An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.
A vasodilator that also has bronchodilatory action. It has been employed in the treatment of angina pectoris, in the treatment of asthma, and in conjunction with ultraviolet light A, has been tried in the treatment of vitiligo. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1024)
Cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive also used to occlude blood vessels supplying neoplastic or other diseased tissue.
A genus of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria whose species are widely distributed and are abundant in soil. Some strains are pathogenic opportunists for humans and animals.
A genus of gram-positive bacteria that forms a branched mycelium. It commonly occurs as a saprophytic form in soil and aquatic environments.
Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
A genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria whose organisms are nonmotile. Filaments that may be present in certain species are either straight or wavy and may have swollen or clubbed heads.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.
A genus of asporogenous bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. Its organisms appear as straight to slightly curved rods and are known to be human and animal parasites and pathogens.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
The outermost layer of a cell in most PLANTS; BACTERIA; FUNGI; and ALGAE. The cell wall is usually a rigid structure that lies external to the CELL MEMBRANE, and provides a protective barrier against physical or chemical agents.
Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
Organic, monobasic acids derived from hydrocarbons by the equivalent of oxidation of a methyl group to an alcohol, aldehyde, and then acid. Fatty acids are saturated and unsaturated (FATTY ACIDS, UNSATURATED). (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Proteins found in any species of bacterium.

Application of temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis in taxonomy of coryneform bacteria. (1/1707)

Strains belonging to the Gram-positive coryneform soil bacteria were screened genotypically by temperature-gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). This method allows the sequence-specific separation of amplified fragments of 16S rRNA genes. A total of 115 reference strains representing the majority of the species of the genera Aeromicrobium, Agromyces, Arthrobacter, Aureobacterium, Cellulomonas, Curtobacterium, Nocardioides and Terrabacter were characterized. Depending on the genus investigated, the resolution limit of the technique appeared to be at the species or genus level or intermediate between the two. Aberrant TGGE profiles of strains within particular taxa revealed genomic heterogeneity and generic misclassification of nine strains studied. Beyond that, indications of 16S rRNA gene heterogeneity were found within the genomes of three Curtobacterium strains. The misclassifications revealed by TGGE were confirmed using whole-cell fatty acid methyl ester analysis and subsequent comparison with a database. TGGE has been demonstrated to be a useful tool in bacterial taxonomy.  (+info)

New genus-specific primers for the PCR identification of members of the genera Pseudonocardia and Saccharopolyspora. (2/1707)

Members of the family Pseudonocardiaceae are difficult to identify on the basis of their micromorphology only. The biochemical characterization of each new isolate is a painstaking and time-consuming task which cannot always be undertaken when handling large numbers of strains as is the case in natural product screening programmes. In this study, two sets of genus-specific oligonucleotides were designed which allow rapid detection of members of the genera Pseudonocardia and Saccharopolyspora by means of PCR-specific amplification. The genus specificity of these primers was validated on a wide range of collection strains and the primers were subsequently used to study a group of 106 wild-type isolates that possessed morphological characteristics of the family. Out of this group, 51 strains could be identified as members of the genus Pseudonocardia and only nine isolates could be assigned to the genus Saccharopolyspora. The diversity indicated by whole-cell fatty acid profiles of both wild-type and reference strains was compared with that identified using the oligonucleotide primers. The partial 16S rDNA sequencing of representative wild-type strains was used to validate their genus assignment by PCR-specific amplification. This study shows the industrial usefulness of the application of these direct identification tools as well as the complementary use of two sources of data, PCR-specific amplification results and fatty acid composition, to assess the diversity of a microbial population.  (+info)

Reclassification of Brevibacterium oxydans (Chatelain and Second 1966) as Microbacterium oxydans comb. nov. (3/1707)

Phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses indicate that Brevibacterium oxydans is closely related to species of the genus Microbacterium, namely Microbacterium liquefaciens, Microbacterium luteolum and Microbacterium saperdae. DNA-DNA reassociation values of less than 60% between Brevibacterium oxydans and these three Microbacterium species support the distinctness of this misclassified Brevibacterium species, which is reclassified as Microbacterium oxydans comb. nov.  (+info)

Structure of actinotetraose hexatiglate, a unique glucotetraose from an actinomycete bacterium. (4/1707)

An Actinomycete strain A499 belonging to the genera Amycolatopsis or Amycolata isolated from a Western Australian soil sample produced the cyclic decapeptide antibiotic quinaldopeptin (1), together with the actinotetraose hexatiglate (2), the hexa-ester of a novel non-reducing glucotetraose.  (+info)

IC202A, a new siderophore with immunosuppressive activity produced by Streptoalloteichus sp. 1454-19. I. Taxonomy, fermentation, isolation and biological activity. (5/1707)

IC202A, a new immunosuppressive compound, was isolated from the culture filtrate of Streptoalloteichus sp. 1454-19. It showed a suppressive effect on mixed lymphocyte culture reaction with an IC50 value of 3.6 microg/ml and mitogen induced lymphocyte blastogenesis in vitro.  (+info)

IC202A, a new siderophore with immunosuppressive activity produced by Streptoalloteichus sp. 1454-19. II. Physico-chemical properties and structure elucidation. (6/1707)

IC202A (1) was isolated from the culture filtrate of Streptoalloteichus sp. 1454-19. The structure of 1 was determined by spectral analysis including a variety of two-dimentional NMR and FAB-MS experiments. IC202A is a ferrioxamine-related compound containing a butylidene N-oxide function.  (+info)

Growth and production kinetics of a teicoplanin producing strain of Actinoplanes teichomyceticus. (7/1707)

The growth and production kinetics of a teicoplanin producing strain of Actinoplanes teichomyceticus (ATCC 31121) was investigated during batch cultivations on defined media. The growth was characterised by two exponential growth phases (EGPs), with a higher specific growth rate in the first than in the second phase. Also the specific rate of formation of teicoplanin was significantly lower in the second phase than in the first phase. This two-phased growth pattern was suggested to be caused by inhibition of growth by teicoplanin accumulated. Furthermore high concentrations of ammonia or phosphate reduced both the specific growth rate in the first EGP and the total production of teicoplanin.  (+info)

Formation of hydride-Meisenheimer complexes of picric acid (2,4, 6-trinitrophenol) and 2,4-dinitrophenol during mineralization of picric acid by Nocardioides sp. strain CB 22-2. (8/1707)

There are only a few examples of microbial conversion of picric acid (2,4,6-trinitrophenol). None of the organisms that have been described previously is able to use this compound as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy at high rates. In this study we isolated and characterized a strain, strain CB 22-2, that was able to use picric acid as a sole source of carbon and energy at concentrations up to 40 mM and at rates of 1.6 mmol. h(-1). g (dry weight) of cells(-1) in continuous cultures and 920 micromol. h(-1). g (dry weight) of cells(-1) in flasks. In addition, this strain was able to use picric acid as a sole source of nitrogen at comparable rates in a nitrogen-free medium. Biochemical characterization and 16S ribosomal DNA analysis revealed that strain CB 22-2 is a Nocardioides sp. strain. High-pressure liquid chromatography and UV-visible light data, the low residual chemical oxygen demand, and the stoichiometric release of 2.9 +/- 0.1 mol of nitrite per mol of picric acid provided strong evidence that complete mineralization of picric acid occurred. During transformation, the metabolites detected in the culture supernatant were the [H-]-Meisenheimer complexes of picric acid and 2,4-dinitrophenol (H--DNP), as well as 2,4-dinitrophenol. Experiments performed with crude extracts revealed that H--DNP formation indeed is a physiologically relevant step in picric acid metabolism.  (+info)

Actinomycetales is an order of Gram-positive bacteria that are characterized by their filamentous morphology and branching appearance, resembling fungi. These bacteria are often found in soil and water, and some species can cause diseases in humans and animals. The name "Actinomycetales" comes from the Greek words "actis," meaning ray or beam, and "mykes," meaning fungus.

The order Actinomycetales includes several families of medical importance, such as Mycobacteriaceae (which contains the tuberculosis-causing Mycobacterium tuberculosis), Corynebacteriaceae (which contains the diphtheria-causing Corynebacterium diphtheriae), and Actinomycetaceae (which contains the actinomycosis-causing Actinomyces israelii).

Actinomycetales are known for their complex cell walls, which contain a unique type of lipid called mycolic acid. This feature makes them resistant to many antibiotics and contributes to their ability to cause chronic infections. They can also form resistant structures called spores, which allow them to survive in harsh environments and contribute to their ability to cause disease.

Overall, Actinomycetales are important both as beneficial soil organisms and as potential pathogens that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals.

Khellin is not typically defined in a medical dictionary as it is not a medical term itself, but rather a chemical compound found in certain plants. However, Khellin is known for its use in traditional medicine and has been studied in modern medicine for its potential therapeutic effects. Here's the definition of Khellin from a chemistry perspective:

Khellin (C10H8O3) is a chemical compound derived from the seeds of the plant Ammi visnaga, also known as khella or Bishop's weed. It belongs to the class of organic compounds called furanocoumarins, which are naturally occurring aromatic organic compounds containing a furan ring (a five-membered aromatic heterocycle with four carbon atoms and one oxygen atom) fused to a coumarin ring (a benzene ring fused to α-pyrone).

Khellin has been used in traditional medicine for treating various conditions, including asthma, angina pectoris, and headaches. Modern research has investigated its potential as a therapeutic agent for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and other medical conditions. However, more studies are needed to establish its safety and efficacy before it can be widely used in modern medicine.

I apologize for any confusion, but I am unable to provide a medical definition for "Bucrylate" because it is not a term recognized in the medical field. It is possible that there may be a typographical error or misunderstanding of the intended term. If you have more information about the substance you are asking about, I'd be happy to help you try to find the correct definition or provide information related to its uses, safety, or other relevant details.

Nocardia is a genus of aerobic, gram-positive, filamentous bacteria that can be found in soil, water, and decaying vegetation. It is known to cause various infectious diseases in humans and animals, known as nocardiosis. The infection often enters the body through inhalation, skin wounds, or surgical procedures. Nocardia species are opportunistic pathogens, meaning they mainly cause disease in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS, organ transplants, or cancer. The infection can affect various organs, including the lungs, brain, skin, and eyes, leading to symptoms like cough, fever, chest pain, weight loss, and skin abscesses. Proper diagnosis and treatment with antibiotics are crucial for managing nocardiosis.

Micromonospora is a genus of aerobic, Gram-positive bacteria that are widely distributed in soil and aquatic environments. These bacteria are known for their ability to produce a variety of bioactive compounds, including antibiotics, antifungal agents, and enzyme inhibitors. They are characterized by their filamentous morphology and the production of aerial hyphae that fragment into rod-shaped or coccoid cells. Some species of Micromonospora have been investigated for their potential use in biotechnology and medicine due to their ability to produce useful compounds. However, some species can also be opportunistic pathogens in humans, causing infections in immunocompromised individuals.

Actinobacteria are a group of gram-positive bacteria that are widely distributed in nature, including in soil, water, and various organic substrates. They are characterized by their high G+C content in their DNA and complex cell wall composition, which often contains mycolic acids. Some Actinobacteria are known to form branching filaments, giving them a characteristic "actinomycete" morphology. Many species of Actinobacteria have important roles in industry, agriculture, and medicine. For example, some produce antibiotics, enzymes, and other bioactive compounds, while others play key roles in biogeochemical cycles such as the decomposition of organic matter and the fixation of nitrogen. Additionally, some Actinobacteria are pathogenic and can cause diseases in humans, animals, and plants.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Actinomyces is a genus of gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are normal inhabitants of the human mouth, colon, and urogenital tract. Under certain conditions, such as poor oral hygiene or tissue trauma, these bacteria can cause infections known as actinomycosis. These infections often involve the formation of abscesses or granulomas and can affect various tissues, including the lungs, mouth, and female reproductive organs. Actinomyces species are also known to form complex communities called biofilms, which can contribute to their ability to cause infection.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

Streptomyces is a genus of Gram-positive, aerobic, saprophytic bacteria that are widely distributed in soil, water, and decaying organic matter. They are known for their complex morphology, forming branching filaments called hyphae that can differentiate into long chains of spores.

Streptomyces species are particularly notable for their ability to produce a wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites, including antibiotics, antifungals, and other therapeutic compounds. In fact, many important antibiotics such as streptomycin, neomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin are derived from Streptomyces species.

Because of their industrial importance in the production of antibiotics and other bioactive compounds, Streptomyces have been extensively studied and are considered model organisms for the study of bacterial genetics, biochemistry, and ecology.

Corynebacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. Some species of Corynebacterium can cause disease in humans, including C. diphtheriae, which causes diphtheria, and C. jeikeium, which can cause various types of infections in immunocompromised individuals. Other species are part of the normal flora and are not typically pathogenic. The bacteria are characterized by their irregular, club-shaped appearance and their ability to form characteristic arrangements called palisades. They are facultative anaerobes, meaning they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

Base composition in genetics refers to the relative proportion of the four nucleotide bases (adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine) in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, adenine pairs with thymine, and guanine pairs with cytosine, so the base composition is often expressed in terms of the ratio of adenine + thymine (A-T) to guanine + cytosine (G-C). This ratio can vary between species and even between different regions of the same genome. The base composition can provide important clues about the function, evolution, and structure of genetic material.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A cell wall is a rigid layer found surrounding the plasma membrane of plant cells, fungi, and many types of bacteria. It provides structural support and protection to the cell, maintains cell shape, and acts as a barrier against external factors such as chemicals and mechanical stress. The composition of the cell wall varies among different species; for example, in plants, it is primarily made up of cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, while in bacteria, it is composed of peptidoglycan.

Actinomycetales are a group of gram-positive bacteria that can cause various types of infections in humans. The term "Actinomycetales infections" is used to describe a range of diseases caused by these organisms, which are characterized by the formation of characteristic granules or "actinomycetes" composed of bacterial cells and inflammatory tissue.

Some common examples of Actinomycetales infections include:

1. Actinomycosis: A chronic infection that typically affects the face, neck, and mouth, but can also occur in other parts of the body such as the lungs or abdomen. It is caused by various species of Actinomyces, which are normal inhabitants of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract.
2. Nocardiosis: A rare but serious infection that can affect the lungs, brain, or skin. It is caused by the bacterium Nocardia, which is found in soil and water.
3. Mycetoma: A chronic infection that affects the skin and underlying tissues, causing the formation of nodules and sinuses that discharge pus containing grains composed of fungal or bacterial elements. It is caused by various species of Actinomyces, Nocardia, and other related bacteria.
4. Streptomyces infections: While Streptomyces species are best known for their role in producing antibiotics, they can also cause infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These infections can affect various organs, including the lungs, skin, and soft tissues.

Treatment of Actinomycetales infections typically involves the use of antibiotics, often for prolonged periods of time. The specific antibiotic regimen will depend on the type of infection and the susceptibility of the causative organism to various antimicrobial agents. Surgical intervention may also be necessary in some cases to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue.

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

Fatty acids are carboxylic acids with a long aliphatic chain, which are important components of lipids and are widely distributed in living organisms. They can be classified based on the length of their carbon chain, saturation level (presence or absence of double bonds), and other structural features.

The two main types of fatty acids are:

1. Saturated fatty acids: These have no double bonds in their carbon chain and are typically solid at room temperature. Examples include palmitic acid (C16:0) and stearic acid (C18:0).
2. Unsaturated fatty acids: These contain one or more double bonds in their carbon chain and can be further classified into monounsaturated (one double bond) and polyunsaturated (two or more double bonds) fatty acids. Examples of unsaturated fatty acids include oleic acid (C18:1, monounsaturated), linoleic acid (C18:2, polyunsaturated), and alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, polyunsaturated).

Fatty acids play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as energy storage, membrane structure, and cell signaling. Some essential fatty acids cannot be synthesized by the human body and must be obtained through dietary sources.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Bacterial proteins are a type of protein that are produced by bacteria as part of their structural or functional components. These proteins can be involved in various cellular processes, such as metabolism, DNA replication, transcription, and translation. They can also play a role in bacterial pathogenesis, helping the bacteria to evade the host's immune system, acquire nutrients, and multiply within the host.

Bacterial proteins can be classified into different categories based on their function, such as:

1. Enzymes: Proteins that catalyze chemical reactions in the bacterial cell.
2. Structural proteins: Proteins that provide structural support and maintain the shape of the bacterial cell.
3. Signaling proteins: Proteins that help bacteria to communicate with each other and coordinate their behavior.
4. Transport proteins: Proteins that facilitate the movement of molecules across the bacterial cell membrane.
5. Toxins: Proteins that are produced by pathogenic bacteria to damage host cells and promote infection.
6. Surface proteins: Proteins that are located on the surface of the bacterial cell and interact with the environment or host cells.

Understanding the structure and function of bacterial proteins is important for developing new antibiotics, vaccines, and other therapeutic strategies to combat bacterial infections.

The Actinomycetales is an order of Actinomycetota. A member of the order is often called an actinomycete. Actinomycetales are ... Actinomycetales can range from harmless bacteria to pathogens with resistance to antibiotics. Actinomycetales have 2 main forms ... Actinomycetales can be found mostly in soil and decaying organic matter, as well as in living organisms such as humans and ... Actinomycetales can be found in the human urogenital tract as well as in the digestive system including the mouth, throat, and ...
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Tomita, K.; Nakakita, Y.; Hoshino, Y.; Numata, K.; Kawaguchi, H. (1 July 1987). "New Genus of the Actinomycetales: ...
1986). "New genus of the Actinomycetales: Kibdelosporangium aridum gen. nov., sp. nov". Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 36: 47-54. doi ...
... is a family of bacteria of the order Actinomycetales. They are Gram-positive soil organisms. The family ...
nov., a New Genus of the Order Actinomycetales". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. 45 (2): 357-363. doi:10.1099 ...
... is a saturated fatty acid produced by Actinomycetales bacteria. The name 'Tuberculostearic acid' was ...
Nov., a new genus of the order Actinomycetales -- Tamura et al. 50 (3): 1163 -- International Journal of Systematic and ...
Pridham, T.G. (1970). "New names and new combinations in the order Actinomycetales Buchanan 1917" (PDF). Bulletin of the United ...
The Actinomycetales is an order of Actinomycetota. A member of the order is often called an actinomycete. Actinomycetales are ... Actinomycetales can range from harmless bacteria to pathogens with resistance to antibiotics. Actinomycetales have 2 main forms ... Actinomycetales can be found mostly in soil and decaying organic matter, as well as in living organisms such as humans and ... Actinomycetales can be found in the human urogenital tract as well as in the digestive system including the mouth, throat, and ...
or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites. ...
COG0644-nuoA-nuoB-nuoCD-nuoCD-nuoE-nuoF-nuoG-nuoH-nuoI-nuoJ-nuoK-nuoL-nuoM- ...
Results of search for su:{Actinomycetales infections} Refine your search. *. Availability. * Limit to currently available ...
Infection caused by Actinomycetales): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis. ... Introduction Actinomycetales order mainly known as aerobic actinomycetes are Gram-positive bacteria with a high guanine-plus- ...
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Actinomycetales. 176 (60). 98.1. 45. 2. 15. 3. 118. 97.1. 294. 97.7. ...
TIGR03428 (PSSM ID: 132469): Conserved Protein Domain Family ureacarb_perm, A number of bacteria obtain nitrogen by biotin- and ATP-dependent urea degradation system distinct from urease
Actinomycetales Infections / drug therapy* * Adult * Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use* * Anti-Infective Agents / ...
Order; Actinomycetales Family; Corynebacteriaceae Genus; Cornebacterium mastitidis 2. Description and significance. Describe ...
Actinomycetales (Order). *Streptosporangineae (Suborder). Authority. (Stackebrandt, Rainey & Ward-Rainey, 1997) emend. Zhi, Li ...
Tubercle bacilli belong to the order Actinomycetales and family Mycobacteriaceae. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the most common ...
Actinomycetales Buchanan, 1917 Order. Bifidobacteriales Stackebrandt et al., 1997 References Expert(s):. ...
Categories: Actinomycetales Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 737 ...
Actinomycetales. Suborder: Corynebacterineae. Family: Corynebacteriaceae. Genus: Corynebacterium. Lehmann & Neumann 1896 ...
Lineage: cellular organisms; Bacteria; Terrabacteria group; Actinomycetota; Actinomycetes; Actinomycetales; Actinomycetaceae; ...
Actinomycetales துணைவரிசை: Corynebacterineae குடும்பம்: மைக்கோபாக்டீரியேசியே பேரினம்: மைக்கோபாக்டீரியம் இனம்: M. leprae இருசொற் ...
Bacteria; Actinobacteria; Actinobacteria (class); Actinobacteridae; Actinomycetales; Corynebacterineae; Nocardiaceae; Nocardia ...
C12R2001/01-Bacteria or Actinomycetales ; using bacteria or Actinomycetales * C12R2001/185-Escherichia ...
Bacteria in the order of Actinomycetales cause chronic infections. This order includes Mycobacteriaceae, Actinomycetaceae and ...
In June of 2017, a University of Bristol study in the UK found a 5 to 10-fold increase in Actinobacteria (order Actinomycetales ... of involvement of Actinomycetales in AD. Unfortunately, this is not the case. ... Actinomycetales) that Emery and Fischer had probed. Mawanda and Wallace pointed to two prime suspects for Alzheimers amyloid- ... 2017 also could be indicative of another organism in the same order of Actinomycetales, namely Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...
In June of 2017, a University of Bristol study in the UK found a 5 to 10-fold increase in Actinobacteria (order Actinomycetales ... of involvement of Actinomycetales in AD. Unfortunately, this is not the case. ... Actinomycetales) that Emery and Fischer had probed. Mawanda and Wallace pointed to two prime suspects for Alzheimers amyloid- ... 2017 also could be indicative of another organism in the same order of Actinomycetales, namely Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ...
nov., a new genus of the order Actinomycetales.. Author. Yassin, A.F., Rainey, F.A., Brzezinka, H., Jahnke, K.-D., Weissbrodt, ...
Actinomycetes, the Gram-positive bacteria of the order Actinomycetales, are fertile producers of bioactive secondary ... Actinomycetes, the Gram-positive bacteria of the order Actinomycetales, are fertile producers of bioactive secondary ...
Distribution and functional analysis of the phosphopantetheinyl transferase superfamily in Actinomycetales microorganisms. Proc ...
We wonder, if the presence of AmlE-homologs in the class Actinomycetales correlates with an absence of a MalP-function. BlastP- ... Also, BlastP-analysis against the nr database of the taxonomic group Actinomycetales shows hits with highest identities and ... analyses against the nr database of the taxonomic group Actinomycetales, reveal, that most of these species encode for a ...
Actinomycetales, article, bacterial phenomena and functions, ecology, growth, development and aging, microbiology, physiology, ...
Actinomycetales. were more diverse in vinasse-amended soil than in soils without vinasse. Navarrete et al. [14] reported ...
Tamura T., Nakagaito Y., Nishii T., Hasegawa T., Stackebrandt E., Yokota A. 1994; A new genus of the order Actinomycetales, ... Krasilnikov N. A. 1938 Ray Fungi and Related Organisms - Actinomycetales Moscow: Izdatelstvo Akademii Nauk SSSR; ... A new genus of the Actinomycetales . J Elisha Mitchell Sci Soc 66:87-92 ...
  • An infectious process caused by actinomycetales which is an order of Actinobacteria. (nih.gov)
  • Four parenteral drug abusers with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome had nonmycobacterial actinomycetales infections. (nih.gov)
  • WC 302 Actinomycetales infections. (lstmed.ac.uk)
  • A virus that causes infections in bacteria: A bacteriophage is an actinophage that transmits diseases to actinomycetes, the bacteria of the order Actinomycetales, and causes lysis, or the decomposition or disintegration of these bacteria. (wordinfo.info)
  • Infezioni Da Actinomycetales 0 domande Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES. (lookformedical.com)
  • A genus of gram-positive bacteria in the family Thermomonosporaceae, order ACTINOMYCETALES. (nih.gov)
  • Tubercle bacilli belong to the order Actinomycetales and family Mycobacteriaceae. (medscape.com)
  • This genus comprises a number of Gram-positive, acid-fast, rod-shaped aerobic bacteria and is the only member of the family Mycobacteriaceae within the order Actinomycetales. (up.ac.za)
  • The Actinomycetales is an order of Actinomycetota. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actinomycetales can be found mostly in soil and decaying organic matter, as well as in living organisms such as humans and animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like other closely related Actinomycetales, such as Nocardia and Corynebacterium, mycobacteria have unusually high genomic DNA GC content and are capable of producing mycolic acids as major components of their cell wall. (up.ac.za)
  • Actinomycetales and Prevotella (bacterial marker for gingivitis) and Treponema and Veillonella , (periodontitis) were present exclusively in the AD group.This study confirmed Actinomycetale s and Bacteroidales ( Treponema and Veillonella species) were exclusively isolated from AD brain tissue, and supports other epidemiological studies which demonstrate gingivitis and periodontal disease to be associated with AD. (jneuro.org)
  • Actinomycetales" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (rush.edu)
  • Actinomycetales can be found in the human urogenital tract as well as in the digestive system including the mouth, throat, and gastrointestinal tract in the form of Helicobacter without causing disease in the host. (wikipedia.org)