in relation to the multiplication and clearance of virulent and intermediately virulent strains of R. equi. These cytokines were not detected in mice infected with avirulent R. equi. Deaths occurred among mice treated with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either TNF or IFN-gamma prior to sublethal dose infection with virulent and intermediately virulent strains of R. equi, but not with avirulent R. equi. These results suggested that cytokine production depended largely on the virulence levels of R. equi: TNF and IFN-gamma were required early during infection with virulent R. equi to limit replication and clearance of bacteria within the organs, but they were not necessary for limiting infection with avirulent R. equi.  (+info)

Infection by Rhodococcus equi in a patient with AIDS: histological appearance mimicking Whipple's disease and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. (4/351)

Rhodococcus equi pneumonia with systemic dissemination is being reported increasingly in immunocompromised patients. This is the first case report of disseminated R equi infection with biopsy documented involvement of the large intestine. The patient was a 46 year old male with AIDS who was diagnosed with cavitating pneumonia involving the left lower lobe. R equi was isolated in culture from the blood and lung biopsies. Subsequently, the patient developed anaemia, diarrhoea, and occult blood in the stool. Colonoscopy revealed several colonic polyps. Histological examination of the colon biopsies showed extensive submucosal histiocytic infiltration with numerous Gram positive coccobacilli and PAS positive material in the histiocytes. Electron microscopy showed variably shaped intrahistiocytic organisms which were morphologically consistent with R equi in the specimen. Disseminated R equi infection may involve the lower gastrointestinal tract and produce inflammatory polyps with foamy macrophages which histologically resemble those seen in Whipple's disease and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection.  (+info)

Role of the 85-kilobase plasmid and plasmid-encoded virulence-associated protein A in intracellular survival and virulence of Rhodococcus equi. (5/351)

Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and a cause of pneumonia in young horses (foals) and immunocompromised people. Isolates of R. equi from pneumonic foals typically contain large, 85- or 90-kb plasmids encoding a highly immunogenic virulence-associated protein (VapA). The objective of this study was to determine the role of the 85-kb plasmid and VapA in the intracellular survival and virulence of R. equi. Clinical isolates containing the plasmid and expressing VapA efficiently replicated within mouse macrophages in vitro, while plasmid-cured derivatives of these organisms did not multiply intracellularly. An isolate harboring the large plasmid also replicated in the tissues of experimentally infected mice, whereas its plasmid-cured derivative was rapidly cleared. All foals experimentally infected with a plasmid-containing clinical isolate developed severe bronchopneumonia, whereas the foals infected with its plasmid-cured derivative remained asymptomatic and free of visible lung lesions. By day 14 postinfection, lung bacterial burdens had increased considerably in foals challenged with the plasmid-containing clinical isolate. In contrast, bacteria could no longer be cultured from the lungs of foals challenged with the isogenic plasmid-cured derivative. A recombinant, plasmid-cured derivative expressing wild-type levels of VapA failed to replicate in macrophages and remained avirulent for both mice and foals. These results show that the 85-kb plasmid of R. equi is essential for intracellular replication within macrophages and for development of disease in the native host, the foal. However, expression of VapA alone is not sufficient to restore the virulence phenotype.  (+info)

Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in two goats. (6/351)

Rhodococcus equi infection was diagnosed in two goats from the same herd. At necropsy, numerous caseating granulomas were disseminated throughout the liver, lungs, abdominal lymph nodes, medulla of right humerus, and the right fifth rib of goat No. 1, and the liver of goat No. 2. Histopathologic examination confirmed the presence of multiple caseating granulomas in these organs. Numerous gram-positive and Giemsa-positive coccobacilli were identified within the cytoplasm of macrophages. Aerobic bacterial cultures of the liver and lung from both goats yielded a pure growth of R. equi. R. equi antigens were immunohistochemically identified in caseating granulomas from both goats. However, the 15- to 17-kd virulence antigens of R. equi were not detected, suggesting possible infection by an avirulent strain of this organism.  (+info)

TNF receptor p55 is required for elimination of inflammatory cells following control of intracellular pathogens. (7/351)

The elimination of lymphocytes within inflammatory lesions is a critical component in the resolution of disease once pathogens have been cleared. We report here that signaling through the TNF receptor p55 (TNFRp55) is required to eliminate lymphocytes from lesions associated with intracellular pathogens. Thus, TNFRp55-/- mice, but not Fas-deficient mice, maintained inflammatory lesions associated with either Leishmania major or Rhodococcus equi infection, although they developed a Th1 response and controlled the pathogens. Inflammatory cells from either L. major- or R. equi-infected C57BL/6 mice were sensitive to TNF-induced apoptosis, and conversely the number of apoptotic cells in the lesions from TNFRp55-/- mice was dramatically reduced compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, in vivo depletion of TNF in wild-type mice blocked lesion regression following R. equi infection. Taken together, our results suggest that signaling through the TNFRp55, but not Fas, is required to induce apoptosis of T cells within inflammatory lesions once pathogens are eliminated, and that in its absence lesions fail to regress.  (+info)

Modulation of cytokine response of pneumonic foals by virulent Rhodococcus equi. (8/351)

The ability of Rhodococcus equi to induce pneumonia in foals depends on the presence of an 85- to 90-kb plasmid. In this study, we evaluated whether plasmid-encoded products mediate virulence by modulating the cytokine response of foals. Foals infected intrabronchially with a virulence plasmid-containing strain of R. equi had similar gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) p35 but significantly higher IL-1beta, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA expression in lung tissue compared to foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. IFN-gamma mRNA expression levels in CD4+ T lymphocytes isolated from bronchial lymph nodes (BLN) were similar for the two groups of R. equi-infected foals on day 3 postinfection. However, on day 14, in association with pneumonia and marked multiplication of virulent R. equi but with complete clearance of the plasmid-cured derivative, IFN-gamma mRNA expression in BLN CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. These results suggests an immunomodulating role for R. equi virulence plasmid-encoded products in downregulating IFN-gamma mRNA expression by CD4+ T lymphocytes.  (+info)

Actinomycetales are a group of gram-positive bacteria that can cause various types of infections in humans. The term "Actinomycetales infections" is used to describe a range of diseases caused by these organisms, which are characterized by the formation of characteristic granules or "actinomycetes" composed of bacterial cells and inflammatory tissue.

Some common examples of Actinomycetales infections include:

1. Actinomycosis: A chronic infection that typically affects the face, neck, and mouth, but can also occur in other parts of the body such as the lungs or abdomen. It is caused by various species of Actinomyces, which are normal inhabitants of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract.
2. Nocardiosis: A rare but serious infection that can affect the lungs, brain, or skin. It is caused by the bacterium Nocardia, which is found in soil and water.
3. Mycetoma: A chronic infection that affects the skin and underlying tissues, causing the formation of nodules and sinuses that discharge pus containing grains composed of fungal or bacterial elements. It is caused by various species of Actinomyces, Nocardia, and other related bacteria.
4. Streptomyces infections: While Streptomyces species are best known for their role in producing antibiotics, they can also cause infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These infections can affect various organs, including the lungs, skin, and soft tissues.

Treatment of Actinomycetales infections typically involves the use of antibiotics, often for prolonged periods of time. The specific antibiotic regimen will depend on the type of infection and the susceptibility of the causative organism to various antimicrobial agents. Surgical intervention may also be necessary in some cases to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue.

Actinomycetales is an order of Gram-positive bacteria that are characterized by their filamentous morphology and branching appearance, resembling fungi. These bacteria are often found in soil and water, and some species can cause diseases in humans and animals. The name "Actinomycetales" comes from the Greek words "actis," meaning ray or beam, and "mykes," meaning fungus.

The order Actinomycetales includes several families of medical importance, such as Mycobacteriaceae (which contains the tuberculosis-causing Mycobacterium tuberculosis), Corynebacteriaceae (which contains the diphtheria-causing Corynebacterium diphtheriae), and Actinomycetaceae (which contains the actinomycosis-causing Actinomyces israelii).

Actinomycetales are known for their complex cell walls, which contain a unique type of lipid called mycolic acid. This feature makes them resistant to many antibiotics and contributes to their ability to cause chronic infections. They can also form resistant structures called spores, which allow them to survive in harsh environments and contribute to their ability to cause disease.

Overall, Actinomycetales are important both as beneficial soil organisms and as potential pathogens that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals.

Khellin is not typically defined in a medical dictionary as it is not a medical term itself, but rather a chemical compound found in certain plants. However, Khellin is known for its use in traditional medicine and has been studied in modern medicine for its potential therapeutic effects. Here's the definition of Khellin from a chemistry perspective:

Khellin (C10H8O3) is a chemical compound derived from the seeds of the plant Ammi visnaga, also known as khella or Bishop's weed. It belongs to the class of organic compounds called furanocoumarins, which are naturally occurring aromatic organic compounds containing a furan ring (a five-membered aromatic heterocycle with four carbon atoms and one oxygen atom) fused to a coumarin ring (a benzene ring fused to α-pyrone).

Khellin has been used in traditional medicine for treating various conditions, including asthma, angina pectoris, and headaches. Modern research has investigated its potential as a therapeutic agent for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and other medical conditions. However, more studies are needed to establish its safety and efficacy before it can be widely used in modern medicine.

I apologize for any confusion, but I am unable to provide a medical definition for "Bucrylate" because it is not a term recognized in the medical field. It is possible that there may be a typographical error or misunderstanding of the intended term. If you have more information about the substance you are asking about, I'd be happy to help you try to find the correct definition or provide information related to its uses, safety, or other relevant details.

Nocardia is a genus of aerobic, gram-positive, filamentous bacteria that can be found in soil, water, and decaying vegetation. It is known to cause various infectious diseases in humans and animals, known as nocardiosis. The infection often enters the body through inhalation, skin wounds, or surgical procedures. Nocardia species are opportunistic pathogens, meaning they mainly cause disease in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS, organ transplants, or cancer. The infection can affect various organs, including the lungs, brain, skin, and eyes, leading to symptoms like cough, fever, chest pain, weight loss, and skin abscesses. Proper diagnosis and treatment with antibiotics are crucial for managing nocardiosis.

Micromonospora is a genus of aerobic, Gram-positive bacteria that are widely distributed in soil and aquatic environments. These bacteria are known for their ability to produce a variety of bioactive compounds, including antibiotics, antifungal agents, and enzyme inhibitors. They are characterized by their filamentous morphology and the production of aerial hyphae that fragment into rod-shaped or coccoid cells. Some species of Micromonospora have been investigated for their potential use in biotechnology and medicine due to their ability to produce useful compounds. However, some species can also be opportunistic pathogens in humans, causing infections in immunocompromised individuals.

Actinobacteria are a group of gram-positive bacteria that are widely distributed in nature, including in soil, water, and various organic substrates. They are characterized by their high G+C content in their DNA and complex cell wall composition, which often contains mycolic acids. Some Actinobacteria are known to form branching filaments, giving them a characteristic "actinomycete" morphology. Many species of Actinobacteria have important roles in industry, agriculture, and medicine. For example, some produce antibiotics, enzymes, and other bioactive compounds, while others play key roles in biogeochemical cycles such as the decomposition of organic matter and the fixation of nitrogen. Additionally, some Actinobacteria are pathogenic and can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Actinomyces is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are normal inhabitants of the human mouth, colon, and urogenital tract. Under certain conditions, such as poor oral hygiene or tissue trauma, these bacteria can cause infections known as actinomycosis. These infections often involve the formation of abscesses or granulomas and can affect various tissues, including the lungs, mouth, and female reproductive organs. Actinomyces species are also known to form complex communities called biofilms, which can contribute to their ability to cause infection.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Streptomyces is a genus of Gram-positive, aerobic, saprophytic bacteria that are widely distributed in soil, water, and decaying organic matter. They are known for their complex morphology, forming branching filaments called hyphae that can differentiate into long chains of spores.

Streptomyces species are particularly notable for their ability to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, antifungals, and other therapeutic compounds. In fact, many important antibiotics such as streptomycin, neomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin are derived from Streptomyces species.

Because of their industrial importance in the production of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds, Streptomyces have been extensively studied and are considered model organisms for the study of bacterial genetics, biochemistry, and ecology.

Corynebacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. Some species of Corynebacterium can cause disease in humans, including C. diphtheriae, which causes diphtheria, and C. jeikeium, which can cause various types of infections in immunocompromised individuals. Other species are part of the normal flora and are not typically pathogenic. The bacteria are characterized by their irregular, club-shaped appearance and their ability to form characteristic arrangements called palisades. They are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Base composition in genetics refers to the relative proportion of the four nucleotide bases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, so the base composition is often expressed in terms of the ratio of adenine + thymine (A-T) to guanine + cytosine (G-C). This ratio can vary between species and even between different regions of the same genome. The base composition can provide important clues about the function, evolution, and structure of genetic material.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A cell wall is a rigid layer found surrounding the plasma membrane of plant cells, fungi, and many types of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to the cell, maintains cell shape, and acts as a barrier against external factors such as chemicals and mechanical stress. The composition of the cell wall varies among different species; for example, in plants, it is primarily made up of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, while in bacteria, it is composed of peptidoglycan.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

Acrorenoocular syndrome Acrospiroma ACTH deficiency ACTH resistance Actinic keratosis Actinomycetales causes anal infection ... propionic Acitretine antenatal infection Ackerman syndrome Acne rosacea Acne vulgaris; often called acne Acoustic neuroma ... syndrome Albright-Turner-Morgani syndrome Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy Albright's syndrome Alcohol antenatal infection ... neonatorum Aspiration pneumonia Asplenia Astasia-abasia Astasis Asthenia Asthma Astigmatism Astrocytoma Astrovirus infection ...
New Microbes and New Infections. 14: 8-9. doi:10.1016/j.nmni.2016.07.011. PMC 5009226. "Flaviflexus massiliensis". www.uniprot. ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 2016, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ...
"Varibaculum cambriense Infections in Hong Kong, China, 2006". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 15 (7): 1137-1139. doi:10.3201/ ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria genera, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ...
... vibrio infections MeSH C01.252.400.959.347 - cholera MeSH C01.252.410.040 - actinomycetales infections MeSH C01.252.410.040.137 ... bacteroides infections MeSH C01.252.400.126 - bartonellaceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.126.100 - bartonella infections MeSH ... moraxellaceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.560.022 - acinetobacter infections MeSH C01.252.400.610 - mycoplasmatales infections ... salmonella infections, animal MeSH C01.252.400.310.821.873 - typhoid fever MeSH C01.252.400.310.850 - serratia infections MeSH ...
It has been known to cause head and neck infections, pharyngitis, and sinusitis (Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infections). It ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 1946). ... A. haemolyticum infection is most common in 15- to 25-year-old ... The use of parenteral antimicrobial drugs must be limited to serious infections. Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infection Volante ... Symptoms look like those of β-hemolytic streptococci or viral infection. A rash of the chest and of the abdomen, neck, or ...
"Varibaculum cambriense Infections in Hong Kong, China, 2006". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 15 (7): 1137-1139. doi:10.3201/ ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 2003, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ...
Gomez-Garces, J. L.; Burillo, A.; Gil, Y.; Saez-Nieto, J. A. (2010). "Soft Tissue Infections Caused by Actinomyces neuii, a ... Actinomycetales, Gram-positive bacteria, Bacteria described in 1995, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ...
Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 2002, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ... "Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum Isolates from Infections of Horses". Journal of ...
2003). "Characterization and clinical manifestations of Arcanobacterium phocae infections in marine mammals stranded along the ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 1997, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ...
New Microbes and New Infections. 7: 21-22. doi:10.1016/j.nmni.2015.05.001. Silva, W. A.; Pinheiro, A. M.; Jahns, B.; Bögli- ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 1997, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ... Stuber, K.; Droz, S.; Zimmerli, S. (June 2011). "Breast abscess due to Actinomyces europaeus". Infection. 39 (3): 255-258. doi: ...
Infection is established first by a breach of the mucosal barrier during various procedures (dental, gastrointestinal), ... Actinomycetales, Gram-positive bacteria, Bacteria described in 1898). ... Wade, William G.; Könönen, Eija (2015-04-01). "Actinomyces and Related Organisms in Human Infections". Clinical Microbiology ... Valour, Florent (5 July 2014). "Actinomycosis: etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and management". Infection ...
Actinomycetales) with one new combination and six new species of the genus Frankia Brunchorst 1886, 174". Int J Syst Evol ... The first symptom of infection by Frankia alni is a branching and curling of the root hairs of the alder as the bacterium moves ... "Frankia infection process". Web.uconn.edu. Retrieved 2011-01-16. "Frankia nitrogen fixation". Web.uconn.edu. Retrieved 2011-01- ...
Still, they are more frequently a chromosomal-encoded barrier to MGE than an MGE-encoded tool for cell infection. Lateral gene ... This is clearly exhibited within certain groups of bacteria including P. aeruginosa and actinomycetales, an order of ... Michod RE, Bernstein H, Nedelcu AM (May 2008). "Adaptive value of sex in microbial pathogens" (PDF). Infection, Genetics and ... Strategies to combat certain bacterial infections by targeting these specific virulence factors and mobile genetic elements ...
Actinomycetales, Gram-positive bacteria, Bacteria described in 2001, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ... detection of Propionibacterium propionicus and Actinomyces radicidentis in primary and persistent endodontic infections". Oral ...
It is often associated with vaginal infections. Spiegel, C. A.; Roberts, M. (1984). "Mobiluncus gen. nov., Mobiluncus curtisii ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 1984, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ... Mayer, Jeanmarie; Hegewald, Susan; Sartor, Victor E.; Carroll, Karen (1994). "Extragenital infection due to Mobiluncus mulieris ...
258-261 M. F. Madelin "Virus infections of invertebrates" L.E. Hawker, A.H. Linton (Eds.), Micro-organisms: form, function and ... 251-256 M. F. Madelin, "Actinomycetales" L.E. Hawker, A.H. Linton (Eds.), Micro-organisms: form, function and environment, ... 233-271 M. F. Madelin, "Laboratory studies on the infection of Anopheles gambiae Giles by a species of Coelomomyces" World ... 473-480 M. F. Madelin, "Studies on the infection by Coelomomyces indicus of Anopheles gambiae" Journal of the Elisha Mitchell ...
... viscosus infection symptoms are indistinguishable from Actinomyces israelii infection symptoms or Actinomyces bovis infection ... Actinomycetales, Gram-positive bacteria). ... Infections are treatable with penicillin for three-week ... A. israelii and A. bovis infections usually cause actinomycotic infections, but sometimes and very rarely will the pathogen be ... Multiple-week antibiotic therapies have cured actinomycotic infections caused by A. viscosus in every recorded case. Therapies ...
Cattoir, Vincent (2012). "Actinobaculum schaalii: Review of an emerging uropathogen". Journal of Infection. 64 (3): 260-267. ... Actinomycetales, Bacteria described in 1997, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ... "Ten Cases of Actinobaculum schaalii Infection: Clinical Relevance, Bacterial Identification, and Antibiotic Susceptibility". ...
ISBN 978-0-531-09806-6. Wuerthele-Caspe, V (1955). "Neoplastic infections of man and animals". Journal of the American Medical ... attributing characteristics to Actinomycetales (the order Livingston believed P. cryptocides belonged to) shared by no other ... The microbe was classified under the order Actinomycetales. Livingston described Progenitor as an intermittently acid-fast ...
Infections of the mouth, face, and neck are the most commonly recognized infections; however, the thoracic region, abdomen, ... Actinomycetales, Bacterial vaginosis, Bacteria described in 1951, All stub articles, Actinomycetota stubs). ...
Infection leads to inflammation and the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6 ) which stimulates hepcidin expression. In humans, IL-6 ... Common Gram-positive species are those belonging to the Actinomycetales and species of the genera Bacillus, Arthrobacter and ... With bacterial vascular diseases, the infection is spread within the plants through the xylem. Once within the plant, the ... Lactoferrin is present in secretory fluids, such as sweat, tears and milk, thereby minimising bacterial infection. Ferritin is ...
To diagnose lumpy jaw, the fluids exuding from the bony lump or other abscesses are sampled or aspirated if the infection has ... Actinomycetales, Gram-positive bacteria, Bacteria described in 1877). ... The first is called the exogenous theory and was developed by Bostroem in 1891, when he suggested infection is caused by a ... The number and virulence of bacterial particles involved in the infection have been suggested to contribute to whether or not ...
Two Actinomycetales bacteria Streptomyces asiaticus and S. cangkringensis have been isolated from the rhizosphere soil ... DOI 10.1007/s13313-014-0301-z S.M. Widyastuti; Harjono; Z.A. Surya (2013). "Initial infection of Falcataria moluccana leaves ...
Cell Biology and Infection, Developmental Biology, Genomes and Genetics, Immunology, Infection and Epidemiology, Microbiology, ... Having observed that most actinomycetales are saprophytes, that are able to survive outside of living organisms, with the help ... Yersin looked for the germ responsible for the infection specifically in these plague spots, tumors caused by the inflammation ... The discovery and use of sulfonamides in treating infections were another of its earlier breakthroughs. Some researchers ...
Some can cause disease in humans and other animals (for example, Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infections). As with various ... Actinomycetales). ...
Brakhage AA (December 2005). "Systemic fungal infections caused by Aspergillus species: epidemiology, infection process and ... Many Actinomycetales (Actinomycetota), a group with many filamentous bacteria, were also long believed to be fungi. Although ... Struck C (2006). "Infection strategies of plant parasitic fungi". In Cooke BM, Jones DG, Kaye B (eds.). The Epidemiology of ... Koeck M, Hardham A, Dodds, P.N. (2011). "The role of effectors of biotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi in infection". Cellular ...
The bacterial order Actinomycetales, also share homologs of the 20S proteasome, whereas most bacteria possess heat shock genes ... The molecule ritonavir, marketed as Norvir, was developed as a protease inhibitor and used to target HIV infection. However, it ... the 11S may play a role in degradation of foreign peptides such as those produced after infection by a virus. The number and ... such as infection, heat shock, or oxidative damage - heat shock proteins that identify misfolded or unfolded proteins and ...
Clinical laboratories do culture and isolate them, but a negative result does not rule out infection, because it may be due ... Actinomycetales, Gram-positive bacteria, Bacteria genera). ... and refractory infection after a typical course of antibiotics ... As with other opportunistic infections, people with immunodeficiency are at higher risk. In all of the preceding traits and in ... Actinomycota are normally present in the gums, and are the most common cause of infection in dental procedures and oral ...
"First description of an Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens prosthetic joint infection". New Microbes and New Infections. 18 ... Pridham, T.G. (1970). "New names and new combinations in the order Actinomycetales Buchanan 1917" (PDF). Bulletin of the United ... It can be potentially lethal to humans, but infections are rare. † Archaeoacanthocircus angustiannulatus Kozur, Moix & Ozsvárt ... in some cases it can cause clinically significant infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Its name means "club- ...
Lan, R; Reeves, PR (2002). "Escherichia coli in disguise: molecular origins of Shigella". Microbes and Infection / Institut ... Actinomycetales, Streptomycetales, and Flexibacteriales. Walter Migula's system, which was the most widely accepted system of ... several orders such as Bacillales and Actinomycetales (now in the phylum Actinobacteria) Mollicutes (gram variable, e.g. ... classes Actinomycetales, Myxobacteriales, and Azotobacteriales) Algobacteriales (classes Siderobacteriales and Thiobacteriales ...
Results of search for su:{Actinomycetales infections} Refine your search. *. Availability. * Limit to currently available ...
Infection caused by Actinomycetales): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis. ... The infection can also affect certain women who have had an intrauterine device (IUD) to prevent pregnancy. [medlineplus.gov] ... Meningitis is an infection if the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. This membrane is called the meninges. [ ... Introduction Actinomycetales order mainly known as aerobic actinomycetes are Gram-positive bacteria with a high guanine-plus- ...
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections / drug therapy* * Actinomycetales Infections / drug therapy* * Adult * Anti-Bacterial ...
Bacteria in the order of Actinomycetales cause chronic infections. This order includes Mycobacteriaceae, Actinomycetaceae and ... Section 19: Infections. » Section 19, Chapter 1: Infections of the Spine. Section 19, Chapter 1: Infections of the Spine. ... Primary spinal infections are described as infections of the vertebrae that are not secondary to an operation. Such infections ... Postoperative surgical site infections may present as a superficial or deep infection. Superficial infections involve only the ...
Categories: Actinomycetales Infections Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Acrorenoocular syndrome Acrospiroma ACTH deficiency ACTH resistance Actinic keratosis Actinomycetales causes anal infection ... propionic Acitretine antenatal infection Ackerman syndrome Acne rosacea Acne vulgaris; often called acne Acoustic neuroma ... syndrome Albright-Turner-Morgani syndrome Albrights hereditary osteodystrophy Albrights syndrome Alcohol antenatal infection ... neonatorum Aspiration pneumonia Asplenia Astasia-abasia Astasis Asthenia Asthma Astigmatism Astrocytoma Astrovirus infection ...
... is the most common cause of infection-related death worldwide. In 1993, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared TB to be a ... Tubercle bacilli belong to the order Actinomycetales and family Mycobacteriaceae. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the most common ... In fact, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most significant risk factors for TB infection. Case ... Primary infection of the respiratory tract occurs as a result of inhalation of these aerosols. The risk of infection is ...
infection: coordinate IM with ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS (IM). Scope Note. A genus of facultatively anaerobic, gram-positive ... Actinomycetales [B03.510.024.049] * Actinomycetaceae [B03.510.024.049.050] * Actinomyces [B03.510.024.049.050.050] * ... A genus of facultatively anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria in the family ACTINOMYCETACEAE, order ACTINOMYCETALES. They are ... bacteria in the family ACTINOMYCETACEAE, order ACTINOMYCETALES. They are obligate parasites of the PHARYNX in humans and farm ...
Actinomycetales Infections Entry term(s). Actinomycetales Infection Actinomycete Infection Actinomycete Infections Infection, ... Actinomycetales Infection. Actinomycete Infection. Actinomycete Infections. Infection, Actinomycetales. Infection, Actinomycete ... Actinomycetales Infections - Preferred Concept UI. M0000289. Scope note. Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES ... 77; was ACTINOMYCETE INFECTIONS 1972-76. Online Note:. use ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS to search ACTINOMYCETE INFECTIONS 1972-76 ...
Actinomycetales Infections Entry term(s). Actinomycetales Infection Actinomycete Infection Actinomycete Infections Infection, ... Actinomycetales Infection. Actinomycete Infection. Actinomycete Infections. Infection, Actinomycetales. Infection, Actinomycete ... Actinomycetales Infections - Preferred Concept UI. M0000289. Scope note. Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES ... 77; was ACTINOMYCETE INFECTIONS 1972-76. Online Note:. use ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS to search ACTINOMYCETE INFECTIONS 1972-76 ...
Actinomycetales Infections * Animals * Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay * Foal * Horse Diseases * Horses * Infectious Disease ...
Actinomycetales Infections. *Bacterial Infections. *Bacteroides Infections. *Endocarditis, Bacterial. *Pneumonia, Pneumocystis ... It should not be used in patients with nonbacterial infections such as most upper respiratory tract infections. C. difficile ... The recommended dose of clindamycin injection for the treatment of bacterial infections is 600 to 2700 mg per day in 2, 3, or 4 ... Clindamycin is an antibiotic and treats infection. Finish taking all of your medication as directed. Even if you feel better, ...
infection = ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS. Scope Note. An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form ... Actinomycetales Preferred Term Term UI T000550. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1967). ... Actinomycetales Preferred Concept UI. M0000285. Registry Number. txid2037. Related Numbers. txid1653. Scope Note. An order of ... use ACTINOMYCETALES to search ACTINOMYCETES 1966; CORYNEBACTERIACEAE 1975-91; CORYNEFORM GROUP 1976-91. History Note. 67; was ...
AN - infection: coordinate IM with ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS (IM); infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei = WHIPPLE DISEASE ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTIONS (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enteropathogenic BX - EPEC BX - ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM); consider also HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME HN - 2008 BX - E ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enterotoxigenic BX - Escherichia coli ...
AN - infection: coordinate IM with ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS (IM); infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei = WHIPPLE DISEASE ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTIONS (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enteropathogenic BX - EPEC BX - ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM); consider also HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME HN - 2008 BX - E ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enterotoxigenic BX - Escherichia coli ...
AN - infection: coordinate IM with ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS (IM); infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei = WHIPPLE DISEASE ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTIONS (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enteropathogenic BX - EPEC BX - ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM); consider also HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME HN - 2008 BX - E ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enterotoxigenic BX - Escherichia coli ...
AN - infection: coordinate IM with ACTINOMYCETALES INFECTIONS (IM); infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei = WHIPPLE DISEASE ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTIONS (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enteropathogenic BX - EPEC BX - ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM); consider also HEMOLYTIC UREMIC SYNDROME HN - 2008 BX - E ... AN - infection: coordinate IM with ESCHERICHIA COLI INFECTION (IM) HN - 2008 BX - E coli, Enterotoxigenic BX - Escherichia coli ...
Actinomycetales. Copyright Restrictions:. None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions ...
... is an infection caused by a soil-borne aerobic filamentous bacterium in the genus Nocardia and the order Actinomycetales. ... Isolated infection of the sphenoid sinus is uncommon. It usually occurs in conjunction with infection of the other paranasal ... Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic fungus that can cause infection in immunocompromised hosts. Reports on infection with this ... Disseminated Penicillium marneffei Infection: A Report of Five Cases in Singapore. A Kurup, Y S Leo, A L Tan, S Y Wong ...
infection by Actinomycetales, such as species of Actinomyces, Actinomadura, Nocardia, Streptomyces. maduromycosis ( ...
Nearly two-thirds of antibiotics that are used for the treatment of bacterial infections [...] Read more. ... Actinomycetes, the Gram-positive bacteria of the order Actinomycetales, are fertile producers of bioactive secondary ... Nearly two-thirds of antibiotics that are used for the treatment of bacterial infections were originally isolated from ... Actinomycetes, the Gram-positive bacteria of the order Actinomycetales, are fertile producers of bioactive secondary ...
... is an infection caused by a soil-borne aerobic filamentous bacterium in the genus Nocardia and the order Actinomycetales. ... Corneal infection is the most common cause of profound ocular morbidity leading to blindness worldwide. Corneal infection in ... Penicillium marneffei is a dimorphic fungus that can cause infection in immunocompromised hosts. Reports on infection with this ... Dear Editor, Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most common congenital infection.1 A systematic review that included 77 ...
Infezioni Da Actinomycetales 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES. * Actinomicosi 0 domande ... DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal ... Listeriosis 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus LISTERIA. * Infezioni Da Staphylococcus 1 quesito Infections with ... Infezioni Da Bifidobacteriales 0 domande Infections with BACTERIA of the order Bifidobacteriales. This includes infections in ...
  • A genus of facultatively anaerobic, gram-positive bacteria in the family ACTINOMYCETACEAE , order ACTINOMYCETALES . (nih.gov)
  • Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES. (bvsalud.org)
  • Infezioni Batteriche 18 domande Infections by bacteria, general or unspecified. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Batteriche Dell'Occhio 5 domande Infections in the inner or external eye caused by microorganisms belonging to several families of bacteria. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Batteri Gram-Negativi 1 quesito Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Batteri Gram-Positivi 2 domande Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method. (lookformedical.com)
  • Actinomicosi 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOMYCES. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Nocardia 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the genus NOCARDIA. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Staphylococcus 1 quesito Infections with bacteria of the genus STAPHYLOCOCCUS. (lookformedical.com)
  • Infezioni Da Streptococcus 1 quesito Infections with bacteria of the genus STREPTOCOCCUS. (lookformedical.com)
  • therefore the bacteria identified here may be due to secondary infection after BBB [blood-brain barrier] breakdown. (j-alz.com)
  • Evidence that associated soil bacteria may influence root hair infection of actinorhizal plants by Frankia. (who.int)
  • This genus comprises a number of Gram-positive, acid-fast, rod-shaped aerobic bacteria and is the only member of the family Mycobacteriaceae within the order Actinomycetales. (up.ac.za)
  • any bacteria (some of which are pathogenic for humans and animals) belonging to the order Actinomycetales. (wordinn.com)
  • Mycetomas are caused by 2 totally different groups of organisms: the first are moulds and the second are filamentous bacteria in the order Actinomycetales. (wikitropica.org)
  • In June of 2017, a University of Bristol study in the UK found a 5 to 10-fold increase in Actinobacteria (order Actinomycetales ) population in postmortem AD brains compared with controls [1]. (j-alz.com)
  • Here we report a case who presented with symptomatic pleural effusion due to opportunistic infection caused by Actinomyces viscosus. (symptoma.com)
  • There may be: a hard, painful swelling in the soft tissue of the mouth, known as a "woody" fibrosis an abscess This is the most common form of infection caused by Actinomyces. (symptoma.com)
  • MYCOBACTERIUM infections of organs other than the lung. (nih.gov)
  • CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES AND INJURIES I. INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (001-139) Includes: diseases generally recognized as communicable or transmissible as well as a few diseases of unknown but possibly infectious origin Excludes: acute respiratory infections (460-466) influenza (487. (cdc.gov)
  • certain localized infections Note: Categories for "late effects" of infectious and parasitic diseases are to be found at 137. (cdc.gov)
  • They commonly cause severe infections such as urinary tract infection, endocarditis, and bacteremia (Fiore et al. (springeropen.com)
  • Clinical correla- the order Actinomycetales , which tion is difficult if the infection is includes Mycobacterium , Nocardia , silent. (cdc.gov)
  • Like other closely related Actinomycetales, such as Nocardia and Corynebacterium, Mycobacteria have unusually high genomic DNA GC content and are capable of producing mycolic acids as major components of their cell wall. (up.ac.za)
  • Infection usually is caused by bacterial organisms, but can also be due to viral or fungal organisms. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Polmonite Batterica 1 quesito Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by bacterial infections. (lookformedical.com)
  • Regardless of the source of the infection, an infection of the spine should be quickly diagnosed in order to prevent structural instability or neurologic compromise. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Tubercle bacilli belong to the order Actinomycetales and family Mycobacteriaceae. (medscape.com)
  • By comparing microbial interaction networks pre- and post-infection using the predictive algorithm SPIEC-EASI, we observe that extra connections are gained by Actinomycetales , the order containing Mtb, in spite of an overall reduction in the number of interactions of the whole community post-infection, implicating Mtb-driven ecological reorganization within the lung. (biomedcentral.com)
  • See Medscape Drugs & Diseases articles Tuberculosis , Miliary Tuberculosis , Primary Tuberculosis Imaging , Pediatric HIV Infection , and HIV Disease for more information on these topics. (medscape.com)
  • zoonotic refers to diseases, infections, or agents that can be transmitted between animals and humans, posing the risk of infection or disease transmission from animals to people or vice versa. (wordinn.com)
  • Gram-positive organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species are the most commonly isolated organisms in patients with pyogenic vertebral infections. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Molecular responses to influenza A virus (IAV) infections vary between mammalian species. (bvsalud.org)
  • Highly conserved gene coexpression modules across the three species are enriched for IAV infection-induced pathways including cell cycle and interferon (IFN) signaling. (bvsalud.org)
  • TDRD7 is predicted as an IFN-inducible host factor that is up-regulated upon IAV infection in the three species. (bvsalud.org)
  • Identification of the common and species-specific molecular signatures, networks, and regulators of IAV infection provides insights into host-defense mechanisms and will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic interventions against IAV infection. (bvsalud.org)
  • Laboratory isolation, detection and identification of Mycobacterium species are therefore critical if human and animal infections are to be controlled. (openmicrobiologyjournal.com)
  • The sensitivity and specificity of the reactions were assessed with DNA samples extracted from tuberculous and non-tuberculous mycobacteria, as well as other actinomycetales species and DNA samples extracted directly from bovine and bubaline tissue homogenates. (scite.ai)
  • Spinal infections involve pyogenic or granulomatous infections of the vertebral column, intervertebral discs, the dural sac or the epidural space. (wheelessonline.com)
  • A chronic granulomatous infection caused by MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Many cause respiratory tract infections during the abdominal pain in the right lower pilgrims from throughout the world, pilgrimage (hajj) season in Makkah, Saudi quadrant and feculent vomitus. (cdc.gov)
  • Environmental organism which causes infections in birds and humans. (up.ac.za)
  • This organism causes tuberculosis in birds and disseminated infections in immunocompromized humans (the elderly, children, and especially patients with AIDS). (up.ac.za)
  • infection by a virus that is pathogenic to humans. (wordinn.com)
  • a serious (sometimes fatal) infection of rodents caused by Yersinia pestis and accidentally transmitted to humans by the bite of a flea that has bitten an infected animal. (wordinn.com)
  • The nested-PCR exhibited 100% analytical specificity for M. bovis when tested with the DNA of reference strains of environmental mycobacteria and closely-related Actinomycetales. (scite.ai)
  • When pil- had influenza B infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Invasive infections tive effect of the influenza vaccine. (cdc.gov)
  • Kingdom case of bacteremia with Streptomyces acquired influenza B infection imme- thermovulgaris . (cdc.gov)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) is the most common cause of infection-related death worldwide. (medscape.com)
  • For patient education information, see the Infections Center and Tuberculosis . (medscape.com)
  • Case rates for persons who are dually infected with HIV and M tuberculosis exceed the lifetime risk of persons with TB infection who are not infected with HIV. (medscape.com)
  • Cutaneous miliary tuberculosis in two patients with HIV infection. (ucdenver.edu)
  • The specific interactions of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), and the lung microbiota in infection are entirely unexplored. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the early days of the pandemic when information on COVID-19 infection was lacking, all COVID-19 positive patients were admitted into acute hospitals for. (annals.edu.sg)
  • A spectrum of immune dysregulation has been described following SARS-CoV-2 infections-from the cytokine storm in the acute phase, to hyperinflammatory syndromes that occur after. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and its corresponding coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was first reported as a cluster of pneumonia cases in. (annals.edu.sg)
  • 5,14 That prevalence of this infection increases with age is possibly due to a number of factors: the increasing age of the population, increasing number of patients on renal replacement therapy, increasing number of patients with immunosuppressive medications and increasing rates of bacteremia due to intravascular devices and other forms of instrumentation. (wheelessonline.com)
  • The most common sources are urinary tract infections and the transient bacteremia caused by genitourinary procedures. (wheelessonline.com)
  • The lished, including bloodstream related bacteremia due to Streptomyces in a World Health Organization/Interna- infection (1,4) and focal invasive patient receiving holistic infusions. (cdc.gov)
  • Human infections can be persistent and may lead to systemic infection and arthritis. (up.ac.za)
  • Fournier gangrene is usually secondary to perirectal or periurethral infections associated with local trauma, operative procedures, or urinary tract disease. (lookformedical.com)
  • Also, contacts of persons with sputum-positive smears have an increased prevalence of infection as opposed to contacts of those with sputum-negative smears. (medscape.com)
  • Cryptococcosis is a well-recognised infection in immunocompromised patients, although its prevalence varies with the type of immune defect. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Whipple's disease and Tropheryma whipplei infections: from bench to bedside. (nih.gov)
  • Whipple's disease and Tropheryma whipplei infections: when to suspect them and how to diagnose and treat them. (nih.gov)
  • Three major routes of spread are: (1) hematogenous spread from a distant infection, (2) direct inoculation from trauma, (3) direct inoculation following invasive spinal diagnostic procedures and from spinal surgery. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Tissue-resident memory CD8 T cells (TRM) principally reside in peripheral nonlymphoid tissues, such as lung and skin, and confer protection against a variety of illnesses ranging from infections to cancers. (bvsalud.org)
  • To assess whether Mtb infection modifies the lung microbiome, and identify changes in microbial abundance and diversity as a function of pulmonary inflammation, we compared infected and uninfected lung lobe washes collected serially from 26 macaques by bronchoalveolar lavage over the course of infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • We found that Mtb induced an initial increase in lung microbial diversity at 1 month post infection that normalized by 5 months of infection across all macaques. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Moreover, we identified several specific taxa normally associated with the oral microbiome that increased in relative abundance in the lung following Mtb infection, including SR1 , Aggregatibacter , Leptotrichia , Prevotella , and Campylobacter . (biomedcentral.com)
  • The precise mechanisms driving the variability in human Mtb infection outcome are poorly understood but may include the earliest interactions between pathogen and the local lung microbiota [ 21 ]. (biomedcentral.com)
  • General Information: It was derived from an AIDS patient and has been characterized for virulence in the murine model of low-dose aerosol infection in that it could colonize the lung, proliferate within the tissue and disseminate to other organs. (up.ac.za)
  • This includes infections in the genera BIFIDOBACTERIUM and GARDNERELLA, in the family Bifidobacteriaceae. (lookformedical.com)
  • Several core genera showed global shifts from baseline and throughout infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The Listeria 471 -- Epidemiology and Clinical Manifestations of Listeria monocytogenes Infection / Walter F. Schlech III 473 -- Immune and Inflammatory Responses to Listeria monocytogenes Infection / Alyce Finelli, Eric G. Pamer 480 -- Genetic Tools for Use with Listeria monocytogenes / Nancy E. Freitag 488 -- Regulation of Virulence Genes in Pathogenic Listeria spp. (epa.gov)
  • Static hyperinflation (inspiratory-to-total respiratory capacity ratio [IC/TLC], well-designed recurring capacity, as well as residual size) confirmed more robust links with cardiovascular chamber Severe malaria infection dimensions compared to airway obstructions as well as diffusion ability. (mdm2signals.com)
  • Spinal infections can also develop postoperatively and most often develop secondary to direct inoculation of the wound. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Primary spinal infections are described as infections of the vertebrae that are not secondary to an operation. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Overall, however, the changes to the airway microbiota after Mtb infection were surprisingly modest, despite a range of Mtb-induced pulmonary inflammation in this cohort of macaques. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Infection results in a characteristic pulmonary disease which requires expensive drug therapy for successful treatment. (up.ac.za)
  • This chapter describes both primary and post-operative spinal infections. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Spine infections are rare infections that can involve the intervertebral disc space (discitis), the vertebral bones, the spinal canal or adjacent soft tissues. (wheelessonline.com)
  • The most common primary spinal infection is pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Infezioni Batteriche Del Sistema Nervoso Centrale 4 domande Bacterial infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges, including infections involving the perimeningeal spaces. (lookformedical.com)
  • Another rare type affects the skin and bones, usually when the infection spreads from deeper tissues. (symptoma.com)
  • Infection spreads into vertebral bodies by first seeding underneath vertebral end plates, which is followed by disc and nearby vertebrae involvement. (wheelessonline.com)
  • PPI use was related to a decrease in Clostridiales and an increase in Actinomycetales, Micrococcaceae and Streptococcaceae, which are changes that have previously been involved in gut dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infection. (lactobacto.com)
  • Infections of the spine can take the form of a primary infection of the spine or a spread of microorganisms originating from elsewhere in the body. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Dear Editor, Children with COVID-19 infection can present with a variable spectrum of clinical manifestations, and sometimes mucocutaneous manifestations can be the only manifestation of. (annals.edu.sg)
  • Risk factors for infections of the spine involve conditions that weaken the patient's immune system, such conditions include diabetes mellitus, use of immunosuppressant medications, cancer, HIV/AIDS, malnutrition, history of an organ transplant and intravenous drug abuse. (wheelessonline.com)
  • In certain instances, such as extremes of age or defects in cell-mediated immune (CMI) response (eg, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] infection , malnutrition , administration of chemotherapy, prolonged steroid use), TB may develop. (medscape.com)
  • McFarland EJ, Kuritzkes DR. Clinical features and treatment of infection due to mycobacterium fortuitum/chelonae complex. (ucdenver.edu)
  • Discitis refers to an infection of the intervertebral disc in the spine. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Vertebral osteomyelitis refers to an infection of the vertebral bones in the spine. (wheelessonline.com)
  • DNA sequencing reactions were had no signs or symptoms of infection. (cdc.gov)
  • Such infections commonly originate from elsewhere in the body and spread to the spine and its musculoskeletal components. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Osteomyelitis following hematogenous spread of infection is the major mechanism by which adults and children contract vertebral osteomyelitis. (wheelessonline.com)
  • Clindamycin is a prescription medication used to treat acne and vaginal infections. (rxwiki.com)