Actinobacteria: Class of BACTERIA with diverse morphological properties. Strains of Actinobacteria show greater than 80% 16S rDNA/rRNA sequence similarity among each other and also the presence of certain signature nucleotides. (Stackebrandt E. et al, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. (1997) 47:479-491)RNA, Ribosomal, 16S: Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.Proteobacteria: A phylum of bacteria consisting of the purple bacteria and their relatives which form a branch of the eubacterial tree. This group of predominantly gram-negative bacteria is classified based on homology of equivalent nucleotide sequences of 16S ribosomal RNA or by hybridization of ribosomal RNA or DNA with 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Bacteria: One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.DNA, Ribosomal: DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.Biodiversity: The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Soil Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Metagenome: A collective genome representative of the many organisms, primarily microorganisms, existing in a community.Fresh Water: Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.Propionibacteriaceae: A family of gram-positive bacteria found in dairy products or in the intestinal tracts of animals.Biota: The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.Petrosia: A genus of SPONGES in the family Petrosiidae, characterized by an ectosomal triangular or polygonal reticulation of spicule tracts or single spicules.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Acidobacteria: A physiologically diverse phylum of acidophilic, gram-negative bacteria found in a wide variety of habitats, but particularly abundant in soils and sediments.Genes, rRNA: Genes, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which are transcribed to produce the RNA which is incorporated into RIBOSOMES. Prokaryotic rRNA genes are usually found in OPERONS dispersed throughout the GENOME, whereas eukaryotic rRNA genes are clustered, multicistronic transcriptional units.Actinomycetales: An order of gram-positive, primarily aerobic BACTERIA that tend to form branching filaments.Bacteroidetes: A phylum of bacteria comprised of three classes: Bacteroides, Flavobacteria, and Sphingobacteria.Betaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised of chemoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs which derive nutrients from decomposition of organic material.Micrococcaceae: A family of bacteria ranging from free living and saprophytic to parasitic and pathogenic forms.Fusobacteria: A phylum of anaerobic, gram-negative bacteria with a chemoorganotrophic heterotrophic metabolism. They are resident flora of the OROPHARYNX.Streptomycetaceae: A family of soil bacteria. It also includes some parasitic forms.Geologic Sediments: A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)Plankton: Community of tiny aquatic PLANTS and ANIMALS, and photosynthetic BACTERIA, that are either free-floating or suspended in the water, with little or no power of locomotion. They are divided into PHYTOPLANKTON and ZOOPLANKTON.Frankia: Genus of BACTERIA in the family Frankiaceae. They are nitrogen-fixing root-nodule symbionts of many species of woody dicotyledonous plants.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Verrucomicrobia: A phylum of gram-negative bacteria containing seven class-level groups from a wide variety of environments. Most members are chemoheterotrophs.Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis in which various denaturant gradients are used to induce nucleic acids to melt at various stages resulting in separation of molecules based on small sequence differences including SNPs. The denaturants used include heat, formamide, and urea.Microbiota: The full collection of microbes (bacteria, fungi, virus, etc.) that naturally exist within a particular biological niche such as an organism, soil, a body of water, etc.Soil: The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.Genome, Bacterial: The genetic complement of a BACTERIA as represented in its DNA.Archaea: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.Heterotrophic Processes: The processes by which organisms utilize organic substances as their nutrient sources. Contrasts with AUTOTROPHIC PROCESSES which make use of simple inorganic substances as the nutrient supply source. Heterotrophs can be either chemoheterotrophs (or chemoorganotrophs) which also require organic substances such as glucose for their primary metabolic energy requirements, or photoheterotrophs (or photoorganotrophs) which derive their primary energy requirements from light. Depending on environmental conditions some organisms can switch between different nutritional modes (AUTOTROPHY; heterotrophy; chemotrophy; or PHOTOTROPHY) to utilize different sources to meet their nutrients and energy requirements.Rhizosphere: The immediate physical zone surrounding plant roots that include the plant roots. It is an area of intense and complex biological activity involving plants, microorganisms, other soil organisms, and the soil.Metagenomics: The genomic analysis of assemblages of organisms.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Streptomyces coelicolor: A soil-dwelling actinomycete with a complex lifecycle involving mycelial growth and spore formation. It is involved in the production of a number of medically important ANTIBIOTICS.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Porifera: The phylum of sponges which are sessile, suspension-feeding, multicellular animals that utilize flagellated cells called choanocytes to circulate water. Most are hermaphroditic. They are probably an early evolutionary side branch that gave rise to no other group of animals. Except for about 150 freshwater species, sponges are marine animals. They are a source of ALKALOIDS; STEROLS; and other complex molecules useful in medicine and biological research.Gordonia Bacterium: A genus of gram-positive BACTERIA in the family Gordoniaceae, isolated from soil and from sputa of patients with chest disorders. It is also used for biotransformation of natural products.Microbial Consortia: A group of different species of microorganisms that act together as a community.Bacterial Physiological Phenomena: Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.Islands: Tracts of land completely surrounded by water.Symbiosis: The relationship between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other or a relationship between different species where both of the organisms in question benefit from the presence of the other.Gastrointestinal Tract: Generally refers to the digestive structures stretching from the MOUTH to ANUS, but does not include the accessory glandular organs (LIVER; BILIARY TRACT; PANCREAS).Burkholderiaceae: A family of gram negative, aerobic, non-sporeforming, rod-shaped bacteria.Chloroflexi: Phylum of green nonsulfur bacteria including the family Chloroflexaceae, among others.Gammaproteobacteria: A group of the proteobacteria comprised of facultatively anaerobic and fermentative gram-negative bacteria.Ants: Insects of the family Formicidae, very common and widespread, probably the most successful of all the insect groups. All ants are social insects, and most colonies contain three castes, queens, males, and workers. Their habits are often very elaborate and a great many studies have been made of ant behavior. Ants produce a number of secretions that function in offense, defense, and communication. (From Borror, et al., An Introduction to the Study of Insects, 4th ed, p676)Sewage: Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.RNA, Bacterial: Ribonucleic acid in bacteria having regulatory and catalytic roles as well as involvement in protein synthesis.Gram-Positive Bacteria: Bacteria which retain the crystal violet stain when treated by Gram's method.Soil Pollutants: Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Diaminopimelic AcidArctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)Aquatic Organisms: Organisms that live in water.Fungi: A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.Alphaproteobacteria: A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised mostly of two major phenotypes: purple non-sulfur bacteria and aerobic bacteriochlorophyll-containing bacteria.Base Composition: The relative amounts of the PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in a nucleic acid.Environmental Microbiology: The study of microorganisms living in a variety of environments (air, soil, water, etc.) and their pathogenic relationship to other organisms including man.Lakes: Inland bodies of still or slowly moving FRESH WATER or salt water, larger than a pond, and supplied by RIVERS and streams.Water Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Actinomycetales Infections: Infections with bacteria of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.Streptomyces: A genus of bacteria that form a nonfragmented aerial mycelium. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. This genus is responsible for producing a majority of the ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS of practical value.Waste Water: Contaminated water generated as a waste product of human activity.Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial: Any of the processes by which cytoplasmic or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in bacteria.DNA, Archaeal: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of archaea.Eukaryota: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.Antibiosis: A natural association between organisms that is detrimental to at least one of them. This often refers to the production of chemicals by one microorganism that is harmful to another.
(1/597) Kocuria palustris sp. nov. and Kocuria rhizophila sp. nov., isolated from the rhizoplane of the narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia).

Two Gram-positive, aerobic spherical actinobacteria were isolated from the rhizoplane of narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia) collected from a floating mat in the Soroksar tributary of the Danube river, Hungary. Sequence comparisons of the 16S rDNA indicated these isolates to be phylogenetic neighbours of members of the genus Kocuria, family Micrococcaceae, in which they represent two novel lineages. The phylogenetic distinctness of the two organisms TA68T and TAGA27T was supported by DNA-DNA similarity values of less than 55% between each other and with the type strains of Kocuria rosea, Kocuria kristinae and Kocuria varians. Chemotaxonomic properties supported the placement of the two isolates in the genus Kocuria. The diagnostic diamino acid of the cell-wall peptidoglycan is lysine, the interpeptide bridge is composed of three alanine residues. Predominant menaquinone was MK-7(H2). The fatty acid pattern represents the straight-chain saturated iso-anteiso type. Main fatty acid was anteiso-C15:0. The phospholipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and an unknown component. The DNA base composition of strains TA68T and TAGA27T is 69.4 and 69.6 mol% G+C, respectively. Genotypic, morphological and physiological characteristics are used to describe two new species of Kocuria, for which we propose the names Kocuria palustris, type strain DSM 11925T and Kocuria rhizophila, type strain DSM 11926T.  (+info)

(2/597) Polyamine profiles within genera of the class Actinobacteria with LL-diaminopimelic acid in the peptidoglycan.

Polyamine patterns of coryne- and nocardioform representatives of the class Actinobacteria with LL-diaminopimelic acid in the peptidoglycan, comprising strains of the genera Aeromicrobium, Nocardioides, Intrasporangium, Terrabacter, Terracoccus, Propioniferax, Friedmanniella, Microlunatus, Luteococcus and Sporichthya, were analysed. The different polyamine patterns were in good agreement with the phylogenetic heterogeneity within this group of actinomycetes. Strains of the closely related genera Nocardioides and Aeromicrobium were characterized by the presence of cadaverine. The second cluster, consisting of the type strains of the species Friedmanniella antarctica, Propioniferax innocua, Microlunatus phosphovorus and Luteococcus japonicus, displayed as a common feature the presence of the two predominant compounds spermidine and spermine. The presence of putrescine was common to the type strains of the species Intrasporangium calvum, Terrabacter tumescens and Terracoccus luteus. Sporichthya polymorpha, which is a representative of a separate line of descent, displayed spermidine as the predominant polyamine. These data indicate that polyamine patterns are suitable for the classification of actinomycetes with LL-diaminopimelic acid in the peptidoglycan.  (+info)

(3/597) Whipple's arthritis: direct detection of Tropheryma whippelii in synovial fluid and tissue.

We describe 2 patients presenting with polyarthritis in whom the synovial fluid (1 patient) or synovial tissue (1 patient) was positive for Tropheryma whippelii, the Whipple's disease-associated bacillus, when examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. Histopathologic findings were consistent with articular Whipple's disease in the synovial fluid of 1 patient and the synovial tissue of the other. In both patients, bowel mucosal specimens were negative for Whipple's disease features by histologic and PCR methods. One patient was positive for T whippelii in the peripheral blood. Control synovial fluid specimens from 40 patients with other arthritides, including Lyme arthritis, were negative. Sequencing of a 284-basepair region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene confirmed that the sequence is closely related to the known T whippelii sequence. Both patients responded to treatment with antibiotics.  (+info)

(4/597) Characterization of a novel Atopobium isolate from the human vagina: description of Atopobium vaginae sp. nov.

Phenotypic and phylogenetic studies were performed on a hitherto undescribed micro-organism isolated from the human vagina. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies demonstrated that the unknown strain constituted a new subline within the genus Atopobium. The unknown bacterium was readily distinguished from other Atopobium species by biochemical tests and electrophoretic analysis of whole-cell proteins. Based on phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence, it is proposed that the unknown bacterium be classified as Atopobium vaginae sp. nov. The type strain of Atopobium vaginae is CCUG 38953T.  (+info)

(5/597) Detection of three different types of 'Tropheryma whippelii' directly from clinical specimens by sequencing, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and type-specific PCR of their 16S-23S ribosomal intergenic spacer region.

The 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region of organisms identical with or closely related to 'Tropheryma whippelii', the uncultivated causative agent of Whipple's disease, was analysed directly from 38 clinical specimens of 28 patients using a specific nested PCR followed by direct sequencing. As compared to the reference sequence in public databases, two novel 'T. whippelii' spacer types were recognized. In the absence of DNA-DNA hybridization data it is uncertain whether the three types found represent subtypes of a single species or three different but closely related species. Methods were developed to detect all three variants by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and by type-specific PCR assays, thus allowing the screening of large numbers of specimens. Further studies may provide a clue to the possible associations between the type of infecting strain and the various clinical presentations of Whipple's disease.  (+info)

(6/597) Evaluation of a specific nested PCR targeting domain III of the 23S rRNA gene of "Tropheryma whippelii" and proposal of a classification system for its molecular variants.

"Tropheryma whippelii"-associated infections are usually confirmed histopathologically by using light microscopy. PCR assays targeting the 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) of "T. whippelii" are increasingly being applied for this purpose. Compared to microscopic analysis, PCR seems to be more sensitive, as indicated by the fact that several cases of Whipple's disease with negative histopathological findings but positive PCR results have been reported. Considering the lack of pathognomonic clinical features for this disease and the fact that "T. whippelii" DNA has repeatedly been found in patients without clinical Whipple's disease, such PCR results should be confirmed by additional tests. We have, therefore, evaluated a "T. whippelii"-specific nested PCR targeting domain III of the 23S rDNA with 41 clinical specimens known to contain "T. whippelii" 16S rDNA. All of these specimens were also positive for "T. whippelii" 23S rDNA. The specificity of the test was shown by sequencing of the amplicons and by the absence of amplicons in 38 negative controls. We consider this PCR test to be a suitable tool for confirming the presence of "T. whippelii" DNA in specimens with inconclusive histopathological findings. The information derived from sequencing of the partial "T. whippelii" 23S rDNA was then combined with our recent data of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region of this organism. Overall, four different rDNA types are recognized in our proposed classification system for molecular variants of "T. whippelii." This preliminary scheme may provide a basis for further epidemiological and clinical studies with "T. whippelii" and associated diseases.  (+info)

(7/597) Identification of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms and design of 16S rRNA-directed probes for their detection and quantitation.

Laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) as models for activated sludge processes were used to study enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater. Enrichment for polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) was achieved essentially by increasing the phosphorus concentration in the influent to the SBRs. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using domain-, division-, and subdivision-level probes was used to assess the proportions of microorganisms in the sludges. The A sludge, a high-performance P-removing sludge containing 15.1% P in the biomass, was comprised of large clusters of polyphosphate-containing coccobacilli. By FISH, >80% of the A sludge bacteria were beta-2 Proteobacteria arranged in clusters of coccobacilli, strongly suggesting that this group contains a PAO responsible for EBPR. The second dominant group in the A sludge was the Actinobacteria. Clone libraries of PCR-amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes from three high-performance P-removing sludges were prepared, and clones belonging to the beta-2 Proteobacteria were fully sequenced. A distinctive group of clones (sharing >/=98% sequence identity) related to Rhodocyclus spp. (94 to 97% identity) and Propionibacter pelophilus (95 to 96% identity) was identified as the most likely candidate PAOs. Three probes specific for the highly related candidate PAO group were designed from the sequence data. All three probes specifically bound to the morphologically distinctive clusters of PAOs in the A sludge, exactly coinciding with the beta-2 Proteobacteria probe. Sequential FISH and polyphosphate staining of EBPR sludges clearly demonstrated that PAO probe-binding cells contained polyphosphate. Subsequent PAO probe analyses of a number of sludges with various P removal capacities indicated a strong positive correlation between P removal from the wastewater as determined by sludge P content and number of PAO probe-binding cells. We conclude therefore that an important group of PAOs in EBPR sludges are bacteria closely related to Rhodocyclus and Propionibacter.  (+info)

(8/597) Cultivation of the bacillus of Whipple's disease.

BACKGROUND: Whipple's disease is a systemic bacterial infection, but to date no isolate of the bacterium has been established in subculture, and no strain of this bacterium has been available for study. METHODS: Using specimens from the aortic [corrected] valve of a patient with endocarditis due to Whipple's disease, we isolated and propagated a bacterium by inoculation in a human fibroblast cell line (HEL) with the use of a shell-vial assay. We tested serum samples from our patient, other patients with Whipple's disease, and control subjects for the presence of antibodies to this bacterium. RESULTS: The bacterium of Whipple's disease was grown successfully in HEL cells, and we established subcultures of the isolate. Indirect immunofluorescence assays showed that the patient's serum reacted specifically against the bacterium. Seven of 9 serum samples from patients with Whipple's disease had IgM antibody titers of 1:50 or more, as compared with 3 of 40 samples from the control subjects (P<0.001). Polyclonal antibodies against the bacterium were generated by inoculation of the microorganism into mice and were used to detect bacteria in the excised cardiac tissue from our patient on immunohistochemical analysis. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the cultured bacterium was identical to the sequence for Tropheryma whippelii identified previously in tissue samples from patients with Whipple's disease. The strain we have grown is available in the French National Collection. CONCLUSIONS: We cultivated the bacterium of Whipple's disease, detected specific antibodies in tissue from the source patient, and generated specific antibodies in mice to be used in the immunodetection of the microorganism in tissues. The development of a serologic test for Whipple's disease may now be possible.  (+info)

*  Streptomyces
... is the largest genus of Actinobacteria and the type genus of the family Streptomycetaceae. Over 500 species of ... As with the other Actinobacteria, streptomycetes are Gram-positive, and have genomes with high GC content. Found predominantly ...
*  Actinobacteridae
... is a subclass of bacteria, in the class of Actinobacteria. The group is diverse. Examples of organisms in this ...
*  Actinobacteria
... have high guanine and cytosine content in their DNA. The G+C content of Actinobacteria can be as high as 70%, ... The Actinobacteria are a phylum of Gram-positive bacteria. They can be terrestrial or aquatic. They are of great economic ... Some soil actinobacteria (such as Frankia) live symbiotically with the plants whose roots pervade the soil, fixing nitrogen for ... Streptomyces and other actinobacteria are major contributors to biological buffering of soils. They are also the source of many ...
*  Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology
The Actinobacteria. Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 4 (2nd ed.). New York: Springer. p. 1750. ISBN 978-0-387-95043- ... The Actinobacteria Bergey's Manual Trust was established in 1936 to sustain the publication of Bergey's Manual of Determinative ...
*  Aestuariimicrobium
Like all Actinobacteria, it is gram-positive and with a high CG content (69%). It is rod/coccoid shaped bacterium whose main ... The Actinobacteria. Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 4 (2nd ed.). New York: Springer. p. 1750. ISBN 978-0-387-95043- ... Aestuariimicrobium is a singleton genus in the phylum Actinobacteria (Bacteria), whose sole member, namely Aestuariimicrobium ...
*  Gram-negative bacteria
Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermotogae, Chloroflexi). The presence of this CSI in all sequenced species of conventional ...
*  Gram-positive bacteria
The high G + C phylum was made up of the Actinobacteria and the low G + C phylum contained the Firmicutes. The Actinobacteria ... The (low G + C) Firmicutes, have a 45-60% GC content, but this is lower than that of the Actinobacteria. Although bacteria are ... Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Thermotogae, Chloroflexi, etc.). The presence of this CSI in all sequenced species of conventional ...
*  Cellulomonas pakistanensis
nov., a moderately halotolerant Actinobacteria". International journal of systematic and evolutionary microbiology. 64 (Pt 7): ...
*  Anthracimycin
... is derived from marine actinobacteria. In preliminary laboratory research, it has shown activity against Bacillus ...
*  Nocardiaceae
Proposal for a new hierarchic classification system, Actinobacteria classis nov. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol., 1997, 47:479-491. ... "An update of the structure and 16S rRNA gene sequence-based definition of higher ranks of the class Actinobacteria, with the ... "Road map of the phylum Actinobacteria". Bergey's Manual® of Systematic Bacteriology. p. 1. doi:10.1007/978-0-387-68233-4_1. ... "Phylogenetic Framework and Molecular Signatures for the Main Clades of the Phylum Actinobacteria". Microbiology and Molecular ...
*  Coriobacteriia
... delineating them from other Actinobacteria. The Coriobacteriia are an early branching lineage within the Actinobacteria phylum ... Gao B, Gupta RS (2005). "Conserved indels in protein sequences that are characteristic of the phylum Actinobacteria". Int J ... The Coriobacteriia are a class of Gram-positive bacteria within the Actinobacteria phylum. Species within this group are ... Gao B, Gupta RS (2012). "Phylogenetic framework and molecular signatures for the main clades of the phylum Actinobacteria". ...
*  Mycorrhiza helper bacteria
Actinobacteria are gram-positive bacteria, and they are found in the soil. In this phylum, Streptomyces is the largest genus of ... Streptomyces are of the Actinobacteria class. Streptomyces have been an organism of study in biological research on MHB. One ...
*  Cellulomonas
They are members of the actinobacteria. Parte, A.C. "Cellulomonas". www.bacterio.net. Glazer AN, Nikaido H (2007) Microbial ...
*  Streptomyces roseosporus
... is a species of actinobacteria. It produces the novel antibiotic daptomycin (US trade name: Cubicin). ...
*  Jonesiaceae
The Jonesiaceae are a monotypic Actinobacteria family. The currently accepted taxonomy is based on the List of Prokaryotic ...
*  Streptomyces tsukubaensis
... is a species of actinobacteria. It produces the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus. Pritchard D (2005 ...
*  Actinomycetales
Actinobacteria#Phylogeny, shows about 20 species See the NCBI webpage on Actinomycetales Data extracted from the "NCBI Taxonomy ... The Actinomycetales are an order of Actinobacteria. A member of the order is often called an actinomycete. The actinomycetes ...
*  Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum
nov.: heterotrophic, iron-oxidizing, extremely acidophilic actinobacteria". International Journal of Systematic and ...
*  Streptomyces rectiviolaceus
Stevenson, A; Hallsworth, JE (December 2014). "Water and temperature relations of soil Actinobacteria". Environmental ...
*  Streptomyces ciscaucasicus
Actinobacteria : application in bioremediation and production of. [S.l.]: Crc Press. ISBN 1-4665-7873-4. CS1 maint: Extra text ...
*  Streptomyces fradiae
... is a species of Actinobacteria. Different strains of S. fradiae are known to produce the antibiotics ...
*  Streptomyces caespitosus
... is a species of actinobacteria. It produces chemotherapeutic drug mitomycin C. http://www.uniprot.org/ ...
*  Actinoplanes italicus
A. italicus belongs to the phylum Actinobacteria. It is most closely related to Actinoplanes couchii with 98.9% similarity ...
*  Licancabur Lake
Typical bacterial taxa are actinobacteria, bacteroidetes and betaproteobacteria. Overall, at such high lakes only a limited ...
*  Kitasato Shibasaburō
Kitasatospora, an Actinobacteria genus named after Kitasato Shibasaburō. Satoshi Ōmura Shibasaburo Kitasako - Nomination Howard ...
Frontiers | Culturable diversity and antimicrobial activity of Actinobacteria from marine sediments in Valparaíso bay, Chile |...  Frontiers | Culturable diversity and antimicrobial activity of Actinobacteria from marine sediments in Valparaíso bay, Chile |...
Rare Actinobacteria represent an untapped source of new bioactive compounds that have been scarcely recognized. In this study, ... Rare Actinobacteria represent an untapped source of new bioactive compounds that have been scarcely recognized. In this study, ... Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences led to identifying isolates that belong to the phylum Actinobacteria with ... Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences led to identifying isolates that belong to the phylum Actinobacteria with ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2015.00737/full
Actinobacteria - Wikipedia  Actinobacteria - Wikipedia
Actinobacteria have high guanine and cytosine content in their DNA. The G+C content of Actinobacteria can be as high as 70%, ... The Actinobacteria are a phylum of Gram-positive bacteria. They can be terrestrial or aquatic. They are of great economic ... Some soil actinobacteria (such as Frankia) live symbiotically with the plants whose roots pervade the soil, fixing nitrogen for ... Streptomyces and other actinobacteria are major contributors to biological buffering of soils. They are also the source of many ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actinobacteria
Actinobacteria bacterium OK006  Actinobacteria bacterium OK006
"Draft genome sequences for four Actinobacteria strains OK006 OK074 OV450 and OV320.". Brown S.D., Utturkar S.M., Klingeman D.M. ... This proteome is part of the Actinobacteria bacterium OK006 pan proteome (fasta) ...
more infohttp://www.uniprot.org/proteomes/UP000037912
Actinobacteria bacterium IMCC26207  Actinobacteria bacterium IMCC26207
"Genome sequence of freshwater Actinobacteria.". Kim S., Cho J.-C.. Submitted (MAY-2015) to the EMBL/GenBank/DDBJ databases ...
more infohttps://www.uniprot.org/proteomes/UP000036180
Actinobacteria - Wikipedia  Actinobacteria - Wikipedia
Actinobacteria have high guanine and cytosine content in their DNA.[14] The G+C content of Actinobacteria can be as high as 70 ... Class Actinobacteria Stackebrandt et al. 1997 (Actinobacteridae Stackebrandt et al. 1997 emend. Zhi et al. 2009) *Species ?" ... The Actinobacteria are a phylum of Gram-positive bacteria. They can be terrestrial or aquatic.[1] They are of great economic ... Some soil actinobacteria (such as Frankia) live symbiotically with the plants whose roots pervade the soil, fixing nitrogen for ...
more infohttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actinobacteria
Phys.org - actinobacteria  Phys.org - actinobacteria
Actinobacteria. Actinobacteria are a group of Gram-positive bacteria with high guanine and cytosine content. They can be ... Actinobacteria is one of the dominant phyla of the bacteria.. Use of the ferric uptake regulator (fur) has been suggested for ...
more infohttps://phys.org/tags/actinobacteria/sort/date/all/
Category:Actinobacteria - wikidoc  Category:Actinobacteria - wikidoc
Pages in category "Actinobacteria". The following 166 pages are in this category, out of 166 total. ... Retrieved from "https://www.wikidoc.org/index.php?title=Category:Actinobacteria&oldid=161160" ...
more infohttp://wikidoc.org/index.php/Category:Actinobacteria
Actinobacterium dictionary definition | actinobacterium defined  Actinobacterium dictionary definition | actinobacterium defined
ac·tin·o·bac·ter·i·a, Any of various gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Actinobacteria, which includes bacteria that live in ... actinobacterium. ac·tin·o·bac·ter·i·um. noun. pl. ac·tin·o·bac·ter·i·a, Any of various gram-positive bacteria of the phylum ... Origin of actinobacterium. From New Latin Actīnobactēria phylum name Actīnomykēs type genus of the phylum ; see actinomyces . ... How would you define actinobacterium? Add your definition here.. Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by ...
more infohttp://www.yourdictionary.com/actinobacterium
Antimicrobial Producing Actinobacteria from Soil  Antimicrobial Producing Actinobacteria from Soil
Actinobacteria on the other hand shows important bioactive substances. ... Actinobacteria are gram-positive bacteria that can be found in both aquatic and terrestrial environment. This kind of bacteria ... Isolation of Antimicrobial Producing Actinobacteria from Soil Samples. Actinobacteria is a gram-positive that mostly found in ... Actinobacteria is much like fungi aiding in the decomposition of organic matter from the dead organisms. Because of these, the ...
more infohttps://www.biology-online.org/isolation-antimicrobial-producing-actinobacteria-soil-samples/
Actinobacterium - definition of actinobacterium by The Free Dictionary  Actinobacterium - definition of actinobacterium by The Free Dictionary
actinobacterium synonyms, actinobacterium pronunciation, actinobacterium translation, English dictionary definition of ... ac·tin·o·bac·ter·i·a Any of various gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Actinobacteria, which includes bacteria that live in ... actinobacterium. Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.. Related to actinobacterium: Actinomycetes, Verrucomicrobia. ac·tin·o·bac· ... Actinobacterium - definition of actinobacterium by The Free Dictionary https://www.thefreedictionary.com/actinobacterium ...
more infohttps://www.thefreedictionary.com/Actinobacterium
Simple colony PCR procedure for the filamentous actinobacteria Frankia | SpringerLink  Simple colony PCR procedure for the filamentous actinobacteria Frankia | SpringerLink
Molecular analysis of the filamentous actinobacteria Frankiais laborious because of the slow growth rate and required biomass ... Bassi CA, Benson DR (2007) Growth characteristics of the slow-growing actinobacterium Frankia sp. strain Ccl3 on solid media. ... In: Rosenberg EDE, Lory S, Stackebrandt E, Thompson F (eds) The prokaryote-actinobacteria. Springer, Berlin, pp 339-356. https ... Molecular analysis of the filamentous actinobacteria Frankia is laborious because of the slow growth rate and required biomass ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10482-018-1155-0
Actinobacteria | definition of Actinobacteria by Medical dictionary  Actinobacteria | definition of Actinobacteria by Medical dictionary
Actinobacteria explanation free. What is Actinobacteria? Meaning of Actinobacteria medical term. What does Actinobacteria mean? ... Looking for online definition of Actinobacteria in the Medical Dictionary? ... redirected from Actinobacteria). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.. Related to Actinobacteria: ... Actinobacteria abundance was found to be increasing in the burned sites (Table 4).. Changes of ground vegetation, soil chemical ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Actinobacteria
Class Actinobacteria  Class Actinobacteria
Actinobacteria Stackebrandt et al. 1997, classis nov. Type order: not given. Etymology: Gr. n. aktis -inos, a ray, beam; Gr. n ... Class Actinobacteria. Warning: In the List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in Nomenclature, an arrow (→) only indicates the ... n. Actinobacteria, actinomycete group of bacteria of diverse morphological properties. Valid publication: STACKEBRANDT (E.), ... Note: According to Rules 15, 22 and 27(3), the class Actinobacteria is illegitimate because it was proposed without the ...
more infohttp://www.bacterio.net/actinobacteria.html
Plant Growth Promoting Actinobacteria eBook by  - 9789811007071 | Rakuten Kobo  Plant Growth Promoting Actinobacteria eBook by - 9789811007071 | Rakuten Kobo
Read Plant Growth Promoting Actinobacteria A New Avenue for Enhancing the Productivity and Soil Fertility of Grain Legumes by ... Plant Growth Promoting Actinobacteria A New Avenue for Enhancing the Productivity and Soil Fertility of Grain Legumes by ...
more infohttps://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/plant-growth-promoting-actinobacteria
Exploiting Actinobacteria genomes - DOE Joint Genome Institute  Exploiting Actinobacteria genomes - DOE Joint Genome Institute
Exploiting Actinobacteria genomes. Actinobacteria are ubiquitously distributed in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and ... The team expects that this expansion of the genomic coverage of the Actinobacteria will also help researchers resolve the ... Next to Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, Actinobacteria constitute the third most populated phylum among the Bacteria. This ... project calls for sequencing the genomes of 1,000 environmental isolates (type and reference strains) of Actinobacteria and to ...
more infohttps://jgi.doe.gov/exploiting-actinobacteria-genomes/
Unexpected abundance of coenzyme F(420)-dependent enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria.  - PubMed -...  Unexpected abundance of coenzyme F(420)-dependent enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria. - PubMed -...
Unexpected abundance of coenzyme F(420)-dependent enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria.. Selengut JD1 ... Unexpected Abundance of Coenzyme F420-Dependent Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Actinobacteria ... Unexpected Abundance of Coenzyme F420-Dependent Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Actinobacteria ... Unexpected Abundance of Coenzyme F420-Dependent Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Actinobacteria ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20675471
Post-genomic Studies and Systems Biology of Actinobacteria: A Brief Overview | SpringerLink  Post-genomic Studies and Systems Biology of Actinobacteria: A Brief Overview | SpringerLink
In: Wink J., Mohammadipanah F., Hamedi J. (eds) Biology and Biotechnology of Actinobacteria. Springer, Cham. * First Online 21 ... Gomez-Escribano JP, Alt S, Bibb MJ (2016) Next Generation Sequencing of Actinobacteria for the Discovery of Novel Natural ... Bilyk O, Luzhetskyy A (2016) Metabolic engineering of natural product biosynthesis in actinobacteria. Curr Opin Biotechnol 42: ... Poorinmohammad N., Hamedi J. (2017) Post-genomic Studies and Systems Biology of Actinobacteria: A Brief Overview. ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-60339-1_12
Yimella lutea gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel actinobacterium of the family Dermacoccaceae.  - PubMed - NCBI  Yimella lutea gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel actinobacterium of the family Dermacoccaceae. - PubMed - NCBI
nov., a novel actinobacterium of the family Dermacoccaceae.. Tang SK1, Wu JY, Wang Y, Schumann P, Li WJ. ... On the basis of the phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics of the actinobacterium, a novel genus and species, Yimella ... A Gram-stain-positive, coccoid, non-motile, halotolerant actinobacterium, designated YIM 45900(T), was found as a contaminant ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19656924?dopt=Abstract
Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum | Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews  Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum | Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews
Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum Marco Ventura, Carlos Canchaya, Andreas Tauch ... Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum Marco Ventura, Carlos Canchaya, Andreas Tauch ... Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum Marco Ventura, Carlos Canchaya, Andreas Tauch ... Genomics of Actinobacteria: Tracing the Evolutionary History of an Ancient Phylum Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a ...
more infohttps://mmbr.asm.org/content/71/3/495/article-info
Marine Drugs  | Free Full-Text | Biodiversity of Actinobacteria from the South Pacific and the Assessment of Streptomyces...  Marine Drugs | Free Full-Text | Biodiversity of Actinobacteria from the South Pacific and the Assessment of Streptomyces...
... since new taxa of marine actinobacteria can be found, and thus possible new metabolites. Actinobacteria are in the foreground ... This study shows a remarkable culturable diversity of actinobacteria, associated to marine environments along Chile. ... Isolation of Actinobacteria. 2.3.1. Isolation Media. For the isolation of actinobacteria, different media were used (Table 1). ... most of the so-called rare actinobacteria are present (Figure 2a). Rare actinobacteria are those strains that are less likely ...
more infohttp://www.mdpi.com/1660-3397/15/9/286/htm
  • In this study, rare Actinobacteria from marine sediments were isolated from the Valparaíso bay, Chile, and their potential to produce antibacterial compounds was evaluated. (frontiersin.org)
  • Different culture conditions and selective media that select the growth of Actinobacteria were used leading to the isolation of 68 bacterial strains. (frontiersin.org)
  • An actinobacterium closely related to S. arenicola , a known producer of the antimycobacterial rifamycins, was coisolated from the same A. queenslandica specimen from which mycobacteria had been isolated. (wiley.com)
  • Unexpected abundance of coenzyme F(420)-dependent enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other actinobacteria. (nih.gov)
  • Different culture conditions and selective media that select the growth of Actinobacteria were used leading to the isolation of 68 bacterial strains. (frontiersin.org)
  • On the other hand Actinobacteria also gives importance in agriculture as an insecticides, fungicides, herbicides and growth enhancement substances. (biology-online.org)