A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS, which causes EPIDIDYMITIS in SHEEP.
A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE described as gram-negative, nonsporeforming, nonmotile, facultative anaerobes. Most members are found both as pathogens and commensal organisms in the respiratory, alimentary, and genital tracts of animals.
A disease characterized by suppurative and granulomatous lesions in the respiratory tract, upper alimentary tract, skin, kidneys, joints, and other tissues. Actinobacillus lignieresii infects cattle and sheep while A. equuli infects horses and pigs.
Infections with bacteria of the genus ACTINOBACILLUS.
A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic coccobacillus-shaped bacteria that has been isolated from pneumonic lesions and blood. It produces pneumonia with accompanying fibrinous pleuritis in swine.
A species of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic spherical or rod-shaped bacteria indigenous to dental surfaces. It is associated with PERIODONTITIS; BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS; and ACTINOMYCOSIS.
Inflammation of the EPIDIDYMIS. Its clinical features include enlarged epididymis, a swollen SCROTUM; PAIN; PYURIA; and FEVER. It is usually related to infections in the URINARY TRACT, which likely spread to the EPIDIDYMIS through either the VAS DEFERENS or the lymphatics of the SPERMATIC CORD.
A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE that consists of several species occurring in animals and humans. Its organisms are described as gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, coccobacillus or rod-shaped, and nonmotile.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS. It is mainly a pathogen of PIGS, but also can infect HORSES.
Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is associated with PLEURISY, inflammation of the PLEURA.
A genus of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS, which is pathogenic for HORSES and PIGS.
Diseases of domestic and mountain sheep of the genus Ovis.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
Inflammation and loss of PERIODONTIUM that is characterized by rapid attachment loss and bone destruction in the presence of little local factors such as DENTAL PLAQUE and DENTAL CALCULUS. This highly destructive form of periodontitis often occurs in young people and was called early-onset periodontitis, but this disease also appears in old people.
Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A genus of PASTEURELLACEAE. Members are nonmotile, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rods or coccobacilli. Its members are X factor (HEMIN) independent and variably dependent on V factor (NAD).

Identification of an immunogenic protein of Actinobacillus seminis that is present in microvesicles. (1/1)

Actinobacillus seminis is a gram-negative bacterium of the Pasteurellaceae family that is involved in ovine epididymitis. Looking for a protein specific to this species, we determined the protein profile of subcellular fractions of A. seminis (American Type Culture Collection number 15768): proteins from the outer membrane (OMPs), inner membrane (IMPs), and cytoplasm (CPs). These profiles provide the first data, to our knowledge, regarding subcellular fractions of A. seminis. In the OMP fraction, we identified a protein with a molecular mass of 75 kDa that proved to be immunogenic and apparently specific for A. seminis. This conclusion was based on the reaction of hyperimmune serum of rabbits inoculated with whole cells of A. seminis that was tested against sonicated complete cells of reference strains and field isolates of Brucella ovis, Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni. No protein of these bacteria cross-reacted with the 75-kDa protein of A. seminis. Furthermore, when each type of hyperimmune serum was tested against the sonicated cells and each of the subcellular fractions of A. seminis, it did not recognize the A. seminis 75-kDa protein. We also isolated and identified this protein in microvesicles released to the culture supernatant. The results suggest that the 75-kDa protein could be used to establish a diagnostic test specific for ovine epididymitis caused by A. seminis.  (+info)

"Actinobacillus seminis" is not a widely recognized or officially established medical term or species name in the field of human or veterinary medicine. It appears to be a combination of the genus name "Actinobacillus," which refers to a group of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria, and the term "seminis," which is Latin for "of the seed" or "sperm."

There is some research suggesting that certain Actinobacillus species may be associated with reproductive tract infections in animals, such as bovine genital campylobacteriosis caused by Actinobacillus bovis. However, there is no established or well-known connection between the genus Actinobacillus and human male reproductive health or semen.

Therefore, it is not possible to provide a medical definition for "Actinobacillus seminis" as it does not appear to be a recognized or established term in the medical literature.

According to the Merriam-Webster Medical Dictionary, 'actinobacillus' is defined as:

"A genus of gram-negative, nonmotile, facultatively anaerobic rods (family Pasteurellaceae) that are parasites or commensals in animals and occasionally cause disease in humans. Some species produce a polysaccharide capsule."

In simpler terms, Actinobacillus is a type of bacteria that can be found in animals, including sometimes as normal flora in their mouths and throats. These bacteria can sometimes infect humans, usually through close contact with animals or through the consumption of contaminated food or water. Some species of Actinobacillus can produce a polysaccharide capsule, which can make them more resistant to the body's immune defenses and more difficult to treat with antibiotics.

It is worth noting that while some species of Actinobacillus can cause disease in humans, they are generally not considered major human pathogens. However, they can cause a variety of clinical syndromes, including respiratory tract infections, wound infections, and bacteremia (bloodstream infections). Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are active against gram-negative bacteria, such as amoxicillin/clavulanate or fluoroquinolones.

Actinobacillosis is a bacterial disease caused by the gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped bacteria Actinobacillus spp. This disease primarily affects animals such as cattle, sheep, and swine, causing symptoms such as abscesses, respiratory distress, and lameness. In rare cases, actinobacillosis can also affect humans, particularly those who have close contact with infected animals or consume contaminated food or water.

In humans, actinobacillosis typically manifests as a localized infection of the skin or mucous membranes, although it can also cause more widespread systemic infections. Symptoms may include fever, chills, fatigue, swollen lymph nodes, and painful abscesses or ulcers at the site of infection. Treatment typically involves antibiotics and surgical drainage of any abscesses.

It is important to note that actinobacillosis is a relatively rare disease in humans, and it is not considered a significant public health concern. However, healthcare providers should be aware of the possibility of this infection in individuals who have close contact with infected animals or consume contaminated food or water.

Actinobacillus infections are caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Actinobacillus, which are gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, and non-motile rods. These bacteria can cause a variety of infections in humans and animals, including respiratory tract infections, wound infections, and septicemia.

The most common species that causes infection in humans is Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, which is associated with periodontal disease, endocarditis, and soft tissue infections. Other species such as A. suis, A. lignieresii, and A. equuli can cause infections in animals and occasionally in humans, particularly those who have close contact with animals.

Symptoms of Actinobacillus infections depend on the site of infection and may include fever, chills, swelling, redness, pain, and purulent discharge. Diagnosis is typically made through culture and identification of the bacteria from clinical samples such as blood, wound secretions, or respiratory specimens. Treatment usually involves antibiotics that are effective against gram-negative bacteria, such as aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or third-generation cephalosporins. In severe cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to drain abscesses or remove infected tissue.

'Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae' is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that primarily affects the respiratory system of pigs, causing a disease known as porcine pleuropneumonia. This disease is associated with severe respiratory signs, including coughing, difficulty breathing, and high fever, and can lead to significant economic losses in the swine industry.

The bacterium is typically transmitted through direct contact with infected pigs or contaminated fomites, and it can also be spread through aerosolized droplets. Once inside the host, 'Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae' produces a number of virulence factors that allow it to evade the immune system and cause tissue damage.

Effective control and prevention strategies for porcine pleuropneumonia include vaccination, biosecurity measures, and antibiotic treatment. However, antibiotic resistance is an emerging concern in the management of this disease, highlighting the need for continued research and development of new control strategies.

'Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans' is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that belongs to the family Pasteurellaceae. It is facultatively anaerobic, meaning it can grow in both the presence and absence of oxygen. This bacterium is commonly found as part of the oral microbiota in humans and is associated with periodontal diseases such as localized aggressive periodontitis. Additionally, it has been implicated in various extraoral infections, including endocarditis, meningitis, and septicemia, particularly in individuals with underlying medical conditions. The bacterium's virulence factors include leukotoxin, cytolethal distending toxin, and adhesins, which contribute to its pathogenicity.

Epididymitis is defined as the inflammation of the epididymis, a curved tube-like structure located at the back of the testicle that stores and transports sperm. The inflammation can result from infection, trauma, or other causes, and may cause symptoms such as pain, swelling, and tenderness in the scrotum. In some cases, epididymitis may also be associated with urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted infections, or other medical conditions. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to treat any underlying infection, as well as pain relief measures and supportive care to help reduce symptoms and promote healing.

Haemophilus is a genus of Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found as part of the normal microbiota of the human respiratory tract. However, some species can cause infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

The most well-known species is Haemophilus influenzae, which was originally identified as a cause of influenza (hence the name), but it is now known that not all strains of H. influenzae cause this disease. In fact, the majority of H. influenzae infections are caused by strains that produce a polysaccharide capsule, which makes them more virulent and able to evade the host's immune system.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was once a major cause of serious bacterial infections in children, including meningitis, pneumonia, and epiglottitis. However, since the introduction of vaccines against Hib in the 1980s, the incidence of these infections has decreased dramatically.

Other Haemophilus species that can cause human infections include Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus ducreyi (which causes chancroid), and Haemophilus aphrophilus (which can cause endocarditis).

'Actinobacillus suis' is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that primarily affects pigs, causing diseases such as Glasser's disease (also known as porcine respiratory disease complex) and reproductive disorders. The bacterium can cause septicemia, meningitis, pneumonia, and arthritis in pigs, resulting in significant economic losses for the swine industry.

Humans can also become infected with 'Actinobacillus suis' through close contact with infected animals or contaminated environments, although such cases are rare. In humans, the bacterium can cause various clinical manifestations, including septicemia, meningitis, endocarditis, and wound infections. Immunocompromised individuals are at higher risk of developing severe disease.

It is essential to maintain good hygiene practices when handling animals or working in environments where the bacterium may be present to reduce the risk of infection. If you suspect an 'Actinobacillus suis' infection, consult a medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Pleuropneumonia is a medical condition characterized by inflammation that affects both the lung tissue (pneumonia) and the pleural space (pleurisy) surrounding the lungs. It is often caused by bacterial infections, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae or Haemophilus influenzae, that spread from the lungs to the pleural space.

The inflammation can cause symptoms such as chest pain, cough, fever, and difficulty breathing. In severe cases, it may lead to complications such as pleural effusion (accumulation of fluid in the pleural space), lung abscesses, or empyema (pus in the pleural space).

Pleuropneumonia can be diagnosed through physical examination, medical history, imaging studies such as chest X-rays or CT scans, and laboratory tests such as blood cultures or analysis of sputum or pleural fluid. Treatment typically involves antibiotics to eliminate the infection, along with supportive care such as pain management, hydration, and respiratory support if necessary.

'Actinobacillus equuli' is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is part of the normal flora in the upper respiratory tract and gastrointestinal system of horses. However, it can also cause disease in both horses and other animals, including humans, under certain conditions.

In horses, 'Actinobacillus equuli' can cause a variety of clinical syndromes, including septicemia, pneumonia, meningitis, endocarditis, and abortion. The bacterium is often found in cases of "sleepy staggers," a neurological condition that affects young foals.

In humans, 'Actinobacillus equuli' is an uncommon cause of infection, but it has been associated with cases of bacteremia, endocarditis, meningitis, and wound infections, particularly in individuals who have close contact with horses or other animals.

The bacterium is typically treated with antibiotics, such as penicillin or ceftriaxone, although resistance to these drugs has been reported in some strains. Prevention measures include good hygiene practices and avoiding contact with infected animals or their bodily fluids.

I'm happy to help, but I want to clarify that the term "sheep diseases" refers to a wide range of health issues that can affect sheep populations. It's not a single medical condition with a specific definition. Here are some examples of common diseases that can affect sheep:

1. Ovine Johne's Disease (OJD): A chronic, infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. It affects the intestines and can cause weight loss, diarrhea, and death.
2. Footrot: A highly contagious bacterial infection that affects the feet of sheep, causing lameness, swelling, and pain. It's caused by the bacteria Dichelobacter nodosus.
3. Caseous Lymphadenitis (CL): A chronic infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. It affects the lymph nodes and can cause abscesses, weight loss, and death.
4. Contagious Ecthyma (Orf): A highly contagious viral infection that affects the skin and mucous membranes of sheep, causing sores and lesions.
5. Mastitis: An inflammation of the mammary gland in sheep, usually caused by a bacterial infection. It can cause decreased milk production, fever, and loss of appetite.
6. Pneumonia: A respiratory infection that can affect sheep, causing coughing, difficulty breathing, and fever. It can be caused by various bacteria or viruses.
7. Enterotoxemia: A potentially fatal disease caused by the overproduction of toxins in the intestines of sheep, usually due to a bacterial infection with Clostridium perfringens.
8. Polioencephalomalacia (PEM): A neurological disorder that affects the brain of sheep, causing symptoms such as blindness, circling, and seizures. It's often caused by a thiamine deficiency or excessive sulfur intake.
9. Toxoplasmosis: A parasitic infection that can affect sheep, causing abortion, stillbirth, and neurological symptoms.
10. Blue tongue: A viral disease that affects sheep, causing fever, respiratory distress, and mouth ulcers. It's transmitted by insect vectors and is often associated with climate change.

Swine diseases refer to a wide range of infectious and non-infectious conditions that affect pigs. These diseases can be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, or environmental factors. Some common swine diseases include:

1. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS): a viral disease that causes reproductive failure in sows and respiratory problems in piglets and grower pigs.
2. Classical Swine Fever (CSF): also known as hog cholera, is a highly contagious viral disease that affects pigs of all ages.
3. Porcine Circovirus Disease (PCVD): a group of diseases caused by porcine circoviruses, including Porcine CircoVirus Associated Disease (PCVAD) and Postweaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS).
4. Swine Influenza: a respiratory disease caused by type A influenza viruses that can infect pigs and humans.
5. Mycoplasma Hyopneumoniae: a bacterial disease that causes pneumonia in pigs.
6. Actinobacillus Pleuropneumoniae: a bacterial disease that causes severe pneumonia in pigs.
7. Salmonella: a group of bacteria that can cause food poisoning in humans and a variety of diseases in pigs, including septicemia, meningitis, and abortion.
8. Brachyspira Hyodysenteriae: a bacterial disease that causes dysentery in pigs.
9. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae: a bacterial disease that causes erysipelas in pigs.
10. External and internal parasites, such as lice, mites, worms, and flukes, can also cause diseases in swine.

Prevention and control of swine diseases rely on good biosecurity practices, vaccination programs, proper nutrition, and management practices. Regular veterinary check-ups and monitoring are essential to detect and treat diseases early.

Aggressive periodontitis is a severe form of periodontal disease that affects the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, including the gums, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. It is characterized by rapid destruction of the periodontal tissues and can result in significant tooth loss if left untreated.

Aggressive periodontitis typically affects younger individuals, often before the age of 30, and can progress rapidly, even in the absence of obvious dental plaque or calculus accumulation. It is often associated with a genetic predisposition and may cluster in families.

The disease is classified as localized or generalized based on the distribution of affected sites. Localized aggressive periodontitis typically affects no more than two teeth next to each other, while generalized aggressive periodontitis involves at least three or four teeth in different areas of the mouth.

In addition to genetic factors, other risk factors for aggressive periodontitis include smoking, diabetes, and hormonal changes. Treatment typically involves a combination of thorough dental cleanings, antibiotics, and sometimes surgical intervention to remove damaged tissue and promote healing. Regular maintenance care is essential to prevent recurrence and further progression of the disease.

Periodontitis is a severe form of gum disease that damages the soft tissue and destroys the bone supporting your teeth. If left untreated, it can lead to tooth loss. It is caused by the buildup of plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that constantly forms on our teeth. The body's immune system fights the bacterial infection, which causes an inflammatory response. If the inflammation continues for a long time, it can damage the tissues and bones that support the teeth.

The early stage of periodontitis is called gingivitis, which is characterized by red, swollen gums that bleed easily when brushed or flossed. When gingivitis is not treated, it can advance to periodontitis. In addition to plaque, other factors that increase the risk of developing periodontitis include smoking or using tobacco products, poor oral hygiene, diabetes, a weakened immune system, and genetic factors.

Regular dental checkups and good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, and using an antimicrobial mouth rinse, can help prevent periodontitis. Treatment for periodontitis may include deep cleaning procedures, medications, or surgery in severe cases.

"Swine" is a common term used to refer to even-toed ungulates of the family Suidae, including domestic pigs and wild boars. However, in a medical context, "swine" often appears in the phrase "swine flu," which is a strain of influenza virus that typically infects pigs but can also cause illness in humans. The 2009 H1N1 pandemic was caused by a new strain of swine-origin influenza A virus, which was commonly referred to as "swine flu." It's important to note that this virus is not transmitted through eating cooked pork products; it spreads from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

'Aggregatibacter' is a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are part of the normal flora in the human mouth and respiratory tract. Some species of Aggregatibacter can cause infections, particularly in the mouth and throat, as well as in the brain, heart, and other parts of the body. These infections can include abscesses, endocarditis, meningitis, and pneumonia.

The name 'Aggregatibacter' comes from the Latin word "aggregatus," which means "to gather together or collect." This is a reference to the fact that these bacteria are often found in clusters or aggregates.

It's important to note that Aggregatibacter species can be difficult to distinguish from other related genera, such as Haemophilus and Actinobacillus, based on traditional biochemical tests alone. Therefore, molecular methods such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing are often used to confirm the identification of these bacteria in clinical laboratories.

"Actinobacillus seminis" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN NSWDPI Type strain of Actinobacillus seminis at BacDive - the ... Sneath, P. H. A.; Stevens, M. (1990). "Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella ... "Isolation and Characterization of Actinobacillus seminis Strains from Ovine Semen Samples and Epididymitis". Journal of ... Actinobacillus seminis is a Gram-negative bacterium associated with epididymitis of sheep. ...
Sneath, P. H. A.; Stevens, M. (1990). "Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella ...
Sneath, P. H. A.; Stevens, M. (1990). "Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella ... "Actinobacillus rossii" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN Type strain of Actinobacillus rossii at BacDive - the Bacterial ... Actinobacillus rossii is a bacterium. It was first isolated from the vaginas of postparturient sows. ... Actinobacillus] rossii". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 55 (Pt 1): 209-223. doi:10.1099/ijs ...
Sneath, P. H. A.; Stevens, M. (1990). "Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella ...
Sneath, P. H. A.; Stevens, M. (1990). "Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella ... Actinobacillus] rossii and [Pasteurella] mairii". Veterinary Microbiology. 116 (1-3): 194-201. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2006.03.003 ... Actinobacillus] rossii". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 55 (Pt 1): 209-223. doi:10.1099/ijs ...
Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae MeSH B03.440.450.009.675 - Actinobacillus seminis MeSH B03.440.450.009.700 - Actinobacillus ... Actinobacillus seminis MeSH B03.660.250.550.050.700 - Actinobacillus suis MeSH B03.660.250.550.290 - Haemophilus MeSH B03.660. ... Actinobacillus MeSH B03.440.450.009.050 - Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans MeSH B03.440.450.009.200 - Actinobacillus equuli ... Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans MeSH B03.660.250.550.050.200 - Actinobacillus equuli MeSH B03.660.250.550.050.580 - ...
"Actinobacillus seminis" at the Encyclopedia of Life LPSN NSWDPI Type strain of Actinobacillus seminis at BacDive - the ... Sneath, P. H. A.; Stevens, M. (1990). "Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella ... "Isolation and Characterization of Actinobacillus seminis Strains from Ovine Semen Samples and Epididymitis". Journal of ... Actinobacillus seminis is a Gram-negative bacterium associated with epididymitis of sheep. ...
CCUG23440 - Actinobacillus seminis, Deposit Date: 1988-11-02
Actinobacillus scotiae sp. nov. The type strain of Actinobacillus scotiae sp. nov. is NCTC 12922T(= M2000/95/1T). ... The nearest phylogenetic relative of the unknown bacterium was Actinobacillus delphinicola, an organism also originating from ... Sneath P. H. A., Stevens M. 1990; Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis sp. nov., nom. rev., Pasteurella ... Foster G., Ross H. M., Malnick H., Willems A., Garcia P., Reid R. J., Collins M. D. 1996; Actinobacillus delphinicola sp. nov ...
Actinobacillus seminis and Pasteurella haemolytica Erasmus, JA. 97. ... The usefulness of the API 20 E classification system in the identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetem comitans, ...
Acute outbreaks of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) require rapid, effective, parenteral antimicrobial treatment. The ... Sneath PHA, Stevens M. Actinobacillus rossii sp. nov., Actinobacillus seminis Spa nov., noma rev., Pastewella bettii sp. nov., ... Common porcine, bacterial respiratory pathogens include Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP), Pasteurella multocida (PM), ... Vanni M, Merenda M, Barigazzi G, Garbarino C, Luppi A, Tognetti R, Intorre L. Antimicrobial resistance of Actinobacillus ...
The standard test for B. canis is culture (8). Commonly collected samples include blood, vaginal discharge, and semen. Of these ... Actinobacillus equuli, Bordetella bronchiseptica) and gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis) and ... Several PCR primers have been designed to detect B. canis DNA in whole blood, vaginal secretions, and semen. PCR has the ... or semen (11,12). Like the rest of the Brucella species, B. canis exhibits tropism for reproductive tissue. Thus, infected dogs ...
Actinobacillus equuli infections. *Gram-negative pleomorphic infections: Actinobacillus seminis, Histophilus ovis and ...
Low-density colloid centrifugation removes bacteria from boar semen doses after spiking with selected species Research in ... Brazilian Clinical Strains of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida: Capsular Diversity, Antimicrobial ... Removal of bacteria from boar semen using a low-density colloid Theriogenology, Vol. 126, pp. 272-278 ...
Growth Conditions A Seminis Reference Strain Atcc, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 92/100, ... ATCC actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus Seminis, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 86/100, ... ATCC actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus Seminis, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. Bioz Stars score: 86/100, ... actinobacillus seminis (ATCC) ATCC is a verified supplier ATCC manufactures this product ...
Development of a flow cytometric assay to assess bacterial count in boar semen. Oehler, C., Janett, F., Schmitt, S., Malama, E ... Draft genome sequences of two clinical Actinobacillus pleuropneumonie serotype 19 strains from pigs in Switzerland. Peterhans, ... of a novel high resolution melting assay for identification and differentiation of all known 19 serovars of Actinobacillus ... of a novel high resolution melting assay for identification and differentiation of all known 19 serovars of Actinobacillus ...
Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus suis. Actinobacillus suis. ... Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. ...
Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus suis. Actinobacillus suis. ... Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. ...
Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus suis. Actinobacillus suis. ... Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. ...
Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus seminis. Actinobacillus suis. Actinobacillus suis. ... Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. Actinobacillus equuli. ...
Moreover, serum samples collected on D0, D28 and D90 were negative for PCV2 and BALF samples were negative for Actinobacillus ... Transmission of porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) by semen and viral distribution in different piglet tissues. Pesqui Veterinária ... Identification and detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by PCR based on the gene apxIVA. Vet Microbiol. 2001;79:47-62. ... BALF samples were evaluated by qPCRs for detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae [28], Glaesserella parasuis [29], ...
Changes in Plasma Testosterone Level and Semen Quality after Frequent Injections of GnRH Analogue in a Beagle Dog with ... Apx toxins have been identified as important virulence factors of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the etiologic agent of ... Construction and Characterization of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae Serotype 2 Mutant Lacking the Apx Toxin Secretion ... Motile sperm were detected in the semen collected 8 weeks and 7 weeks after the first injection in Experiment 1 and Experiment ...
Circovirus Present in Boar Semen , The Pig Site In a paper entitled Shedding of porcine circovirus type 2 by boars and the role ... 6. Actinobacillus Pleuropneumoniae: a bacterial disease that causes severe pneumonia in pigs.. 7. Salmonella: a group of ... Type 2 PCV was also detected in 6% (2/34) of DNA extracted directly from semen of randomly chosen healthy boars. Positive PCR ... of PCV-2 in semen transmission, Darin Madson ... Circovirus Present in Boar Semen In a paper entitled Shedding of porcine ...
In order to guarantee this status the herd is tested on a regular basis by specialized swine veterinarians. Furthermore it goes without saying that all animals prior to export are tested according to customers wishes and are delivered with full documentation. ...
Both classical swine fever virus (CSF) and the atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV) are shed in the semen of infected boars. ... Were assessed the serological antibodies occurrency of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and swine ... semen, and preputial swabs were collected every four days until the 52nd day after inoculation. The samples were tested for the ... they may not be the only species belonging to the genus Pestivirus that can be shed in the semen of infected pigs. The ...
Determining the Pathways for ASF Introduction into Boar Studs and Risk of ASF Transmission via Semen Movements During an ASF ... In one case, the outbreak investigations of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 15 cases in central Iowa from November ... semen, visitors, tools (both for breeding replacements and cull animals), livestock trailers (for both weaned pigs and ...
Other gram-negative bacteria such as Citrobacter, Klebsiella, Serratia, Pasteurella, Bordetella, Borrelia, Actinobacillus and ... is trimmed 1 cm ventral to the cloaca to prevent the feathers from interfering in semen transfer. (Peter Coutteel). ...
Nevertheless, Swine Flu, particularly in grower pigs, can make them vulnerable to other diseases, notably Actinobacillus ... OSB Semen for AI. *OSBPG Transporter for UK. *Vet Attestation Info. *YouTube Channel ...
Actinobacillus T02262 asi Actinobacillus suis H91-0380 Prokaryotes;Bacteria;Other Gammaproteobacteria;Actinobacillus T03246 ass ... Mycoplasma T09354 mses Mycoplasma seminis Prokaryotes;Bacteria;Mycoplasmatota;Mycoplasma T09431 mbra Mycoplasma bradburyae ... Actinobacillus T09109 agp Actinobacillus genomosp. 1 Prokaryotes;Bacteria;Other Gammaproteobacteria;Actinobacillus T09470 agk ... Actinobacillus T03501 aeu Actinobacillus equuli subsp. equuli Prokaryotes;Bacteria;Other Gammaproteobacteria;Actinobacillus ...
Semen Abnormal spermatozoa Excludes: azoospermia (606) oligospermia (606) 792.3 Amniotic fluid 792.4 Saliva Excludes: ... Actinobacillus mallei Farcy Malleomyces mallei Malleus Pseudomonas mallei 025 Melioidosis Infection by: Malleomyces ...
Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 3(132) * Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5b(1388) * Actinobacillus ...
Actinobacillus Pleuropneumoniae BactoReal® Kit - Ingenetix * ADV/PPV Real-time PCR Kit - Genesig ... Genomic Mini AX Swab & Semen Spin * Genomic Mini AX Tissue * Genomic Mini AX Tissue 96-well ...
  • Acute outbreaks of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (APP) require rapid, effective, parenteral antimicrobial treatment. (biomedcentral.com)
  • A Seminis Strains, supplied by ATCC, used in various techniques. (bioz.com)
  • The nearest phylogenetic relative of the unknown bacterium was Actinobacillus delphinicola , an organism also originating from sea mammals, although a sequence divergence of 3% demonstrated that the newly isolated bacterium is a distinct species. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • On the basis of the results of the phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic criteria, it is proposed that the bacterium should be classified as a new species, Actinobacillus scotiae sp. (microbiologyresearch.org)
  • Identification of an immunogenic protein of Actinobacillus seminis that is present in microvesicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Actinobacillus equuli , Bordetella bronchiseptica ) and gram-positive bacteria (e.g. (medscape.com)
  • HN - 2004 MH - Actinobacillus equuli UI - D044131 MN - B3.440.450.09.200 MN - B3.660.250.550.50.200 MS - A genus of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS, which is pathogenic for HORSES and PIGS. (nih.gov)
  • AN - infection: coord IM with ACTINOBACILLUS INFECTIONS (IM) + EPIDIDYMITIS (IM) if pertinent HN - 2004 MH - Actinobacillus suis UI - D044132 MN - B3.440.450.09.700 MN - B3.660.250.550.50.700 MS - A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS. (nih.gov)
  • Sub denumirea de Actinobaciloză se descrie de obicei boala produsă de Actinobacillus lignieresii la mai multe specii de animale domestice (bovine, ovine, solipede, câini) sau sălbatice ( căpriori, cerbi, mistreţi, iepuri), precum şi boala produsă la suine de A. suis (3,4). (radumogamanzat.ro)
  • Astăzi, conform manualului Bergey, în genul Actinobacillus, în afară de A. lignieresii şi A. suis, care produc bolile numite actinobaciloze, sunt alăturate şi alte 16 specii de bacterii (1). (radumogamanzat.ro)
  • Several PCR primers have been designed to detect B. canis DNA in whole blood, vaginal secretions, and semen. (medscape.com)
  • B. canis infection in dogs occurs predominantly through ingestion, inhalation, or contact with aborted fetuses or placenta, vaginal secretions, or semen ( 11 , 12 ). (cdc.gov)
  • A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS , which causes EPIDIDYMITIS in SHEEP . (nih.gov)
  • AN - infection: coord IM with ACTINOBACILLUS INFECTIONS (IM) HN - 2004 MH - Actinobacillus seminis UI - D044133 MN - B3.440.450.09.675 MN - B3.660.250.550.50.675 MS - A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus ACTINOBACILLUS, which causes EPIDIDYMITIS in SHEEP. (nih.gov)
  • AN - infection: coord IM with ACTINOBACILLUS INFECTIONS (IM) HN - 2004 MH - Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase UI - D042964 MN - D8.811.682.675.150.100 MN - D12.776.331.99 MS - A flavoprotein oxidoreductase that has specificity for medium-chain fatty acids. (nih.gov)
  • Especie de bacterias gramnegativas del género ACTINOBACILLUS, que produce EPIDIDIMITIS en OVINOS. (bvsalud.org)