Actinomycetales Infections: Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.Actinomycetales: An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.Khellin: A vasodilator that also has bronchodilatory action. It has been employed in the treatment of angina pectoris, in the treatment of asthma, and in conjunction with ultraviolet light A, has been tried in the treatment of vitiligo. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1024)Bucrylate: Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive also used to occlude blood vessels supplying neoplastic or other diseased tissue.Nocardia: A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria whose species are widely distributed and are abundant in soil. Some strains are pathogenic opportunists for humans and animals.Micromonospora: A genus of gram-positive bacteria that forms a branched mycelium. It commonly occurs as a saprophytic form in soil and aquatic environments.Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Actinomyces: A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Streptomyces: A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.Corynebacterium: A genus of asporogenous bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. Its organisms appear as straight to slightly curved rods and are known to be human and animal parasites and pathogens.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cell Wall: The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.Culture Media: Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.Fatty Acids: Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Rifabutin: A broad-spectrum antibiotic that is being used as prophylaxis against disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex infection in HIV-positive patients.Lopinavir: An HIV protease inhibitor used in a fixed-dose combination with RITONAVIR. It is also an inhibitor of CYTOCHROME P-450 CYP3A.Partnership Practice, Dental: A voluntary contract between two or more dentists who may or may not share responsibility for the care of patients, with proportional sharing of profits and losses.Ritonavir: An HIV protease inhibitor that works by interfering with the reproductive cycle of HIV. It also inhibits CYTOCHROME P-450 CYP3A.PyrimidinonesAntibiotics, Antitubercular: Substances obtained from various species of microorganisms that are, alone or in combination with other agents, of use in treating various forms of tuberculosis; most of these agents are merely bacteriostatic, induce resistance in the organisms, and may be toxic.Bulimia: Eating an excess amount of food in a short period of time, as seen in the disorder of BULIMIA NERVOSA. It is caused by an abnormal craving for food, or insatiable hunger also known as "ox hunger".Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome: Exuberant inflammatory response towards previously undiagnosed or incubating opportunistic pathogens. It is frequently seen in AIDS patients following HAART.Art Therapy: The use of art as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of neurological, mental, or behavioral disorders.Tuberculosis: Any of the infectious diseases of man and other animals caused by species of MYCOBACTERIUM.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Tuberculosis, Pulmonary: MYCOBACTERIUM infections of the lung.Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active: Drug regimens, for patients with HIV INFECTIONS, that aggressively suppress HIV replication. The regimens usually involve administration of three or more different drugs including a protease inhibitor.Latent Tuberculosis: The dormant form of TUBERCULOSIS where the person shows no obvious symptoms and no sign of the causative agent (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) in the SPUTUM despite being positive for tuberculosis infection skin test.Burning Mouth Syndrome: A group of painful oral symptoms associated with a burning or similar sensation. There is usually a significant organic component with a degree of functional overlay; it is not limited to the psychophysiologic group of disorders.Pruritus Vulvae: Intense itching of the external female genitals.Diagnostic Errors: Incorrect diagnoses after clinical examination or technical diagnostic procedures.Voice: The sounds produced by humans by the passage of air through the LARYNX and over the VOCAL CORDS, and then modified by the resonance organs, the NASOPHARYNX, and the MOUTH.Voice Disorders: Pathological processes that affect voice production, usually involving VOCAL CORDS and the LARYNGEAL MUCOSA. Voice disorders can be caused by organic (anatomical), or functional (emotional or psychological) factors leading to DYSPHONIA; APHONIA; and defects in VOICE QUALITY, loudness, and pitch.Sensation: The process in which specialized SENSORY RECEPTOR CELLS transduce peripheral stimuli (physical or chemical) into NERVE IMPULSES which are then transmitted to the various sensory centers in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Cellulitis: An acute, diffuse, and suppurative inflammation of loose connective tissue, particularly the deep subcutaneous tissues, and sometimes muscle, which is most commonly seen as a result of infection of a wound, ulcer, or other skin lesions.Dermatitis, Allergic Contact: A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.Patch Tests: Skin tests in which the sensitizer is applied to a patch of cotton cloth or gauze held in place for approximately 48-72 hours. It is used for the elicitation of a contact hypersensitivity reaction.Dermatitis, Occupational: A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.Pyoderma Gangrenosum: An idiopathic, rapidly evolving, and severely debilitating disease occurring most commonly in association with chronic ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by the presence of boggy, purplish ulcers with undermined borders, appearing mostly on the legs. The majority of cases are in people between 40 and 60 years old. Its etiology is unknown.Dental Pulp CalcificationDermatitis, Irritant: A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.Dermatitis, Contact: A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.

Case of sepsis caused by Bifidobacterium longum. (1/351)

We report a case of sepsis caused by Bifidobacterium longum in a 19-year-old male who had developed high fever, jaundice, and hepatomegaly after acupuncture therapy with small gold needles. Anaerobic, non-spore-forming, gram-positive bacilli were isolated from his blood and finally identified as B. longum. He recovered completely after treatment with ticarcillin and metronidazole. To our knowledge, this is the first report of incidental sepsis caused by B. longum.  (+info)

Movement disorders in encephalitis induced by Rhodococcus aurantiacus infection relieved by the administration of L-dopa and anti-T-cell antibodies. (2/351)

Mice injected with Rhodococcus aurantiacus by the intravenous (i.v.) route show neurological disorders, hemiparesis, vertical headshake and turn-round gait after day 7 postinfection (p.i.). Neurological symptoms caused by i.v. inoculation of R. aurantiacus were relieved by treatment with levodopa (l-dopa). R. aurantiacus was isolated from the brain and was found to be completely eliminated at day 7 p. i. Focal encephalitis was mainly observed in the brain stem, and T cells could be isolated from the brain after day 7 p.i. Administration of both an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and an anti-CD8 mAb suppressed neurological symptoms. These results suggest that R. aurantiacus induces movement disorders in mice, and that the symptoms are mediated by T cells infiltrating the brain, rather than directly by the bacterium.  (+info)

Tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma are required in host resistance against virulent Rhodococcus equi infection in mice: cytokine production depends on the virulence levels of R. equi. (3/351)

Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes pneumonia in foals and immunosuppressed humans. There are at least three virulence levels of R. equi and these pathogenicities are associated, in mice, with the presence of virulence plasmids. This study focused on cytokine secretion, in mice, in the course of a primary infection with sublethal doses of R. equi strains of different virulence levels (virulent, intermediately virulent and avirulent). Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were induced endogenously in mice in relation to the multiplication and clearance of virulent and intermediately virulent strains of R. equi. These cytokines were not detected in mice infected with avirulent R. equi. Deaths occurred among mice treated with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either TNF or IFN-gamma prior to sublethal dose infection with virulent and intermediately virulent strains of R. equi, but not with avirulent R. equi. These results suggested that cytokine production depended largely on the virulence levels of R. equi: TNF and IFN-gamma were required early during infection with virulent R. equi to limit replication and clearance of bacteria within the organs, but they were not necessary for limiting infection with avirulent R. equi.  (+info)

Infection by Rhodococcus equi in a patient with AIDS: histological appearance mimicking Whipple's disease and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. (4/351)

Rhodococcus equi pneumonia with systemic dissemination is being reported increasingly in immunocompromised patients. This is the first case report of disseminated R equi infection with biopsy documented involvement of the large intestine. The patient was a 46 year old male with AIDS who was diagnosed with cavitating pneumonia involving the left lower lobe. R equi was isolated in culture from the blood and lung biopsies. Subsequently, the patient developed anaemia, diarrhoea, and occult blood in the stool. Colonoscopy revealed several colonic polyps. Histological examination of the colon biopsies showed extensive submucosal histiocytic infiltration with numerous Gram positive coccobacilli and PAS positive material in the histiocytes. Electron microscopy showed variably shaped intrahistiocytic organisms which were morphologically consistent with R equi in the specimen. Disseminated R equi infection may involve the lower gastrointestinal tract and produce inflammatory polyps with foamy macrophages which histologically resemble those seen in Whipple's disease and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection.  (+info)

Role of the 85-kilobase plasmid and plasmid-encoded virulence-associated protein A in intracellular survival and virulence of Rhodococcus equi. (5/351)

Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and a cause of pneumonia in young horses (foals) and immunocompromised people. Isolates of R. equi from pneumonic foals typically contain large, 85- or 90-kb plasmids encoding a highly immunogenic virulence-associated protein (VapA). The objective of this study was to determine the role of the 85-kb plasmid and VapA in the intracellular survival and virulence of R. equi. Clinical isolates containing the plasmid and expressing VapA efficiently replicated within mouse macrophages in vitro, while plasmid-cured derivatives of these organisms did not multiply intracellularly. An isolate harboring the large plasmid also replicated in the tissues of experimentally infected mice, whereas its plasmid-cured derivative was rapidly cleared. All foals experimentally infected with a plasmid-containing clinical isolate developed severe bronchopneumonia, whereas the foals infected with its plasmid-cured derivative remained asymptomatic and free of visible lung lesions. By day 14 postinfection, lung bacterial burdens had increased considerably in foals challenged with the plasmid-containing clinical isolate. In contrast, bacteria could no longer be cultured from the lungs of foals challenged with the isogenic plasmid-cured derivative. A recombinant, plasmid-cured derivative expressing wild-type levels of VapA failed to replicate in macrophages and remained avirulent for both mice and foals. These results show that the 85-kb plasmid of R. equi is essential for intracellular replication within macrophages and for development of disease in the native host, the foal. However, expression of VapA alone is not sufficient to restore the virulence phenotype.  (+info)

Disseminated Rhodococcus equi infection in two goats. (6/351)

Rhodococcus equi infection was diagnosed in two goats from the same herd. At necropsy, numerous caseating granulomas were disseminated throughout the liver, lungs, abdominal lymph nodes, medulla of right humerus, and the right fifth rib of goat No. 1, and the liver of goat No. 2. Histopathologic examination confirmed the presence of multiple caseating granulomas in these organs. Numerous gram-positive and Giemsa-positive coccobacilli were identified within the cytoplasm of macrophages. Aerobic bacterial cultures of the liver and lung from both goats yielded a pure growth of R. equi. R. equi antigens were immunohistochemically identified in caseating granulomas from both goats. However, the 15- to 17-kd virulence antigens of R. equi were not detected, suggesting possible infection by an avirulent strain of this organism.  (+info)

TNF receptor p55 is required for elimination of inflammatory cells following control of intracellular pathogens. (7/351)

The elimination of lymphocytes within inflammatory lesions is a critical component in the resolution of disease once pathogens have been cleared. We report here that signaling through the TNF receptor p55 (TNFRp55) is required to eliminate lymphocytes from lesions associated with intracellular pathogens. Thus, TNFRp55-/- mice, but not Fas-deficient mice, maintained inflammatory lesions associated with either Leishmania major or Rhodococcus equi infection, although they developed a Th1 response and controlled the pathogens. Inflammatory cells from either L. major- or R. equi-infected C57BL/6 mice were sensitive to TNF-induced apoptosis, and conversely the number of apoptotic cells in the lesions from TNFRp55-/- mice was dramatically reduced compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, in vivo depletion of TNF in wild-type mice blocked lesion regression following R. equi infection. Taken together, our results suggest that signaling through the TNFRp55, but not Fas, is required to induce apoptosis of T cells within inflammatory lesions once pathogens are eliminated, and that in its absence lesions fail to regress.  (+info)

Modulation of cytokine response of pneumonic foals by virulent Rhodococcus equi. (8/351)

The ability of Rhodococcus equi to induce pneumonia in foals depends on the presence of an 85- to 90-kb plasmid. In this study, we evaluated whether plasmid-encoded products mediate virulence by modulating the cytokine response of foals. Foals infected intrabronchially with a virulence plasmid-containing strain of R. equi had similar gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) p35 but significantly higher IL-1beta, IL-10, IL-12 p40, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA expression in lung tissue compared to foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. IFN-gamma mRNA expression levels in CD4+ T lymphocytes isolated from bronchial lymph nodes (BLN) were similar for the two groups of R. equi-infected foals on day 3 postinfection. However, on day 14, in association with pneumonia and marked multiplication of virulent R. equi but with complete clearance of the plasmid-cured derivative, IFN-gamma mRNA expression in BLN CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in foals infected with the plasmid-cured derivative. These results suggests an immunomodulating role for R. equi virulence plasmid-encoded products in downregulating IFN-gamma mRNA expression by CD4+ T lymphocytes.  (+info)

Serum antibody titres to Dermatophilus congolensis demonstrated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in young steers and in adult cows from an Ayrshire herd showed a bimodal distribution and provided evidence of subclinical infection. Very high titres detected in sera from crossbred Galloway steers were indicative of recent or existing infection which may have been masked by concurrent ringworm. The ELISA is a sensitive and technically simple method which enables sera to be screened for evidence of infection by D congolensis which may otherwise pass unrecognised. Such infections may be of importance not only in the epidemiology of the disease in farm animals but also as a potential source of infection for man and his domestic pets.. ...
Mud fever, also known as scratches or pastern dermatitis, is a group of diseases of horses causing irritation and dermatitis in the lower limbs of horses. Often caused by a mixture of bacteria, typically Dermatophilus congolensis, and Staphylococcus spp, mud fever can also be caused by fungal organisms (dermatophytes). Photosensitization, chorioptic mange mites, contact dermatitis and other conditions also contribute to some cases. This condition is also known as dew poisoning, grease heel, or greasy heel. Mud fever affects most horses and ponies during winter and early spring, resulting in painful sores and scabs, which in severe cases can make a horse lame. Mud fever most commonly affects the pastern and heel area but can also affect the upper leg, the belly, and in some cases the neck area (also known as Rain Scald). Non-pigmented skin tends to be more severely affected. Mud fever is caused by an infection of the skin by bacteria, including Dermatophilus congolensis, and often Staphylococcus ...
An investigation into potential disinfectant agents that could be used on farms to reduce environmental virulent Rhodococcus equi burdens. - Research Supervisor Connect - University of Sydney, Australia
Rhodococcus equi was previously thought to be exclusively an equine pathogen, but in recent years Rhodococcus equi infection is occurring with increasing frequency in humans [15]. Infection in a human was first reported in 1967 in a 29-year-old man with plasma cell hepatitis receiving immunosuppressant medications [10]. It is found exclusively in immunocompromised individuals, such as those with AIDS, small cell carcinoma of the lung, malignant lymphoma, or recipients of kidney or bone marrow transplants [19].. The organism is particularly susceptible to erythromycin and clindamycin; the aminoglycosides, amikacin, gentamycin, neomycin and tobromycin, rifampin and vancomycin [15]. It is moderately susceptible to penicillin G, ampicillin and tetracyclines, and is usually moderately susceptible or resistant to first and second generation cephalosporins [15].. As determined by FIC (fractional inhibitory concentration) indices, four combinations were synergistic: rifampin-erythromycin, ...
The conjugative virulence plasmid is a key component of the Rhodococcus equi accessory genome essential for pathogenesis. Three host-associated virulence plasmid types have been identified: the equine pVAPA and porcine pVAPB circular variants, and the linear pVAPN found in bovine (ruminant) isolates. We recently characterized the R. equi pangenome (Anastasi E, et al. 2016. Pangenome and phylogenomic analysis of the pathogenic actinobacterium Rhodococcus equi. Genome Biol Evol. 8:3140-3148.) and we report here the comparative analysis of the virulence plasmid genomes. Plasmids within each host-associated type were highly similar despite their diverse origins. Variation was accounted for by scattered single nucleotide polymorphisms and short nucleotide indels, while larger indels-mostly in the plasticity region near the vap pathogencity island (PAI)-defined plasmid genomic subtypes. Only one of the plasmids analyzed, of pVAPN type, was exceptionally divergent due to accumulation of indels in the ...
Rhodococcus equi, (previously known as Corynebacterium equi) causes a persistent bacterial pneumonia in foals, and may become established as an endemic disease on some breeding farms. It may result in considerable losses through costs of diagnosis and treatment, and in some cases, through death. A better understanding of the disease may reduce its significance.
Dermatophilus congolensis is a gram positive bacterium which causes a skin disease in a wide range of animals including man. This disease is called dermatophilosis, commonly known as rain rot. Dermatophilosis causes extensive damage within the animal industry, including loss of days at work, reduction in milk yield, and deterioriation of hide and meat quality. This disease requires quick diagnostic tools and sustainable treatment to avoid economic losses. ^ The 1029 bp DNA segment of the alkaline ceramidase gene of D. congolensis was targeted to develop a species-specific PCR to speed up the diagnostic and treatment process to minimize economic losses. The PCR is sensitive, specific and detects as low as 50 × 10-3µg of D. congolensis DNA within 4 hours. This PCR has potential clinical application for rapid diagnosis of dermatophilosis. ^ Caprylic acid is a medium chain fatty acid that contains 8 carbons in its structure. Caprylic acid and its derivatives, namely monocaprylin and sodium caprylate, are
The response of the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi to H(2)O(2) treatment, a situation potentially encountered after the oxidative burst of alveolar macrophages, was analyzed. Compared to other bacteria, including Deinococcus radiodurans, R. equi showed exceptionally high resistance to this stress. A proteomic approach showed that four polypeptides present in the wild-type strain (85F) are missing in the plasmid-cured strain 85F(P-), and by using a DNA macroarray, we identified two plasmid-encoded vap genes, vapA and vapG, whose expression was highly induced by H(2)O(2) treatment. Whereas the transcript size of vapA was compatible with a monocistronic mRNA, the transcript of vapG was considerably longer. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCRs showed that the transcriptional start sites of the two operons were 69 and 269 nucleotides (nt) upstream of the start codon, respectively. Analysis of these leader sequences revealed the presence of a small open reading frame named podG, which ...
A vaccine for Rhodococcus equi, the common bacteria that affects foals, often causing severe infections, pneumonia, and sometimes death, is in the final stages of development. Intervet/Schering-Plough Animal Health (ISPAH) said on Jan. 27 that a candidate vaccine for R. equi would be tested in a field trial in Germany in the near future.
... ADRPresented by Dr. Richard MarkellCellulitisPresented by Dr. Phoebe SmithFoal DiarrheaPresented by Dr. Bonnie BarrLamin...
FINAL DIAGNOSIS. PNEUMONIA, HILAR LYMPHADENITIS, AND SEPSIS SECONDARY TO Rhodococcus equi. Rhodococcus equi, originally identified by Magnusson as an agent capable of causing a granulomatous infection in horses in 1923,1,2 is an increasingly recognized opportunistic pathogen of humans. Since the initial description by Golub et al 3 initial description of R. equi infection in humans in 1967, more than 100 cases have been reported in the literature.2 While the organism primarily afflicts patients with impaired cellular immunity, cases have been described in patients with no known underlying predisposing condition.. R. equi is a water and soil organism which is most commonly found in environments associated with domesticated animals, whose manure provide required nutritional support for these organisms.4 Human infection is believed to occur secondary to the exposure of a susceptible individual to the appropriate environment. In the present case, the patient had a farm where he raised 27 horses ...
Members of genus Gordonia are widely distributed in nature, and about 29 species have been identified. From 1996 to 2015, only 16 cases of infections caused by Gordonia sputi were reported worldwide, most of which were catheter related, such as contaminated central venous catheters and chest tubes, in a setting of immunocompromised status [7-9]. Gordonia spp. infection usually has a subacute or chronic course, sometimes resembling fungi infection. The patient in this case presented with vision blurred about 10 days after the iron foreign body penetrating, showing multiple clusters of white purulent lesions in the anterior chamber, vitreous cavity and on the retina, without obvious pain, which might clinically indicate a less virulent bacteria or fungi infection. According to the contemporary gram stain and its reaction to intravitreal antibiotic a gram-positive bacilli infection was presumed, and further molecular examinations confirmed the pathogen as Gordonia sputi. So, when facing a subacute ...
It isn't for lack of effort that the equine industry still doesn't have new options for treating Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals. According to Noah Cohen, VMD, MPH, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, professor of equine medicine at Texas A&M University, he and his colleagues are well aware that veterinarians are in dire need of better antibiotic alternativ.... ...
Abstract: Aim: To study the prevalence of Theileria equi among horses in different age groups, both sexes, months and seasons of the year, and regions of Giza governourate. Studying the changes in the blood picture, blood chemistries, liver enzymes associate with T.equi infections in horses. Evaluating IFA and CFT at different dilutions in the serodiagnosis of T.equi infections in horses. Evaluating four anti-Theileria medication regimens (diminazine aceturate, imidiocarb 7%, buparvaquone and a combination of imidiocarb 7% and buparvaquone) in treatment of T.equi infections in horses. Materials and Methods: Total of 149 horses were examined by clinical signs and blood smears. Fortey whole blood samples from T.equi infected horses were examined to measure haemoglobin, total RBCs count and PCV. Fortey serum samples from T.equi infected horses were examined to measure total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, ALT and AST enzymes. Serum samples from T.equi infected (40) and non infected (14) horses were ...
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Arcanobacterium pyogenes Pyolysin: member of thiol-activated cytolysin family; isolated from Arcanobacterium pyogenes; amino acid sequence in first source; GenBank U84782
Arcanobacterium haemolyticum ATCC ® BAA-1784™ Designation: Vitek 1656 TypeStrain=False Application: Quality control strain
Arcanobacterium haemolyticum ATCC ® BAA-1784™ Designation: Vitek 1656 TypeStrain=False Application: Quality control strain
TY - JOUR. T1 - Sicca syndrome associated with Tropheryma whipplei intestinal infection. AU - Bosman, Cesare. AU - Boldrini, Renata. AU - Borsetti, Giuliana. AU - Morelli, Sergio. AU - Paglia, Maria Grazia. AU - Visca, Paolo. PY - 2002/8/1. Y1 - 2002/8/1. N2 - The case of a 61-year-old woman with Whipples disease-associated sicca complex is reported. Tropheryma whipplei infection was diagnosed by histological and ultrastructural examination of the jejunal mucosa and sequence analysis of the bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA. The role of vitamin A malabsorption in sicca complex secondary to Whipples disease is discussed.. AB - The case of a 61-year-old woman with Whipples disease-associated sicca complex is reported. Tropheryma whipplei infection was diagnosed by histological and ultrastructural examination of the jejunal mucosa and sequence analysis of the bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA. The role of vitamin A malabsorption in sicca complex secondary to Whipples disease is discussed.. UR - ...
As base substitutions within domain V of the 23S rRNA can result in ML resistance (17), sequencing of this gene region in these A. pyogenes isolates was undertaken. Primers 23S-1 (5′-AGTTCCGACCTGCACGAATGGC-3′) and 23S-2 (5′-GTTCGTCCGTCCCGGTCCTCTC-3′) were used to amplify a product of 728 bp, equivalent to bases 1953 to 2680 of the E. coli 23S rRNA gene (GenBank accession no. U70214 ), from the four macrolide-resistant and three macrolide-susceptible A. pyogenes isolates. The sequences of the PCR products were determined by using automated DNA sequencing.. Mutations were identified by aligning the sequences using CLUSTAL W (13), with the sequence of the MLsA. pyogenes isolate BBR1 being designated the wild type. Of the other MLs isolates, OX-5 has a wild-type sequence and OX-9 has a G2137T substitution (E. coli numbering). As OX-9 is MLs, it is unlikely that the G2137T change contributes to ML resistance, and it probably represents a naturally occurring polymorphism in the 23S rRNA ...
Enda joined the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science in 2005 from the School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science and Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research at University College Dublin. He holds a B.Sc. in Industrial Microbiology and a Ph.D. in Molecular Microbiology from UCD, where he studied the regulation of virulence gene expression in the intracellular equine pathogen Rhodococcus equi.. In his role as Senior Technical Officer, Enda provides training and support for researchers in Functional Genomics and Molecular Biology techniques, to examine gene expression and regulation. These include Microarray and Real Time PCR technology, RNA Isolation and QC, Experimental Design and Microarray Data Analysis using the GeneSpring GX data analysis package.. Enda also provides support for the recently established NCBES High Throughput Screening facility, where Drug Discovery and Characterisation, Cellular, Enzymatic and Binding Assays, as well as Sample Analysis may be ...
Background:Tropheryma whipplei causes acute diseases, such as gastroenteritis, bacteremia, and pneumonia (1), as well as chronic Whipple disease (2). It can be cultivated from stool samples, which are a potential source of infection (3). Detection of T. whipplei DNA in saliva also suggests an oral-oral method of transmission. However, cultivation of T. whipplei from saliva has been impossible because of heavy contamination by other bacteria ...
The bacterium Rhodococcus equi has been a known cause of life-threatening pneumonia in foals for many years. But the ideal treatment for R. equi infection remains debatable because of the lack of research comparing the efficacy of each possible treat
Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. Uppsala University, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga vetenskapsområdet, Faculty of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. IMMUNOLOGY PROGRAMME. ...
Rhodococcus equi is a gram-positive, pleomorphic coccobacillus that is a frequent cause of pneumonia and enteritis in foals, especially before 6 months of age. It has also been linked to a variety of suppurative processes in immune-suppressed humans (Prescott, 1991). The organism has a worldwide distribution and can easily be isolated from soil and environmental samples (Barton and Hughes, 1984; Debey and Bailie, 1987; Takai et al., 1991). Pathogenic R. equi isolated from sick foals uniformly contain an 85- to 90-kb plasmid known as vapA, which carries a gene responsible for expression of a 15- to 17-kDa antigen of undetermined function (Takai et al., 1991, 1993). Environmental strains of R. equi not associated with equine disease do not contain this plasmid. ...
57) Abstract:. The invention relates to veterinary Microbiology and can be used in bacteriological laboratories for the preparation of diagnostic kits. The strain obtained using traditional microbiological techniques from the urine of pigs with clinical signs of urocystic and pyelonephritis. The strain is deposited in the Institute of culture collections of microorganisms GMCVB Vector number 0699. Expressed antigenic properties and the ability to quickly and easily multiply on artificial and natural environments make use of this strain as a reference strain in the preparation of diagnostic kits. The invention relates to the field of veterinary Microbiology, epizootiology and can be used in bacteriological laboratories.. In the claimed invention was set the task of finding a strain of bacteria, easy and fast breeding on natural and artificial nutrient media and has marked antigenic properties.. Known strains of Actinobaculum (Corynebacterium, Eubacterium, Actinomyces) suis allocated M. A. Soltys, ...
Liver abscesses containing hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae have emerged during the past 2 decades, originally in Southeast Asia and then worldwide. We hypothesized that hypervirulent K. pneumoniae might also be emerging in France. In a retrospect ...
Functional Study 3: Elucidate the role and function of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence-associated protein Rv0577.Project lead: Garry Buchko, PNNLProject collaborators: Chang Kim, Ph.D., Los Alamos National LaboratoryStatus: Project completed Link to original prooposal
Susceptibility to R. equi pneumonia in foals is exclusive to the first 2-3 months of life. This bacterium causes severe pneumonia, enteritis and occasionally joint infection, with significant economic losses to the horse industry, and critical concerns about equine health and well-being. R. equi is prevalent in the horse environment (soil), and foals are exposed to it immediately after birth. Importantly, R. equi survives and replicates inside immune cells (macrophages); therefore, this bacterium has developed a mechanism to escape the immune system and cause disease. Our hypothesis is that phagocytes of the susceptible foal have impaired killing activity against R. equi because of inadequate signaling from the airway epithelial cells. Our previous studies funded by the Harry M. Zweig Memorial Fund for Equine Research revealed that specialized phagocytes present an age-dependent limitation in their activation, which may be a consequence of inadequate stimulus. This age-dependent development of ...
3P-036 Rhodococcus属菌のフタル酸モノエステル加水分解酵素に重要なアルギニン残基(酵素学,酵素工学,一般講演)3P-036 Rhodococcus属菌のフタル酸モノエステル加水分解酵素に重要なアルギニン残基(酵素学,酵素工学,一般講演)AN10549378 ...
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We investigated the effects of a chronic, progressive infection with Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs), the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), on selected aspects of smoltification in yearling juvenile spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). After experimentally infecting fish with Rs using an immersion challenge, we sampled them every two weeks to monitor changes in gill Na+, K+-ATPase (ATPase), cortisol, infection level, mortality, growth, and other stress-related physiological factors during the normal time of parr-smolt transformation in fresh water (i.e., from winter to spring). A progressively worsening infection with Rs did not alter the normal changes in gill ATPase and condition factor associated with smoltification in juvenile chinook salmon. The infection did, however, lead to elevated levels of plasma cortisol and lactate and depressed levels of plasma glucose, indicating that the disease is stressful during the later stages. A dramatic proliferation of BKD was
Maulén, N. P., Morales, P. J., Aruti, D., Figueroa, J. E., Concha, M. I., Krauskopf, M. and León, G. (1996), Identification of a Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA fragment associated with bacterial internalization into CHSE-cultured cells. FEMS Microbiology Letters, 135: 37-43. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-6968.1996.tb07963.x ...
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Macrolide and rifampin resistance developed on a horse breeding farm after widespread use was instituted for treatment of subclinical pulmonary lesions in foals. Resistance occurred in 6 (24%) of 25 pretreatment and 8 (62%) of 13 (62%) posttreatment isolates from affected foals. Drug-resistant isolates formed 2 distinct genotypic clusters.
Fig. S1. Neighbour-joining unrooted trees of (A) DNA polymerase (E3 gp154) and (B) prohead protease (E3 gp77). Numbers in nodes are the percentage bootstrap values for 1000 replicates; values under 50% are not represented. Reference bacteriophages for accepted genera according to ICTV and NCBI taxonomy are indicated by asterisks. E3 proteins are indicated by arrows. The scale shows the number of amino acid substitutions per site. The topology of the phylogenetic trees (including the TerL tree; see Fig. ) reproduced the branching pattern of phage phylogenies based on whole genomes (Rohwer and Edwards, 2002; Glazko et al., 2007), and most well-supported clades grouped phages classified within an established genus.. Fig. S2. Alignment of the head morphogenesis module of R. equi phage E3, enterobacteriophage HK97 and mycobacteriophages Bxz1 and Myrna. Pairwise sequence similarity between adjacent genomes is indicated by shading. HP, hypothetical protein; PAP, protease-associated protein; ThyX, ...
ID BX251410; SV 1; linear; genomic DNA; STD; PRO; 324050 BP. XX AC BX251410; XX DT 17-FEB-2003 (Rel. 74, Created) DT 06-FEB-2015 (Rel. 123, Last updated, Version 4) XX DE Tropheryma whipplei TW08/27, complete genome; segment 1/3 XX KW complete genome. XX OS Tropheryma whipplei TW08/27 OC Bacteria; Actinobacteria; Micrococcales; Tropheryma. XX RN [1] RP 1-324050 RX DOI; 10.1016/S0140-6736(03)12597-4. RX PUBMED; 12606174. RA Bentley S.D., Maiwald M., Murphy L.D., Pallen M.J., Yeats C.A., Dover L., RA Norbertczak H.T., Besra G.S., Quail M.A., Harris D.E., von Herbay A., RA Goble A., Rutter S., Squares R., Squares S., Barrell B.G., Parkhill J., RA Relman D.A.; RT "Sequencing and analysis of the genome of the Whipples disease bacterium RT Tropheryma whipplei"; RL Lancet 361(9358):637-644(2003). XX RN [2] RP 1-324050 RA Bentley S.D.; RT ; RL Submitted (10-FEB-2003) to the INSDC. RL Submitted on behalf of the Pathogen Sequencing Unit, Sanger Institute, RL Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, ...
Neonatal sepsis due to Rhodococcus equi in two preterm infants. Takçı, Şahin; Bildik, Hacer Neslihan; Yurdakök, Murat; Kara, Ateş // Turkish Journal of Pediatrics;Mar/Apr2013, Vol. 55 Issue 2, p229 We present two cases of Rhodococcus equi bacteremia as a cause of sepsis in premature infants who had increasing respiratory distress with multiple episodes of apnea. When we investigated these infants for apnea etiology, blood cultures were taken, and R. equi was confirmed based on the colony... ...
Statutory controls restrict the movement of live fish to and from the affected farm. Harvesting of clinically unaffected fish for human consumption is permissible but dead fish displaying clinical signs of disease should be disposed of by an approved method in accordance with the appropriate Animal By-Products Regulations. Under certain circumstances permission may be granted to move live fish from an affected farm to another farm subject to BKD controls if such a movement comprises part of a managed clearance and eradication programme and it poses no risk of further transmission of disease. Statutory controls are revoked when BKD is deemed to have been eradicated from the infected site. Eradication can be achieved by depopulating, cleaning and disinfecting an infected farm. Alternatively, eradication can also be achieved through a programme of progressive cleaning and disinfection along with careful management of infected stocks. This involves restocking with fish from a disease-free source and ...
Administration, Amino Acid Substitutions, Ciprofloxacin, Concentration, DNA, DNA Gyrase, Humans, Infection, Oral Administration, Rhodococcus, Rhodococcus Equi, Serum, Strains
Global Whipples Disease Market was around USD 206.2 million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD 255.3 million by 2023 at a projected CAGR of 3.1%,Whipples disease market by diagnosis,by treatment,by end use | Whipples Disease Industry
Estimating actual and ideal bodyweight of adult horses. New calculations more accurately estimate horse bodyweight without a livestock scale.
A typical case of Whipples disease is reported, substantiated by histopathologic study. Treatment with steroids has been used with good results. A prolonged clinical remission has occurred, although...
There are two groups of horses that are assessed and therefore valued to a large extent on their conformation and presentation-the halter horse and the sales weanling or yearling. Fat is a pretty color is an age-old adage, and some sales and halter horses are simply overfed, becoming too fat. In the modern sales and show arena, being fat is simply not enough. To be successful in preparing sales horses and halter horses, the fitter must be able to differentiate fat from fit.
ts very exciting to have the opportunity to school a young horse and see the progress through many hours of training, time and effort. However, all too often riders and trainers get carried away too quickly, and we subject the young horse to injury - not intentionally, but it can happen nonetheless. We explore the…
An im paired production of interleukin (IL)-12 and T cell interferon-γ (IFN-γ) of in vitro stimulated monocytes has been discussed as a pathogenic factor in Whi p ples disease (WD). It is unclear whe
விப்பிள் நோய் (Whipples disease) என்பது துரோபெரைமா விப்ளெய் எனும் பாக்டீரியாவினால் ஏற்படும் உடற்தொகுதி நோயாகும். சோர்ச் ஒய்ட் விப்பிள் 1907 இல் இதனை முதன்முதலில் கண்டறிந்தபோது இது சிறுகுடலில் உணவு அகத்துறிஞ்சாமையை ஏற்படுத்தும் இரையகக் குடலியநோய் என்று கருதினர். எனினும், மூட்டுக்கள், மைய நரம்புத் தொகுதி, குருதிச் சுற்றோட்டத் தொகுதி, நுரையீரல் தொகுதி போன்ற வேறு ஒருங்கியங்களையும் ...
All breeders hope to produce healthy, well-grown foals that continue to grow and thrive. It is known that larger mares tend to deliver larger foals and that a mares first foal may be somewhat smaller than her later foals.
Analysis of transcriptional responses of BMDMs to T. whipplei.BMDMs were stimulated with T. whipplei (50 bacteria/cell) for six hours and host responses were an
A 43 year old man with a history of chronic hepatitis C and alcohol abuse was admitted to the hospital with a five day history of haemoptysis and shortness of breath. He had no recent history of hospitalisation, fever with rigor, tuberculosis, or HIV exposure. He also denied contact with sick individuals, contact with animals, or recent travel. He had a history of heavy alcohol intake and a splenectomy after a motor vehicle trauma in the remote past.. On initial examination he had a fever of 100°F, although his other vital signs were normal. His physical examination revealed mild bronchial breath sounds on the left upper lung field. The initial laboratory findings revealed his total white blood cell count to be 32.4 × 109/litre. A hepatic screen revealed raised liver enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase, 155 U/litre; alanine aminotransferase, 110 U/litre; and alkaline phosphatase, 134 U/litre). His chest x ray was suggestive of left upper lung field opacification. An empirical antibiotic ...
... syndrome Acrospiroma ACTH deficiency ACTH resistance Atelectasis Actinic keratosis Actinomycetales causes anal infection ... propionic Acitretine antenatal infection Ackerman syndrome Acne rosacea Acne vulgaris; often called acne Acoustic neuroma ... syndrome Albright-Turner-Morgani syndrome Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy Albright's syndrome Alcohol antenatal infection ... neonatorum Aspiration pneumonia Asplenia Astasis Astasia-abasia Asthenia Asthma Astigmatism Astrocytoma Astrovirus infection ...
... vibrio infections MeSH C01.252.400.959.347 --- cholera MeSH C01.252.410.040 --- actinomycetales infections MeSH C01.252.410.040 ... bacteroides infections MeSH C01.252.400.126 --- bartonellaceae infections MeSH C01.252.400.126.100 --- bartonella infections ... acinetobacter infections MeSH C01.252.400.610 --- mycoplasmatales infections MeSH C01.252.400.610.610 --- mycoplasma infections ... bordetella infections MeSH C01.252.400.143.740 --- whooping cough MeSH C01.252.400.155 --- borrelia infections MeSH C01.252. ...
... ulcerans infection. Screening to detect early infection could guide early intervention. There are several polymerase chain ... particularly bacteria such as Streptomyces and Saccharopolyspora species in the order Actinomycetales. Interestingly, a number ... Infection of two patients in Liberia". Int J Dermatol. 20 (5): 362-7. doi:10.1111/j.1365-4362.1981.tb00822.x. PMID 7239752. ... In Papua New Guinea, the infection occurs mainly in relation to the Sepik and Kumusi rivers; in the latter areas, the disease ...
These bacteria cause disease in humans called Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection or Mycobacterium avium complex ... "Mycobacterium Avium Complex infections , Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) - an NCATS Program". rarediseases. ... MAC bacteria enter most people's body when inhaled into the lungs or swallowed, but only cause infection in those who are ... Jones-Lopez, Edward C.; Ellner, Jerrold J. (2011). "Chapter 35: Tuberculosis and Atypical Mycobacterial Infections". In ...
Mycobacterial infections are difficult to treat. The organisms are tough due to their cell wall.[2] In addition, they are ... Many people around the world have infections of M. tuberculosis without showing any signs of it. ...
MAC infection can cause chronic pulmonary disease, lymphadenitis, and can cause disseminated disease, especially in people with ... Actinomycetales. Suborder:. Corynebacterineae. Family:. Mycobacteriaceae. Genus:. Mycobacterium. Species complex:. ... Gram-positive bacterial infection: Actinobacteria (primarily A00-A79, 001-041, 080-109) ... These bacteria cause disease in humans called Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection or Mycobacterium avium complex ...
Infection occurs if the bacterium is ingested.[citation needed]. M. bovis is usually transmitted to humans by consuming raw, ... M. bovis infections in cattle herds in the United States is not common. M. bovis is endemic in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus ... In the 1930s, 40% of cattle in the UK were infected with M. bovis and there were 50,000 new cases of human M. bovis infection ... Actual infections in humans are nowadays rare in developed countries, mainly because pasteurisation kills M. bovis bacteria in ...
These are: Cell Biology and Infection, Developmental Biology, Genomes and Genetics, Immunology, Infection and Epidemiology, ... Having observed that most actinomycetales are saprophytes, that is able to survive outside of living organisms, with the help ... Yersin looked for the germ responsible for the infection specifically in these plague-spots, tumors caused by the inflammation ... The discovery and use of sulfonamides in treating infections was another breakthrough. Some researchers won fame by discovering ...
ISBN 0-531-09806-0. Wuerthele-Caspe, V (1955). "Neoplastic infections of man and animals". Journal of the American Medical ... attributing characteristics to Actinomycetales (the order Livingston believed P. cryptocides belonged to) shared by no other ... The microbe was classified under the order Actinomycetales. Livingston described Progenitor as an intermittently acid-fast ...
Infection leads to inflammation and the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6 ) which stimulates hepcidin expression. In humans, IL-6 ... Common Gram-positive species are those belonging to the Actinomycetales and species of the genera Bacillus, Arthrobacter and ... With bacterial vascular diseases, the infection is spread within the plants through the xylem. Once within the plant, the ... Lactoferrin is present in secretory fluids, such as sweat, tears and milk, thereby minimising bacterial infection. Ferritin is ...
Two Actinomycetales bacteria Streptomyces asiaticus and S. cangkringensis have been isolated from the rhizosphere soil ... "Initial infection of Falcataria moluccana leaves and Acacia mangium phyllodes by Uromycladium tepperianum fungi in a laboratory ...
"Diphtheria Infection , Home , CDC". www.cdc.gov. 2017-04-10. Retrieved 2017-11-27.. ...
Brakhage AA (December 2005). "Systemic fungal infections caused by Aspergillus species: epidemiology, infection process and ... Many Actinomycetales (Actinobacteria), a group with many filamentous bacteria, were also long believed to be fungi. Although ... Struck C (2006). "Infection strategies of plant parasitic fungi". In Cooke BM, Jones DG, Kaye B. The Epidemiology of Plant ... Fungi can become the target of infection by mycoviruses. Many fungi produce biologically active compounds, several of which are ...
The molecule ritonavir, marketed as Norvir, was developed as a protease inhibitor and used to target HIV infection. However, it ... Some prokaryotes, including many archaea and the bacterial order Actinomycetales also share homologs of the 20S proteasome, ... the 11S may play a role in degradation of foreign peptides such as those produced after infection by a virus. The number and ... such as infection, heat shock, or oxidative damage - heat shock proteins that identify misfolded or unfolded proteins and ...
Species include Chlamydia trachomatis (chlamydia infection). Chlorobi[edit]. Main article: Chlorobi. Chlorobi is a member of ...
Lan, R; Reeves, PR (2002). "Escherichia coli in disguise: molecular origins of Shigella". Microbes and infection / Institut ... Actinomycetales, Streptomycetales, and Flexibacteriales. Migula, which was the most widely accepted system of its time and ... several orders such as Bacillales and Actinomycetales (now in the phylum Actinobacteria) Mollicutes (gram variable, e.g. ... classes Actinomycetales, Myxobacteriales, and Azotobacteriales) Algobacteriales (classes Siderobacteriales and Thiobacteriales ...
Infection, Genetics and Evolution. 8 (3): 267-85. doi:10.1016/j.meegid.2008.01.002. PMID 18295550. Archived (PDF) from the ... as these structures are often present during chronic bacterial infections or in infections of implanted medical devices, and ... "Infection and Immunity. 72 (10): 5676-86. doi:10.1128/IAI.72.10.5676-5686.2004. PMC 517526. PMID 15385466.. ... Some organisms, such as Staphylococcus or Streptococcus, can cause skin infections, pneumonia, meningitis and even overwhelming ...
Having observed that most actinomycetales are saprophytes, that is able to survive outside of living organisms, with the help ... Yersin looked for the germ responsible for the infection specifically in these plague-spots, tumors caused by the inflammation ... The discovery and use of sulfonamides in treating infections was another breakthrough. Some researchers won fame by discovering ... mistake by the Institute was ignoring a dissertation by Ernest Duchesne on the use of Penicillium glaucum to cure infections in ...
... in a disseminated infection but not lung infection, used to be a significant cause of death in AIDS patients. The species M. ... 放线菌目 Actinomycetales 科:. 分枝杆菌科 Mycobacteriaceae ...
The symptoms of Campylobacter infections were described in 1886 in infants by Theodor Escherich.[10] These infections were ... "Infection and Immunity. 61 (5): 1764-71. PMC 280763. PMID 8478066.. *^ Firehammer, BD; Border, M (1968). "Isolation of ... "Campylobacter Infections: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology".. *^ a b Ryan, Kenneth James; Ray, C. George, eds. (2004 ... Another source of infection is contact with infected animals, which often carry Campylobacter asymptomatically.[3] At least a ...
Lan, R; Reeves, PR (2002). "Escherichia coli in disguise: molecular origins of Shigella". Microbes and Infection / Institut ... several orders such as Bacillales and Actinomycetales (now in the phylum Actinobacteria) ... Eubacteriales (classes Asporulales and Sporulales) Mycobacteriales (classes Actinomycetales, Myxobacteriales, and ... Actinomycetales, Streptomycetales, and Flexibacteriales. Migula,[23] which was the most widely accepted system of its time and ...
... is a large family of Gram-negative bacteria. It was first proposed by Rahn in 1936, and now includes over 30 genera and more than 100 species. Its classification above the level of family is still a subject of debate, but one classification places it in the order Enterobacterales of the class Gammaproteobacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria.[2][3][4][5] Enterobacteriaceae includes, along with many harmless symbionts, many of the more familiar pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, and Shigella. Other disease-causing bacteria in this family include Enterobacter and Citrobacter. Members of the Enterobacteriaceae can be trivially referred to as enterobacteria or "enteric bacteria",[6] as several members live in the intestines of animals. In fact, the etymology of the family is enterobacterium with the suffix to designate a family (aceae)-not after the genus Enterobacter (which would be "Enterobacteraceae")-and the type genus is Escherichia. ...
... are a class of gram-negative bacteria, and one of the eight classes of the phylum Proteobacteria.[1] The Betaproteobacteria are a class comprising over 75 genera and 400 species of bacteria.[2] Together, the Betaproteobacteria represent a broad variety of metabolic strategies and occupy diverse environments from obligate pathogens living within host organisms to oligotrophic groundwater ecosystems. Whilst most members of the Betaproteobacteria are heterotrophic, deriving both their carbon and electrons from organocarbon sources, some are photoheterotrophic, deriving energy from light and carbon from organocarbon sources. Other genera are autotrophic, deriving their carbon from bicarbonate or carbon dioxide and their electrons from reduced inorganic ions such as nitrite, ammonium, thiosulfate or sulfide [1] - many of these chemolithoautotrophic Betaproteobacteria are economically important, with roles in maintaining soil pH and in elementary cycling. Other economically ...
optochin susceptible: S. pneumoniae (Pneumococcal infection). optochin resistant: S. viridans (S. mitis, S. mutans, S. oralis, ...
Blamed for causing the 'stink' when creating a sourdough starter, some species are also capable of causing human infection.[3] ...
The molecule ritonavir, marketed as Norvir, was developed as a protease inhibitor and used to target HIV infection. However, it ... Some prokaryotes, including many archaea and the bacterial order Actinomycetales, also share homologs of the 20S proteasome, ... In response to cellular stresses - such as infection, heat shock, or oxidative damage - heat shock proteins that identify ... the 11S may play a role in degradation of foreign peptides such as those produced after infection by a virus.[16] ...
What is Actinomycetales (Actinomyces) infection? Actinomycetales infections are caused by an order of bacteria known as ... Do you have an Actinomycetales Infection question or want to share advice?. ...
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Ritonavir. ...
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Virus Diseases ... Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the deadliest infections throughout the world, particularly in the setting of HIV infection. ... Human immunodeficiency virus associated tuberculosis more often due to recent infection than reactivation of latent infection. ... not much is known about how these two infections affect each other. Some people who have HIV or TB infections develop health ...
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. To Top ...
Mycobacterium Infections. Actinomycetales Infections. Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections. Bacterial Infections. Moxifloxacin. ... Wells CD, Cegielski JP, Nelson LJ, Laserson KF, Holtz TH, Finlay A, Castro KG, Weyer K. HIV infection and multidrug-resistant ... by use of an in vitro pharmacodynamic infection model and mathematical modeling. J Infect Dis. 2004 Nov 1;190(9):1642-51. Epub ...
6. Actinomycetales infection. 7. Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene. 8. Adenocarcinoma of lung. 9. Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo- ...
2. Actinomycetales infection. 3. Acute leukemia. 4. Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome. 5. Behcets Disease. 6. Besnier- ...
3. Actinomycetales infection. 4. Acute fatty liver of pregnancy. 5. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. 6. Alcohol-induced pseudo- ...
Actinomycetales Infections / microbiology* * Bacterial Typing Techniques * Female * Genes, rRNA * Humans * Molecular Sequence ...
Actinomycetales Infections / immunology * Actinomycetales Infections / microbiology * Actinomycetales Infections / pathology* * ...
Actinomycetales infection ... cough, coughing up blood*Actinomycosis ... pus in the mouth, jaw pain, tooth pain, swollen jaw, ... Arcobacter butzleri infection ... vomiting*Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection ... vomiting*Arcobacter infection ... vomiting* ... Acanthamoeba infection ... vomiting*Acanthamoeba infection of the central nervous system ... vomiting*Acanthocytosis ... ... Adenophorea Infections ... cough*Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anaemia due to ... breathlessness*Adenoviridae Infections ...
Actinomycetales infection ... enlarged spleen, enlarged liver*Acute adult T-Cell leukemia ... enlarged spleen, enlarged liver* ... Invasive candidiasis ... hepatosplenic infection, liver infection. J. *Joubert Syndrome 9 ... liver fibrosis. K. *Kawasaki ... Hepadnaviral infection ... jaundice*Hepadnaviruses ... jaundice*Hepadnoavirus infection ... jaundice*Hepatic amyloidosis with ... Liver infection (12 causes) *Liver cancer (40 causes) *Abnormal liver function tests (12 causes) *Liver abnormalities (23 ...
Categories: Actinomycetales Infections Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
Actinomycetales infection in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Ann Intern Med. 1985;102:203-5.PubMed ... To the Editor: Invasive infections with Streptomyces spp. are rare; in reference to two cases reported in Emerging Infectious ... Streptomyces pneumonia in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection: case report and review of the literature on ... Autopsy identified no possible focus of infection other than the patients intestines, which were severely inflamed with ...
Actinomycetales Infections. *Bacterial Infections. *Bacteroides Infections. *Endocarditis, Bacterial. *Leukemia, Promyelocytic ...
Actinomycetales Infections. *Bacterial Infections. *Bacteroides Infections. *Endocarditis, Bacterial. *Pneumonia, Pneumocystis ... It should not be used in patients with nonbacterial infections such as most upper respiratory tract infections. C. difficile ... Cleocin is an antibiotic and treats infection. Finish taking all of your medication as directed. Even if you feel better, do ... The recommended dose of clindamycin injection for the treatment of bacterial infections is 600 to 2700 mg per day in 2, 3, or 4 ...
The most common factor among IUD users with Actinomycetales infection is not the type of IUD but the duration of use; almost 85 ... DISTRIBUTION OF ACTINOMYCETALES IN SEWAGE OUTLETS ALONG COAST IN NINGBO%宁波沿海陆源排污口放线菌(Actinomycetales sp.)的分布特点 ... Lung transplant recipients have an increased risk for actinomycetales infection secondary to immunosuppressive regimen. A case ... Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung transplant recipients have an increased risk for actinomycetales
The predominant orders in lung microbiota communities before infection were Bacillales, Actinomycetales and Clostridiales. ... The predominant orders in lung microbiota communities before infection were Bacillales, Actinomycetales and Clostridiales. ... Whereas the presence of local lung infection with Ps aer did not significantly alter the proportion of Gram negative bacteria ( ... Whereas the presence of local lung infection with Ps aer did not significantly alter the proportion of Gram negative bacteria ( ...
Factors that affect latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion in the US have not been well studied beyond public ... Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections, Actinomycetales Infections, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Mycobacterium Infections, ... see also Mycobacterium Infections - Latent Tuberculosis).. Keywords for this news article include: Fort Worth, Texas. , United ... For more information on this research see: Predictors of latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion in the US private ...
... syndrome Acrospiroma ACTH deficiency ACTH resistance Atelectasis Actinic keratosis Actinomycetales causes anal infection ... propionic Acitretine antenatal infection Ackerman syndrome Acne rosacea Acne vulgaris; often called acne Acoustic neuroma ... syndrome Albright-Turner-Morgani syndrome Albrights hereditary osteodystrophy Albrights syndrome Alcohol antenatal infection ... neonatorum Aspiration pneumonia Asplenia Astasis Astasia-abasia Asthenia Asthma Astigmatism Astrocytoma Astrovirus infection ...
... suspects were presumptively diagnosed as having Nocardia infection and three patients had infection with other Actinomycetales ... The proportion of individuals with Nocardia infection alone was 76.5% (n = 13), three (n = 3, 17.7%) cases had co-infection ... Jones N, Khoosal M, Louw M, Karstaedt A. Nocardial infection as a complication of HIV in South Africa. The Journal of infection ... Patients might also be confused with other chronic lung infections such as invasive fungal infection [18, 19]. ...
Gastrointestinal Mycobacterium Infections Actinomycetales Infections Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections Bacterial Infections ... function (Grade A). Peritonitis, tunnel infections and vascular access-related infections in patients on peritoneal or ... TB peritonitis Peritoneal infection represents seeding from abdominal lymph nodes or from salpingo-oophoritis. Peritonitis is ... Uncontrolled massive dissemination can occur during primary infection or after reactivation of a latent focus. The lungs and ...
6. Actinomycetales infection. 7. Acute Bokhoror. 8. Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers and painters Naptha. 9. Acute ...
7. Actinomycetales infection. 8. Acute Bronchitis. 9. Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers and painters Naptha. 10. ...
  • CLASSIFICATION OF DISEASES AND INJURIES I. INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES (001-139) Includes: diseases generally recognized as communicable or transmissible as well as a few diseases of unknown but possibly infectious origin Excludes: acute respiratory infections (460-466) influenza (487. (cdc.gov)
  • Acute renal failure has many possible causes, including urinary tract obstruction, tubular necrosis, autoimmune diseases, very low blood pressure, clots in the kidney blood vessels, infections, and complications associated with pregnancy. (webhealthnetwork.com)
  • Acute infection with Propionibacterium acnes after a Latarjet coracoid transfer procedure: a case report. (rush.edu)
  • Many cause respiratory tract infections during the abdominal pain in the right lower pilgrims from throughout the world, pilgrimage (hajj) season in Makkah, Saudi quadrant and feculent vomitus. (cdc.gov)
  • As with HIV in humans, FIV infection can result in progressive immune dysfunction, with a corresponding increase in a variety of infectious disease risks. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A variety of ocular and oral manifestations of HIV infection can occur in humans, including both infectious and non-infectious causes [ 11 ], and it is possible that alterations in the local microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology of some of these diseases. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In addition to humans, a variety of animals, birds, reptiles and fish are susceptible to infection with atypical mycobacteria (AM). Modern taxonomic tools have identified many new species of AM, the majority of which are considered potential pathogens, given appropriate host conditions. (cancerscreening.gov.au)
  • Since the initial description by Golub et al 3 initial description of R. equi infection in humans in 1967, more than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. (upmc.edu)
  • Current research also focuses on several species that are known to cause infections, especially in humans. (asm.org)
  • This infection causes respiratory illness in birds, pigs, and humans, especially in immunocompromised people. (sciencephoto.com)
  • This underscores needs to consider pulmonary nocardiosis as a differential diagnosis when there is a failure of anti-TB therapy and as a possible cause of human infections. (biomedcentral.com)
  • nocardiosis - a pulmonary or brain infection that is caused by Nocadia asteroides. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Pulmonary infections usually arise after aspiration of oropharyngeal or GI secretions. (medscape.com)
  • To assess whether Mtb infection modifies the lung microbiome, and identify changes in microbial abundance and diversity as a function of pulmonary inflammation, we compared infected and uninfected lung lobe washes collected serially from 26 macaques by bronchoalveolar lavage over the course of infection. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Overall, however, the changes to the airway microbiota after Mtb infection were surprisingly modest, despite a range of Mtb-induced pulmonary inflammation in this cohort of macaques. (beds.ac.uk)
  • Whilst treatment with CMS appeared to have little impact on microbial community composition after infection, or the change undergone by communities in reaching that state, when Gram negative organisms (excluding Pseudomonadales) were considered together as a group there was a significant decrease in their relative proportion that was only observed in the sheep treated with CMS. (nih.gov)
  • certain localized infections Note: Categories for "late effects" of infectious and parasitic diseases are to be found at 137. (cdc.gov)
  • Chronic wound infections make up 60 - 80% of all human infectious diseases, and are cause of major concern to global health in view of our aging population and increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity. (kenyon.edu)
  • Since there were no obvious predisposing conditions preceding anaerobic infection in the young male patient other than acupuncture therapy, it is speculated that the organism was introduced to the blood circulation either from improperly sterilized acupuncture needles or from the colon via minute perforations caused by those needles. (asm.org)
  • Once the organism is established locally, it spreads to surrounding tissues in a progressive manner, leading to a chronic, indurated, suppurative infection often with draining sinuses and fibrosis. (medscape.com)
  • Necropsy examination at d14 confirmed the presence of chronic local lung infection and lung pathology in every direct lung segment. (nih.gov)
  • While the diagnosis of R. equi infections ultimately rests on culture techniques, characteristic tissue pathology, particularly in lung parenchyma, should raise the pathologist's suspicion of R. equi . (upmc.edu)
  • Bacteroides fragilis and Clostridium perfringens are the anaerobic agents isolated most frequently from infections ( 3 , 7 ). (asm.org)
  • As the infection progresses, the foamy histiocytes accumulate lamellar calcified basophilic staining cytoplasmic bodies containing a central crystalline core surrounded by a less dense peripheral zone, Michaelis-Gutmann bodies (Image 19 , not from current case, courtesy of Samuel A. Yousem, MD). This latter histologic picture, termed malakoplakia, is extremely rare within the lung and, when present, is highly suggestive of a R. equi infection. (upmc.edu)
  • R. equi is unable to hydrolyze casein, xanthine, and tyrosine, features which biochemically distinguish it from many members of Actinomycetales . (upmc.edu)
  • Recently, blood transcriptional signatures capable of distinguishing active and latent TB infection have been identified using highly parallelized analytical platforms capable of simultaneous survey of transcription of known genes. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The typical encrustations of organic and inorganic urine-derived material, including microbial biofilms formed during 3-6 weeks on ureteral stents in patients treated for kidney and ureteral stones, and without reported urinary tract infection at the time of stent insertion, were analysed. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To be sure, Oskar Fischer was the first on record to suggest that chronic infection might be causative for what we today call AD. (j-alz.com)
  • Together these findings extend the complexity of regulation and function of Hox genes in C. elegans and demonstrate the importance of their tissue-specific expression for correct development and response to infection. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Moreover, we identified several specific taxa normally associated with the oral microbiome that increased in relative abundance in the lung following Mtb infection, including SR1 , Aggregatibacter , Leptotrichia , Prevotella , and Campylobacter . (beds.ac.uk)